Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 6, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Trump: no longer just the message; also the medium

Tree Frog Forestry News
March 6, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

While collecting today’s news stories, we were reminded of an article by New York Times columnist Farhad Manjoo (a self-proclaimed political junkie) who undertook NOT to “read, watch or listen to a single story about President Trump for an entire week”. Amongst other observations, he concluded: “President Trump is no longer just the message. He has become the medium, the ether through which all other stories flow.”

Case in point today, author Mike Parker, tells fellow Nova Scotians not to listen to “industry assurances” that all is well in the forests. According to Parker, whenever the public questions forestry practices, government and industry respond “with talking points straight from The Clear-Cutters’ Thesaurus of Alternative-Facts”, and should that fail, “they play the Trump press card claiming persistent anti-forestry-resource-management bias.”

Other Trump infused headlines today include:

  • National Observer: The Trudeau government has just given a clear signal to the Trump administration that it plans to defend the Paris agreement to combat climate change
  • Castanet: Softwood envoy David Emerson heads south to begin talks on a new softwood lumber agreement
  • CJFC News: Trump effect on BC lumber a waiting game for Liberals
  • Statesman Journal: Freres Lumber VP makes bold predictions for 2017 – Market turbulence with trade

In other news, a study by Atlantic Wood WORKS! confirms the “cost advantages of six-storey wood building construction“, which has taken off in BC and Ontario. And speaking of Wood WORKS!, we look forward to seeing many of BC’s Wood Champions at this evening’s Wood Design Awards – the Oscars of wood design.

–Tree Frog Editors

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Froggy Foibles

When the b-roll in a music video is all about wood-framing, Tree Frog gets excited

You Tube
March 6, 2017
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

Hey girls, if you want to be ginning like me, you’ve got to get yourself a good looking’ Tradie! He’s got all the right tools!

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Forestry

Waterloo to give out 2017 trees for Canada 150

By Samantha Beattie
Waterloo Chronicle
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Waterloo’s going green for Canada 150. The city is planning to give out 2,017 maple trees this spring in celebration of 150 years since Canada’s Confederation. “The impacts of planting 2,000 trees is massive,” said Tim Wolfe, forestry manager, at a committee meeting March 2. “I know everyone thinks trees take a long time to grow, but in five to seven years there will be a substantial amount of growth.” Each of the city’s seven wards will receive 150 trees. There will also be tree giveaways at Waterloo Earth Day in May and the Service Centre open house in June, as well as at other city functions and events.

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Don’t listen to industry reassurances

By Mike Parker, author
Chronicle Herald
March 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


Whenever we, the public, question questionable forestry practices, government and industry invariably respond with talking points straight from The Clear-Cutters’ and Whole Tree Harvesters’ Biomass Thesaurus of Alternative-Facts.  …Not being a professional forester, I have been sloughed off in the past by the self-appointed stewards-of-the-woods as being critical, rhetorical, holier-than-thou and, the deepest cut of all, a “retiree”, which I can only guess means I am old and as such my opinions are based in senility and not fact. …With what fading faculties remain, I searched out a respected voice who can speak to forestry issues in Nova Scotia. I found it in the person of Dr. Jack Ward Thomas (1934-2016), a renowned American ecologist, Boone and Crockett Professor of Wildlife Conservation in the School of Forestry at the University of Montana, and thirteenth chief of the U.S. Forest Service.

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Confusing opinion with the facts

By Jeff Bishop, executive director, Forest Nova Scotia
Chronicle Herald
March 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: Public forests should not be private resource (Feb. 21), Bob Bancroft has made serious allegations among a pile of incorrect and misleading information. I have no problem with people being critical of forestry or our industry, asking questions and raising concerns. But I do have a big problem with people presenting opinions and revisions of history as facts. ..Mr. Bancroft’s allegations of “subsidized, cheap wood” from Crown lands creating a market where private producers cannot compete are incorrect. One needs to look no further than the exemption Nova Scotia has enjoyed from tariffs on softwood lumber exported into the United States to see the Nova Scotian wood market is held out by the American industry as a benchmark market with no government subsidies and free-market pricing — resulting in the highest wood costs in North America.

