Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 30, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Michael Green and the case for tall wood buildings

March 30, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Yesterday’s executive order rescinding several Obama-era initiatives that “sought to prepare the country for the impacts of climate change” heightens our attention on how forests may be impacted and adapt to a warming climate. New research by NRCan suggests the environments of most parks and protected areas across North America are “on the move” and will “shift more than 1,000 kilometres by the end of the century”, while researchers at the University of Maine say that as winters warm in the Northeast “25% of the hemlock trees are at a high risk of decline”

BC’s Envoy David Emerson says “there is a window of opportunity” for an early resolution of the softwood lumber dispute but that “continued turbulence in the administration and strong protectionist sentiments” are a barrier and having it “wrapped up in a bigger NAFTA negotiation would cause it to be dragged out for multiple years.”

Lloyd Alter has a great update (with instructional videos) on the “remarkable last five years of architect Michael Green” and his new book “THE CASE FOR Tall Wood BUILDINGS: How Mass Timber Offers a Safe, Economical, and Environmentally Friendly Alternative for Tall Building Structures”.

Finally, the BC Government has announced the appointment of retired MLA George Abbott as the “independent facilitator overseeing the Contractor Sustainability Review”, a long-time concern of the Truck Loggers Association.

–Tree Frog Editors

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Special Feature

Canadian Forest Service Research Aimed at Keeping Asian Gypsy Moth out of British Columbia

By Lara Van Akker, Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada
Natural Resources Canada
March 30, 2017
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Every year, thousands of Asian ships arrive on the coast of British Columbia carrying everything from cars and steel to containers of running shoes. Occasionally some unintended cargo also arrives in the form of Asian gypsy moth egg masses hiding on the ship’s hulls and in the nooks and crannies of shipping containers. While ship inspections and certification programs run by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) catch most of these stowaways, the system is not perfect and every so often some gypsy moths make it onto Canadian trees. The permanent establishment of Asian gypsy moth (AGM) populations in Canada would gravely impact Canada’s forests, biodiversity and economy so Dr. Brian Van Hezewijk and Kaitlyn Schurmann are developing a new type of risk mapping system that will help detect these invaders and eradicate populations before they grow to unmanageable sizes.

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Forestry

George Abbott to facilitate Contractor Sustainability Review

By Brenda Martin
Truck Loggers Association
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver – Following through on Premier Christy Clark’s commitment at the TLA’s 74th Annual Convention & Trade Show, the provincial government announced today that George Abbott, along with his partners at Circle Square Solutions, will be the independent facilitator overseeing the Contractor Sustainability Review. “We’re pleased to have an independent facilitator with so much experience working with industry and communities,” said David Elstone, TLA Executive Director. “The Contractor Sustainability Review is the most significant piece of work to affect timber harvesting contractors in almost 20 years and George Abbott is the kind of experienced person we need take on this challenge.” Abbott has had a long and distinguished career in politics and public service, serving in many ministerial positions. 

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B.C. gives over $1.8 million in grants to fight invasive plants

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government is handing out over $1.8 million in new grants to help control the spread of invasive plants in the province, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson and Minister of State for Rural Economic Development Donna Barnett announced today. The 31 grants are being distributed to regional invasive species committees, local governments and the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia to support their ongoing work to deal with the unwelcome plants and to support the objectives of the provincial Invasive Plant Program. Over the next three years, the B.C. government is committing over $20 million to invasive plant management. Invasive plants are species that have been introduced into British Columbia from other areas. 

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Environmental group concerned about forested area south of Nanaimo

By Karl Yu
Nanaimo News Bulletin
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A grassroots group is expressing concern about the fate of 24 hectares of forested land in the Cedar and Yellow Point roads area. A subsidary company of Coastland Wood Industries purchased the property and the recently formed Yellow Point Community Forest Society is worried it could be logged. The society said of of its associates has made an offer to the company to purchase the land above asking price, but Coastland has asked for more time to explore other options. Jain Alcock-White, society spokeswoman, said its main concern is uncertainty. “They are aware it’s a community concern. It’s an environmental issue,” said Alcock-White. “To log this piece of property would have serious consequences. The property drains directly into the ecological reserve and into Yellow Point Park on one side. It drains down into Giovando Lake and into Quennell Lake on the other side.”

