Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 3, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Massive tree-planting effort in Fort McMurray to start this spring

Tree Frog Forestry News
February 3, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Dubbed ‘Operation ReLeaf’, Tree Canada announced that it will start a “massive tree-planting effort in Fort McMurray this spring” to replenish the millions of trees “lost in the bush, in the rural forest and in town”.

The wrap-up this week of the Premier’s “well-attended” Natural Resources Forum in Prince George appears conflicted, at least in the 250 News. In back-to-back columns, Macdonald-Meisner writes that “challenges lie ahead for the resource sector”, while a “mood of optimism at natural resources forum” was also present. This comes as no surprise given the plethora of softwood pundits commenting on how best to “temper protectionism in Trump’s trade world” (Globe and Mail) and deal with “the post-truth world of the US lumber industry” (Troy Media).

Resolute’s CEO is in the news again expressing confidence that he can convince the US that “Ontario and Quebec are modelled after the market-based system” and thus “deserve free and unencumbered access to the US market”. 

And finally, in the Construction Specifier, “How feasible is a 40-storey timber residential tower in Seattle?”. According to Amir Lotfi of CallisonRTKL, it’s “appropriate, responsible, and feasible”.

–Tree Frog Editors

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Forestry

Why Canada matters on World Wetlands Day

By Dan Kraus
The Nature Conservancy
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

While other nations have picked wetland wildlife, such as Finland’s whooper swan or Pakistan’s Indus crocodile, to represent their country, Canada is the only country in the world that has selected a wetland engineer as its national animal. By damming small creeks and streams, Canada’s five to 10-million-plus beavers build and maintain millions of acres of shallow ponds across our country. Shallow ponds and beaver meadows are not just good for beavers, but provide important habitat for other species ranging from moose to wood ducks. Beaver-built wetlands, combined with vast swamps, fens, marshes and bogs, cover about 13 percent of Canada. More importantly, the wetlands of the Great White North make up approximately one-quarter of all the wetlands left in the world. These wetlands are not just important for Canadians and our wildlife, but exert an ecological influence that has a global impact.

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More rangers part of new $35-million investment in BC parks

By Brian Morton
Vancouver Sun
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government will invest an additional $35 million in parks over the next three years, partly to hire 25 more full-time park rangers. The funding, which was announced Thursday, will also be used for new programs to promote and protect the natural environment, and provide an initial endowment for a new B.C. Parks Foundation. Twenty-five-million dollars will go directly to B.C. Parks operations and the remaining $10 million will go to the foundation to help generate private revenue. Park ranger duties include maintaining trails and campsites, monitoring wildlife habitats and ensuring visitors are aware of the risks posed by dangerous animals such as bears and cougars.

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Rural areas let down by lack of HEMS access

AirMed and Rescue Magazine
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A report from the British Columbia (BC) Forest Safety Ombudsman, which reviews the BC Forest Safety Council in Canada, has stated that injured forestry workers in rural or remote communities must wait twice as long for access to air ambulance services. The report, titled Will It Be There – A Report on Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in BC, states that the gap between rural and urban access to emergency medical transport threatens the lives of workers and residents. “Rural communities are impacted twice compared to urban centres – first, in reduced access to medical care and again in the reduced access to emergency medical transportation,” said BC Forest Safety Ombusman Rodger Harris. “For remote communities, as the distance to the nearest medical centre increases, the access to HEMS should be enhanced, not reduced.”

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Massive $1.3M tree-planting effort in Fort McMurray to start this spring

By Julia Wong
Global News
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tree Canada will start planting new trees this spring in Fort McMurray, nearly a year after wildfire ravaged the area. The project is dubbed Operation ReLeaf – Fort McMurray, and it has the potential to continue into 2018. More than $1.3 million has been collected by Tree Canada from individuals, as well as corporate sponsors, and donations are still pouring in. Communications manager Paul Jorgenson said it is one of the largest tree-planting efforts by the organization. …“This is a biggie. There were thousands of trees lost, urban trees. There were millions of trees lost in the bush, in the rural forest, but there were thousands of trees lost in town,” he said.

