Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 17, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Boasts and bellyaches on the campaign trail

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 17, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Boasts and bellyaches in today’s news – BC’s election is in full swing and the leaders are out stumping on the campaign trail. In the Globe and Mail, Premier Clark boasts about BC having the “lowest jobless rate in Canada” while the mayors of Port McNeill and Merritt are focused on their “sawmill closures”. Using Structurlam’s CLT plant as a background, NDP leader Horgan hypes his plan to “invest in BC infrastructure”, while just down the street, Liberal Finance Minister Mike de Jong, says “the NDP’s budget is impossible to balance.

Of course, election campaigns are also a good time for special interest groups to have their say. Examples today include; “International efforts hope to save Vancouver Island rainforests” (Nanaimo News NOW) and “Let’s have local control of our Kootenay forests” (Nelson Star).

“Oregon State University has been ranked #2 in the world in forestry,” by the Center for World University Rankings, based on the number of research articles in top-tier journals. Other top-five forestry finishers include the University of BC (#3) and the University of Alberta (#5). And speaking of Alberta, Forestry Minister Carlier—speaking in Fort McMurray—said his government is dedicating “$15 million a year to help Alberta communities protect themselves against wildfires.”

Finally, CBC News reports that the US government will announce its decision on Canadian softwood lumber duties on April 25 and any countervailing duties would be applied on imports about a week later. A decision on anti-dumping duties is expected to be released May 5, but could be delayed. 
–Tree Frog Editors

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Forestry

Y2Y encourages new approach to forestry

By David Feil
Cochrane Times
April 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

With Spray Lake Sawmill’s logging operations in the Ghost Valley coming to a close, residents invited Stephen Legault, from Yellowstone to Yukon, to speak to Ghost residents about the future of the land they fought hard to save from being clearcut. “We’ve all seen the ways in which clearcutting has affected our valley,” Sharon MacDonald told close to 90 people who came to hear Legault speak Thursday, with some families losing their tourist driven ventures, concerns that wild fires could become more common and everyone worried about how this will affect the watershed… As this subject falls under the scope of Y2Y, a not-for-profit organization that works with 300 partners across four states, two provinces and the territories.

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$45M for forest fires prevention, Alberta government announces

By David Thurton
CBC News
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Alberta is dedicating $15 million a year for the next three years to allow more communities to access the FireSmart program. “Our government is committed to ensuring the necessary resources are in place to protect Albertans and their communities,” Forestry Minister Oneil Carlier said at a news conference in Fort McMurray Thursday. FireSmart is a program which helps reduce the impact of forest fires through a range of activities such as clearing dead trees and educating the public. In 2016, Carlier said the province spent $3.8 million on FireSmart. Fort McMurray and the Wood Buffalo region would receive over $10.5 million for work in the municipality. Other communities around Alberta can apply for funding.

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International efforts hope to save Vancouver Island rainforests

By Spencer Sterritt
Nanaimo News NOW
April 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

NANAIMO — Rainforests are disappearing but there might be a way to save them while still keeping a thriving logging industry. Jens Wieting, a forests and climate campaigner with Sierra Club B.C., said 25 international organizations have joined the Club to help promote proper logging and environmental considerations in the island’s rainforest. “We’re concerned the BC government isn’t taking our global responsibility with the endangered rainforest seriously,” he said. According to Wieting, the amount of old-growth rainforest on the Island, meaning trees over 150 years old, have dwindled by 30 per cent over recent decades and there’s only one per cent left of Douglas Fir trees.

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Let’s have local control of our Kootenay forests

Letter by Dick Murphy
Nelson Star
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canada is about to spend huge money on innovation. Let us here in the Kootenays join that sentiment and look at our forest with new eyes. There is a total lack of innovation in our forest because we are not tapping into the vast talent of Kootenay residents. Our forests are totally controlled by Victoria, Ottawa and the timber corporations. Locally we have virtually no access to the timber that surrounds us. We need local control. In the entire history of humanity, never have there been tools to work with wood like we have today. Plus with the computer and the internet, we can manage each watershed on literally a tree by tree basis. 

