Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: February 7, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Two tree stories spoke to us

Tree Frog Forestry News
February 7, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Headlining today’s news is BC’s lobbying strategy on softwood lumber. According to the Canadian Press, the goal is to “convince American consumers, politicians and lumber buyers that an equitable softwood lumber deal is needed to avoid the damage that will result from import restrictions into the US and higher prices”. According to BC Forest Trade Council president Susan Yurkovich, the “spike in lumber prices“, will otherwise push “home ownership out of reach for some“, while encouraging imports from Europe and substitution with non-wood products.

Also in business news—an Oregon report looks at recent trends of lumber, logs, home construction, and housing markets. In sum, “interest rates are leveling off, lumber and logs are steady, home values continue a steady rise, and housing starts are rising slowly, despite tightening home inventories and Canadian exports are creating local headaches“.

Two forestry stories spoke to us – so to speak. From CNN, a Ted Talks story titled: “The secret life of trees: is nature less selfish than we think”, and a Phys.org story on how “tree rings reveal highly abnormal solar activity in the mid-holocene”. That’s a 5,500 year old message.

And finally, with the super Super Bowl now in the books, we bring you the story of how Fox News forced 84 Lumber to “re-tool its ad that depicted Trump’s border wall”. Given the controversy, viewers were forced to go to the company’s website to see the original ad, which of course suited 84 Lumber just fine (in fact the rush of traffic to their site caused it initially to crash). 

— Tree Frog Editors

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Forestry

Brand new website – Forestry Friendly Communities!

Coast Forest Products Association
February 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry Friendly Communities celebrates the important role forestry plays in resource-dependent communities on BC’s coast! Forestry Friendly Communities was started in 2016 as a way to celebrate the proud history and rich future of BC’s coast forest sector. The term “Forestry Friendly” is intended to recognize pride in, and an ongoing commitment to BC’s forestry sector. In fact, the forest sector supports 1 in 16 jobs in BC. It also contributes $12.4 billion to the provincial GDP and injects $2.5 billion in taxes and fees to the three levels of government. How can you get involved? Check out news, community stories, videos, and more, and share on social media with your friends and family! Plus, check out Forestry Friendly Communities on Facebook for even more exciting informative content. Don’t forget to like and share!

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Coquitlam is the newest Bear Smart community in B.C.

By The Ministry of Environment
Government of British Columbia
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Coquitlam is the newest community in British Columbia to be recognized for its collaborative efforts to reduce human-bear conflicts. Surrounded by farms, rivers, trails and wildlife corridors, this Metro Vancouver municipality is an enticing place for black bears. Coquitlam has been actively addressing this by successfully implementing all 50 recommendations outlined in their Bear Hazard Assessment, including establishing a new wildlife-resistant solid-waste management system, and developing and enforcing a variety of Bear Smart bylaws, such as ensuring grease containers are inaccessible to wildlife.

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The secret life of trees: Is nature less selfish than we think?

By Paula Erizanu
CNN
February 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


Nature might not be all about a ruthless “survival of the fittest”. Research suggests that trees don’t just compete for survival, but also cooperate and share resources using underground fungi networks. “A forest has an amazing ability to communicate and behave like a single organism — an ecosystem,” Suzanne Simard, an ecologist at the University of British Columbia, told CNN. Simard studied how, over the summer, shaded fir trees receive carbon from sun brushed birch trees, while in autumn the opposite happens — birch trees receive carbon from fir trees as they start to lose their leaves. This exchange takes place through an underground “mycorrhizal network,” a symbiotic association between a fungus and the roots of its host plant.

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Province responds to Heiltsuk’s concerns on wildfire response

By The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson issued the following statement today in response to concerns expressed by the Heiltsuk First Nation with regard to provincial response to a wildfire on Denny Island: “The provincial government, including the BC Wildfire Service, considers public safety its top priority. That is why the BC Wildfire Service has a provincial duty officer on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. “The provincial duty officer was made aware of a fire on Denny Island via a phone call he received on Saturday, Feb. 4, at 1 a.m. He immediately notified the Heiltsuk First Nation, the Bella Bella fire chief and the RCMP to gain more information about the fire. The RCMP dispatched a boat to take a closer look. The duty officer also subsequently engaged with the power company, BC Ferries and the Coast Guard.