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Annapolis County clearcut frustrates neighbours

By Michael Gorman
CBC News
February 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada, US West

…The Torbrook resident is angry that, for almost a month, clear cutting has been happening on 21 hectares of Crown land behind her house — without any notice to her or neighbouring properties.  …Natural Resources Minister Lloyd Hines said his department does public consultation through its harvest plans map viewer, an online tool that shows proposed cuts. People are able to comment for 20 days once a block is posted. …There is, however, a reverse onus to know when that is happening. People must either check the website each day, or they can register to received a notification if a new block is posted. Hines said the department’s public consultation process is working.

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Daines talks timber, trade with Agriculture secretary nominee

By Tom Lutey
The Billings Gazette
February 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

U.S. Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., is asking the next Agriculture secretary to focus on trade relations, forestry and the food labeling requirements important to Montana farmers and loggers. Daines made his requests recently to Sonny Perdue, former Georgia governor and President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the U.S. Department of Agriculture. As a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, Daines will be questioning Perdue during an upcoming confirmation hearing. Perdue appears to be a good fit for Montana agriculture and forestry, Daines said. Perdue’s experience promoting exports of Georgia farm products will come in handy when negotiating a bilateral trade agreement with Canada, something Daines said will be needed after President Trump withdraws the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement.

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Walatowa Timber can be a model in other woodlands

By Laura Mccarthy, Associate State Director, The Nature Conservancy
Albuquerque Journal
February 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

New Mexico is struggling to recover from the tens of thousands of jobs lost in the 2008 recession, especially in rural areas. The recent growth of Walatowa Timber Industries – with support from Rio Grande Water Fund projects – offers hope and a model for other forested areas. The Conservancy-led, collaborative effort focuses on water security, community protection and job creation. Today, I want to focus on the economics: Generating new jobs and more wood supply to create products to sell and restoring forests to support our recreation industry. …Collaboration between TC Company and Jemez Pueblo, Walatowa Timber Industries joint owners, provides a working solution. Seeking smart ways to build the economic base, Sandoval County and consultant Mark Lautman identified small wood manufacturing as an opportunity.

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Spruce beetles still on the march in Colorado

By Bob Berwyn
Summit County Citizens Voice
February 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Spruce beetles continued to expand in Colorado in 2016, at least in part due to global warming and drought, as well as the density of old-growth spruce forests. In all, spruce beetles were active across 350,000 acres of higher-elevation stands of Engelmann spruce statewide, including about 136,000 acres of new activity, causing widespread tree mortality, according to the results of the latest aerial surveys conducted by the U.S. Forest Service and the Colorado State Forest Service. Since 1996, spruce beetle outbreaks have caused tree mortality on more than 1.7 million acres in Colorado. The survey also showed that Douglas-fir beetle populations also continued to expand across the West Slope, affecting about 19,000 acres.

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The unique partnership behind the proposal

By Emily Hoard
The News-Review
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Elliott State Forest has been costing Oregon more to manage than it’s been able to provide in timber revenue to local schools through the Common School Fund, so the state is considering selling the land to the only partners who proposed a purchase. If the state accepts the proposal, the two investment partners, Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians and Lone Rock Timber Management Company, would manage the land for timber harvest and public benefit protections while the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians (CTCLUSI) would hold and monitor a conservation easement. Advice and support for the proposal has come from The Conservation Fund, Dr. John Gordon, the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, the Oregon Department of Forestry, The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians and The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde.

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Speed of public reaction on land-use proposals dazzles politicians, kills measures

By Rob Chaney
Helena Independent Record
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MISSOULA — Did you hear about the bill to stop requiring “No Trespassing” warnings on Montana fences? How about the congressional legislation allowing sale of 3.3 million acres of Bureau of Land Management property, including 94,520 acres in Montana? No? Perhaps that’s because both issues disappeared almost before anyone not professionally involved could react. Montana’s Legislature has a tendency to raise and dispose of unexpected issues fast, something often chalked up to well-meaning but inexperienced legislators bringing unstudied ideas to the table. The big-leaguers in Congress usually move with more deliberation. Not anymore. During Wednesday afternoon’s White House briefing, President Trump’s spokesman Sean Spicer veered into logging and public lands disposal.