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Province quadruples funding for wildfire protection program to $15 million

By Stuart Thomson
Edmonton Journal
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the province gears up for another wildfire season, Agriculture Minister Oneil Carlier announced a big boost Thursday to funding that helps Alberta communities protect themselves against wildfires. The province will provide $15 million a year for the FireSmart program, up from $3.8 million last year. The government is making a three-year commitment of $45 million, which includes $10.5 million specifically for the Fort McMurray area, which is still recovering from last year’s massive wildfire. The fire destroyed homes, dragged the economy down and caused emotional trauma in firefighters and residents. FireSmart is a Canada-wide program that helps communities reduce the risk of wildfire and plan for the worst-case scenario. The funds will go to wildfire education, vegetation management and emergency planning, among other things. Carlier said the program is just “one tool in the toolbox” in a news release.

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Forecast of a warm summer means increased risk of forest fires, meteorologists say

Canadian Press in Calgary Herald
April 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Nearly a year after the massive wildfire that devastated Fort McMurray, a climate scientist says there may be more forest fires in Canada this summer. “If the forecast’s right that it’s a warmer than normal summer, we’ll probably have more fires,” says Mike Flannigan, a meteorologist and professor in the University of Alberta’s renewable resources department. Flannigan says there are about 7,000 forest fires a year in Canada on average. But that number can vary dramatically depending on the weather. Warm temperatures mean a longer fire season and more susceptible conditions. Forest fires are usually triggered either by lightning or by human activity.

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Sunshine Coast Regional District to be briefed on BC Timber Sales plans

By Sean Eckford
Coast Reporter
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Directors at the Sunshine Coast Regional District were due to hear a staff report on BC Timber Sales operations in the area at the April 13 meeting of the planning and community development committee. Last year saw some of the biggest protests against logging in several years, including two protests led by Elphinstone Logging Focus that led to court injunctions and arrests. …In the leadup to the Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities meeting, the Truck Loggers Association (TLA) released a study following up on a survey it did with community leaders. This time the TLA surveyed residents of coastal communities. It found nearly 60 per cent believed forests are being managed sustainably, but when the TLA asked people if they were satisfied with how land use issues were dealt with in their communities, 74 per cent responded that they “felt more needs to be done.”

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Moose hunters penalized, claims alliance

By Bryan Meadows
The Chronicle Journal
April 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Northwestern Ontario Sportsmen’s Alliance is not happy that the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry is cutting moose tags in the region again this year. Executive director John Kaplanis said Thursday that the alliance believes the tags should have been kept as status quo for this year in the Northwest region, since the ministry really has no way of knowing if moose populations went up or down in many wildlife management units, since they failed to complete most moose aerial inventories this past winter. “(And) with very poor harvest data collected, due to dwindling rates of returns on the moose hunter post card surveys, it would appear that (the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) is taking an overly cautious approach; therefore artificially estimating much higher harvest rates than are likely the case on the ground,” Kaplanis said.

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Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry gets $10 million from province for public forest access roads

By Ryan Young
Kenora Online
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


The provincial government is showing support for public access roads in Crown forested areas. Ontario has announced $10 million in funding to go towards public forest access roads. The $10 million is in addition to the previously announced $60 million budget for the Provincial Forests Access Roads Funding Program for 2016-17. “This additional support will help people across Northern and rural Ontario to continue to use forest access roads in their communities,” said Kathryn McGarry, of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, in a press release yesterday. “These roads are important connections for many communities and provide opportunities to our forestry, mining and tourism industries. Forestry is a major source of jobs and economic opportunities in the region, and our government will continue to support this sector and the communities that depend on it.”

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Simcoe County’s rich forestry history to be told in new interpretive centre

By Sara Carson
Simcoe.com
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Wandering through a Simcoe County forest surrounded by towering trees and thick leaf coverage, it’s hard to imagine 100 years ago the land could best be described as a barren desert. “If you went back 100 years in this area you would have very, very little forest cover. It’s surprising to people that there was much less forest 100 years ago than we have today,” said county forester Graeme Davis. The rich history of Simcoe County Forests will be told with stories and artifacts inside Simcoe County Museum’s new forestry interpretative building. Construction will begin on the 1,000-square-foot EcoLog home this spring. It will be located on the museum grounds in Minesing in a forested section on the edge of a small embankment. … Simcoe County Forests celebrates its 100th birthday in 2022.

