Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 15, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Earth has 9% more forest than we thought

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 15, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

According to a new study in the journal Science (using satellite imagery), “global forest cover is at least 9 percent higher than previously thought”. The increase was found in dryland forests which are difficult to detect with classic mapping approaches. And sticking with forestry, the plan to keep Elliott Forest public is “prudent“, according to both the Oregonian Editorial Board and Thomas Maness, Dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

The Canadian forest industry is “still basking in the sunshine because of high lumber prices”, said Russ Taylor, of International Wood Markets Group, notwithstanding pending US duties. “But the storm is coming and European lumber producers are looking at the US market”. In other softwood headlines:

  • Freeland expects US to trigger NAFTA consultation period soon (CTV News)
  • Jimmy Carter, Of All People, Should Understand Canadian Softwood Tariffs – Sadly Not (Forbes)
  • Quebec mayors head to Washington to plead for softwood lumber deal (CBC News)
  • Quebec lumber workers among first hit by duty-inspired layoffs (Canadian Press)

And finally, a newly constructed home in the Phoenix area is “the first of its kind; it’s built completely out of foam”. I’m not sure if the Big Bad Wolf would agree, but the builder says “it’s stronger than wood and it goes together much like Legos.” 


— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry

Logging proposal gets frosty response in Ymir

By John Boivin
Boundary Sentinel
May 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Residents of Ymir say they’re alarmed by plans of BC Timber Sales to allow logging in their community watershed. They’re concerned that their tiny community water system could be damaged by forestry operations in the area. “It’s our only source of drinking, consumable and firefighting water,” says Jay Leus, a resident of Ymir who opposes the idea of logging the area. “It could very well put us into a water crisis, as our community watershed is incredibly small.” BC Timber Sales told locals in April it was looking at developing a section of the watershed for logging, with an eye to begin leasing timber stands in 2020. However, “logging is not imminent,” an spokesperson for BC Timber Sales told thenelsondaily.com. “[It] is still in the preliminary stages of planning and will be continuing to consult the community before a final development schedule is made.”

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Pacheedaht First Nation has designs on Jordan River lands

Victoria Times Colonist
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Pacheedaht First Nation wants its traditional lands at Jordan River returned and has an eco-tourism vision for the area. Elected Chief Jeff Jones and other members of the nation presented their ideas to the Capital Regional District board this week. Their plan includes possible surf shops, traditional Nuu-chah-nulth canoe rentals, an interpretive centre and restaurants featuring a Pacheedaht salmon bake. … The future of Jordan River has been up for debate since B.C. Hydro announced a major earthquake would destroy its dam and wipe out the homes below. It has purchased all but one home along the main strip. …Two upland parcels zoned for logging would be used for forestry operations in the short term. In the long term, they could host Pacheedaht housing and accommodations.

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Festival of Forestry announces summer teacher tour to Port Alberni

By Festival of Forestry
Festival of Forestry
May 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

50 years and counting – the BC Festival of Forestry is committed to taking BC teachers out of the classroom and into the forest! Our tours take teachers to rural and resource-based communities throughout the province. Over three days, we provide teachers of all levels and subject areas with curriculum-focused, hands-on teaching ideas based on forest science and policy. Our 2017 summer teachers’ tour will operate from Port Alberni — a hub for forestry on Southern Vancouver Island. The tour kicks off in the MacMillan Provincial Park at Cathedral Grove, were participants will get up close and personal with giant Douglas-fir trees, some over 800 years old. In contrast – our next stop is a local Christmas Tree Farm run by students in Alberni District High School, followed by a visit to a private land woodlot. Many industry and government groups will contribute to the program, giving us access to live logging shows, log sorts, manufacturing and more. We are grateful to all our partners who help us to make these tours so successful. 