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Crews battling 2 wildfires in southeastern Oklahoma

Associated Press in the St. Louis-Post Dispatch
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

STIGLER, Okla. — Crews are battling two wildfires in rural eastern Oklahoma that have burned more than 10 square miles combined. Oklahoma Forestry Services fire management chief Mark Goeller said the first fire in Haskell County was about 50 percent contained as of Thursday afternoon, but might continue to burn for another two days. Goeller said no homes or other structures were immediately threatened. A second fire was burning about 5 miles northwest of Wilburton in Latimer County, but Goeller said officials haven’t determined how much of it has been contained. Both counties are located in part of the state experiencing the worst drought conditions.

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Recommended by Coroner condemns ‘she’ll be right’ attitude that played a part in Lincoln Kidd’s forestry death

By Jono Galuszka
Stuff.co.nz
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A coroner has strongly criticised the boss of a forestry worker killed on the job, despite a jury acquitting him of the manslaughter charge. Lincoln Kidd, 20, died when a tree felled by his boss, Paul Burr, crushed him on the Aratangata? forestry block between Foxton and Levin on December 19, 2013. Burr, who was in a mechanical harvester, cut down three trees without looking around to see if anyone was nearby. …The coroner said he entered the inquest quite sure Lincoln Kidd knew the two-tree rule, requiring forestry workers to stand two tree lengths away from anyone cutting down a tree. But by the end of the inquest, he was satisfied there was no basis on which to deem Kidd a competent forestry worker. While Kidd had about three years’ experience in the bush, both Burr and his former boss, Murray Spiers, could not say how he knew the rule, the coroner said.

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Regional Forest Agreement given last-minute extension

By Nicole Asher
ABC News, Australia
February 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The first of the controversial Regional Forest Agreements (RFA) to expire has been extended for 12 months. The agreements were signed by state and federal governments between 1997 and 2001. A 20-year old East Gippsland Regional Forest Agreement was set to expire on Friday, but will now continue for one year to allow for further review. RFAs were created to manage the use of native forests on public land by balancing the need for timber supply, conservation and regeneration. But they have drawn criticism from green groups because they include exemptions from Commonwealth environment laws.

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Company & Business News

The post-truth world of the U.S. lumber industry

By Roslyn Kunin, consulting economist and speaker
Troy Media
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States


Constructing an industry without all the necessary supplies can lead to fiscal imbalance. Welcome to the post-truth world of economics. …And in the midst of this post-truth reality, we must also deal with partial truths. The lack of a softwood lumber agreement between Canada and the United States illuminates another partial truth. …Unfortunately, current American policy related to lumber duties is framed by partial truth. …The US imports Canadian lumber not just because it’s cheap. The American lumber industry can’t produce enough to meet its country’s needs. So by blocking Canadian lumber, the US industry can inflate prices for their scarce production. This hurts American consumers, and reduces construction and related jobs.

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New Nafta Could Settle Canada-U.S. Lumber War, Resolute CEO Says

By Jen Skerritt
Bloomberg
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

A renegotiation of Nafta could be used to settle a lumber dispute that’s been simmering between Canada and the U.S. for decades and threatens to make housing unaffordable for thousands of Americans, according to the world’s largest newsprint maker. The Canadian government will probably want lumber included in a new North American Free Trade Agreement, Richard Garneau, chief executive officer of Montreal-based Resolute Forest Products Inc., said by phone. “I think that makes sense,” he said. The U.S. has initiated an investigation into softwood lumber imports amid allegations Canadian timber is heavily subsidized and shipments are harming U.S. mills and workers. President Donald Trump has also signaled that the U.S. may seek more favorable terms in trade pacts such as Nafta.

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How to temper protectionism in Trump’s trade world

By Paul Moen, principal at Earnscliffe Strategy Group
The Globe and Mail
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

The North American free-trade agreement is on the table. There are protectionist temptations on Canadian softwood lumber flowing south, and U.S. drywall flowing north. These events, as well as our shared interest in infrastructure and job creation, may provide a unique opportunity to explore a much-needed change in a technical area of international trade known as anti-dumping – a change that considers the impact of anti-dumping action on workers and consumers on both sides of the border. …An example can be seen in the perennial bilateral tussle over softwood lumber. In several rounds of the lumber dispute, the U.S. consistently imposed anti-dumping (and countervailing) duties that overprotect U.S. lumber producers and unnecessarily raise the cost of residential construction and the price of homes for U.S. consumers. 

