Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 10, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

COFI conference wraps while forest fire season kicks-off

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 10, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Leading off today’s news is a wrap of COFI’s successful conference held in Vancouver last week. In her summary, CEO Susan Yurkovich walks us through all the speakers and panels in sequence and sums up the proceeding saying “this industry has a proud history and a bright future” and “although we have our challenges, I am incredibly optimistic about the opportunities ahead”


Not surprisingly, media coverage focused on the softwood discussions and in particular comments made by Canada’s chief negotiator Kirsten Hillman, BC Envoy David Emerson and BC Premier Christy Clark. Hillman stated that the stage is set for
“a period of pain for Canadian forestry workers and communities”, but that because “the US is not able to supply their own market, conditions are good to get a strong deal”. Emerson was blunt saying that “it’s about greed not timber pricing”, while Clark was more hopeful for a deal under Trump than Obama given his “background in construction and understanding of the impact the cost of materials has on a finished product”. 

Although it seems like Spring hasn’t arrived in many part of the continent, the number of forest fire stories suggests that’s not ubiquitous. Forest fires broke out in eastern Kentucky and mandatory evacuations were required just outside of Orlando (Chuluota) as crews battled a 30-acre wildfire. Also, a collection of essays is being published, “
telling the many stories of evacuation and re-entry during last year’s devastating wildfire in Fort Murray”.

Finally, the BC government announced the formation of a Wood Secretariat to help grow the value-added sector under the co-leadership of Ken Kalesnikoff, CEO of Kalesnikoff Lumber.

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Special Feature

COFI Conference Wrap up – Forestry for the Planet. Forest Products for the World

Susan Yurkovich, President and CEO, BC Council of Forest Industries
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 9, 2017
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

We kicked off yesterday with Minister Thomson talking about some of the work his Ministry has undertaken, some of accomplishments during his tenure and with what still lies ahead.

Jock Finlayson followed with a snapshot of the global outlook. He reminded us that it is the growing middle class that is really driving and shaping the global economic environment. And that has implications for all of us. He provided an overview of some of the key economic metrics including the changes he sees occurring and the uncertainty that exists. He provided an overview of some of the key economic metrics including the changes he sees occurring and the uncertainty that exists. He reminded us that, while we may have concerns about a Trump administration, the prospect of interest rates or relatively modest housing growth, our real concern should be the erosion of our competitive position here in BC, if this is not addressed over time.
Our international markets panel looked at four geographic areas. Paul Jannke shared an update on the housing market in the US and the drivers that effect the timing and pace of that recovery. That recovery is in its infancy, in the range of 100,000 units per year, due to a combination of shortages of both labour and building lots, other relative concentration of income gains and difficulties getting mortgages, but he sees a sustained period of growth ahead.
Click the Read More for the full story.

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B.C. premier more hopeful for softwood lumber deal under Trump than Obama

By Gordon Omand
Canadian Press in CTV News
April 7, 2017
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — Canada is more likely to reach a lasting solution for the softwood lumber trade dispute with the United States now that President Donald Trump is in power instead of Barack Obama, says British Columbia Premier Christy Clark. Speaking to a forestry conference in Vancouver on Friday, Clark said the new president has a background in construction and understands the impact the cost of materials has on a finished product. It would have been hard to do any worse than the previous president when it comes to softwood lumber, she added. “My experience has been that the Obama administration was not particularly interested in getting a softwood deal,” Clark told reporters after delivering her keynote address.

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Forestry

Why BC forests need a Lorax or two

By Daniela Ginta
CFJC Today Kamloops
April 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Why would our provincial government allow for mutilation of forests without employing what researchers now know about the forests; the importance of saving ‘mother trees’ as well as disrupting as little as possible of the forest ecosystem by logging selectively, which translates into healthy forests that can withstand climate change, disease and pest challenges. That our precious forests are being clear cut without even maintaining a roster of forestry jobs in the province, and instead raw logs are being exported in quantities that exceed the power of many people’s imagination. . …If every forestry person would read that book or watch what UBC-based Dr. Suzanne Simard shares about the preservation of ‘mother trees’ and the risks of second-growth forests, (a remarkable TED talk), that can help us all have a good shot at a better future. Either way, something has to change, and soon.