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Blizzard of embers sparked fires that burned Fort McMurray homes last year

By John Cotter
Canadian Press in the CBC News
May 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire expert says a blizzard of blazing embers — blown by the wind over fireguards and a river — sparked the flames that destroyed homes in Fort McMurray last spring, and then spread the destruction deeper into neighbourhoods. Alan Westhaver says the embers ignited combustible material such as dry grass, leaves, pine needles, fences, patio decks, wood piles, evergreens and ornamental shrubs that were too close to homes in the northern Alberta city. The smaller blazes set homes on fire and flames then crept to nearby houses in the closely built subdivisions. “Mass ember production and long-distance transport by strong winds subjected neighbourhoods to intense ember showers,” Westhaver wrote in a report for the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction.

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Forestry students lend a shovel

By Carli Berry
Kelowna Capital News
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Students of the Forestry Program based at Rutland Senior Secondary are getting a hands-on experience with helping the community. Approximately 13 students, two instructors and one driver piled into a Central Okanagan school bus Thursday afternoon to prepare sandbags for the predicted floods. One student lives in the Mission Creek area, and once out of class he expects to continue sandbagging at home. “We only have about two and a half feet (of space with the water below) until the top of the creek bank, we usually have 10 to 15 feet,” said Grade 11 student Lucas St. Onge. The students were sent all over Kelowna, with communication provided by the City of Kelowna to the forestry instructors. Instructor Al Colkind said the program takes a snapshot of everything to do with forestry.

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Ontario opens new forest fire base at North Bay airport

CBC News
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Officials with Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry say a new base for forest firefighting efforts at the airport in North Bay will better protect northern communities and firefighters. Representatives from the province and the City of North Bay were on-hand Friday to officially open the new fire management headquarters at the Jack Garland Airport. “North Bay becomes a regional hub for delivering the exceptional fire management services that the people of Ontario depend on,” Natural Resources Minister Kathryn McGarry was quoted as saying in a written release issued in conjunction with the announcement. “We are committed to supporting our forest fire crews and the safety and security they provide to communities across northern Ontario.”

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A wise, bold decision to retain the Elliott State Forest: Editorial

By the Editorial Board
The Oregonian
May 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

As recently as three months ago, the Elliott State Forest near Coos Bay was about to be sold off to a private logging company partnering with an Oregon tribe. But last week that changed sharply. …The action showed foresight and respects the will of a public increasingly weary of natural resource privatization, particularly of distinctive forested settings. …The next move belongs to the Oregon Legislature. By the end of the current session, it must approve the sale of $100 million in general obligation bonds, costing taxpayers far more than that once the debt is paid back. Gov. Kate Brown has pledged support to make it happen. 

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Plan to keep Elliott Forest public, assist Oregon State is prudent

By the Editorial Board
Statesman Journal
May 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


In a saga that has had more plot twists than a daytime soap opera, the 82,500-acre Elliott State Forest near Coos Bay appears likely to remain public land. ….What excites us most, however, is the newcomer at the table. Oregon State University, in the past month and a half, has offered to explore the possibility of buying the forest in the future. Perhaps as soon as five or six years from now. OSU President Edward Ray and the dean of the university’s College of Forestry, Thomas Maness said they envision a living laboratory under the thick canopy of the Elliott State Forest. It’s a rare opportunity for the university’s students and faculty, they said, because unlike restrictions in place on federal or private land, on public land, the university could test many theories, run active experiments.

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Enviro Group Aims to Restore the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh River

May 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


The Nature Conservancy has big plans for the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh River. The conservation organization just acquired 7,000 new acres of land in the watershed from the Hoh River Trust. That adds to the 3,000-acre parcel the Nature Conservancy already owned. Its aim is to improve the health of the forest — and with it, the health of the river. Most of the watershed is in state or federal hands. But the lower portion that the Nature Conservancy now owns has been logged repeatedly and replanted with conifer trees instead of with the hardwood trees and shrubs that used to line the rivers of the Olympic Peninsula. …The Nature Conservancy’s work will include selective logging, replanting, and repairing roads and culverts. The logging will help pay for the restoration work and will also provide employment for local contractors.