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BC First Nations chief talks frustration after fighting wildfire with no help from province

Canadian Press in CTV News
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

BELLA BELLA, B.C. – Power has been restored to a village near British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest, but the community’s chief says frustration lingers because members of the First Nation had to fight the blaze on their own after they were unable to get help from provincial government agencies. Heiltsuk Chief Marilyn Slett said the fire broke out late Friday on a hillside across from Bella Bella in an area where several power lines are located.
She said the First Nation spent the weekend trying to contact BC Wildfire, Provincial Emergency Preparedness and Boralex, which operates the power lines. Boralex spokeswoman Lauriane Dery said the flames were put out Monday and power had been restored.

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Falling boundaries shifted

By Sean Eckford
Sunshine Coast Reporter
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Island Timberlands has adjusted the falling boundaries on its private managed forest lands off Lockyer Road in upper Roberts Creek. The company has been harvesting on the lots since late December, and the group Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) asked the company to increase the buffers it had already established around streams and a popular trail. An email exchange between ELF representatives and Island Timber-lands, copied to Coast Reporter, shows alterations to the block were made late last week after a handful of ELF supporters staged a brief early morning blockade. 

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B.C. First Nation upset it took over 48 hours for the province to respond to a wildfire near Bella Bella

By Andrew Kurjata
CBC News
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Heiltsuk Chief Marilyn Slett says the Central Coast First Nation should be given more power to deal with emergencies after waiting over 48 hours to hear from the province as a wildfire burned near Bella Bella. … Heiltsuk communications coordinator Ayla Brown said they received little to no response from the provincial government or the B.C. Wildfire Service. “It took until 10:10 on Monday morning for us to hear from the province,” she said. …Forests Minister Steve Thompson said a fire officer found out about the fire around 1 a.m. Saturday and immediately notified the Heiltsuk along with the Bella Bella fire chief and the RCMP, who dispatched a boat to take a closer look. …”I am confident that the B.C. Wildfire Service acted appropriately,” he said in a statement.

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Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry can’t count moose

By the Editorial Board
The Chronicle Journal
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has to invest in new technology to count moose. Herds are in flux for a variety of reasons and accurate numbers are essential to the future of Northern Ontario’s largest animal. The MNRF said Friday that more than half the wildlife management units (WMU) in this region would not be flown this winter due to unseasonably warm weather which causes moose to head into the tall timber until late spring. They move around and forage less because they don’t need as much food to keep warm. Less snow means fewer moose tracks to follow from the air. Surveys were completed in just three of eight WMUs.

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Analysis of tree rings reveals highly abnormal solar activity in the mid-holocene

By Nagoya University
Phys.org
February 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, International


By analyzing the level of a carbon isotope in tree rings from a specimen of an ancient bristlecone pine, a team led by Nagoya University researchers has revealed that the sun exhibited a unique pattern of activity in 5480 BC. By comparing this event with other similar but more recent phenomena, they reported that this event may have involved a change in the sun’s magnetic activity, or a number of successive solar burst emissions. An international team led by researchers at Nagoya University, along with US and Swiss colleagues, has identified a new type of solar event and dated it to the year 5480 BC; they did this by measuring carbon-14 levels in tree rings, which reflect the effects of cosmic radiation on the atmosphere at the time. They have also proposed causes of this event, thereby extending knowledge of how the sun behaves.

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Forestry analysis must include all the facts

By Ernie Niemi, president, Natural Resource Economics Inc. in Eugene
The Register-Guard
February 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

We’re tired of the bickering over logging. Tired of people talking past one another: “Logging is good!” “No, it’s bad!” Let’s replace the rhetoric with facts. Compare the benefits of logging against the costs. If the facts show that the benefits exceed the costs, cut the trees down; if not, let them stand. …At a recent public meeting in Springfield, staff from the Oregon Board of Forestry said the board took this approach to develop a proposed rule that will restrict logging along the banks of some streams that are home to salmon, steelhead and bull trout. …Hoping to learn more, I asked the forestry staff if I could see the board’s benefit-cost information. They sent me a summary, contained in the report the board recently released in response to the state law that requires it to provide the public with a “comprehensive analysis” of the economic impact of the proposed rule. What a disappointment.