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Wildfire writers: Fort McMurray’s forest fire book boom

CBC News
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When a wildfire in May forced the evacuation of Fort McMurray, everyone who escaped the flames had a story to tell. Almost a year later some of those harrowing stories are making their way onto bookshelves. In the last couple of months several authors have launched books chronicling the devastating forest fire which forced over 80,000 people to flee and is now considered one of Canada’s costliest insured disasters. Diana Moser, communications and program manager for Arts Council Wood Buffalo, said she’s seeing an upsurge in people putting their stories in writing since the wildfire. “There’s definitely been a boom in expression in the literary form for sure,” Moser said. “It’s really interesting to see that expression come together and come out, especially in books.”

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Cody Caves under threat from proposed logging

Letter by Maurice de St Jorre, Friends of West Kootenay Parks
Nelson Star
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Cody Caves system, a classic example of karst limestone solution formation, is protected by a BC Provincial Park that covers the cave entrance and surface expression of the known limits to the cave. During the 1990s, the B.C. government made a review of its park system. One significant outcome of this review was what is described as a “Goal 2” objective. … Recently, Cooper Creek Cedar, a local logging company, has submitted plans for two cut blocks, one of which encompasses most of this Goal 2 area without prior notice to BC Parks. This logging is scheduled to take place this spring. The issue here is twofold. Firstly, if this logging happens without any inter-ministry consultation taking place, it means the whole Goal 2 process is valueless. …Secondly, looking at the Cody Caves situation in isolation, it is a choice between short term and long term benefits.

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Islanders asked for feedback on community forest shared with BC Timber Sales

By Andrew Hudson
Haida Gwaii Observer
April 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

If local control falls in a community forest, is it still a sound idea? Islands loggers, sawmill owners, and community leaders debated that question last week while discussing the latest plan for a Haida Gwaii Community Forest. It’s not formal yet, but as early as April or May, the B.C. Ministry of Forests could offer Haida Gwaii villages an area-based forestry tenure of 80,000 cubic metres per year. Spread over six units that include the Drizzle/Watt/Loon Lakes area and smaller areas near Tlell, Queen Charlotte, Skidegate Lake, Peel Inlet, and Tasu, it could generate roughly $200,000 to $500,000 a year for community benefits.

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B.C. increases investment in Cariboo grassland and forest restoration

By The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Operations
Government of British Columbia
April 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Province has awarded $60,000 to the Fraser Basin Council to help restore ecosystems in the Cariboo, Coralee Oakes, MLA for Cariboo North, and Donna Barnett, MLA for Cariboo-Chilcotin, announced today on behalf of Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson. The funding is an increase from last year’s $52,000 grant and will support the work of the Cariboo-Chilcotin Ecosystems Restoration Steering Committee as it oversees, promotes and supports the restoration of grasslands in the region.  Ecosystem restoration involves logging, thinning and slashing excess trees from grassland and open forest sites. Once the trees are removed, the area is carefully burned, which replicates natural wildfire and creates the environmental conditions that encourage the growth of native grasses and shrubs.

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Interior Health — Time to talk ticks

April 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the temperature begins to rise, so will the number of tick bites said Interior Health in a media release Friday. The increase in bites generally comes as people begin spending more time outdoors in tall grass or wooded areas. “Ticks are small bugs that feed on the blood of humans and animals and can sometimes transmit disease,” the media release said. “Ticks are most often found in tall grass and wooded areas, so covering up before you head outdoors and checking for ticks on yourself, your children, and your pets after being outdoors, are simple things that go a long way to prevent tick bites.” Interior Health said the most common tick species in our region is the Wood Tick (Dermacentor andersoni), which is not known to carry the Lyme disease bacteria. “The Wood Tick can carry other diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, although it is very rare.

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Early start to Sask. wildfire season expected

Canadian Press in CBC News
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Provincial Wildfire Centre in Saskatchewan is expecting an early start to wildfire activity in some areas of the province. The west side of the province is drier than the east, but the director of the centre says there are a lot of crops left out on the east side, and farmers may burn them off. The wildfire season in Saskatchewan runs from April 1 to Oct. 31. So far, there have only been two reported fires in the province this year. The overall amount dedicated to wildfire management in Saskatchewan went down in the 2017-2018 provincial budget, released last month, from $73,887 to $67,534.