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Environmental advocates disturbed by logging activity in Quebec caribou habitat

By Riley Sparks
National Observer
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

News this week that there are no more than 15 caribou left in a threatened herd near Val d’Or, Que. is giving new urgency to the fight to protect caribou in the neighbouring Broadback River valley. It also adds fuel to the dispute between the Waswanipi Cree of northwestern Quebec and forestry companies planning to build new logging roads this summer that would reach into about 1,100 square kilometres of logging areas in the forests south of the Broadback River. New research from the Quebec Ministry of Environment shows that no more than 15 of the woodland caribou in the Val d’Or herd are still alive — a 50 per cent decline since five years ago. Much of their habitat has been disturbed by logging and human activity, according to research by the Quebec and federal governments.

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New Interior Secretary Zinke sets sights on balance

By Tom Lutey
Billings Gazette
March 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

It might not be long before the inscription atop Yellowstone National Park’s iconic Roosevelt Arch is posted in Ryan Zinke’s new digs. It’s what the new Interior secretary says is his mission for the Department of Interior’s management of federal lands: “For the Benefit and Enjoyment of the People.”… “Multiple use is making sure that the public can use our lands for the enjoyment and the benefit of the people,” Zinke said. “That benefit side may include timber harvest, it may include oil energy production. It may include mining. Our charter is to make sure that those activities that are more invasive have a reclamation plan where at the end of the project that land is returned either in the same or better condition than what we started with. And that’s where the right regulation — but not excessive regulation — is needed.”

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Loggers from across the country converging on Oakhurst after historic levels of dying trees

By Jason Oliveira
ABC30.com
March 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

OAKHURST, Calif. – What is typically the slow, quiet time of year for Oakhurst has seen an unexpected jolt to its local economy. Out of town tree loggers staying there to help with the region’s dead tree population have given the foothill community a nice stream of revenue before tourism season ramps up next month. “They’re from as far as Maine, Florida, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Texas, Oregon, and all over California,” said Kathy Janzen, Sierra Mercantile. Janzen has gotten to know many of them and says half of her business comes from the brave men and women who are busy chopping trees this time of year.

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Logger workshops set in N. Idaho

Bonner County Daily Bee
March 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Over 1,500 Idaho loggers have taken the University of Idaho Extension program on forest ecology, silviculture, and water quality, titled Logger Education to Advance Professionalism or “LEAP”. LEAP Update is an annual opportunity for LEAP graduates to build on that professional development in forestry. …This year’s topics include: costs of tethered logging; geotextiles and road stabilization; ecology and silviculture of Engelmann spruce; Trimble 4-loads and other developing logging support software; Ponsse logging equipment; variances and other forest practice act updates; mechanical site preparation for reforestation; managing forest habitats for moose; loggers and fire; loggers and forest policy; and trends in forest product markets. LEAP Update also helps loggers to fulfill Idaho Pro-Logger program annual continuing education and best management practice training requirements.

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Senate Passes Forest Restoration Bill, Though Funding Still Uncertain

By TJ Martinell
The Lens
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Washington State Senate has unanimously approved SB 5546 directing the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to treat one million acres of state land by 2033. It and other similar bills reflect a growing bipartisan agreement on the importance of forest health restoration to reduce wildfire severity. However, the money to fund those projects may be hard to come by, as other wildfire bills face an uphill battle moving through key fiscal committees. However, sponsors say the money invested in their proposals would pay large dividends during wildfire season. 

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I applaud Blackfoot Clearwater plan

Letter by Austin Wrem
The Billings Gazette
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On Feb. 22, I was able to take the journey to Rich Ranch near Seeley Lake for an event that I will not soon forget. Standing in the shadow of the mighty Swan Range and the Blackfoot River, Senator Jon Tester announced to a crowd of more than 100 that he would introduce the Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act. The Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act is a made-in-Montana collaborative solution with an array of stakeholders, including ranchers, timber interests, snowmobilers, hunters and anglers, small business owners and conservationists. …It’s time to band together and protect the wild lands that make Montana special. It is my hope that the Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act will become a model for the future of collaborative solutions in Montana.