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Never forget, all roads are private in the North Maine Woods

By Julia Bayly
Bangor Daily News
May 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

With countless lakes, ponds and rivers, miles of hiking trails and scores of campsites, the North Maine Woods is an outdoor enthusiast’s paradise with more than 100,000 people visiting the region every year. The 3.5 million acres also is a privately owned working forest and while its owners are more than happy to allow access to the land over thousands of miles of dirt roads, visitors need to know the rules of those roads for safety’s sake. And the most important rule of all to remember is logging trucks always have the right of way. “It’s really about making sure people are aware of active logging and the trucks that are on the roads,” said Ben Carlisle, president of Prentiss & Carlisle, managers for seven of the North Maine Woods’ 27 timberland owners. “North Maine Woods started as a way to ensure that [recreation and forestry] could stay compatible with each other.”

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Water quality is a forest product

By Troy Holcomb
Aitkin Independent Age
May 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

There has been so much talk about water quality lately, both in the legislature and in the news. As an advocate for improving water quality, Gov. Dayton has made it a priority during his second term. Forest management has an important role to play here, too. In the northern part of the state, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ Forestry Division manages public forests for many components of a sustainable forest. …However, one of the most significant and often overlooked outputs of a healthy forest is clean water. We may be the land of 10,000 lakes, but consider all of the many rivers and streams that originate in Minnesota and either run into our lakes or travel the length of North America. Many of these begin in a forest. Providing clean water is something forests have always done and always will do, if they are managed right.

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Wildfire will smolder for several weeks, Forest Service says

By Carlos R. Munoz
Sarasota Herald-Tribune
May 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

SARASOTA COUNTY — Good communication and quick-thinking has kept firefighters safe during an out-of-control wildfire that has burned nearly 4,000 acres east of North Port in the last two days. Fire departments from North Port, Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte, Lee, DeSoto, and Collier counties, and strike teams from Gainesville, Jacksonville, Lake City, Myakka, and South Carolina Forestry are battling the blaze, which is believed to be the biggest fire in Southwest Florida since around 1998. “There were a couple of times where our units had to bail out of where they were at and get to their safe zones, but we did not have any injuries, and nobody had to deploy their fire shelters,” according to Florida Forest Service deputy spokesman Brett Steffen. “There were no burn-overs yesterday; all the crews were extremely safe yesterday.”

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Government clips Forestry wings, puts wildlife in peril

By Patan Afzal Babu
The Hans India
May 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The State government dissolves Social Forestry and Wildlife wings in the Forest Department permanently, in a barefaced breach of Forest Protection Act. Hyderabad: In a blatant violation of Indian Forest Conservation and Wildlife Protection Act, the Telangana State government has dissolved two important wings – Social Forestry and Wildlife – permanently. The two wings have been merged with Territorial wing in the Forest Department recently. Top officials of the department told The Hans India that the Social Forestry and Wildlife wings had been dysfunctional and no specific authority was deputed at wild life sanctuaries and Amrabad and Kawal Tiger reserves. The total number of sanctuaries in the State is seven including Kinnerasani in Khammam, Eturunagaram in Warangal, Manjira and Pocharam in Medak and Pranahitha and Sivaram sanctuaries in Adilabad districts. 

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Earth has 9% more forest than we thought

By Russell McLendon
Mother Nature Network
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forests come in many different formats, but they’re all hugely important to life on Earth — humans included. Yet as deforestation continues to shrink woodlands around the world, these eminent ecosystems are overdue for some good news. And a new study obliges: Using satellite imagery, scientists have discovered global forest cover is at least 9 percent higher than previously thought. Because forests help absorb some of the carbon dioxide emissions that drive climate change, this could have big implications for climate modeling. More broadly, it’s also just a helpful reminder of how much natural heritage still exists for humanity to preserve. …Because Earth has so much ground to cover, scientists often use satellite imagery to estimate forest area. But as study co-author Jean-François Bastin explains in a statement, dryland forests can be hard to find and measure via satellite.