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Colorado lawmakers ask Congress to fix wildfire funding issue

By Luke Perkins
Durango Herald
February 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

DENVER – The cost of fire suppression nationwide has nine times exceeded $1.5 billion since 2000, including reaching a high of $2.1 billion in 2015. Colorado state legislators expect the costly trend to continue because of a federal funding mechanism that pulls money that could be used for mitigation projects that could reduce the severity of wildfires. With this in mind, the state Senate sent a request last month to Colorado’s congressional delegation requesting a change in how funding for wildfire response is prioritized across the nation. Senate Joint Memorial 1 petitions Congress to increase the funding for wildfire suppression for federal land management agencies, such as the Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service.

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Editorial: Pact on timber sale could protect Wallace Falls State Park

By The Herald Editorial Board
Everett Herald
February 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A compromise pitched by Snohomish County officials may end nearly a decade of disagreement and discussions over a timber sale near Wallace Falls State Park. The park features 4,735-acre of forestland northeast of Gold Bar that offers camping facilities and hiking trails that lead past Wallace Lake and Jay Lake to the park’s falls, including its namesake 265-foot falls and the Index Town Wall, a favorite of rock climbers. For nearly 10 years, the state Department of Natural Resources, which manages state land east of the state park, has planned to auction 187 acres of second-growth timber, referred to as the Singletary sale. The sale, however, has pitted two legitimate needs against each other. …As happens with compromise, everyone gets something, even if nobody is entirely satisfied.

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A look at county’s timber decision

By Edward Stratton
The Daily Astorian
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Clatsop County contains nearly one-quarter of state-run forestlands involved in a lawsuit brought by Linn County against the state over timber revenue. But Clatsop was the only one of the 15 counties covered by class action to opt out. …According to a filing last week by lawyers for Linn County, five of the nine taxing districts that opted out were in Clatsop County. … The board of directors for Sunset Empire Parks and Recreation District voted last month to opt out. Michael Hinton, chairman of Sunset Empire’s board, said the group didn’t agree with the change in forest practices that might result from the lawsuit, and that the district’s budget doesn’t rely on timber revenue.

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The new gold rush: Loggers see money growing on millions of dead trees

by Darryl Fears
The Washington Post
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The trees are also dead, marked with bright spray paint by state contractors, destined for a date with a chain saw. They are victims of a massacre, a five-year drought — the longest and worst in state history — that has wiped out 102 million trees in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. But this ecological tragedy has a silver lining. California is in the middle of a $50 million effort to get rid of tens of thousands of dead trees that threaten roads, power lines and homes. Loggers from across the country are flocking to the state in search of a huge payday from tree-removal companies under contract with the state and a few private firms. “They’re coming from Iowa, Texas, Florida and Pennsylvania,” Smith said. “They tend to be young, people in really good shape — climbing trees, using chain saws six or seven days a week. It’s been rather fascinating. It’s been quite an experience.”

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SC Johnson Launches Acre-for-Acre Match to Protect Amazon Rainforest

By SC Johnson
Edmonton Journal
February 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

RACINE, Wis. — SC Johnson, the maker of trusted household products like Pledge®, Glade®, OFF!®, and Ziploc®, today announced an acre-for-acre matching challenge to help protect the Amazon rainforest. The acre challenge is part of SC Johnson’s partnership with Conservation International (CI) to support the new virtual reality film Under the Canopy. “The Amazon rainforest provides a wealth of ecosystem services that are critical for the sustenance of life on this planet…everything from fresh water and fresh air, to carbon sequestration and extraordinary biodiversity, even tourism and recreation,” said SC Johnson Chairman and CEO Fisk Johnson. “It is not only worth protecting, it is a necessity. We are delighted to help CI educate about and protect Amazonia.”

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Timber management a disgrace

Letter by Neil Barraclough
Gippsland Times
February 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

OVER past months we have continually heard of local saw mills losing their allocation of sawlogs with Nationals Tim Bull and Darren Chester telling us that Daniel Andrews has to stand up to the Greens. For as long as I can remember the conflict between environmental groups and timber harvesting has been addressed by, whichever party, government simply setting aside areas of National Parks and areas where timber could be harvested, neither side happy with what they got. …As it has been told to me it is at a cost to the taxpayer with royalties not covering costs to the state, management of the timber resource has been a disgrace and if the environmental movement have been able to galvanise a city based backlash then the governments of either side, including the previous Coalition government that Tim Bull was part of, should accept responsibility.