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Logging Lantzville: Small town fights to save local forest

By Jon Hernandez
CBC News
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Every day, Ted Gullison,of Lantzville, B.C. walks his dog in the woods near his small town on Vancouver Island. The forest is carved with paths that many of the town’s residents use for hiking, horse back riding, and even dirt biking Gullison, an ecologist, often marvels at some of the “veteran” trees that rule the woods. The only problem — the forest is regularly logged, and the conservationist fears that the towering coastal Douglas fir trees could soon be lost forever. And he’s not the only one who’s concerned. Dozens of community members have banded together, spawning the Save Lantzville Forest movement. The group is calling on the provincial government to conserve part of the woods. But the requests have fallen on deaf ears.

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Quebec Cree’s campaign to save ancestral forest goes global

By Les Perreaux
The Globe and Mail
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A northern Quebec Cree nation has gone global with the struggle to preserve one of the province’s last pristine forests and the strategy appears to be paying early dividends. The Quebec government sent the Waswanipi Cree nation a letter last month inviting leaders to set out their expectations for protecting a remaining slice of their ancestral hunting ground in the Broadback Forest, according to Deputy Chief Mandy Gull. The forest in the James Bay area is full of mature trees and is a key habitat for the endangered Woodland Caribou. Talks with the government had been dormant for nearly two years, Ms. Gull said.

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Time to finalize Elliott State Forest sale

By Timm Slater and Debbie Fromdahl, Bay and Roseburg Chambers of Commerce
The News-Review
April 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

For more than two years, the Oregon State Land Board, Oregon Department of State Lands and Oregon Legislature have engaged the public and each other in a discussion about the future of the Elliott State Forest. A forest created by the state, and required by the Oregon Constitution, to generate revenue to help fund Oregon schools. …Acknowledging its Constitutional responsibility, the Land Board recognized, unanimously, the necessity of selling the forest land and investing the proceeds to generate positive cash flow required to support our schools….In response to the State Land Board decision, entities from our communities came together and submitted a proposal to purchase the Elliott State Forest, keeping the forest in local, Oregon-based ownership. We support and are appreciative of the favorable vote at the Feb. 14 State Land Board meeting to accept and move this proposal forward.

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State investigates landslide near Oso; some residents evacuate

By Rachel Lerman
The Seattle Times
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A stretch of Highway 530 will remain closed through the Monday morning commute as geologists continue to evaluate a landslide south of the highway near Oso in rural Snohomish County. Geologists from the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) were investigating the landslide Friday and Saturday, trying to get a sense of how fast it could be moving. Signs of a slide were first discovered Tuesday by state Department of Transportation workers, who noticed cracks on a hillside road. DNR workers investigated Friday and saw signs of movement. … …Survivors of the 2014 slide settled a civil case last fall for $60?million. The plaintiffs alleged that the state and a timber company had taken actions that increased the risks of a slide. Norman, the geologist, said a “limited amount of logging” had occurred in the 25-acre area of the slide.

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As Black Hills beetle epidemic ends, resiliency project begins

Rapid City Journal
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

U.S. Forest Service officials said this month that the 20-year mountain pine beetle epidemic in the Black Hills has officially ended, but that doesn’t mean their fight against the tree-killing insects is over. In fact, an effort to limit the damage from the next epidemic could begin soon. The new effort is called the Black Hills Resilient Landscapes Project, and the project manager is Anne Davy of the U.S. Forest Service. She said the millions of tree deaths during the beetle epidemic knocked conditions in the Black Hills National Forest “out of whack.” “When the infestation was so bad, we just needed to stop it,” Davy said. “We went out and dealt with that, and now we need to start moving things back in the right direction.” If the project is approved, forest managers will spend the next decade working to make the forest more resilient to beetles and wildfires.

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Increased revenue to flow from county timber

By Shaun Hall
Mail Tribune
April 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There’s gold in them hills. And green, too. Josephine County recently hit the jackpot when it discovered it had about twice as much annually harvestable timber as it thought. Now, it hopes to spend the windfall on juvenile justice programs. New surveys indicate the extra timber is available for harvest. “The county was going on old data,” said Dave Streeter, hired last year as forestry timber manager for the county. The county has about 30,000 acres of forest land, and new modeling shows sustainable annual harvests could be about 7.5 million board feet, compared with about 3.5 million board feet allowable under the outdated data. Bigger harvests, coupled with higher timber prices and management changes, could pump an extra $500,000 a year into the county’s coffers.