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Company & Business News

Freeland expects US to trigger NAFTA consultation period soon

By Laura Payton
CTV News
May 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada

OTTAWA — Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says she hopes to meet with newly confirmed U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer “very soon,” and she expects him to trigger the NAFTA pre-negotiation process just as quickly. In an interview with Evan Solomon, host of CTV’s Question Period, Freeland said she met with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson shortly after their confirmations, and expects it to be similar with Lighthizer. “I hope that I’ll meet him very soon,” Freeland said. “One thing that is important, and I do want to give credit to this U.S. administration, is we have a very good working relationship at the personal level. I think that’s a big advantage … and I’m sure we’ll have the same with Ambassador Lighthizer.

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Canadian forest companies see silver lining to softwood dispute

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
May 12, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

Despite a 20% tariff on wood products shipped to the United States, the Canadian forest industry is still basking in the sunshine because of high lumber prices, Russ Taylor, president of International Wood Markets Group, said Thursday at the close of a day-long global lumber conference in Vancouver. “The storm is coming, but we are still in the sunshine,” Taylor said in an interview summing up the generally positive attitude of lumber producers towards the U.S. market. The storm he was referring to is the future impact of a countervailing duty on softwood lumber products that went into effect May 1. What’s behind the optimism is lumber price increases since February that have covered the cost of the duty. It’s already built into prices, so selling lumber into the growing U.S. housing market is still a lucrative business, said speakers at the conference, sponsored by International Wood Markets.

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Jimmy Carter, Of All People, Should Understand Canadian Softwood Tariffs – Sadly Not

By Tim Worstall, writer and Fellow at Adam Smith Institute in London
Forbes
May 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

That the current crop of politicians don’t understand trade and tariffs is well known. Donald Trump and his administration really do seem to be labouring under the impression that imports make us all poorer. Entirely the wrong way around of course, imports are what make us richer, they’re the very point in having trade in the first place. …However, we might expect the distinguished politicians of earlier generations to have a better grasp on this but sadly not as Jimmy Carter has shown. This concerns those tariffs on the Canadian softwood imports. As I’ve pointed out before charging a tax upon such imports raises the price of such softwood in the US. Which makes houses–the US building style uses a lot of such wood–more expensive. …We are supposed to be running the economy for the benefit of consumers, not producers.

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Who’s right and who’s wrong in the softwood lumber dispute?

By Stuart Thomson
Edmonton Journal
May 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The United States has imposed duties up to 24 per cent on Canadian softwood lumber exports, causing concern about job losses in communities across Alberta. Here’s some background on the feud. What’s the dispute all about? Well, are they right? …Tombe said he has some sympathy for the U.S. position and recommended auctioning off the timber rights in a free market, the same way Quebec does. That process satisfied the U.S. and, if you look at the tariffs that were imposed, they get much smaller the further east you go, where the U.S. sees the auctions as more fair. …The right-leaning Cato Institute has argued that the U.S. position is hypocritical, pointing to all the under-the-radar subsidies it offers the forestry industry. The Cato report says the tariffs hurt U.S. consumers as much as the Canadian producers.

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Fortress Paper Announces First Quarter 2017 Results

By Fortress Paper Ltd.
MarketWired
May 11, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver, BC — Fortress Paper Ltd.  (TSX:FTP) (OTCQX:FTPLF) reported 2017 first quarter operating EBITDA of $7.5 million, an increase of $6.4 million relative to the comparative prior year period and an increase of $1.1 million over the previous quarter. The Dissolving Pulp Segment generated operating EBITDA of $8.3 million and the Security Paper Products Segment generated operating EBITDA of $1.5 million. Corporate costs included in operating EBITDA were $2.3 million.