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Plantation timber supply queried

By Philip Hopkins
Gippsland Times
February 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

SUGGESTIONS that Australian Sustainable Hardwoods in Heyfield could be saved by using plantations have been undermined by a landmark report by consultants Poyry. Poyry said plantation wood was not a direct substitute for native forest wood. “The difference between the two types of wood is significant,” it said. The 2011 Poyry report analysed the idea of substituting hardwood plantation logs from western Victoria for native forest hardwood logs used by Gippsland processors. Its conclusions are relevant as the ASH mill is under threat from a dramatic cut in its wood allocation from VicForests. It would drop from 150,000 cubic meters a year to 80,000, then 60,000 in the following two years.

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Company & Business News

‘Be patient, don’t prejudge,’ Trump presidency ‘positive’ for Canada, says Bush-era U.S. ambassador

By Derek Abma
The Hill Times
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

Relations between Canada and the United States are off to a “positive” start under new U.S. President Donald Trump, according to a former U.S. ambassador to Canada who served under George W. Bush. …Mr. Wilkins said too much symbolic importance is placed on where a president makes his first out-of-country trip, adding that it’s not always a sign of how good relations will be. He said despite Mr. Obama making Canada his first foreign visit and George W. Bush not, the latter’s presidency was better for Canada. He cited Mr. Bush’s role in solving the softwood-lumber trade dispute and opening up the U.S. border to Canadian beef after the 2003 mad cow crisis as examples of how “Canada could not have had a better friend than George W. Bush.” Ms. Goldfeder she would be surprised if Canada is Mr. Trump’s first foreign visit, given the likelihood of major protests happening and placing a damper on the tone of discussions. 

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BC government and lumber industry to launch softwood lobbying campaign

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in The Globe and Mail
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

The BC Lumber Trade Council and provincial government said Monday they will try to convince American consumers, politicians and lumber buyers that an equitable softwood lumber deal is needed to avoid the damage that will result from import restrictions into the U.S. and higher prices. Susan Yurkovich, the president of the council, and B.C. Forests Minister Steve Thomson said no budget has been set for the lobbying effort, though they expect fees covering legal, consulting and advertising costs will add up. “It’s a very expensive undertaking and it’s unfortunate that we’re doing this,” Yurkovich said from Ottawa after she and Thomson met with federal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland. Mike Apsey, a former deputy minister in B.C. and forestry sector official, wrote in a book published in 2006 that the lumber industry spent $40 million on lawyers, lobbyists and consultants in the 1990s to defend its interests in a previous softwood dispute, not including public funds.

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U.S. still needs Canadian lumber: Forestry minister

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States, Canada West

Federal and provincial trade and forestry sector officials are in Ottawa today strategizing on the latest softwood lumber battle with the U.S. – something of a never ending story. In a joint teleconference call, B.C. Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson and Council of Forest Industries (COFI) president Susan Yurkovich reiterated the Canadian stance: Americans need Canadian lumber and duties on Canadian softwood lumber will only increase costs for homebuilders and homeowners in the U.S. “If they want to build their economy, they need our lumber,” Thompson said. “When you look at sawmilling capacity to meet their domestic needs, and with … housing starts forecast to increase, they’re going to need our lumber. It’s beneficial for their economy.” It’s estimated that the U.S. will have consumed 47 billion board feet of lumber in 2016, but produced only 32 billion board feet, Yurkovich said.

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Forestry minister Steve Thomson addresses softwood lumber discussions with Ottawa

By Brendan Pawliw
My Prince George Now
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Minister of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operation Steve Thomson gave an update on their softwood lumber talks with Ottawa on Monday. Thomson says a new trade agreement between Canada and the United States is vital to the province. “50% of Canadian softwood lumber production is in British Columbia and the US still is one of our most important markets, that’s not to discount the work we have done on market diversification.”