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Conservation groups lobby to nix sale of Elliott State Forest

By Claire Withycombe
Blue Mountain Eagle
March 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SALEM — Opponents of the planned sale of an 82,500-acre swath of the Elliot State Forest to a private partnership are lobbying members of the State Land Board to change their vote and keep the forest in public hands. Meanwhile, officials at the Department of State Lands are both negotiating a sales agreement for the forest and, at the direction of the governor, researching a public ownership option. …Environmental groups are lobbying the Legislature and members of the board — Gov. Kate Brown, Treasurer Tobias Read and Secretary of State Dennis Richardson — in earnest to change course and find a means of public ownership. …Environmental groups, including Cascadia Wildlands and Portland Audobon, held an official lobby day at the state capitol last week, meeting with Read and state legislators. They’ve encouraged their members to call legislators and the land board to push for the public ownership option.

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Tester’s new wilderness bill draws critics, supporters

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
March 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A week after Sen. Jon Tester released his Blackfoot Clearwater Stewardship Act, some wilderness advocates question what it might really do. Now designated as S. 507, the bill resurrects a portion of Tester’s 8-year-old Forest Jobs and Recreation Act affecting the southwest corner of the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex. That bill ran into opposition from some environmentalists and U.S. Forest Service officials who objected to the way it mandated commercial work in the forests. The new bill has raised eyebrows for the compromises it’s made with mountain biking groups. “We’ve gone backwards from FJRA,” said Jake Kreilick of the Wild West Institute. “That kind of activity (mountain biking) raises threats to grizzly bears and human tragedies. And it’s another step toward privatization and Balkanization of our national forests.”

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Athens-Clarke County to revitalize Sandy Creek Nature Center

By Ashley Soriano
Red and Black
March 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Sandy Creek Nature Center has been an educational home to the Athens community since the 1970s. Following a 2014 proposal for a Managed Forest Project and approval by the Mayor and Commission of Athens-Clarke County, the SCNC has begun its 25-year plan to regenerate a low-quality forest while educating the community. This forest, in particular, is deemed low-quality as a result of its abundance of invasive species. According to the 2014 proposal, there was a need for professional management. “As with pine forests, human activity, invasive species and the suppression of historically periodic wildfires continue to dramatically alter southeastern hardwood forests,” the proposal said. “Even when left alone, forests are being assaulted by invasive species, significantly impacting ecological functions and habitat quality. Forests are suffering.”

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Foresters see increased spread of diseases

By Arielle Breen
Gaylord Herald Times
March 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

NORTHERN MICHIGAN — Michigan has become increasingly familiar with certain invasive species in recent years. And foresters with the Department of Natural Resources are working to slow the spread tree loss in trees like beech, ash and red oak. Scott Lint, forest health technician with the DNR, said foresters have seen a change in the type of forest health problems in the state through the years. …Beech bark disease impacts beech trees after a non-native scale insect feeds from under the bark and then the trees weaken and become susceptible to fungus. The fungus is what kills the trees. The fungus leads to yellow girdled or snapped beech trees. After the trees die, areas have a cycle of weak beech sprouts from the root system of the previous tree pop up in the spring and then has a stunted lifespan, Lint said.

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New home for Forestry under consideration; but laid-off foresters still in limbo

By Brad McElhinny
West Virginia MetroNews
March 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — While the governor and the Legislature are trading shots over the coming fiscal budget gap, 37 workers from the state Division of Forestry who were laid off during the last budget crisis are still hoping to come back to work. The upcoming fiscal gap is estimated to be almost $500 million. The forestry workers were laid off over a $1.7 shortfall in their own agency’s budget that came about largely because of a decrease in timber severance tax money. Last week, during a special Town Hall show on MetroNews Talkline, new Gov. Jim Justice said he would like to bring the foresters back. …Justice responded, “I was adamantly against the forestry cuts. I thought that was crazy to tell you the truth. I mean the dollars that it saved had to be considered insignificant.”

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New forest conservation program in north Louisiana said to benefit both industry and environment

By Steve Hardy
The Advocate
March 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A lot of people have to buy in to protect Southern forests: Most of the land is held in small private patches, a few dozen acres here and there that in combination form whole forests. A new conservation program aims to manage the environment in north Louisiana and southern Arkansas by getting all those landowners pulling in the same direction. The Morehouse Family Forests Initiative plans to lay the groundwork for sustained forest health, said Tom Martin, CEO of the nonprofit American Forest Foundation. Pete Madden’s first goal is to get 10,000 acres certified with the American Tree Farm System, which sets out provisions for replanting trees, eliminating invasive species and protecting streams from erosion. Madden is the CEO of Atlanta-based wood pellet manufacturer Drax Biomass. 