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Wood exports need more study and investment

Letter by Robert Gunn, Port Alberni
Victoria Times Colonist
May 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Canada must secure new softwood markets,” comment, May 4. Few would disagree with Naomi Christensen on the need to diversify softwood markets, but I wonder if a little more analysis is needed as to what is happening at present. Perhaps there has been some honesty from the B.C. industry about its exports to China, but I have not seen it. One wonders what percentage of our exports have been for frame-house construction, at roughly comparable prices to exports to the U.S., and how much has been cheap lumber for scaffolding and concrete forming….All issues that can be addressed, but it will take more investment than we have seen recently from both industry and Victoria.

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Fire at West Fraser Sawmill

My Cariboo Now
May 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West


The Williams Lake Fire Department was on the scene of a fire which broke out at West Fraser Sawmill off Soda Creek Rd. Saturday morning. The fire which could be seen still smoldering as of 1:30 pm appeared to be limited and contained to the area which contains 3 dry kilns as well as an electrical control room. The kilns are used to remove moisture from the lumber before it heads off for the planing process. There is no further information at this time. An update is expected to be provided by the Fire Department on Monday. (END OF STORY)

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Quebec lumber workers among first hit by duty-inspired layoffs

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in the Montreal Gazette
May 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Hundreds of Quebec forestry workers are experiencing the first sour tastes from the softwood lumber battle with the United States as they prepare for the start of layoffs. Starting Monday, Resolute Forest Products is cutting shifts at seven sawmills and delaying the start of forest operations that will affect 1,282 workers. Pierrot Fortin, who experienced such heartache during the last impasse in the early 2000s, is again preparing for lost income and uncertainty. “Work stoppages like this are never easy,” said the truck driver who hauls wood from forests in the Lac-St-Jean region. “It has an impact on families and everyone is worried.” But the 48-year-old says he’s luckier than some — his house is almost paid off and his two children are no longer babies. Fortin feels for young families and older workers who have few employment alternatives in one-industry towns.

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Quebec mayors head to Washington to plead for softwood lumber deal

CBC News
May 14, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

A group of Quebec mayors are in Washington today trying to rally support for a swift end to the latest softwood lumber dispute, the effects of which are already being felt in the province. The delegation — headed by Drummondville Mayor Alexandre Cusson — is expected to meet in the coming days with both adversaries and potential allies in the dispute. Among their most daunting meetings will be with members of the U.S. Lumber Coalition, a powerful lobby group representing American sawmills. They are among the most ardent supporters of the 20-per-cent duties that the Trump administration slapped on Canadian lumber last month. “That will be a tense meeting,” Cusson told Radio-Canada before leaving. 

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New Brunswick hires ex-U.S. ambassador as special envoy in softwood tariff dispute

By Bobbi-Jean MacKinnon
CBC News
May 12, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Gallant government has appointed a former United States ambassador to Canada as New Brunswick’s special envoy in the softwood lumber tariff dispute. David Wilkins, who served from 2005 to 2009 during the George W. Bush administration, begins his one-year contract effective immediately, the government announced Friday. …”Ambassador Wilkins brings a wealth of inside knowledge, expertise and strategic know-how to his role,” said Treasury Board president Roger Melanson, who is also the minister responsible for trade policy. …Melanson also noted that Wilkins helped resolve a previous softwood lumber dispute between the two countries within 15 months of becoming ambassador. That deal earned the support of “most of the Canadian lumber industry,” according to the government.

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Timber industry needs help to keep driving SC economy

May 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: US East, United States


Columbia, SC- As legislators finalize the state budget, I worry that they might neglect to adequately support one of South Carolina’s economic engines, one that helps drive our manufacturing economy and simultaneously enhances our water resources, soil conservation, wildlife and recreation. That economic engine is the state’s forests, which cover more than two-thirds of the land area. Timber is one of the foundations of our state economy — our No. 1 harvested crop and the No. 1 commodity exported from the Port of Charleston — and the S.C. Forestry Commission is critical to maintaining and developing our forests and protecting them from wildfires, insects and diseases. Recently, tight budgets have made that job more difficult. …Underfunding the state Forestry Commission could dampen one of the state’s most important economic engines.