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Siege Has Ended, but Battle Over Public Lands Rages On

By Kirk Johnson
The New York Times
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States


BURNS, Ore. — A year ago, this corner of rural Oregon became center stage in the drawn-out drama over public lands when armed militia leaders seized a national wildlife refuge, arguing that the government had too much control of land in the West. Now that President Trump is in office, people here and in other parts of the 11 states where 47 percent of the landmass is publicly owned are watching to see what he will do on everything related to public lands, from coal mining and cattle grazing to national monuments and parks. In Burns, some ranchers and others are feeling emboldened, hopeful that regulatory rollbacks by the federal government will return lands to private use and shore up a long-struggling economy. But the change in administration has also spawned a countermovement of conservatives and corporate executives who are speaking up alongside environmentalists in defense of public lands and now worry about losing access to hunting grounds and customers who prize national parks and wildlife.

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Oregon State ranked among top three universities in the world in forestry, oceanography

Oregon State University News
April 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CORVALLIS, Ore. — Oregon State University has been ranked among the top three universities in the world in forestry and oceanography on the basis of the number of research articles published in top-tier scientific journals. Oregon State was listed as No. 2 in forestry and No. 3 in oceanography. …“We are successfully competing on the international stage,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the College of Forestry. “The college has developed a global reputation for groundbreaking work in forest products and forest ecosystems. We attract students from around the world because our research focuses on things that matter for the environment and the economy.”

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Foresters struggle to tell tree tales

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

If a tree issue blows up in the forest, does anyone hear it? Considering that eight of every 10 Americans live in big cities, that’s a problem for the Society of American Foresters. On Friday, the organization of forest professionals, loggers, mill workers, academics and government land managers gathered to puzzle how to better get their stories told. Because while millions of Americans may never see a Ponderosa pine burn in a wildfire, they will breathe the smoke and may cancel their vacation plans and might pay more taxes for disaster relief. Meanwhile, the assembled society members at the University of Montana struggled with their own mixed messages, long-standing mistrust of opponents and unfamiliarity with a fast-changing media landscape.

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Forest thinning contractor still struggling

by Peter Aleshire
Payson Roundup
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Pressure continues to build on the U.S. Forest Service to get the most ambitious forest thinning project in history moving again. The Forest Service five years ago awarded a contract to thin 300,000 acres in Northern Arizona to Good Earth Power AZ. The historic contract represented the only large-scale effort underway to reduce the danger of devastating crown fires across some 2.4 million acres of Northern Arizona. However, the company has so far treated 8,332 acres of the 58,731 acres awarded to it since 2012… U.S. Sen. John McCain wrote a letter to U.S. Forest Service Chief Thomas Tidwell calling the lack of progress “profoundly disappointing.”

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Lawsuit filed over Elliston-area timber project

By Tom Kuglin
Helena Independent Record
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A pair of conservation groups filed suit against the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week, alleging inadequate analysis of an Elliston-area timber project and violation of federal environmental laws and rules. Three Forks-based Native Ecosystems Council and Helena-based Alliance for the Wild Rockies filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Missoula, challenging the Telegraph Vegetation Project and the USFWS “biological opinion” of the project. The 5,700-acre project includes logging and prescribed burning about 15 miles southwest of Helena and 5 miles south of Elliston. First proposed in 2009, the project seeks greater resiliency to fire, insects and drought through diversifying age classes of trees. …The council and alliance objected to the project, saying it violated environmental laws while degrading fish and wildlife habitat. The Forest Service added additional information but said it complied with all laws and regulations in its final January decision.

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Clemson hosts conference designed to strengthen South Carolina forestry industry

By Jonathan Veit
Clemson Newsstand
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CLEMSON — Forestry industry leaders from across South Carolina converged on Clemson University Tuesday for an all-day conference billed as an opportunity to forge collaborations between business and higher education. The Forestry Industry Advisory Conference was hosted by Clemson’s forestry and environmental conservation department and attended by more than 70 industry executives and representatives from state and federal agencies. The attendees worked with Clemson administrators, faculty, Extension foresters and students to find ways they can partner to keep the state’s $20 billion forestry industry humming. The conference’s keynote speaker was John D. Williams, chief executive officer of Domtar Corporation, the largest integrated producer of uncoated freesheet paper in North America.