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Metsähallitus invites actor, environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio to Finland

Helsinki Times
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The State Forest Enterprise of Finland (Metsähallitus) has invited one of the world’s most prolific actors and environmentalists, Leonardo DiCaprio, to Finland. The Oscar-winning actor seemingly expressed his concern about logging and its effects on forest biodiversity by sharing a photo of a lake island in Lammasjärvi, a medium-sized lake in Kuhmo, Finland, on 28 February, 2017. The photo was originally published on Instagram by Greenpeace International. “These beautiful islands in Lammasjärvi, Finland, are threatened by logging,” the caption read. “The forests are of high conservation value and are critical for biodiversity, not to mention extremely beautiful, but we’ve already lost three-quarters of these trees.”

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Campaign calls on Tehraners to plant 3 million trees

Tehran Times
March 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The campaign called “ye alameh derakht” literary meaning “a lot of trees” is encouraging people to participate in a scheme to plant the trees at 354 parks of the capital. The move will be taken in association with Tehran Municipality and concurrent with Natural Resources Week falling on March 5-12 with its first day dedicated to tree planting, IRNA reported. “This is the second year that the scheme is running; last year some five million trees were planted in Tehran in two months,” Matin Sharifi, the executive director of the scheme, said. “Now that everyone is caught up with social media we decided to draw their interest to tree planting using social media such as Telegram an Instagram,” Sharifi explained.

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Interpol: $5.1 million of illegal wildlife and timber seized

By Edith M. Lederer
Washington Post
March 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

UNITED NATIONS — Interpol says a three-week operation to tackle the illegal trade in wildlife and timber in 43 countries has led to the seizure of $5.1 million worth of illicit products from wild cats to seahorses and the jailing of almost 90 people. The operation, codenamed Thunderbird, was carried out jointly by police, customs and border agencies, along with environment, wildlife and forestry officials ahead of World Wildlife Day on Friday. Its results put a spotlight on the increase in wildlife trafficking and the billions of dollars it generates annually in illegal profits… According to Interpol, the seizures included 60 tons of wood and timber, 4,770 birds, 1,240 reptiles, 100 wild cats, 2.75 tons of pangolin scales, 2.5 tons of raw and processed ivory, 25 tons of various animal parts and 37,130 other products including medicines, ornaments and carvings.

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Company & Business News

Log-export ban advocates barking up wrong tree again

By Rod Bealing, Executive Director, Private Forest Landowners Association
The Province
March 5, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

An openly partisan coalition of labour unions and internationally funded environmental activists opposed to B.C. timber harvesting are once again promoting the myth that a ban on log exports is the best solution to ensure more logs are milled in B.C. This idea is callously disrespectful to the thousands of hardworking rural men and women who rely on the log-export trade for their livelihoods. Not to mention dangerous, because it ignores almost all the evidence, as well as a shameful waste of time, because it focuses on the symptoms of the problem, rather than focusing on making B.C. an attractive place to build new mills. …If the goal is to put an abrupt and complete halt to the coastal timber-growing and harvesting sector, then a log-export ban is the way to go. If, as the United Steelworkers — whose members enjoy both mill and woods jobs — suggest, the goal is to encourage a thriving milling sector, then finding a solution will require a lot more than idealistic rhetoric.

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Softwood envoy heads south

By Dustin Godfrey
Castanet
March 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Province will be sending a special envoy to the U.S. early this week with aims to bring B.C. softwood lumber to the table with decision makers south of the border. Former provincial and federal politician David Emerson is heading south to begin talks on a new softwood lumber agreement, the predecessor of which had run its course in October 2015. Emerson will be bringing the issue to Ottawa first on Monday, where he will speak to senior officials, including the minister of foreign affairs and Quebec’s representative to the U.S. “These are key meetings to discuss our collective strategies on how Canada and the provinces can partner to secure a softwood agreement,” B.C. Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson said in a statement. From Ottawa, Emerson will head south to Washington, where talks with officials in the U.S. capital will begin.