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Fire crews battle blaze at Point Pelee National Park

CBC News
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Officials kept Canada’s southern-most national park under complete lockdown Wednesday night as firefighters carefully managed a wildfire that slowly burned through an expansive area of marshland. Nearby residents drove to Point Pelee National Park, just outside Leamington, Ont., and got as close as they could, watching as flames danced along the dark and distant horizon and a wall of smoke billowed into the sky. …Fire crews protected the boardwalk, which snakes through the normally picturesque marshland, but there wasn’t much else they needed to do. Parks Canada policies allow natural fires like this one to continue burning. “Anything that’s natural like that, it’s just part of the ecosystem, so that’s why it’s burned off,” said Leamington fire Chief Chuck Parsons.

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Woodlot owners seek assistance

By John J. Rowe, Chairman, P.E.I. Woodlot Owners Association
The Prince Edward Island Guardian
March 30, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Can we stop climate change? It’s hard to know for sure but we can certainly mitigate the effects and slow the process. How? Plant more trees and use more silviculture to help forests grow faster. About half of the mass of a tree is stored carbon. Trees store carbon in the cells of their tissues (wood), as well as in the leaves and roots below the surface. Simply put, a tree is a “carbon-storing machine.” When trees are used for products, carbon is locked up. …Did you know there are over 15,000 woodlot owners in the province of Prince Edward Island? And there are nearly a half million woodlot owner families in Canada? …What we need is for Government, both provincial and federal, to increase support for silviculture and tree planting programs in private woodlots. Woodlot owners have the will and the skills needed to nurture trees to maturity, but it costs money.

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Fight to save trees begins

By Matt Vis
The Chronicle Journal
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

As Thunder Bay prepares to implement the first year of its emerald ash borer management plan, the city can look to another Ontario municipality to see the benefits of a proactive approach. Last year Thunder Bay city council voted to adopt a 10-year, $6.3 million strategy to save a significant number of the city’s ash trees from the invasive beetle, which has been making its way across North America after being first detected in the Windsor, Ont. area in 2002. City urban forest program specialist Rena Viehbeck said the emerald ash borer was found in Thunder Bay for the first time last summer. “The finds we’ve found are very low infestations, low population numbers,” Viehbeck said.

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Growing an interest in urban forestry for Toronto women

By Sarah-Joyce Battersby
Metro Vancouver
March 30, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Kat Berton can deal with the heavy lifting involved in her dream job of urban forestry. What she can’t deal with is the misogyny. The 25-year-old says she’s heard “some nasty opinions” while out in the field and sometimes feels underestimated when it comes to the physical labour of tree planting…It’s attitudes like that she was happy to escape when she took part in the Young Urban Forest Leader program run by LEAF, a non-profit dedicated to nurturing Toronto’s trees. The summer-long mentorship program primes young women for a career in the field, whether in academia, as arborists, or working with municipalities or agencies.According to Statistics Canada, 82 per cent of forestry and logging workers were men in 2016, with 39,600 men compared to just over 8,500 women.

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WestFor presents at Digby municipal council on business, its methods

By Sara Ericsson
The Digby Courier
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

DIGBY, NS – A major forestry industry player presented Mar. 28 at Digby Municipal Council regarding their practices, including controversial clearcutting methods, on crown lands. Marcus Zwicker, General Manager of WestFor, presented to Digby Municipal Council and spoke about the company’s general practices. “I’m sure you’re all aware of what WestFor may or may not be,” he said. The presentation involved numbers regarding how much crown land WestFor cuts annually, and the percentage of clearcuts. Over 2.1 million acres of land in Nova Scotia is owned by the province, meaning it is crowned land. WestFor manages 1.25 million acres of this. 52 per cent of wood from this territory in 2016 was harvested via clearcutting methods.

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When conservation measures help preserve and create logging jobs at Mount Shasta

By Jane Braxton Little
The Sacramento Bee
March 30, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Mount Shasta presides over the Northern California landscape, a towering spiritual presence that attracts poets, presidents and healers seeking harmony in its aura. Today the mountain is casting its spell on the land itself. While most of the nation is facing a divisive assault on the environment led by the president, the Mount Shasta region is experiencing a surge of grass-roots agreements as anomalous as they are unifying: ? Timber companies are forming partnerships with a progressive conservation think-tank. ? Private forestlands rich with wildlife and natural springs are gaining permanent protection from development. ? Supporting both are a multinational bottling company and the Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors. And most surprising of all: The combination of conservation measures is preserving and creating jobs in one of the state’s most economically depressed areas.