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Challenges Lie Ahead for Resource Sector

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- “There are huge opportunities if we continue to work together” says Ben Stewart, BC’s Special Representative in Asia. “Why aren’t we manufacturing for Ikea?” asked Stewart as he presented the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for a variety of resource sectors to delegates at the BC Natural Resources Forum.. Stewart says there needs to be more flexibility in forestry product development. …But Natural Resources are not just the typical thoughts of mining, forestry and energy. There are other sectors which are growing throughout BC and across the country. One of them is Aboriginal Tourism.

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Mood of Optimism at Natural Resources Forum

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – There is an upbeat mood at the 14th annual Natural Resources forum underway in Prince George. Despite the fact the “Trump effect” has dominated most forum discussions, there are more exhibitors taking part in the trade show portion of the forum than there were last year. The 600 people attending the Premier’s lunch on Wednesday was double the number served last year. …But the lack of a Softwood Lumber Agreement is a concern. Premier Christy Clark told the crowded luncheon yesterday that Donald Trump is a businessman and that he understands the best way to kick start the U.S. economy is to get housing construction going.

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2017 – BC Forest Safety Ombudsman Report on Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

BC Forest Safety Council
February 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

This review was undertaken as part of the mandate of the BC Forest Safety Ombudsman, specifically as part of the Office’s responsibility to “identify and make recommendations to resolve systemic problems within the forest sector”. This report initially focused on the effectiveness of the Helicopter Emergency Services (HEMS) strictly from a forest worker perspective. However, because the emergency medical transportation system is so inter-related, it was difficult to entirely separate out issues also affecting the general public. Therefore, some of the observations and recommendations contained in this report apply not only to the forestry sector but also to all residents of the province.

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Real estate market shows optimistic signs

By Richard Froese
South Peace News
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Local realtors predict a rise in population and housing sales when Tolko Industries restarts its High Prairie plant. “When Tolko re-opens, I would expect to see substantial increase in housing sales,” says Gord Olson, realtor-owner with Century 21 Sunnyside Realty. Closed in 2008, Tolko plans to re-open its oriented strand board (OSB) plant west of town, and projects it would employ about 300 people with direct and indirect jobs. “When Tolko initially opened (in 1995), it created an upstart in housing sales, and we could expect that same thing to happen,” Olson says. He also projects that the re-opening of Tolko would not only double sales, but also increase local housing prices. Tolko officials updated community leaders on Jan. 20 that the company remains committed to High Prairie, although no dates to re-open have been confirmed.

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Hefler sale a first for Canada: analyst

By James Risdon
Chronicle Herald
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

The pending sale of Hefler Forest Products’ 3.7-megawatt biomass power plant in Middle Sackville to merchant bank Hawthorne Capital and green energy company Katalyst Wind will be a first for Canada, says a leading forestry analyst. “I’ve never seen (a biomass power plant) run independently. Every one I know has been tied to a forestry company,” Kevin Bromley, a PricewaterhouseCoopers partner, said in an interview from his Vancouver office “This is the first time I’ve seen a purchase by a non-industry buyer.” The PwC analyst has been following the forestry sector for roughly 30 years. Under a deal set to close Feb. 24, Hefler’s biomass power plant and most of its other assets are being picked up by a numbered company, Halifax-based 3304051 Nova Scotia Ltd.

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City, First Nation partner for prosperity

By Brent Linton
The Chronicle Journal
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fort William First Nation and the City of Thunder Bay are looking at ways to improve economic prosperity through joint development. …One area being looked at is how land on Fort William First Nation can be developed, said Collins pointing to Resolute (Forest Products) as a prime example of how industry can be developed. Collins figures that 75 per cent of the people employed at the Resolute sawmill on the First Nation live in Thunder Bay. “We are looking to create a brighter future for our communities — our kids — and give them hope and take that dispair away from them,” explained Collins.

