Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 13, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Time and money – more needed!

Tree Frog Forestry News
June 13, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

What is the value of a forest? The Nature Conservancy of Canada and the TD Bank have tackled this tricky question with a report on the value of conserved forests in Canada. Their premise is “by better incorporating nature into economic decision-making, we may be better able to protect nature itself“. They give some specific figures for the value but you will have to read the article and report to learn more!

Less than positive news on the softwood lumber dispute from Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland (speaking at the International Economic Forum of the Americas in Montreal), commenting that Canada and the US positions “are still quite far apart“. But the government is “confident in its position that the duties….are punitive and without foundation“. Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard vows to keep fighting saying the US is mistaken “if they think they will tire us out“.

New Zealand forest owners are pushing the government to start using extra tree planting now rather than waiting for a climate change report due out next year. This would allow for increased carbon sequestration and timber availability sooner.  Forest Owners’ Association president Peter Clark says the “government timetable will add at least an extra two years…That’s too long a delay”.

— Heidi Walsh, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry

Board to audit Winton Global Lumber Ltd. near Fort St. James

BC Forest Practices Board
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board will examine the activities of Winton Global Lumber Ltd. on forest licence A18171, in the Fort St. James Natural Resource District, during the week of June 19, 2017. Auditors will examine whether harvesting, roads, silviculture, fire protection and associated planning, carried out between June 2015 and June 2017, met the requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Winton Global Lumber Ltd.’s forestry activities are located around Fort St. James. Harvesting has focused on salvaging timber damaged by the mountain pine beetle. Once the audit work is complete, a report will be prepared, and any party that may be adversely affected by the audit findings will have a chance to respond. The board’s final report and recommendations then will be released to the public and government.

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Logging trucks and ATVs

Letter by Michael France
Castanet
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…After moving to Christina Lake, I started becoming a steady user of the Trans Canada trail in my area. …And now I find out that Interfor has made it be known to the government that they would like to shut down the trail in the Christina Lake area so that they can log in the area and use the trail as a logging road! So beware Kelowna, one day you may find that your beloved trail, will become a logging road. …Ironically, the American logging company is trying to shut down the trail to sell wood to the U.S. with the recent duties imposed on Canada. Ms. Clark seems to talk tough in front of the cameras, but it would seem that it is all hot air.

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Pricing the priceless

Letter by Dan Kraus, national conservation biologist, Nature Conservancy of Canada
The Telegram
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Putting a price tag on nature is challenging. Some people even hate the idea of it. But as Canada continues to face the extraordinary challenges of climate change and habitat loss, more people are seeing the value in putting a dollar value on nature. And the hope is, that by better incorporating nature into economic decision-making, we may be better able to protect nature itself. … So what’s a forest worth? The value of the services calculated in these case studies range from $5,800 to $46,000 per hectare per year. Remove the forest and those costs are incurred by society, local communities and individuals year after year, forever. Invest in forests and we invest in these services. The bottom line is we live in country that has an abundance of natural capital, but it is eroding, especially in southern Canada where most people live.

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Meeting to consider Fall Creek logging permit

By Jutin Criado
Telluride Daily Planet
June 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

San Miguel County commissioners on Tuesday will consider granting a logging company a special use permit for operations on Down Valley federal lands. The action item relates to the proposed Little Cone Timber Sale and the possible traffic impacts associated with logging an 86-acre parcel near the end of Fall Creek Road. County Commissioner Hilary Cooper said the possible increase in traffic along the half-paved, half-gravel road would be pretty significant. “What we need to consider here is the impact on the road and that’s going to be a challenge because there will be a lot of impacts from logging trucks up and down that road all summer,” she said. Glenwood Springs-based logging company Buen Tiempo Forest Restoration LLC previously was granted state and federal approval to harvest upwards of 880,000 board feet of timber from the U.S. Forest Service parcel over a two-year period, equating to approximately 75 trips per 90-day logging season.

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Logger rebuilds after equipment, business loss in Copper King Fire

By Caryn Foehringer
NBC Montana
June 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

THOMPSON FALLS, Mont. – It’s almost been a year since the Copper King Fire destroyed more than 29,000 acres of private, state and national forest land. NBC Montana talked to logger Mike Newton last year when his logging equipment succumbed to the fire. Newton estimates the fire did around $350,000 worth of damages. “When I raced down here early in the morning and I came around the corner, I could see the fire,” Newton said. “I assumed I was out of business because I knew none of the machines could have survived.” Three of Newton’s six machines survived. Now a year later, Newton has replaced all of his damaged equipment. Newton says the fire was not as devastating for his business as he initially believed. He says just eight days after his equipment burned, he was out logging with the other materials.