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Area entities pose united front for forest funding

By Katy Nesbitt
The Observer
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ENTERPRISE — One of Northeastern Oregon’s largest employers is garnering support in its effort to persuade leaders in Salem and Washington, D.C. to adequately fund the U.S. Forest Service’s budget. Wallowa and Union counties, along with a handful of industry advocates, have signed on to a white paper drafted by Boise Cascade of La Grande asking Oregon’s Gov. Kate Brown to use her influence to convince the U.S. Congress to appropriate forest restoration funding that would help each of the Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla national forests harvest 75 million board feet a year. Lindsay Warness of Boise Cascade said an adhoc working group, dubbed the Northern Blue Mountains Coalition, wants to see the same results on the Wallowa-Whitman and Umatilla national forests as the Malheur National Forest. Increased forest staffing on the Malheur helped bring harvest up to an average of approximately 69 million board feet per year since 2013.

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Logging and fire myths

By George Wuerthner of Bend, ecologist
Ashland Daily Tidings
March 30, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Recently the Forest Service reported with great alarm that more than 100 million trees had died in the southern Sierra Nevada. The agency suggested that this tree mortality would greatly enhance wildfire risk, and of course, proposed that more logging was the cure. We hear the same refrain in Oregon. There are several problems with all the hype over dying trees. For instance, the assertion that these dead trees will increase fire risk is false. …Why? Because fires are driven by fine fuels. Not big boles. That is why you have snags left after a fire. What burns is the pine needles, small branches, etc. The larger pieces of wood don’t readily burn. And when the trees die from drought, bark beetles and disease, fuels are reduced. …The timber industry and its advocates continue to promote several myths designed to garner public support for increased logging.

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Freeman optimistic about new administration after Washington, D.C. trip

By Carisa Cegavske
The Oregon News-Review
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The federal government is finally listening. That’s how Douglas County Commissioner Tim Freeman felt during a recent trip to Washington, D.C., where he visited with officials from the Interior Department. Freeman, who is also president of the Association of O&C Counties, attended a National Association of Counties conference in late February and early March. He was there to raise awareness of the challenges Douglas and other rural Oregon counties face when it comes to federal land management. On Freeman’s mind was the Bureau of Land Management’s unwillingness to harvest timber at a level he argues is required by the 1937 O&C Act. …During his recent trip, Freeman had a rare opportunity to share those concerns with some of the nation’s top policymakers.

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Petersburg residents ask tough questions on Mental Health land exchange

By Joe Viechnicki
KTOO
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Alaska Mental Health Trust Land Office representatives faced some tough questions about a proposed land exchange between the Trust and the U.S. Forest Service in Petersburg last week. The Mental Health Trust Authority owns lands in Petersburg it wants to swap for Tongass National Forest acreage elsewhere in the region. Resulting timber sales would raise money for the Trust. …“Get out of your back yard and be a little bit more remote,” said Paul Slenkamp, senior resource manager with the Trust Land Office. That office is part of the Alaska Department of Natural Resources and manages lands for the Authority. He presented arguments for the exchange to about a dozen people in Petersburg. “We believe this will help protect jobs both in the timber industry, which is very beleaguered which you may be aware of, and also in the tourism industry by preserving some of the backdrops and viewsheds of the local communities, specifically Ketchikan and Petersburg,” Slenkamp said.

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Climate change threatens Maine’s lumber industry

Associated Press WCSH
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ORONO, Maine – Researchers with the University of Maine say hemlock trees will be at risk of accelerated decline as winters warm in the Northeast. The university says an estimated 26 percent of the region’s groups of hemlock trees are at high risk of decline. They are threatened by a warming climate and an invasive pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid. A team of researchers led by UMaine professor of forest resources William Livingston says that figure could get worse. The researchers say 43 percent of hemlock tree groups will be at risk as winters get warmer. Eastern hemlocks are towering trees that live from southern Canada to Alabama. They can live to be more than 500 years old. The trees have economic value as they’re used in the lumber industry.