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Big turnout for southern forestry industry awards

Otago Daily Times
May 13, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International


Forestry companies, contractors and transport operators from around the lower South Island were in Dunedin last night for the annual Southern Wood Council Forestry Awards. More than 350 people attended the event at Forsyth Barr Stadium. The Wood Council, representing all major forest owners and most of the major processing companies in Otago and Southland, runs the awards programme in conjunction with industry training organisation Competenz. Southern Wood Council secretary Brent Apthorp said the turnout by forestry workers, families and supporters was a true reflection of the momentum which been building during the past year because of on-site training and safety in the region. “The event was designed to profile the real contribution that forestry and those working within the industry are making to the economic and social well-being of the region,” Mr Apthorp said.

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VicForests will cooperate with inquiry

Australian Associated Press in Sky News
May 12, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

VicForests says it will fully cooperate with an inquiry into its practices and procedures after being accused by a Victorian MP of potentially putting the states timber mills in jeopardy. Jeff Bourman, a state MP for the Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Party, has established a parliamentary inquiry into VicForests, who manage the state’s timber supplies. The soon-to be closed Heyfield Mill sits in Mr Bourman’s electorate and he says its dire situation is a direct consequence of not being able to secure log supply from VicForests.VicForests acting CEO Nathan Trushell said the organisation welcomed the inquiry. ‘VicForests is an open and transparent organisation and will cooperate with any inquiry into our forest management practices and procedures,’ he told AAP on Thursday night. Mr Bourman added that the inquiry won’t be a ‘witch hunt’. They simply want to uncover the truth for mill workers and their families ‘who are hurting’.

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Deputy PM Barnaby Joyce unveils $900,000 forestry project

By Letitia Fitzpatrick
Manning River Times
May 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

Deputy PM Barnaby Joyce came to Wauchope to announce a project which puts a value on Australia’s natural resources. Forest and Wood Products Australia will get $900,000 for a project to apply Natural Capital Accounting on forestry, cotton and fisheries enterprises. Natural Capital Accounting is an internationally recognised way of calculating the value of natural assets like soil, air, water and biodiversity. That information can then be incorporated into economic models and accounting systems. Minister Joyce said the project would give Australian forestry, cotton and fisheries producers the tools they need to incorporate the value of natural assets into their business systems.

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Sappi continues to deliver solid results driven by strong global dissolving pulp and speciality packaging performance

By Sappi Limited
Canada Newswire
May 15, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

JOHANNESBURG – Financial summary for the quarter and half-year: Profit for the period:  For the quarter US$88 million (2016 US$100 million) and  for the half-year US$178 million (2016 US$175 million). EPS excluding special items: for the quarter 17 US cents (2016 16 US cents)  and for the half-year 33 US cents (2016 29 US cents). Sappi Chief Executive Officer Steve Binnie, commenting on the group’s performance, said:”I am pleased to report that Sappi continues to deliver solid results on the back of our strategic shift to place more emphasis on dissolving pulp and speciality packaging. Coupled with strong cash generation and cost management initiatives to reduce variable costs we are well positioned to achieve our 2020 targets.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Farewell, giant pine: Climate change kills a champion at Washington Park Arboretum

By Lynda V. Mapes
The Seattle Times
May 13, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

It saw the flight of Boeing’s first jet; the World’s Fair, the founding of Microsoft. It survived the eruption of Mount St. Helens, witnessed the state’s centennial, and the confession of the Green River Killer. But after 72 years, Pinus rigida 212-45-C, the state’s champion pitch pine, has died and will be cut down at the Washington Park Arboretum. The cause of death was climate change: steadily warming and drier summers, that stressed the tree in its position atop a droughty knoll. Red turpentine beetles, catching the scent of stress chemicals emitted by the tree as it struggled, bored in. The beetles chewed and fed on the tree’s phloem, conduits just below the bark for the tree’s life-giving juices. Just as damaging, the beetles were vectors for fungus that plugged up other conduits carrying water into the tree. It wasn’t long before arborist Clif Edwards, making his usual rounds, noticed something amiss in the pinetum, the collection of pines at the arboretum.