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Protecting the forestry mill tax and public land

Letter by Josh Swan
Ashland Daily Press
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

I would like to thank the State legislature for dedicating time to highlight the important role forestry and the forest products industry plays in our state. Assembly Joint Resolution 23, proclaiming April as forestry and paper products month, does a terrific job outlining how our forests drive Wisconsin’s economy and represent a big part of our identity as a state. That said, I’m disappointed that National Forests and Federal lands in Wisconsin were omitted from this resolution… I write with a personal and vested interest. I harvest and mill specialty lumber for wooden boat construction here at my boatshop in Bayfield County. 

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Crews battle wildfire at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

By Caitlyn Chastain
ABC News WALB 10
April 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CLINCH CO., GA — South Georgia residents might notice smoky skies when they step outside. That’s because crews are working to fight a wildfire in the Okeefenokee Wildlife Reserve. The fire has spread across nearly 20,000 acres. Smoke has filled the roads and the air, small flames, and a few larger ones, can be seen almost everywhere. WALB’s Caitlyn Chastain got a look inside the more than 18 thousand acre fire at the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday. “It has spread fast in the past couple of days. Particularly in the afternoon,” explained Information Officer Susan Granbery. A lightning strike started the fire on April 6, and the blaze quickly grew. 

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Anger in Tasmania after one of pair of rare giant pine cone bunya trees gets the chop

By Rhiannon Shine
ABC News, Australia
April 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Horticulturalists and historians are outraged a 170-year-old tree rarely seen in Tasmania has been chopped down because of its dangerously large and heavy pine cones. The bunya pine tree – or araucaria bidwillii – is native to Australia, and was first identified by Europeans in Queensland. It is a rare sight in Tasmania where it is not endemic, and is difficult to grow due to the cool climate. It is understood a pair were planted in the Hobart suburb of New Town in the 1840s by Captain Charles Swanston, the first president of the Hobart Town Horticultural Association. After subdivision of the land, the pair were separated on two properties adjacent to each other.

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Rainforest conservation may be aimed at the wrong places, study finds

By Dyna Rochmyaningsih
Mongabay
April 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Previous research indicates tree diversity may have a positive correlation with carbon storage ability – at least on the small scale. In other words, forests with more tree species may store more carbon than forests with fewer tree species. But the tree diversity-carbon storage relationship has been little explored for larger areas. A group of international scientists sought to change this, and assessed the relationship between carbon storage and tree diversity in tropical forests at the one-hectare scale in the forests of Southeast Asia, Africa, and South America. … To their surprise, the researchers found no set carbon storage-tree diversity relationship at this larger scale. On the contrary, their results for tropical forests in Africa indicate overall tree diversity is low while carbon storage is quite high.

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Coillte launches ‘risk-free’ private forestry initiative

By Caroline Allen
Agriland
April 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Coillte has launched a private forestry partnership initiative. ‘Coillte Premium Partners’ has been presented as a new option for owners of private forestry to earn an annual risk-free income from their forests – without the need to sell their land. The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed; Coillte Chairman, John Moloney; and Coillte Chief Executive, Fergal Leamy launched the product in Cork. Coillte Premium Partners is aimed at landowners of high-quality, commercial forests where the Forest Service payments have or are due to expire. Through the partnership, Coillte will manage all aspects of the private forest including the harvesting and sale of the timber while the landowners retain ownership of the land.

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Tasmanian politicians confused as forestry, anti-discrimination bill debates on hold

By Georgie Burgess
ABC News, Australia
April 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Two divisive bills set to be debated in the Tasmania’s Upper House have been “put on the shelf” for at least a month, raising the suspicion of some MLCs. On Thursday the Legislative Council was halfway through debating changes to the Anti-Discrimination Act and was set to begin the Unlocking Production Forests Bill, after receiving briefings from key players for the last two weeks. In March the Government succeeded in chaperoning the forestry bill, which will reopen areas of forest to logging, past the Lower House after a marathon debate into the early hours of the morning. The need for the bill to become law has been a recurrent theme of Resources Minister Guy Barnett, who has stressed the move is necessary in order to “save up to 700 jobs” and “strengthen resource security”. Both bills were expected to come to a close vote, tying at six, which means Legislative Council President Jim Wilkinson would need to vote them down.