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Resolute CEO confident he can convince U.S. on softwood lumber dispute

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in the Globe and Mail
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada, United States

The head of Eastern Canada’s largest lumber producer said he is confident he can demonstrate to American authorities this month that the region deserves free and unencumbered access to the U.S. market. The forestry sectors of Ontario and Quebec are modelled after the market-based systems in the U.S., and that should convince the U.S. Commerce Department that the region doesn’t engage in the unfair trade of softwood lumber, Resolute Forest Products Inc. CEO Richard Garneau said. “So based on this, I think that we deserve the right to have access in Central Canada – in Quebec and Ontario – to the U.S. market,” he said in an interview after Resolute released its fourth-quarter and 2016 results.

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Port Hawkesbury Paper to continue paying power tariff

By Matt Draper
Port Hawkesbury Reporter
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

POINT TUPPER: A load retention tariff at the local paper mill continues to do what it was intended. On January 23, the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (UARB) issued a decision regarding the Nova Scotia Power Inc. and Port Hawkesbury Paper (PHP) load retention tariff. Dave Rodenheiser, spokesperson with NSPI, said the decision found the current tariff is valid. “The UARB had its consultant do an examination [as to] whether the tariff continues to be operating as it was intended to and the finding was that in fact it was operating as it was designed and intended to,” said Rodenheiser.

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Weyerhaeuser misses 4Q profit forecasts

Australian Associated Press in Yahoo News
February 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States

SEATTLE _ Weyerhaeuser Co. (WY) on Friday reported fourth-quarter profit of $551 million. The Seattle-based company said it had profit of 73 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, were 14 cents per share. The results did not meet Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of four analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 15 cents per share. The timber and paper products company posted revenue of $1.6 billion in the period. For the year, the company reported profit of $1.03 billion, or $1.39 per share. Revenue was reported as $6.37 billion.

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Calls for Nominations – Softwood Lumber Board Seeks Candidates

Softwood Lumber Board
February 2, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States

The Softwood Lumber Board (SLB) seeks nominations of softwood lumber manufacturers and importers interested in candidacy for Board seats coming open in January 2018. The deadline for nominations is March 13th, 2017. The 19-member Board will hold elections to fill seven seats for Directors whose terms expire on Dec. 31, 2017. Domestic manufacturers are being sought to fill four seats – two large companies* representing the US South region and two large companies representing the US West region. Importers are being sought to fill three seats – one large company and one small company representing the Canada West region, and one small company representing the Canada East region. Each Director will serve a three-year term, which may be renewed once.

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Lumber Knocks Higher

By Alex Breitinger, Breitinger & Sons commodity futures broker
The Banner-Graphic
February 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States

The trade in wood has been good to the bulls recently, with lumber futures reaching a two-year high this week. Prices are exploding as the U.S. wrestles with a looming shortage of the building material and rising construction demand. Much of the lumber used in the United States normally comes from Canada, the world’s largest exporter. That supply could be threatened by an expiring trade deal, resulting in tariffs being levied against Canadian lumber. So far, the U.S. and Canada have not been able to reach a new deal, and President Trump’s concerns about NAFTA could block an extension of the status quo. U.S. lumber producers would prefer a protective tax on imports, which would boost their domestic industry, while much of the construction industry wants continued access to plentiful and cheap Canadian timber.

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Stora Enso Financial Statement Release 2016

By Stora Enso
PR Newswire
February 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

…Stora Enso’s CEO Karl-Henrik Sundström, “Year 2016 was an important milestone in our transformation. We completed a large part of our heavy investment programme, and we continue to maintain a strong focus on customers and innovation. With this, we are well prepared for 2017 and beyond. In the fourth quarter, our sales excluding the structurally declining paper business increased 4.5%, primarily due to the ramp-ups at Varkaus kraftliner and Beihai consumer board mills. Operational EBIT was EUR 191 million compared to EUR 242 million a year ago. This is mainly due to historically low hardwood pulp prices with an impact of EUR 35 million, a negative impact from the ramp-up of Beihai operations of EUR 25 million, and a power generator failure at Enocell Mill of EUR -5 million.”