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Extremely rare Indochinese tiger cubs spotted in Thai jungle, fuelling hopes they may evade extinction

By Kaweewit Kaewjinda
Associated Press in the National Post
March 29, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

BANGKOK — Conservationists say they have evidence that the critically endangered Indochinese tiger is breeding in a Thai jungle, giving hope for the survival of an animal whose total population may be less than 300. Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation along with two private organizations announced Tuesday they have photographic evidence of new tiger cubs in eastern Thailand, supporting a scientific survey that confirmed the existence of the world’s second breeding population of the tigers. The other breeding ground is in the Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary in western Thailand. …The statement noted the tigers’ “remarkable resilience given wildlife poaching and illegal rosewood logging” in the eastern jungle. “The Thai forestry department proved that with protection you can not only bring tigers back, but now the western forest complex, specifically Huai Kha Khaeng, is a global model of tiger conservation,” Alan Rabinowitz…

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Forestry in focus at Feilding conference

By Laurel Stowell
New Zealand Herald
March 30, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The use of drones in forest harvesting and the control of some “spectacular” erosion will be subjects in the 2017 New Zealand Farm Forestry Association conference in Feilding next month. The annual conference is hosted by the Middle Districts Farm Forestry Association and runs from April 6-10 with talks and field days. It’s based at the Feilding Civic Centre. Forestry is doing well at present, with a single hectare of 25-30-year old pines worth up to $50,000. The theme of the conference is “the challenge of diverse land forms” and it ranges from the terraces around Feilding, out to the coastal sand country and inland to eroding Pohangina hills.

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Company & Business News

US Senators are watching Canadian exports like hawks: Envoy

By Kyle Balzer
My Prince George Now
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

BC’s Envoy to the United States David Emerson…says American Senators have made things difficult to deal with, which could mean a longer timeline on reaching an agreement. “If there’s going to be a successful negotiation, the first thing that has to happen is that the President’s office needs to be enthusiastic about negotiating. The loss on Obamacare is going to create a different kind of dynamic.” He says their “hawk-ish” behaviour has made it hard to determine what’s important to both parties, especially during the on-going investigation into Canada’s lumber exports….Having softwood lumber wrapped up in a bigger NAFTA negotiation would cause it to be dragged out for multiple years.”

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Tax phase-in approved for West Fraser plant

By John Hopkins-Hill
Hinton Parklander
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Denise Parent, director of corporate services, presented a request from Hinton Pulp, a division of West Fraser Mills, for a tax phase-in on the new lignin plant in Hinton to council on March 21. The proposal calls for 20 per cent increases annually starting in 2017 and going until 2021, when full property taxes will be paid on the facility. The idea was first presented at the standing committee meeting on March 14, where the proposal was directed to council for a formal decision. West Fraser is the largest taxpayer in Hinton, accounting for nearly 30 per cent of the municipal tax base. There have been four previous similar agreements between Hinton and West Fraser, with the most recent taking place in 2011.

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Slight opportunity to negotiate new softwood lumber deal with U.S.: B.C. envoy

Canadian Press in The Globe and Mail
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – British Columbia’s softwood trade envoy says there’s a slight opportunity to quickly negotiate a new lumber agreement between Canada and the United States, but if a deal can’t be reached by the summer or fall it could mean a lengthy fight. David Emerson said Wednesday he sensed a chance at a deal but also saw continued turbulence in the administration of President Donald Trump and strong protectionist sentiments in the US Congress after visiting Washington, DC, last week. “My own guess is there is a window of opportunity, late summer or early fall, and if that doesn’t initiate something meaningful in terms of negotiations then I think we’re probably into next year,” he said. Emerson said there has not been a formal start to talks, but Canadian officials in Washington and Ottawa are preparing for negotiations. He said he met with David MacNaughton, Canada’s ambassador to the US, last week as well as officials at Canada’s embassy and Global Affairs Canada.

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TimberWest pledges $100000 to the new North Island Hospitals

TimberWest
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

CAMPBELL RIVER / COMOX VALLEY – TimberWest is announcing a $100,000 contribution towards the new North Island Hospital to add cultural elements to support the joint effort that is underway by Island Health, First Nations Health Authority, and the Aboriginal communities of the North Island in creating a healthcare setting that is welcoming and reflective of the environment and traditional territories within which the two campuses of the North Island Hospital are situated. “The North Island Hospitals Project respects the values, culture and history of local First Nations and Aboriginal Peoples,’ said Comox Valley MLA Don McRae. “On behalf of the provincial government, I thank TimberWest for this donation, which will go towards providing a healing environment for patients and families within the North Island Hospital, which is opening this fall.”