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Letter writer needs to check his facts on Wild Olympics criticism

Letter by Jerry Estberg, professor emeritus of physics at the University of San Diego
Peninsula Daily News
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Regarding the points that former Clallam County Commissioner Phillip Kitchel makes in his March 28 letter to Peninsula Voices [“No Wild Olympics”], he suffers from a failure to see the forest for the trees. Despite our human intentions, the clearly demonstrated intention of our forest ecosystem is to grow. …It also provides a valuable sink of carbon dioxide, which we humans are currently producing too much of in the Earth’s atmosphere. Phillip Kitchel neglects accounting for the value of this sink in the economic analysis presented in his letter. …For every ton of carbon dioxide removed from the atmosphere by our forests, we are saving the nation $40. …Phillip Kitchel’s efforts would be better directed toward increasing the Olympic National Forest reserves with proposals such as that for the Wild Olympics.

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California’s huge tree die-off expected to slow after wet winter

By Kurtis Alexander
San Francisco Chronicle
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

California’s extraordinarily wet winter didn’t just end the drought. It’s likely to mean a turnaround for the state’s dying forests. After five years of dry weather unleashed unparalleled havoc on trees from Yosemite to the Central Coast — leaving vast stands of pine too parched to fight pests and reducing entire mountainsides to browning wastelands — a forecast by the U.S. Forest Service suggests the die-off will slow this year. The projection, made public earlier this year, is short on specifics. But it mirrors the opinion of many forestry experts who say fewer trees will perish as rainy weather helps California’s woodlands regain their natural defenses against the ravenous bark beetle. “When we’ve had huge precipitation years, the mortality declines in the same or next year,” said Sheri Smith, a regional entomologist for the Forest Service. “It’s not like there isn’t going to be any new mortality, but we’re going to see a tremendous drop.”

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What’s up with wood piles?

By Michele Nelson
Payson Roundup
April 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Many in Rim Country wonder why wood piles created by thinning efforts litter the forest for years before the Forest Service burns them. On top of that, they don’t understand why the Forest Service creates more piles before burning old piles. Hellsgate Fire Chief John Wisner asked these questions at the annual County Collaborative Fire Meeting in late March. “What is the official word about piles in their community?” said Wisner. Jeremy Plain, Forest Service fire management officer, explained that disposing of piles is a complicated formula that includes years of curing, a perfect storm of weather conditions and money.

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Bruce Ward: Colorado’s Forest Crisis…The Wisdom of Recreation

By Jim Petersen
Evergreen Magazine
April 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bruce Ward is the Founder and President of Choose Outdoors, a Colorado-based coalition of outdoor recreation enthusiasts who work to increase public support for all forms of outdoor recreation, especially activities that frequently occur in National Forests: hiking, camping, backpacking, bicycling, skiing, snowmobiling hunting, fishing and recreational vehicle touring. He has worked closely with the U.S. Forest Service on the nearly 50- year tradition of bringing the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree to Washington, DC, at the request of the Speaker of the House of Representatives. … He is also an executive producer of America’s Forests with Chuck Leavell, airing on Oregon Public Broadcasting in April. … The series focuses on stories that demonstrate how important forests are to the well-being and economic health of communities across the country

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NW Wyoming forest plan receives competing criticism

Billings Gazette
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

JACKSON, Wyo. — Plans by the Bridger-Teton National Forest to thin and burn wildlands in northwest Wyoming have attracted competing arguments over tree cutting and other issues. The Wyoming State Forestry Division and some area government leaders have formally objected to prohibiting tree cutting in a proposed Palisades wilderness area abutting the west side of Jackson Hole. Meanwhile conservationists and some biologists are urging review of the region’s baseline wilderness suitability and more thorough study.

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Teton-to-Snake faces competing objections

By Mike Koshmrl
Jackson Hole News & Guide
April 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Bridger-Teton National Forest officials are being pulled hard in two directions as they try to finalize plans to thin and burn wildlands abutting the west side of Jackson Hole. Tugging on one side of the issue are the Wyoming State Forestry Division and a band of non-Teton County commissioners, who have formally objected to plans to keep chainsaws out of the Palisades until its in-limbo status as proposed wilderness is resolved by Congress. Conservationists and biologists, meanwhile, are yanking in the other direction, asking federal officials to complete a review of the region’s baseline wilderness suitability and better study the effects on wildlife and vegetation.