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Irish forestry boom sees funding and partnerships emerge

By Gordon Hunt
Silicon Republic
February 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

A double move in Wicklow has seen €90m invested into forestry management, alongside a new initiative expected to support a further €112m for the industry. The European Investment Bank (EIB) has been quite active today (3 February), revealing two initiatives to help the forestry industry in Ireland. First, a €90m fund has been created as a support for forestry related investment in Ireland, with expected nee fits to last two decades. The money will be used to finance the cost of planting, forest management and forest road construction and maintenance by Coillte over the next four years. More than 35,000 hectares of trees will be replanted and more than 1,600km of forest roads will be constructed and upgraded. The scheme will also improve maintenance of 1,000km of walking routes and mountain bike trails.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Gov’t supporting First Nations’ clean energy projects

By Frank Peebles
Prince George Citizen
February 2, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Aboriginal communities are often located in remote areas, disconnected from the mainline power grid. On Thursday, the B.C. government announced a $2.1 million injection of funds to support clean energy projects that would get more First Nations plugged into their own electricity supply. The money is new but the program is not. The Kwadacha First Nation located at Fort Ware north of Prince George and Williston Lake is already the site of a heat-electricity dual-track bioenergy system that got funding from the First Nations Clean Energy Business Fund. The fund was created in 2010 and has already helped about 110 First Nations communities in some way. The new money will extend and enlarge that initiative.

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Moose Cree sewing seeds for wood pellet plant

By Alan S. Hale
Timmins Press
February 3, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

MOOSONEE – The Moose Cree First Nation is looking seriously at getting into manufacturing as its next big development project. The First Nation’s economic development department is about to begin work on a feasibility study for either constructing or purchasing an existing facility to make wood pellets. Wood pellets are typically used by wood-burning furnaces – which automatically feed the pellets into the furnace from a hopper to heat homes – or commercially for power generation in biomass power plants. The pellets are typically made of waste wood material left over from sawmills, or insect-killed trees that the lumber industry can’t use. When made of these waste products, and not from whole healthy trees, the pellets are said to be a carbon-neutral fuel source.

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Vision for bioenergy parks offers lifeline to Maine’s forest products industry

By Tux Turkel
Portland Press Herald
February 2, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Maine’s obsolete biomass power plants and its struggling or shuttered paper mills are world-class assets that can become testing grounds for a new manufacturing economy based on sustainably harvested wood, says an international group of energy developers. Seen through fresh eyes, these industrial relics are the pieces with which entrepreneurs can build bioenergy parks, where all parts of a tree are used to make electricity, fuel, food, material and other things, eventually replacing similar products made from petroleum. This vision is in the early stages, and it’s too soon to know if organizers can assemble the mix of money, applied technology and business outreach needed to create such a grand transformation. But there are reasons for cautious optimism: Investment in Maine is being sought, and similar projects have gained ground in Europe.

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Stalled federal policy hurts NH biomass

By Jameson French, president and CEO of Northland Forest Products Inc., Kingston
New Hampshire Business Review
February 3, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

As the second most forested state in the nation, New Hampshire has long recognized the important role woody biomass (mainly forest thinnings and wood waste from forests) energy can play by diversifying its energy mix, providing clean and renewable power and providing local jobs while benefiting the environment. …Unfortunately, stalled action on policy in Washington threatens to undermine this policy and reduce New Hampshire and America’s dependence on fossil fuels….Looking beyond the environmental benefits, it is important to understand that biomass power supports timberland ownership and, by extension, our rural economies. …These woody biomass markets also benefit lumber mills needing a home for their sawdust and slabs

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Maine Compass: Biomass power benefits Maine