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Quebec Budget 2017 – FPInnovations Announces its Support

By Terry Knee
FPInnovations
March 28, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Montreal, Quebec  – FPInnovations is pleased with the announcements made today by Quebec Finance Minister, Carlos Leitão, in his 2017-18 Budget to increase innovation and diversification of forest products. An amount of $46 million is allocated to the forestry sector, confirming the contribution announced by Ministers Blanchette and Anglade on March 16, 2017, and enabling the creation of a new initiative for the panel industry, in addition to improving the program Innovation Bois, as presented at the Forum Innovation Bois. Specifically, an amount of $4 million over four years for the implementation of an innovation platform to support and accelerate the development of next-generation composite panels and engineered wood products was granted to the sector. The platform is aimed at placing Quebec’s industry at the forefront of innovative businesses that are creating products, applications and processes, and developing markets.

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Recollections of a mill closure

Northern Ontario Business
March 30, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

The oral history of the closure of the Sturgeon Falls paper mill will be the subject of a lecture by Concordia history professor Steven High at Nipissing University in North Bay, April 3. High is the author of a prize-winning book, Industrial Sunset: the Making of North America’s Rust Belt and Corporate Wasteland: The Landscape and Memory of Deindustrialization, as well as many other books and articles. Weyerhaeuser closed the corrugated paper mill in December 2002, eliminating 140 jobs.  The former MacMillan Bloedel mill was the industrial cornerstone of the northeastern Ontario town, located 20 minutes west of North Bay. At its peak in the 1960s, the mill employed 600, but production was steadily reduced over the years until its 2002 shuttering by Weyerhaeuser, which had acquired the mill in 1999.

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Biomass firm settles with loggers, wants PUC to defer its subsidy payments

By James McCarthy
Maine Biz
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

Stored Solar, the biomass generator scheduled to receive state subsidies at its plants in West Enfield and Jonesboro over the next two years, has settled with loggers who claimed they were not being paid. The company also told state regulators it would like to rework its share of a two-year subsidy agreement to defer the actual payments until it demonstrates in-state benefits are actually achieved. …In mid-March, following allegations by the Professional Logging Contractors of Maine that some loggers had not been paid, the PUC asked Stored Solar to provide a full financial accounting of its West Enfield and Jonesboro facilities and “the status of any payment obligation to suppliers, contractors or employees.” In a March 27 letter replying to the PUC, Stored Solar Vice President William Harrington told regulators the nonpayment issue had been resolved.

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UPM and Tornator sign forestry land sales and wood supply agreements

By UPM Kymmene Corporation
Global Newsire
March 30, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

UPM, Helsinki – UPM and Tornator PLC have today signed a letter of intent on forestry land sales and long-term wood supply. Tornator will annually sell a significant volume of wood from their forests to UPM mills in Eastern Finland. Additionally, the companies have agreed on forestry land sales covering 23,000 hectares of UPM-owned forest estates in North Karelia to be sold to Tornator. The forests are located in the municipalities of Ilomantsi, Juuka, Lieksa and Polvijärvi and they are both PEFC(TM) and FSC® certified (FSC C 109750). The parties have agreed not to disclose the value of the agreements. “Our mills in Eastern Finland use all wood assortments and Tornator owns a significant number of FSC certified (FSC C 123368) forests in their vicinity with a versatile range of tree species”, says Sauli Brander, SVP, UPM Wood Sourcing and Forestry.

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Global Timber and Wood Products Market Update

By Hakan Ekstrom
Wood Resources International LLC
March 29, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

New record high for globally traded wood chips in 2016 with the Pacific Rim accounting for 70% of total imports followed by Finland, Sweden and Turkey, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. Over the past 15 years, global trade of wood chips has gone up almost 75%, mainly because of major expansion of pulp capacity in China, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. By far the two largest importing countries are China and Japan, followed by Finland, Sweden and Turkey. Global trade of wood chips has seen spectacular development the past 15 years with a steady increase of about four percent annually (volumes year-over-year were up 11 of the past 14 years), according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ)

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Climate change moving park ecosystems out from current zones: study

Canadian Press in the Cape Breton Post
March 29, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

EDMONTON — Government research suggests the environments of parks and protected areas across North America are being shifted hundreds of kilometres away through climate change.  The published research from Natural Resources Canada finds the ecosystems of nearly 80 per cent of those areas in Canada, the United States and Mexico are on the move. The most affected areas are in Canada, where climate zones in many parks are expected to shift more than 1,000 kilometres by the end of the century. Report author Marc-Andre Parisien says his research should change how new parks are planned. He says they should be created to link with current parks, so species have a path to get to new areas. END OF STORY