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BC Takes Softwood Lumber Talks to Ottawa

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C.- Minister of Forests Steve Thomson and BC Lumber Trade Council President Susan Yurkovich are in to Ottawa to talk Softwood Lumber Agreement .“We’ve been meeting with Ministers and key officials on the softwood lumber file” says Minister Thomson. He says the purpose of the visit is to “enforce the importance of this file to British Columbia.” He says they have been working to move the file forward as well as working on the litigation that has been launched against 4 forest companies ( West Fraser, Canfor, Tolko and Resolute) which are the focus of the U.S. legal action launched against Canada. “It is critically important for British Columbia, critically important for Canada” says Minister Thomson. He says he and Yurkovich have been meeting with key Federal Ministers who are involved in this file

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Negotiators prepare for US lumber talks

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C. and Canada have a strong position going into the latest dispute over lumber trade with the U.S., which needs imported lumber to maintain growing housing construction, industry and government representatives say. The U.S. used 47 billion board feet of lumber in 2016 and domestic production was only 32 billion, B.C. Lumber Trade Council president Susan Yurkovich said after meetings with federal trade officials in Ottawa Monday. Yurkovich said the U.S. wants to increase domestic lumber production, but it can’t do that quickly. “If you don’t have that supply, what you’re going to have is a massive spike in lumber prices, which is going to push home ownership out of reach for some,” Yurkovich said. “And frankly if it’s so constrained that you push prices high enough, what you’ll bring in is European supply, or you push people to substitute, which isn’t in the best interests of the wood products industry.”

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MOU signed to streamline forestry contract bids

By Russell Hixson
Journal of Commerce
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Construction Safety Alliance (BCCSA) and BC Forest Safety Council (BCFSC) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) allowing BCCSA COR certified companies to achieve SAFE certification with BCFSC in order to assist companies who wish to bid on forestry contracts. According to the BCCSA, the process to develop the MOU started when the industry heard of new requirements by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations for SAFE certification to qualify to bid on in-forestry projects. “What we wanted to do was establish a process that was not overly bureaucratic,” said Robert Moonen, BCFSC CEO. “We want to see contractors who are new to this industry set up for success.”

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Fire at Resolute Saw Mill causes significant damage

TB Newswatch
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – A chip bin at the Resolute Forest Products Saw Mill sustained significant damage as a result of a fire early Sunday morning. Thunder Bay Fire Rescue were called to the saw mill on Darryl Avenue just after 9 a.m. Arriving crews saw smoke and fire coming from a woodchip bin that is used for loading trailers. An aerial ladder was dispatched to attack the fire from above and 22 firefighters attended the scene. When the fire was cooled, the bottom of the bin was opened to allow firefighters to release the chips and apply water. The chips were then moved with a loader to a safe area and covered in a foam solution.

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Hornepayne, Ont. lumber mill back in action, says mayor

CBC News
February 7, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada


The mayor of Hornepayne, Ont. says the re-start of the lumber mill in the community is good news for the township. The mill underwent a test start in Dec., 2016 before the first shifts went back to work at the beginning of January, according to Morley Forster. “Most of the population is still concerned about the cost of living, [but] certainly [we’re] a lot better off now that the local mill is working and local jobs are back in place,” he said on Monday. The new life at the mill under new ownership is welcome news after the previous owners shut the facility down in November, 2015, leaving 146 people out of work. The mill, along with the neighbouring power co-generation facility and CN Rail are among the biggest employers in town, Forster said, adding that he’s been told a second shift should be added at the mill soon.

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Industry dispute with wood marketing boards needs government action, says ex-minister

By Connell Smith
CBC News
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Former New Brunswick natural resources minister Jeannot Volpé says it is time for the province to show leadership in the dispute between industry and woodlot marketing boards. Volpé says the government should consider a requirement that industrial players like J.D. Irving, Limited. buy a portion of their wood from New Brunswick’s forest product marketing boards as a condition for access to trees on Crown land. The so-called “primary source” rule was abandoned in 1992 but should be reintroduced on a trial basis, says Volpe, who was minister of natural resources and energy from 1999 to 2003 in the Bernard Lord government. Volpé says a current lawsuit launched by J.D. Irving will only do more damage to already struggling woodlot groups.

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JD Irving releases hiring forecast for PEI

By Colin MacLean
The Journal Pioneer
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

J.D. Irving Ltd. expects to hire almost 500 people on P.E.I. over the next three years, though most will be to replace retirees. The New Brunswick-based parent company owns a number subsidiaries operating in various sectors of the P.E.I. economy, including: Kent Building Supplies, Canvendish Farms, Cavendish Agri-Services, Kent Homes, Midland Transport and Master Packaging. Only 16 of the new hires are forecasted to be as a result of growth, said Mary Keith, spokeswoman for J.D. Irving Ltd.