By Dana Doran, executive director, Professional Logging Contractors of Maine; Bob Cleaves, president/CEO, Biomass Power Assn; & Jeremy Payne, executive director, Maine Renewable Energy Assn.
Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
February 3, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Mainers who care about logging and forestry and our local economy should appreciate the steadfast support by Sen. Susan Collins and Sen. Angus King for biomass power. A recent column by Mitch Lansky (“Senators wrong on biomass,” Jan. 13) criticized the two senators for their sponsorship of legislation — an amendment to the failed energy bill from the last Congress — that would recognize the carbon benefits of using forest residues as fuel for clean electricity. We feel strongly that a response is necessary. The debate over biomass electricity is being fueled by two major misconceptions. The first is that generating electricity using biomass means forests will be cut down for power generation. That is false. …The second misconception is that in the fight to limit carbon emissions, burning biomass is a worse power generation option than so-called “clean” fossil fuels like natural gas. This is also false, and here’s why.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Gray Conversation: A Living with Wood Design Forum

BC Wood
February 3, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Join BC Wood for a dynamic panel discussion moderated by Jaime Gillin, editor of Gray Magazine, exploring the “softer side of wood” and its creative applications for interiors, furnishings, architecture, and art. Hear about the process of design as it relates to the products we live and interact with, rather than the structures we inhabit. Bring your questions! In conjunction with the panel discussion, the submissions from BoConcept and Emily Carr’s Student Design Competition will be showcased. This display will feature innovative approaches to designing with wood to create stools. The pieces will be on display prior to the panel discussion will allow the public to engage with talented young designers and get the discussion going!

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World of Wood panel focuses on Lacey Act compliance

By Robert Dalheim
Woodworking Network
February 2, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

ALEXANDRIA, Va. – The International Wood Products Association (IWPA) has announced a new panel discussion at its World of Wood annual convention entitled “Lacey Compliance: Strategies and Solutions.” “The panel will feature leaders from companies from different segments of the wood products industry that have implemented compliance strategies tailored to their business model,” says IWPA executive directory Cindy Squires. “This panel will provide a robust industry-led discussion on how to implement systems that integrate Lacey Act compliance into business practices.” …The 61st World of Wood Annual Convention is the only event in the U.S. that brings together executives from every segment of the North American imported woods industry. 

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How feasible is a 40-storey timber residential tower?

By Amir Lotfi, LEED AP BD+C, CallisonRTKL
The Construction Specifier
February 2, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States


There is considerable fervor on the use of mass timber in tall buildings. Much has been written and investigated about this methodology, but its application in the tall building arena is relatively unclear. The architecture, design, and planning firm CallisonRTKL recently conducted research as an attempt to posit a realistic, constructible, and highly sustainable way of undertaking this challenge. It also addresses a solution for current paucity of affordable accommodation within dense city cores….The implications of this new technology are of a global magnitude. Mass timber designs will impact business and manufacturing streams and construction where timber is available and can be sourced regionally in close proximity to the project site. Additionally, mass timber construction offers distinct performance advantages over conventional cast-in-place concrete technologies with implications for environmental, economic, and social sustainability.

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Cross-laminated Timber: New projects show how the material is fulfilling ‘tall’ orders

By Kenneth E. Bland, PE
The Construction Specifier
February 1, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Modern-day technologies and product delivery methods have created a bold new opportunity for wood products, which in turn has given rise to a new category of structural framing systems using mass timber. The possibility of tall wood buildings represents the first significant challenge to concrete and steel structures since their inception in high-rise building design more than a century ago. Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is among the products helping drive this trend….However, one of the biggest advantages is improved speed and efficiency of installation, given the panels can be prefabricated offsite according to the end-use application, with pre-cut openings for windows, doors, stairs, service channels, and ducts. On arrival from the manufacturing facility, the panels are ready for quick installation, shaving weeks or even months off the construction schedule.

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General

Wildlife groups irked by possible wolf-cull plan around Revelstoke

By John Boivin
Castlegar Source
February 2, 2017
Category: Uncategorised

The Valhalla Wilderness Society wants to know if the government is planning a wolf cull in the Revelstoke area based on the recommendations of a report the environmental group says is fatally flawed. The Society wrote to the ministers of Environment and Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations in December. VWS said it obtained a copy of a leaked report recommending a wolf and bear cull in the Revelstoke-Shuswap, in order to save the Southern Mountain caribou herds in the area. …The government report also says if logging in these areas can be further reduced, then the habitat conditions for these species will improve “and less intensive management of the predator?prey system will be needed”.

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