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Trump effect on B.C lumber a waiting game for Liberals

By Vanessa Ybarra
CJFC News
March 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

MERRITT, B.C. — Premier Christy Clark says it’s a waiting game when it comes to the exact effect the Trump administration will have on B.C’s logging industry. Speaking at a press event in Merritt Friday, Clark says the approval deadline for anti-subsidy duties, otherwise known as countervailling duties, to be imposed by the US on imported Canadian lumber is April 24th. Until then, uncertainty remains. “The thing is, at this point we don’t know what the duty will be,” said Clark… She reassured the crowd softwood was the number one item on the agenda during her sitdown with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Vancouver Thursday, stating the liberals are ‘depending on Canada to be there.’

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Premier Clark’s rural jobs plan draws mixed reaction

By Vanessa Ybarra
CFJC Today Kamloops
March 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

MERRITT, B.C. — There was plenty of buzz surrounding the Premier’s visit to the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology. …”This is where the bulk of our wealth comes from and we need to make sure we’re investing in people,” said Clark. …Merritt Mayor Neil Menard says Clark’s visit is proof positive change is on the way. …One of the things the Premier didn’t deliver was a clear plan to help the almost 200 employees left jobless following the Merritt Tolko mill closure in December. …However, the Steelworkers Union says the Liberals Tolko training program is a slap in the face. “160-thousand is an insult,” said Marty Gibbons, President of United Steel Workers Local 1-417. “That’s less than two workers would have made if the mill had stayed open. All this does is educate people to leave the community.”

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Raw logs a symptom of taking the cheap way

Letter by Ian Laval, furniture maker
Times Colonist
March 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s sad to see British Columbia’s magnificent timber resources increasingly shipped abroad as logs, not homemade products. I’m sorry to be echoing U.S. President Donald Trump — but isn’t the real cause that we’ve become so used to having cheap foreign products foisted on us in the name of quick profits from natural resources that we’re no longer willing to pay for made-in-Canada quality?… BC’s timber is world-beating in quality and quantity. But redeveloping industries to convert the province’s magnificent home-grown timber into higher-value products will take serious investment in time and cash, particularly in re-learning and training. It can be done — but so far there’s little indication that we’re willing to take anything but the cheap, quick way out.

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Wood marketing board turns to U.S. after snub in N.B.

By Connell Smith
CBC News
March 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

The general manager of the Carleton Victoria Forest Products Marketing Board says her organization is pivoting toward the United States after getting a cold shoulder from big wood buyers in New Brunswick. Linda Bell said wood sales to Maine have jumped from 12 percent 10 years ago to 40 per cent of sales today. What’s more, the companies there have been a pleasure to deal with, Bell said. “They’re looking to buy wood when they come. We work through it, and the contract’s done. It’s all together different with the New Brunswick mills.” …She said AV Nackawic Inc. and J.D. Irving, Limited won’t even negotiate with her marketing board. Both companies, she said, are making deals directly with woodlot owners or with contractors.

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Dryden mill offers to hire mercury investigators

By Jon Thompson
TB Newswatch
March 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

DRYDEN — The Dryden Mill’s parent company is offering to pay for an independent expert to assess whether mercury is still leeching from the site into the Wabigoon River. Domtar spokeswoman Bonny Skene issued the statement to media in the aftermath of a report from scientist John Rudd on behalf of Grassy Narrows First Nation that claims mercury levels in the river below the mill site are 130 times higher than normal. Skene said Domtar hasn’t seen the study and doesn’t yet know its methodology but the company is encouraged the First Nation’s leadership has shared it with provincial authorities and that Ontario has committed publicly to cleaning up the legacy. “As the current owners of the Dryden mill, we will provide access to the provincial government so that it can do this work,” she said. 

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Freres Lumber VP makes bold predictions for 2017

By Tyler Freres, VP of Sales.Freres Lumber Company
Statesman Journal
March 3, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

After a year that saw log prices increase dramatically and finished wood product prices remain subdued, at best, wood-products industry professionals in the U.S. speculate what will unfold in 2017. Freres Lumber Company’s Vice President of Sales Tyler Freres published his predictions for the 2017 wood products market on the Freres Lumber Co. blog. …1. Substantial increase in demand: Housing starts are projected to be up 11 percent in 2017 and by another 11 percent in 2018.2. Decreased panel supply: A major provider in the Pacific Northwest wood products market closed early this year. 3. Market turbulence with trade.