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Company & Business News

Gold And Lumber Surge

By Frank Holmes
Value Walk
April 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

As if you need more proof that inflation is finally starting to pick up, lumber prices rose to a 12-year high this week, supported mainly by expectations that steep duties will soon be levied on cheap softwood imports from Canada. Lumber futures rose to nearly $415 per thousand board feet on Monday, a level unseen since March 2005, soon after homeownership peaked here in the U.S. At issue is a mini-trade war between U.S. and Canadian loggers… Shares of Canfor Corporation and Western Forest Products, Canada’s number two and number five lumber producers by annual output, have had a good three months, advancing 25.5 percent and 16.8 percent respectively as of April 12. Timberland-owner Weyerhaeuser has also impressed lately.

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U.S. government to release decision on Canadian softwood lumber duties on April 25

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in the CBC News
April 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

The U.S. Commerce Department said Thursday it will announce on April 25 whether it will impose the first of two duties on Canadian softwood. A spokesman for the department said any countervailing duties would be applied on imports about a week later. A decision on anti-dumping duties is expected to be released May 5, but could be delayed. Analyst Paul Quinn of RBC Capital Markets said he anticipates the Americans will impose “shock and awe” duties in the range of 30 to 40 per cent. “I wouldn’t be surprised if the preliminary rates come out really high,” he said from Vancouver. Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said in the House of Commons that she spoke about the softwood lumber issue Thursday with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “We’ll not let the threat of countervailing duties weaken our negotiating position,” she said. “We’re looking for a good deal, not just any deal.”

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Premier Clark boasts about B.C.’s low jobless rate, but rural areas struggle

By Dirk Meissner
Canadian Press in the Globe and Mail
April 16, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC Liberal Leader Christy Clark often highlights the fact British Columbia has the lowest jobless rate in Canada, but rural and remote areas in the province are struggling with major industry downturns and job losses. …“I would challenge this government to really open its eyes and look at what’s going on in our small community,” said Shirley Ackland, the mayor of Port McNeill in northern Vancouver Island. “You can’t live in the north island if there are no jobs here.” She said sawmill closures have hurt Port McNeill, where 80 per cent of residents are dependent on the forest industry for work. Merritt Mayor Neil Menard said a sawmill closure and layoffs at another lumber mill resulted in the loss of about 350 jobs in the past 18 months. “The situation here in this particular area as far as employment is concerned is not good,” he said. “I don’t think we have the best economy in the country. In the Interior, we’ve got a lot of struggles going on.”

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Horgan lands in Penticton

By Colin Dacre
Castanet
April 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan made his first campaign stop outside the Lower Mainland in Penticton Thursday. Horgan toured Structurlam’s production facility in Okanagan Falls, followed by a media scrum in front of the new tower being constructed at the Penticton Lakeside Resort. “The building behind us is, I believe, the future for our forest industry,” Horgan said, referring to the cross-laminated timber construction of the building, built with Structurlam product. “A B.C. NDP government is going to be investing in infrastructure, building schools and hospitals, public infrastructure that will get our economy going again. And when we build public infrastructure, we want to build it using products like being used here,” he said.

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De Jong visits Merritt, touts Tegart, talks Rural Dividend and softwood lumber agreement

Merritt Herald
April 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s finance minister was in Merritt Friday (April 7), just ahead of the writ dropping on the 2017 election campaign, to show his support for fellow Liberal candidate Jackie Tegart in her bid for a second term as MLA in Fraser-Nicola. While in Merritt, de Jong also commented on the Rural Dividend Fund (RDF) and issues facing B.C.’s forestry industry. …De Jong said he’s optimistic the fund is providing a good return on investment when it comes to supporting various projects. “We’re not providing government money in the Rural Dividend program. This is money from taxpayers. We want to ensure they are getting a good return for their investment,” he said. De Jong also told the Herald he heard from people at Tegart’s fundraiser who were concerned with the current state of the forestry industry and softwood lumber agreement. “First of all, I pointed out the fact that we have been preparing for this for 15 years,” said de Jong.