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Granting indigenous land rights could save the climate – or not

By Irene Banos Ruiz
Deutsche Welle
May 12, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Indigenous peoples believe they preserve forests best – something that is becoming more important as the planet heats up. But indigenous peoples need land title to implement protection – why is this so contentious? Indigenous lands have been a war ground for centuries, as differing interests fight over the richness in them. And in many cases, the tribes who originally lived there became warriors in a broader sense, as they fight to defend their traditional territories. …But the relation between granting land title and greater forest cover is not clear for everyone. Steven Lawry, a researcher with the Center for International Forestry Research, cited indigenous communities in northern Canada with their extensive logging as one example directly challenging this relation. “These timber practices must not conform with the idea some people have about indigenous communities’ relationship with the natural environment,” Lawry pointed out. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Trump May Not Want Ontario Lumber – But Habitat for Humanity Greater Toronto Area Does!

Ontario Forest Industries Association
Canada Newswire
May 15, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

TORONTO — In honour of Canada’s 150th birthday, the Ontario Forest Industries Association alongside the Honourable Kathryn McGarry, Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, will be rolling up their sleeves to help Habitat for Humanity GTA build 15 homes for working, low-income families. As the Official Wood Sponsor for these 15 homes, OFIA is proud that these homes will be built with Ontario Wood – the only naturally, renewable resource.

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No wood? Family builds first house made of foam in Phoenix

By Ty Brennan
Fox 10 Phoenix
May 14, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

PHOENIX – A newly constructed home in the Phoenix area is the first of its kind; it’s built completely out of foam. Builders say it’s easier to work with than wood, it’s earth-friendly, and the best part? It’s a lot cheaper, too. “We’re so thrilled with it. We love every part of it,” said David Stockton. …From the looks of it, you’d never be able to tell there is not a single piece of wood used in the structure. Builders say it’s stronger than wood, cheaper than wood, takes less time to build, and it’s earth-friendly. …”It comes in large blocks, and it goes together much like Legos,” said Jeremy Pollock, the general contractor of the house. “I’ve been building traditional homes for 20 years, so when I heart about it, it intrigued me in many ways.”

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General

Timber industry needs help to keep driving SC economy

May 15, 2017
Category: Uncategorised


Columbia, SC- As legislators finalize the state budget, I worry that they might neglect to adequately support one of South Carolina’s economic engines, one that helps drive our manufacturing economy and simultaneously enhances our water resources, soil conservation, wildlife and recreation. That economic engine is the state’s forests, which cover more than two-thirds of the land area. Timber is one of the foundations of our state economy — our No. 1 harvested crop and the No. 1 commodity exported from the Port of Charleston — and the S.C. Forestry Commission is critical to maintaining and developing our forests and protecting them from wildfires, insects and diseases. Recently, tight budgets have made that job more difficult. …Underfunding the state Forestry Commission could dampen one of the state’s most important economic engines.

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Enviro Group Aims to Restore the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh River

May 15, 2017
Category: Uncategorised


The Nature Conservancy has big plans for the Olympic Peninsula’s Hoh River. The conservation organization just acquired 7,000 new acres of land in the watershed from the Hoh River Trust. That adds to the 3,000-acre parcel the Nature Conservancy already owned. Its aim is to improve the health of the forest — and with it, the health of the river. Most of the watershed is in state or federal hands. But the lower portion that the Nature Conservancy now owns has been logged repeatedly and replanted with conifer trees instead of with the hardwood trees and shrubs that used to line the rivers of the Olympic Peninsula. …The Nature Conservancy’s work will include selective logging, replanting, and repairing roads and culverts. The logging will help pay for the restoration work and will also provide employment for local contractors.

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