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Family-owned Montana timber mill values forest conservation

By Tristan Scott
Great Falls Tribune
March 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

COLUMBIA FALLS, Mont. – Skating his fingertips across the concentric rings of an old-growth Douglas fir, Roy Thompson traced the tree’s 200-year history in the Northern Rockies like a blind man reading braille, deciphering the conifer’s tactile timeline from its genesis to its recent autumnal demise, when his brother Ben and 81-year-old father Malcolm hand-felled the mighty giant with a chainsaw. The brothers Thompson like to say they have sawdust and timber in their blood, a genetic makeup hardwired in their DNA, predetermining their fate as loggers. In junior high, they peddled hand-tooled leather wares and cut lawns with borrowed mowers to earn pocket money, which they used to buy a bow saw and a wagon to cut and haul firewood. …After more than 40 years running a family-owned timber mill, scabbed together with grit and a flair for healthy forests, the concentric lines binding the Thompson clan are even tighter than those aging the tree.

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Japanese lumber imports from Europe to decline by 1.3%

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
March 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

After a probable figure of around 2.81 Mio m³ in 2016, a slight decline of 1.3% is anticipated demand for European lumber in Japan this year. According to the Japan Foreign Timber General Supply & Demand Liaison Conference forecasts published by Japan Lumber Journal, softwood lumber imports from Europe are expected to amount to roughly 2.78m m³ in 2017. This indicates relatively steady development compared with the other main supplier countries.

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Marlborough forestry barge site plans progress as council prepares to invest

By Elea McPhee
Marlborough Express
March 5, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

Marlborough is embarking on a project which could see a million tonnes of logs shipped through part of the Marlborough Sounds, with the council giving a $730,000 barge site plan the go-ahead. The plan will allow harvested timber to be shipped from Kenepuru Sound to Havelock and Picton, so heavy trucks do not have to use a winding rural road. The chairman of Kenepuru and Central Sounds Residents’ Association said the council put plans for a barge site “on the backburner” last year, and the sooner it went ahead the better for both the community and foresters. Council resource management advisor Jon Cunliffe said if all went to plan he expected the site to be finished in September 2018. Foresters in the area still have to sign a memorandum stating they will use the barge, not the road, before the investment is made.

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Japan’s forestry industry thin on workers: survey

Nikkei Asian Review
March 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

TOKYO — Japan’s forestry sector is vastly understaffed, leaving lumber resources planted decades ago in danger of going to waste, according to a survey by The Nikkei. Some 93% of the forest owners’ cooperatives polled reported being short-staffed, including 43% that said the number of forestry workers was “insufficient,” 41% calling labor “somewhat insufficient” and 9% that claimed a shortage of workers was affecting business. The Nikkei reached out in January to 393 cooperatives and builders of wooden homes, 306 of which responded. Nearly 30% of Japan is covered in man-made forest, much of it consisting of conifers planted after World War II to meet anticipated housing demand.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Trudeau’s government just spoke to the Trump administration about climate change

By Carl Meyer
National Observer
March 3, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

The Trudeau government has just given a clear signal to the Trump administration that it plans to defend the Paris agreement to combat climate change, earning praise from analysts and an industry representative. …Derek Nighbor, president and CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), which represents wood, pulp and paper producers, said he was encouraged by the McKenna talking to her U.S. counterpart, pointing to FPAC’s commitment last year to remove 30 megatonnes of carbon dioxide per year by 2030. He said it was important to keep an eye on the contribution of provinces to the fight against climate change. “We have to be staying close to the provinces as they roll out their schemes, whether they be cap and trade or carbon tax, just to be sure that in addressing this problem that needs to be addressed, we’re not going to be seeing any unintended consequences of bad policy for the economy,” he said.