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Reducing fuel loads among a host of preservation tools

By Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County commissioner.
Idaho Statesman
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Readers should beware of ideological or political statements based on “overwhelming science” when the writer doesn’t provide responsible sources. A good example is Brett Haverstick’s March 24 guest opinion that claims science doesn’t support the management and restoration of forests in the face of catastrophic wildfire, insects and disease. There is plenty of peer-reviewed research that strongly supports the role of active management in improving and maintaining the health and resiliency of our forests. …In 2012, the Science-Based Risk Analysis Report, available at forestsandrangelands.gov, determined that “experience with fuels treatment projects has demonstrated the value of fuels reduction to reduce wildfire suppression costs and protect land and resources.” 

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Forest fires break out in Eastern Kentucky

WYMT.com
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PERRY COUNTY, Ky. – Officials with the Kentucky Division of Forestry were busy this weekend putting out forest fires across Eastern Kentucky. On Sunday, officials responded to a fire in the Jeff community in Perry County, which was getting close to homes. We are told it is five to ten acres in size. …Forestry officials say they responded to nine fires across the region this weekend, seven of which they believe were arson. “With low humidities, the heat, the wind … I’d advise everybody not to burn,” said Herman Slone, Regional Ranger with the Kentucky Division of Forestry.

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Surgoinsville couple’s property certified as Stewardship Forest

The Rogersville Review
April 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

SURGOINSVILLE — The Alan and Jean Soucy property near Surgoinsville was recently certified as a Stewardship Forest by the Tennessee Department of Agriculture’s Division of Forestry. Tennessee’s Forest Stewardship Program is designed to help landowners manage their forestland in ways to help meet desired objectives that they wish to receive from their land and to encourage practices that promote the overall health of the forest. The Division of Forestry provides written management plans to landowners at no cost to help them manage their property to achieve objectives such as: increasing timber production, promoting wildlife habitat, taking care of forest health concerns, improving forest recreation and aesthetics, and ensuring good water quality among other goals that they may have.

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Timber production, wildlife habitat can go together

By John Bartlett
Go Erie
April 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Tom Erdman spent 32 years hiking by invitation and with purpose the privately owned woodlands in Erie County. Until his retirement a year ago, Erdman was the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources service forester for Erie County. His job was to help landowners practice sustainable forestry and understand and meet their objectives. He saw a lot — some good and some not. His core advice for a woodland owner: “Talk to a forester before selling any timber.” …Erdman said for most landowners he worked with, timber production was a secondary concern. Their primary objective was an abundance of wildlife. But one is not exclusive of the other. “You can have both,” he said. And it doesn’t require large swaths of land. The average size parcel Erdman worked with was only about 30 acres.

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Support for Community Forestry

By the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry
Government of Maine
April 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

AUGUSTA – Project Canopy, the Maine Forest Service’s community forestry program, recently awarded $116,939 in grants to local governments and municipalities, educational institutions and non-profit organizations that support community efforts to develop and maintain long-term community forestry programs. In all, seventeen awards were made for planning/Education and planting/maintenance. The Project Canopy grants are funded by the U.S. Forest Service. “These awards support community forestry programs growing trees that both enhance quality of life and that have multiple uses in the Maine economy,” said Commissioner Walt Whitcomb. “Urban forestry can also help raise awareness of professional forest practices being practiced on a larger scale throughout Maine.

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Company & Business News

B.C. fighting for fair deal on softwood lumber

By Christy Clark, Premier of British Columbia.
The Vancouver Sun
April 9, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

There’s an old proverb — “The wind does not break a tree that bends.” In B.C., a province defined by nature and built on the forestry industry, we understand that very well. These days, the wind is blowing from the south — which means trouble for our founding industry. …The current softwood lumber dispute with the United States places many of those jobs — and the communities that depend on them — in jeopardy. That is why we are taking a stand to ensure united action. Yes, international trade agreements are a federal responsibility, but half of Canada’s softwood lumber exports to the U.S. come from B.C. So we are working closely with Ottawa to ensure that any future agreement considers B.C.’s interests. …To work to get a fair deal, we have appointed David Emerson as our special envoy to the U.S. …We’ve adopted a three-pronged approach ensuring B.C.’s forest sector is resilient, that we have community supports in place until we are able to reach a deal on softwood lumber, while we continue to fight to get a fair deal.