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Minnesota loggers in favor of Trump’s plan to renegotiate NAFTA

By Korey Kaczur
KBJR 6
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

DULUTH, MN – Northern Minnesota loggers say they’re in an unfair competition with Canada. They say below-market priced Canadian timber is making their wood tough to sell. President Donald Trump’s plan to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, commonly known as NAFTA, will affect Minnesota loggers. “I do, I do. I enjoy it. It’s nice to come to work every day,” said Jeremy Stecker, the president of JATCO, Inc. He is the third generation to run JATCO Inc., an 18-year-old logging company. Like many other Northern Minnesota loggers, Stecker is having to compete with Canadian timber companies. “I really agree with what Nolan has talked about a lot that we can compete with anybody out there as long as we’re on a level playing field,” said Stecker. Canadian timber is subsidized by the Canadian government, meaning Canadian loggers can sell their wood for less.

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Eugene-based Seneca wood products companies offer $5,000 scholarship to winner of essay contest

By Dylan Darling
The Register-Guard
February 7, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

Seneca Sawmill in Eugene and its sister companies are offering a $5,000 scholarship to the winner of a high school essay contest about the benefits of the wood products industry. To be considered for the scholarship, Oregon high school juniors and seniors must interview three people in the wood products industry and write an essay answering this question: “What are the benefits of forest management for the forest and for the community?” “We see it as an educational program, an incentive for students to learn about the viability of our natural resources here,” said Ashley Jones, special projects coordinator for the Seneca Family of Companies and granddaughter of Seneca’s founder. “Obviously, we find that very important as our industry, and we’re just hoping to get students and the next generation excited about it.”

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Cause for optimism

By Dylan Darling
Register-Guard
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

Signs of more U.S. home construction, as well as the possible resolution of a lumber trade dispute with Canada and potential tax changes from President Trump and the Republican Congress are making wood products executives a little more positive about the future. “I am cautiously optimistic,” said Seneca Sawmill Chief Executive Officer Todd Payne. “I think 2017 is going to be better than 2016.” The wood products industry continues to recover from the housing crash that contributed to the Great Recession. In recent years, Lane County plywood, lumber and paper firms have invested about $275 million to improve plants and equipment, demonstrating faith in the future of the industry. Seeing similar opportunities, out-of-area investors have purchased timberlands and plants in Lane County.

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What now collaborators?

By George Ochenski
The Missoulian
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

For more than 20 years the timber industry, joined by federal and state government agencies and elected officials from both parties, has instigated and nurtured the use of collaboration to supposedly solve public lands resource extraction issues. They have been aided and abetted in this effort by any number of so-called “conservation” groups generously funded by foundations such as the PEW Trust to be collaborators. But now, how can these same groups claim a shred of legitimacy by collaborating with Donald Trump’s “make America raped again” agenda?

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Canadian exports creating local headaches

By Rick Sohn, PhD, Umqua Coquille LLC
Oregon Natural Resources Report
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

Interest rates are leveling off, lumber and logs are steady, home values continue a steady rise, and housing starts are rising slowly, despite tightening home inventories. Canadian lumber exports are creating headaches. Recent trends of lumber, logs, home construction, and housing markets, are compared. …Random lengths reports that the shipment of Canadian lumber to the United States increased from 3 billion board feet to 4 billion board feet, in 2016 alone, an increase of 33%. This has happened after the October, 2015, expiration of the lumber trade and tariffs agreement between the US and Canada. On Nov 25, 2016, a coalition of US softwood lumber producers petitioned the US Government (Department of Commerce and International Trade Commission) to restore the schedule of tariffs on Canadian imports that had been in place for the prior 10 years. Stay tuned. If this increased amount of Canadian lumber were not flooding the United States, either prices would be higher, or Pacific Northwest production would rise, since there is unused manufacturing capacity. As housing starts continue their gradual rise, this benefits the timber-based economy either way.

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Fox forced advertiser to re-tool Super Bowl ad that depicted Trump’s border wall

By Marissa Payne
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

Politics appeared to play a larger role than ever in Sunday’s Super Bowl. Perhaps more than any other time in history, politics appear to be playing a larger role than ever in the Super Bowl. …some of the ads have tackled controversial social issues such as immigration. One such ad was imagined by the family-owned company 84 Lumber, which decided to tackle the subject in its first Super Bowl ad. It wasn’t exactly how the company originally planned it, however. …Ultimately, 84 Lumber and Brunner came up with an edit that Fox finally approved and aired on Sunday. Gone is the wall, replaced by a less imposing barbed-wire fence at what appears to be the border.