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Michael Green goes way beyond tall wood

By Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
March 29, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Five years ago, when I last interviewed architect Michael Green, he had not yet built a tall wood building. In fact, there were not many of them anywhere, but Michael had just written the book on it with the very long title: THE CASE FOR Tall Wood BUILDINGS: How Mass Timber Offers a Safe, Economical, and Environmentally Friendly Alternative for Tall Building Structures. What a remarkable five years it has been. Now wood buildings are going up all over the world, with hundreds more of them on the boards. Michael Green has been busy, speaking in thirty countries, building in cities all over the world.He was in the Toronto area recently for the Tall Wood Symposium, reminding the audience that the entire industry is a mess: “Affordability, safety, climate change, environment, practice, all at a level of existential crisis.”

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New kind of timber boom could be coming to Oregon

By Keely Chalmers
KGW.com
March 29, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West


PORTLAND, Ore. — A new kind of timber boom could be coming to Oregon, and it could bring jobs, millions of dollars, and a new kind of wood product. It’s called cross-laminated timber, or CLT for short. Some call it the next big thing in construction. CLT is made from wood planks that are cross hatched, glued and then pressed together. The wood is so strong it can be used instead of concrete or even steel. This week, builders and architects from around the world are meeting in Portland for a conference focusing on cross-laminated timber. It’s the second year in a row Portland has been home to the International Mass Timber conference. Amanda Welker with Business Oregon says the Beaver State is poised to become a leader in this green-building technology.

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Wells Wood Turning Supplies Wooden Eggs for White House Buckfield company manufactures eggs for annual White House Easter Egg Roll

By Wells Wood Turning
Bangor Daily News
March 29, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

BUCKFIELD, ME – We are very pleased to announce that Wells Wood Turning & Finishing will again supply the colorful Maine-made wooden eggs for the 2017 White House Easter Egg Roll. “As new owners of Wells Wood Turning and Finishing, we are simply delighted to provide the eggs again,” said Simon Varney, vice president and co-owner of the company. “We recognize that it’s a bit of a challenge for a new White House to deal with myriad transition details, but our staff has been very responsive and is highly experienced in moving the eggs through the mill.” …Manufacturing the eggs is a multi-step process that involves turning each piece from yellow birch on a high-capacity lathe machine, trimming the ends for shape, sanding, barrel painting with various colors and then rapidly printing images and signatures, in different ink colors, on each side of the eggs.

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Trending: Nike, Britvic Using Recycled Drink Containers, Wood Fiber to Revolutionize Packaging

Sustainable Brands
March 29, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The development of innovative packaging solutions continues to help brands reduce impact and drive future growth. …Meanwhile, Innovate UK and Natural Resources (2000) Ltd have joined forces with soft drink manufacturer Britvic, to develop packaging derived from sustainably sourced wood fiber materials. The company focused much of its 2016 R&D efforts on advancing the wood fiber packaging technology. The research process into fiber and pulp has provided essential information for Britvic to further explore alternative packaging solutions going forward. … “The wood fiber bottle is a great example of what potentially can be done and its development has provided great insight into what will and won’t work in terms of quality standards and mass production in the future. We’re now working hard to take our learnings from the fiber bottle to investigate fiber-based sustainable packaging materials further.”

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Germany’s wood detectives

Deutsche Welle
March 29, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

How can you tell if mahogany is really mahogany? And can you really know whether the wood in your table wasn’t illegally felled? Germany’s wood detectives are on the case with DNA analysis [VIDEO]

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General

Bridging the gap between agriculture and forestry

By Andrew Arbuckle
The Scotsman
March 29, 2017
Category: Uncategorised
Region: International

Farming and forestry have traditionally been at odds over the use of land but moves are being made to bridge the gap by increased forestry grants for landowners facing an otherwise uncertain rural future. Specialists from Scotland’s Rural College have urged farmers and land managers in the north of Scotland to think hard about how woodlands could fit into their future plans and what recent changes in the Scottish Government grants available could mean for them. Many areas of the Highlands would benefit from woodland cover… “In essence the forestry grant scheme payments for these have been increased by £400 per hectare, with additional help for deer fencing and bracken control,” he said.

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