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The Domtar Corporation (UFS) Announces Quarterly Earnings Results

By Donald Swayze
Petro Global News 24
April 16, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Domtar Corporation opened at 42.82 on Thursday. The company has a market cap of $2.68 billion, a price-to-earnings ratio of 19.52 and a beta of 1.59. Domtar Corporation has a 1-year low of $30.27 and a 1-year high of $44.58. The company’s 50-day moving average is $40.91 and its 200 day moving average is $38.47. Domtar Corporation posted its quarterly earnings data on Thursday. The company reported $0.75 earnings per share for the quarter, missing the consensus estimate of $0.95 by $0.20. The company earned $1.27 billion during the quarter, compared to analyst estimates of $1.31 billion. 

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Softwood Lumber and OSB Push Building Materials Prices Higher

LBM Journal
April 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States


For the second consecutive month, prices of softwood lumber, gypsum, ready-mix concrete, and OSB all increased, according to the latest Producer Price Index (PPI) release by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The increases were led by softwood lumber and OSB. The price of softwood lumber increased 2.3% in March after rising 4.8% in February. Softwood lumber prices have increased 7.2% over the first three months of 2017 and are up 12.9% since March 2016. These increases have been largely, if not completely, due to the ongoing softwood lumber trade dispute between the U.S. and Canada. The prices of many softwood products have increased by more than 25% since the beginning of this year, and the Random Lengths Framing Lumber Composite Index has risen 16% during the same period. OSB prices posted a 2.7% increase in March and have increased nearly 25% since March 2016.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Saving the forests

By Kate Bouey
Castanet
April 13, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

With B.C.’s forests threatened by climate change and beetles, efforts are underway to strengthen the province’s forests. Greg O’Neil, an adjunct professor with the University of Northern British Columbia, is involved in seed migration research and has been featured in National Geographic. O’Neil will be a keynote speaker at the BC Nature Conference in Vernon in September. O’Neil is looking at forest species, like the lodgepole pine in California, and how they may be able to adapt to a warmer B.C. The aim of the research is to “strengthen the forest species and make them more adaptable to climate change,” said Rod Drennan, one of the conference organizers. Drennan said about 150 “citizen scientists” will be attending the conference, Sept. 21-24, who include retired experts in ornithology, zoology and biology.

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BC’s provincial tree threatened by climate change, expert says

By Matt Humphrey
CBC News
April 15, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

If you’ve ever walked down Richards Street in Downtown Vancouver, between Helmcken and Nelson, you’ve probably noticed the sidewalk split and curve to accommodate a large Western red cedar growing in the middle of the walkway.  David Tracey, executive director of the Tree City Canada Association, says climate change is now beginning to negatively affect the iconic B.C. red cedars, which can live up to a thousand years. “The hotter, drier summers we’re getting, they’re just not able to take it,” Tracey said. First adopted as the provincial tree in 1988, Tracey said the Western red cedar is one of the most important types of trees in Canadian history.

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Biomass in the budget: Q&A with Forest Products Association of Canada CEO Derek Nighbor

By Maria Church
Canadian Biomass Magazine
April 12, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Canadian Biomass sat down with Derek Nighbor, CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada, to get his thoughts on the 2017 budget, which includes $1.8 billion to support clean technology. It’s going to take some work, Nighbor says, to put forestry biomass in a position to benefit from those dollars. …Is there an opportunity for Canada to have a national biomass strategy? Nighbor: I believe there is, and I believe it’s being worked on. I think it’s a matter of pulling it together. We’re going to have all forest ministers from across Canada in Ottawa in September. I know this is something they’ve talked about as a group and I’m really hopeful we’re going to take that conversation to the next level in the fall. The issue is that you’ve got to educate multiple departments in government. This touches the minister responsible for innovation, environment, natural resources, labour, finance – it’s a lot of work.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Engineered wood can offset costs

By Mike Holmes
National Post
April 15, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

I love the durability of engineered wood. Even though the look of hardwood is classic, I prefer engineered wood flooring in most cases because it’s less likely to be affected by humidity and temperature changes. Made from three to five layers of wood that are stacked and bonded together under heat and pressure, a composite product is created that is stronger and stiffer. You’re likely already familiar with engineered wood without even realizing it. Materials like plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), and medium density fiberboard (MDF) are all materials that are commonly found in kitchen cabinets or shelves. Engineered lumber is strong and straight, and you can get it in lengths that can’t be found with natural wood – and it’s sustainable, which I love. Many engineered wood products are made from fast-growing trees that are small in diameter.

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