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Conifex plans for ‘state-of-the-art’ site

By Nathan Owens
El Dorado News-Times
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

EL DORADO — Conifex’s first timber sawmill complex in the U.S. South, located at the former Georgia-Pacific sawmill, will have the company’s most state-of-the-art site with updated machines processing 180 million board feet annually, officials said. Once the sawmill complex is open and running at full capacity the company will look into expanding the location, said Sandy Ferguson, Conifex Vice President. Robert Hanry, Conifex’s recommissioning and start-up manager, and Supervisor Chad Saxon have been quietly working for the company at the El Dorado mill since April 2016, and hired a small team a month later—seven formerly worked for Georgia-Pacific. “Based on the number of old employees coming up to us, we think we’re doing it right,” he said. “It’s going to be really nice, state-of-the-art.”

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Everything you wanted to know about the impact of forestry in Arkansas, in one booklet

Magnolia Reporter
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

MONTICELLO — The thousands of acres of timberlands that cover the state of Arkansas are valued at $12.6 billion. Arkansas is also four times more dependent on its forestry industry than the entire United States. Those are just a few of the findings in the 2016 “Economic Contributions of Arkansas Forestry” booklet, published by the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture Forest Resources Center in Monticello. Forestry contributes a larger percentage to Arkansas’ state economy than it does in any of the other 13 southern states. “Right now the forestry industry contributes about 5 percent to the state economy,” said Philip Tappe, director of the Arkansas Forest Resources Center. Readers of the booklet can expect to gain insight into the growing economic driver and the many impacts it has on the state. “Forestry means jobs,” Tappe said.

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Watch Lesley Griffiths discussing challenges facing Welsh timber sector as it confronts tree planting crisis

By Andrew Forgrave
Daily Post North Wales
February 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International


Ways of restocking Wales’ dwindling forests were on the agenda when rural affairs minister Lesley Griffiths visited a Denbighshire timber yard. Clifford Jones Timber is the UK’s biggest manufacturer of wooden fence posts but the business is facing a shortage of home-grown timber . Importing timber, to make up the shortfall, has become less attractive following the slump in Sterling, while Brexit may leave the company vulnerable to overseas competition. Ms Griffiths, the Labour AM for Wrexham , was shown round the firm’s Ruthin depot by Alan Jones, whose father founded the company in 1948, before meeting timber industry representatives including Alan’s son and daughter, current chairman Richard and commercial director Sarah Smith.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Transformative building technologies and innovations in wood building and design among topics at inaugural Vancouver conference

By Wood WORKS! BC
Construction Links Media
February 6, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Leading-edge expertise in wood design, construction, finishing and building science will inform and inspire British Columbia’s building and design professionals at the upcoming 2017 Wood Design & Construction Solutions Conference on Tuesday, February 28 and Wednesday, March 1 at the Vancouver Convention Centre – East. The conference is presented by Wood WORKS! BC and the Canadian Wood Council, and is part of Wood Week BC, four events happening over 10 days on the latest trends and topics on wood design and construction with a range of educational and networking opportunities.  Building and design professionals from BC and across the continent will converge in Vancouver for what is expected to be the largest conference on wood design and construction in North America. Current trends and important new topics will be highlighted over two days, including mass timber and hybrid system design, transformative building technologies, recent innovations, off-site prefabrication, sustainability and fire and acoustic performance.

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Timber a viable option for high-rise buildings in quake zones

By Jon Tanner, CEO of the Wood Processors and Manufacturers Association of NZ
Stuff.co.nz
February 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

NZ – It is indeed overdue for bodies such as Callaghan to develop technology for checking buildings after earthquakes… But Callaghan Innovation’s apparent sole focus on finding more earthquake resistance through concrete technology, and particularly how to prevent steel rods from rusting when water gets through from earthquake cracks, is a one trick structural pony. We say simply – why not timber?.. First, there are intrinsic properties in wood we have known about and used for years. It is lightweight. A wooden building weighs less than a steel concrete structure with obvious benefits in both construction and resilience. It is flexible. It can bend and stretch. The designed-in ‘snap-back’ quality is paramount in a quake… Secondly, timber technology is more versatile now than the standard weatherboard, timber frame construction of a single or two-storey bungalow.

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