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Spruce, fir sale designed to combat budworm infestation

By Jim Mimiaga
Durango Herald
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A logging sale proposed on the San Juan National Forest north of Dolores is tapping into the spruce and fir market, but it is also designed to combat the Western spruce budworm infestation. If approved, the Taylor and Stoner mesas logging plan would put aspen, Engelmann spruce, blue spruce and subalpine fir up for bid this summer. While the aspen market has been strong locally, there is an increase in demand for spruce and fir, said forester David Casey. “It is the first green spruce sale since the 1990s,” he said. “Spruce is something we are getting back into to test the market.” The market is being driven in part by demand from the Montrose Forest Products mill, which makes precut lumber. The mill recently changed hands and switched its focus to spruce and fir from lodgepole and ponderosa pine.

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Tenging to the Land

By Kevin Coyne
Rutgers Magazine
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Alumni Bill Haines Jr. and Bob Williams—one the owner of an expanse of acreage in New Jersey and the other a talented forester—provide a model for the stewardship of the state’s forests. On a wet March morning last year, Bob Williams is bumping his pickup along a dirt road through one of the private forests whose health he monitors when he spots a patch of pines needing treatment. But what it needs is what the weather precludes: fire. “This is ready to burn now,” says Williams CC’75, pointing to the brambly underbrush that is nuzzling the ankles of the trees like ground fog. “We’d be burning today if it weren’t raining.” The forest belongs to one of his Rutgers classmates, Bill Haines Jr., whose Pine Island Cranberry Co., the largest grower in the state, sprawls across three townships in Burlington County between the east and west branches of the Wading River.

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Sowing the seeds of hope for critically endangered magnolia tree

By Fauna & Flora International
Phys.org
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In the limestone hills of northern Vietnam, villagers have been busy planting one of the world’s rarest magnolias back into its natural habitat. More than 1,100 seedlings from the critically endangered Magnolia grandis have been planted out by people from three villages in Ha Giang province, northern Vietnam. In a bid to save the species from extinction, seedlings were planted in community forests – areas of land protected by village regulations – and within plantations of cardamom. Planting will help to boost the population size of the species which had fallen to fewer than 150 adult trees as a direct result of illegal logging and loss of the species’ forest habitat to farming.

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Accounting for tree height, biodiversity is 3-D

By National Research Tomsk State University
Phys.org
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The species-area relationship (SAC) is a long-term pattern in ecology and is discussed in most academic Ecology books. Its implications are relevant for many ecological, evolutionary, conservation and biogeographic purposes. Conversely, the associated volume-species relationship has been mostly ignored. According to a new study published in the journal Plant Ecology, this relationship may play a fundamental ecological role, and it is relevant for many ecological applications such as the estimation of minimum viable populations, species ranges and protected areas. In this global-scale study, Roberto Cazzolla Gatti, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the Biological Institute of the Tomsk State University (Russia) and his Italian colleagues from the Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC) in Viterbo, investigated this new perspective looking at canopy height as a proxy of ecosystem volume (“biospace”), which influences plant richness in forest ecosystems.

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Tropical forest diversity and carbon richness not linked, study finds

By Claire Salisbury
Mongabay
June 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Tropical forests are home to more than 50 percent of terrestrial biodiversity, and they also play a globally important role in storing and sequestering carbon. Forest conservation can therefore help address two of the most urgent challenges facing the world today: stemming biodiversity loss and mitigating the effects of climate change. More than 60 countries are developing projects to reduce carbon emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in exchange for economic benefits, under the United Nation’s REDD+ program. But a new study cautions that conservation strategies that focus on protecting only the most carbon-rich forests will “inevitably miss many high diversity ecosystems” that contribute less significantly to curbing greenhouse gases. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, involved more than 100 scientists working within three international networks of forest plots; all using standardized methods so findings could be correlated across regions.

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Urgent need for forestry graduates

Letter by a local forester
The Gisborne Herald
June 13, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

It was interesting seeing EIT’s two-page spread recently showing all the training they had achieved, with no mention of any forestry course. We need another 400 logging workers on the East Coast in the next four years, starting now. They take one to two years to become productive. All other districts in New Zealand are facing the same situation — we will not be able to attract workers here like we have in the past. We have just two training organisations in Gisborne. The above facts are well known to them. I would like to know: (a) from both EIT and Turanga Ararau, how many students who sat logging courses from January to December 2016 are now employed in forestry?

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Forest Fires

Fire crews fighting forest fire near Johnsons Crossing, Yukon

CBC News
June 12, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fire crews are fighting a forest fire east of Whitehorse, about 20 kilometres northwest of Johnsons Crossing, according to Yukon Wildland Fire Management. In a news release, it says there were four new wildfires over the weekend: two caused by lightning and two caused by humans. The fire near Johnsons Crossing was caused by lightning and was about seven hectares in size as of Monday morning. The largest of the new fires, also lightning caused, is in the Klondike region in a “wilderness zone.” It’s being monitored, but not fought.