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Domtar Mill odour complaints triple in 2016

By Vanessa Ybarra
CFJC Today Kamloops
April 8, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS — Odour complaints may be up but Domtar Mill officials say emissions at the pulp mill have decreased significantly. A report presented to city council earlier this week shows Domtar received 42 complaints in 2016, nearly triple the amount from 2015. In the report, officials state ‘One possible explanation is that when it comes to the human perception of odour, it is the presence of odour, rather than the magnitude of odour, that is the determining factor.’

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Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities and Coast Forest Products Association Sign Landmark MOU

Coast Forest Products Association
April 7, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Campbell River: The Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities (AVICC) and the Coast Forest Products Association (Coast Forest) signed a landmark Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) today in a move that will further strengthen the close ties between the forest sector and the coastal communities that depend on it. The MOU was initiated after the findings of a forestry survey conducted by the Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) were released in 2016. The survey results pointed out communication and engagement gaps which remained between communities and forestry in British Columbia. To address these gaps, collaborative discussions followed and the MOU was drafted. “We are very pleased to be signing this Memorandum of Understanding with Coast Forest Products Association today,” said AVICC President Barbara Price. 

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Trimble to Offer Complete End-to-End Ecosystem for Forestry Supply Chain Management with Acquisition of BOS Forestry

By Trimble Inc.
PR Newswire
April 10, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

SUNNYVALE, Calif. — Trimble announced today that it has acquired Canadian-based BOS Forestry, a provider of collaboration, harvesting, production and lumber sale solutions for small- and medium-sized forestry companies. The addition of BOS Forestry emphasizes Trimble’s focus on technologies that address the complete end-to-end ecosystem for forest management, traceability and timber processing. Financial terms were not disclosed. BOS Forestry’s suite of applications provide simplified processes for scale site, log load, yard inventory, contractor settlement, finished goods sales and distribution. In addition, BOS offers a trade portal that facilitates the collaboration of wood supply stakeholders and brings together an innovative network for buyers and sellers to make more informed decisions and improve fiber productivity by leveraging all aggregated log load data transactions.

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Innovative Everett timber firm ships ‘canned’ logs to Asia

By Jim Davis
Everett Herald-Net
April 10, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

EVERETT — Other companies have done it. Forest Marketing Enterprises even has dabbled in it since 2002. But the Everett-based timber company made it a big part of its business model last year and is now getting recognized for the effort. Forest Marketing, better known as Formark, started exporting millions of board feet of logs to Asia in shipping containers. Usually, logs get transported overseas in bulk ships. Formark is packing logs into containers and putting them on container ships. “I think the thought was Del Monte green beans in one end and canned green beans out the other,” said Eric Warren, president and CEO of Formark. “We’re just doing it with logs. Shipping containers come from Asia filled with goods and then are typically shipped back empty.

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Plug pulled on Alexandria biomass plant

By Bea Lewis
New Hampshire Union Leader
April 8, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States

ALEXANDRIA – State and local leaders are expressing concern that Indeck Energy will idle electric generation at its biomass plant at month’s end, but company representatives say the decision to mothball the facility was driven solely by the weak wholesale market and the low reimbursement rates under the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard law. Rich Killion, a spokesman for Indeck Energy Services Inc., headquartered in Buffalo Grove, Ill., said that one-two punch made continued plant operations unsustainable. Management met with the 16 local workers on April 3 and told them the facility’s last day of operation will be April 30. “We’re extremely aware of the impact. It was a tremendously difficult decision,” Killion said.

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Loggers disagree with LePage over biomass contract changes

By Darren Fishell
Bangor Daily News
April 10, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States


PORTLAND, Maine — Maine’s logging industry association has come out against changing a biomass subsidy program, opposing the request of one company and Gov. Paul LePage. Dana Doran, executive director of the Professional Logging Contractors of Maine, wrote that any changes to the terms of a $13.4 million taxpayer-funded biomass subsidy “would seriously undermine the intent and the integrity of the process that produced it.” “It’s like changing the rules of the game after the game has already started,” Doran wrote. Doran’s letter, dated Wednesday and made public Thursday, came in response to biomass generator Stored Solar’s request to change its contract with Central Maine Power Co. The request followed allegations from loggers in Doran’s organization that Stored Solar didn’t pay them for more than a month.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

University of Vermont Study Looks at Carbon Storage of Forests

By Joshua Brown, University of Vermont
VT Digger
April 7, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

New results from a fifteen-year study on Mount Mansfield and at the University of Vermont’s research forest come to a surprising conclusion: imitating old-growth forests enhances carbon storage in managed forestland far better than conventional forestry techniques. As the planet warms, carbon markets are getting hot too. Forest landowners have been looking for ways to enter these markets, making money from their commercial timberland not just by selling logs—but also by demonstrating that their land is absorbing climate-warming carbon dioxide from the air. The more carbon an acre of trees holds, the more valuable it will be in these new carbon markets—whether in the California “cap and trade” market, international voluntary markets, or others that have been sprouting up across the U.S. and Canada.