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Most Americans think climate change is happening- to somebody else

By Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
March 6, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

According to the Yale Climate Opinion Maps 2.0, a majority of Americans really do believe that climate change is happening. Even in the Reddest of states, it is over 50 percent and the national average is 70 percent. But the fun really begins when you start looking at what people think the risks are from climate change. …”Only 40 percent believe climate change will harm them personally, despite worsening problems across the country with drought, flooding, forest fires and more intense storms.” …This is not surprising, and has always been a problem for TreeHugger, for those promoting green building… It is also fascinating that America elected a government that is bound and determined to do exactly the opposite of what the majority of Americans, including a majority of republicans polled, apparently want.

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Biofuel, Maine’s latest hope to save its timber industry, still has a lot to prove

By Darren Fishell
Bangor Daily News
March 5, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

PORTLAND, Maine — The plan to rebuild a wood-fueled economy centered in East Millinocket has major financial and technological hurdles to clear before it has any chance of helping revitalize communities devastated by the paper industry’s decline. Industry experts interviewed last week about EMEP LLC’s East Millinocket plan expressed a mix of excitement about the technology and skepticism about the economics of the plan that has, at its heart, a unique and commercially untested process. “The economics are tough because the capital investment — at least for these first-of-a-kind plants — is very high,” Clay Wheeler, a professor with the University of Maine’s chemical and biological engineering department who researches biofuels, said.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

WIDC: Isn’t it good, Canadian wood?

By Bill Millard
The Architect’s Newspaper
March 3, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Timber was the obvious choice for the Wood Innovation and Design Centre (WIDC). This sturdy carbon-storing material is increasingly an alternative to concrete or steel in mid-rises and “plyscrapers.” For a province-owned building in Prince George, British Columbia, mandated to use local products, Michael Green Architecture (MGA) won the competition with a “dry structure” using no concrete slabs above grade (except one small vibration-controlling roof panel, notes project manager Mingyuk Chen) and deploying wood everywhere from posts and beams to mullions. …Materials include cross-laminated timber (CLT), mainly Douglas fir, for floor panels, shear walls, and core shafts and stairs; Douglas fir glulam for columns and most beams; laminated veneer lumber for the window mullions, entrance canopy, and feature stairs; parallel-strand lumber for load-transferring beams; and Western red cedar, charred or natural, for cladding.

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Using innovation to drive commercialization in B.C.’s forest sector

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 2, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The challenge is clear. While British Columbia’s forest sector has a distinct advantage in market development, there are untapped opportunities related to innovation. The Province is announcing today the launch of the Clean-Tech Innovation Strategy for the B.C. Forest Sector. The strategy, done in partnership with FPInnovations, will help maximize the value of B.C.’s forest resources while identifying innovative solutions to maintain and strengthen the sector… The strategy’s ultimate goal is to use innovation to drive commercialization and enhance the forest resource and product value. A recent example of innovation is the development of cross-laminated timber that is used to construct tall-wood buildings.

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Study answers questions about wood construction costs in Atlantic Canada

By Don Proctor
Daily Commercial News
March 6, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

The cost of building a six-storey wood building in Halifax is comparable to the tab for a similar structure in B.C., according to a study by Atlantic Wood WORKS!, a non-profit program of the Maritime Lumber Bureau that promotes the use of wood in commercial and multi-family construction. Study answers questions about wood construction costs in Atlantic Canada. The findings of the study, based on a five-storey wood mid-rise with a one-storey concrete podium constructed in Kamloops, B.C., are significant because they answer questions developers in Atlantic Canada have on the price to build a wood mid-rise, says Patrick Crabbe, project co-ordinator with Atlantic Wood WORKS!… The first all-wood mid-rise in Atlantic Canada is expected to start in Dartmouth, N.S. this year, he says.

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Local deconstruction crew one-third of the way done on Mercantile project

By David Erickson
The Missoulian
March 3, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

“It’s the best I’ve ever seen.” That’s how Jason Nuckolls describes the quality of timber he and his crew have found so far inside of the Missoula Mercantile building. Nuckolls is the deconstruction manager at Home ReSource, a local nonprofit that salvages and resells building materials. He and his crew are in the midst of the largest project they’ve ever undertaken – the deconstruction of the 80,000-square-foot Missoula Mercantile, and he estimates they’re already 30 percent to 40 percent done… Nuckolls estimates that there will be “hundreds of thousands” of linear feet of timber removed from the building. “It will go into a lot of residential and commercial projects around the area,” he said. “These materials have been important to the community for a long time, and now they’ll be used in a different way.”

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