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New Documentary Gives Smokey Bear A New, Positive Message About Forest Fire

By Derek Lee
Wild Nature Institute
June 9, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States

A short documentary film was released this week that gives the U.S. Forest Service spokes-bear, Smokey, a positive new message about forest fires in the American west. …Monica Bond, principal scientist at Wild Nature Institute and the film’s writer said, “Many species of plants and animals reach their highest abundances only in the blackened ‘snag forests’ created by stand-replacing forest fires, and this overwhelming positive response shows that high-severity crown fire has been a natural part of western forests for thousands of years. Unfortunately, the budget of the U.S. Forest Service is linked to logging and forest fire suppression, so they use forest fires to scare people into supporting ecologically damaging logging operations billed as ‘thinning to reduce fuels’ or ‘post-fire restoration,’ but these logging projects destroy important wildlife habitat and do not effectively protect homes or communities.”

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Company & Business News

Canada and U.S. remain ‘quite far apart’ on softwood lumber, Freeland says

Canadian Press in the CBC News
June 12, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

Canada and the United States remain “quite far apart” on negotiating a softwood lumber settlement, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Monday, suggesting that any hopes for a swift resolution may be dashed. Freeland offered the blunt assessment before meeting members of Quebec’s forestry sector, who for nearly two months have been charged duties for shipping softwood south of the border. “Our positions are still quite far apart,” she said after addressing the International Economic Forum of the Americas in Montreal. “But I think that talking is always a good thing and that is something that we are doing very actively and energetically.” Her comments come after Raymond Chretien, Quebec’s softwood lumber envoy, said earlier this month that he was optimistic the trade dispute could be resolved before NAFTA renegotiations get underway in mid-August. He also warned, however, that the softwood standoff could last for years if an agreement isn’t reached prior to those NAFTA talks.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

More than a few acres: the vital importance of snow to B.C.’s climate

By Roshini Nair
CBC News
June 13, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West


Deep in B.C.’s Interior a very special 3,000-year-old rainforest is a living embodiment of the importance of snow to B.C.’s freshwater future. The ancient cedar stand near McBride, B.C. — 600 kilometres from the coast — isn’t really a rainforest at all, explains Darwyn Coxson, a professor in ecosystem science at the University of Northern British Columbia. Rather, it’s a “snow” forest. Unlike B.C.’s coastal rainforests on Haida Gwaii or Prince Rupert which are fed by constant rain, the trees in this stand only see about a third of the amount of rain those forests do. “Snow is what sustains it. The snow is what keeps it alive,” he said. “As that melts it recharges the groundwater, and the places where the ancient cedars grow are right at the base of the mountain slopes.”

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Another look at timber, carbon

By Richard Waring
Corvallis Gazette-Times
June 12, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

n Nancy Ross Hathaway’s opinion piece (June 9), she correctly states that Oregon’s forests are accumulating substantially more carbon than currently harvested, and that this accumulation is far from adequate to keep up with the amount of carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. She also acknowledged that none of us knows everything about a given subject. A few statements in her essay warrant correction based on more reliable sources, i.e., the primary scientific literature. Although it is true that timber used in house construction stores carbon, more carbon would be stored longer without disturbing the forest, which reduces the photosynthetic capture of carbon dioxide and speeds soil decomposition. In addition, fossil fuels are required to extract, transport, manufacture and use wood products (although far less than required for cement, steel, or brick buildings).

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Forest owners don’t want to wait

New Zealand Herald
June 13, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Forest owners want the government to get extra forest planting underway, rather than waiting for a report on climate change to be presented next year. Minister for Climate Change Paula Bennett has announced that the Productivity Commission will report back in June 2018, with recommendations for achieving a lower-carbon economy, to enable New Zealand to achieve its Paris Agreement commitment of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent from 2005 levels, by 2030. Forest Owners’ Association president Peter Clark said the time to start using trees to sequester carbon from them was now. “The government is already supporting the up-take of electric vehicles without waiting for the Productivity Commission. There’s every reason to get the same impetus for tree planting, especially on farm and Maori-owned land,” he said.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Green homes project set to form Scotland’s tallest timber structure

By Caroline Wilson
Evening Times
June 12, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

WORK is under way to build dozens of new energy- efficient homes which will form Scotland’s tallest timber structure. Glasgow firm CCG is behind the project to build 42 “mid-market’ rented flats in Yoker for Sanctuary housing with views across the River Clyde. Once complete, the seven storey building, which has been designed by Mast Architects and combines the use of cross laminated timber (CLT) and an acrylic brick-slip façade will be the tallest timber structure in the country. CLT first emerged on the market in 2003 and was used to build Murray Grove in London, which at nine storeys is the tallest building of its kind in the UK.

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