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Satellites map carbon sequestered by forests, with accuracy of up to 10 meters

By VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
EurekAlert!
April 8, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, the EU North State project has developed a new method of using satellite images to evaluate the forest carbon balance. The carbon balance indicates how much carbon is sequestered or released by forests each year. This enables the carbon balance to be displayed on digital maps, with an accuracy of up to ten metres. The technique involves mapping the key features of forest areas and forests — such as the location, main tree species, height and biomass — from images provided by the European Sentinel satellites. These digital images are fed into a model, alongside climate data. The result is carbon sequestration maps. Such maps reveal which areas are carbon sinks or carbon sources. This information can be used for activities such as planning forest management and assessing climate impacts.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Grade 7 students get a taste of the trades

By Barbara Latkowski
The Prince George Citizen
April 8, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Hammers were busily banging at the John A. Brink Technology Centre at CNC on Friday. Holding them were Grade 7 students from six local schools: Harwin, Ron Brent, Edgewood, Lac des Bois, Spruceland and Westwood. The students were participating in the Canfor Elementary Trades Program, where they had an opportunity to receive hands-on learning while developing skills and knowledge in various trade programs including carpentry, heavy duty/auto mechanics, millwrighting, and cooking. The goal of the program is to encourage an interest in trades related careers and provide opportunities for student achievement.

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B.C. government announces Wood Secretariat

By The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
April 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Acting on commitments under Strong Past, Bright Future: A Competitiveness Agenda for B.C.’s Forest Sector and the Value-added Sector Action Plan, a Wood Secretariat has been formed, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced today. Growing the value-added sector is a key component of B.C.’s Forest Sector Competitiveness Agenda and a critical component in meeting the B.C. government’s strategic goal of maximizing value derived from the province’s forest resources and enhancing employment. The products and business structure of the value-added sector help develop a more innovative and diversified industry and they currently employ over 12,000 workers across 589 value-added businesses. …The Wood Secretariat is co-chaired by a representative from government and a representative from industry. Ken Kalesnikoff, president and CEO of Kalesnikoff Lumber Co. Ltd., a specialty value-added facility located in Thrums, was selected as industry’s co-lead by the value-added specialty wood manufacturing associations.

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B.C. invests $7.7 million to advance wood use and grow global markets

By The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
April 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Government of British Columbia is investing $7.7 million to promote the use of B.C. wood, advance wood building systems and products, and expand global markets, Premier Christy Clark announced at the Council of Forest Industries annual convention today. Premier Christy Clark made the announcement in her keynote speech, which spoke to government’s actions on the softwood lumber file. Diversifying markets and reducing reliance on the United States market continues to be a key part of government’s strategy to keep B.C.’s forest sector strong. “Forestry will always play a crucial role in communities throughout B.C.,” said Premier Clark. “By growing international demand, we are decreasing our reliance on a single market, creating more opportunity, and supporting the tens of thousands of British Columbians who rely on forestry.” 

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Construction code changes overdue

By the Editorial Board
The North Jersey Record
April 10, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The massive fire at the Avalon apartment complex in Edgewater in January 2015 should have been an instant wake-up call for public officials across New Jersey. …The Edgewater building was constructed to state code, and therein lies the rub. Lightweight wood construction is used in many high-density apartment structures in the state. A similar condominium project in Maplewood was partially destroyed by fire just this February. Because the building was not completed, there were no fire suppression systems in place. But the fire served again as reminder of how easily certain kinds of building materials burn. …There must be a practical balance between the perfect and the affordable for a developer. But there is no price on human life. The 2015 Edgewater fire should have spurred quick changes to the state’s construction codes, and it didn’t. Legislators were listening to the wrong people. It should not have taken two years to get this far.

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