Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 26, 2017

Business & Politics

Boise Cascade Celebrating 60th

Building Products
June 25, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Boise Cascade Co., Boise, Id., is planning a year-long 60th anniversary celebration, with festivities at each of its nearly 60 locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. Boise Cascade was formed in the May 1957 merger of Boise-Payette Lumber Co. and Cascade Lumber Co. It now operates two core businesses, Wood Products Manufacturing and Building Materials Distribution. 

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Canadian lumber producers brace for second round of softwood lumber duties

By Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in Metro News
June 25, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL — Canada’s softwood lumber industry is bracing for a second wave of U.S. duties expected to come Monday that could put further pressure on producers, particularly smaller ones, to cut jobs. …This time, the U.S. is expected to announce preliminary anti-dumping duties with an average rate of around 10 per cent, which would be added on to the previous levy. Analyst Paul Quinn of RBC Capital Markets believes the U.S. will play hardball and impose high anti-dumping rates in order to push Canada to agree to a deal before negotiations on NAFTA begin in August. “Anti-dumping (duties) is a way to scare the Canadians and try to force them to get something done,” he said from Vancouver. …Final duty rates have been lower than preliminary tariffs in the past. But Quinn said that could change this time because the U.S. Lumber Coalition is pushing for a tough response to the Canadian government’s $867-million financial support for the industry, mainly through loans and loan guarantees.

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Canada Braces for Additional Duties on Its U.S.-Bound Softwood-Lumber Exports

By Paul Vieira
Fox Business
June 25, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

OTTAWA – Canada is bracing for Washington to slap additional duties on its U.S.-bound lumber exports, an expected move that could complicate efforts to quickly renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, say lawyers and officials. The Commerce Department is expected to release a decision as early as Monday. The department has been looking at whether Canada is selling softwood lumber, used mostly in the construction of houses, into the U.S. at below-market prices. …A new ruling against Canada could push the average tariff on Canadian softwood lumber above 30%, according to trade lawyers at law firm Dickinson Wright. …Trade watchers worry that letting the current row drag on any longer threatens to cast a pall over trilateral talks between the U.S., Canada and Mexico for a revamped Nafta, which formally begin in mid-August.

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Can Canada resist Trump’s offensive on Nafta?

By Joseph Shupac
Macrogeo
June 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canada’s dependency on the US and internal divisions might reduce its leverage in any trade negotiations. But its interests being global in scope, the US cannot afford to spend much geopolitical capital haggling with Canada. NAFTA stands for the North American Free Trade Act, but President Trump does not. After campaigning on a promise to repeal the Act, then adapting his position to that of merely supporting the Act’s renegotiation, Trump recently announced that he would no longer tolerate the status quo arrangement for American imports of dairy and forestry products originating from Canada. Proposing, on April 24, to add a 24-percent tariff on US imports of Canadian softwood lumber, Trump kept up the pressure on Canada the following day.

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Gorman expansion

By Trevor Nichols
Okanagan Edge
June 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Expansion plans are in the works for Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd. in West Kelowna. At last week’s regular meeting, West Kelowna council gave its initial approval for the rezoning of a 1.75 ha piece of property on the east side of Highway 97, adjacent to where the mill now stores lumber. The site is currently undeveloped, and the rezoning will allow the mill to store more lumber and other things on the site. Right now, Gorman is not asking to build any structures on the property. City staff pointed out that West Kelowna’s Official Community Plan designated the area for industrial uses, and that the rezoning would be in line with that designation. Council was largely in support of the mill storing lumber on the site, and raised only passing concerns about sightlines from the highway.

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Greenpeace is a menace to the world

By Margaret Wente
The Globe and Mail
June 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The little town of Saint-Félicien, in Quebec’s lovely Saguenay region, is under siege. The softwood lumber wars have broken out again, and that’s bad news. … Then there’s Greenpeace. “Greenpeace wants our total death!” mayor Gilles Potvin complained back in 2013. “If we listen to them, we can’t cut wood any more.” Greenpeace has been waging a relentless campaign against Resolute Forest Products, the largest forest company in the region and in Canada. (It is the successor company to Abitibi and Bowater.) … The region’s mayors, union leaders, mill workers, and Indigenous leaders are fed up with Greenpeace. They’re angry at being portrayed by outsiders as forest destroyers. “Greenpeace, in our view, is a group that goes to the extreme, that doesn’t seek a balance between conservation and forest management,” Jack Picard, a band council member of the Innu Nation of Pessamit in Quebec, says in a video. He adds: “We don’t accept anyone else speaking for us. We are fully capable of speaking for ourselves.”

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Judge rules against Westerlund’s attempt to dismiss claims in log fight

By Edward Stratton
The Daily Astorian
June 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A federal judge has denied David Westerlund’s attempt to dismiss claims brought by Astoria Forest Products in a complicated legal dispute over log operations at the Port of Astoria. Westerlund, owner of Westerlund Log Handlers, helped bring log exports back to the Port of Astoria in 2010 after a long hiatus. But several years into the new venture, Westerlund had ended a log-handling contract and became embroiled in a lawsuit with the large, state-owned construction firm China National Building Materials Corp. China National bought many of Westerlund’s logs and loaned the company money for its equipment. Dennis Murphy, of Murphy Overseas USA and Astoria Forest Products, stepped in, allegedly paying $2.5 million three years ago to settle the case and release liens on Westerlund Log Handlers’ equipment.

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Two former sawmills get EPA brownfield clean-up study funding

By Bill Esler
Woodworking Network
June 25, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Two wood industry brownfield manufacturing sites – the Flathead Post & Pole sawmill in Montana and a former LP Crescent Mills sawmill in Plumas County, California – will receive clean-up study funds from the Environmental Protection Agency. The Flathead Post & Pole sawmill facility was located between Dixon and Moeise in Montana. The study will examine mitigation of contamination in soil, groundwater, and wood waste. …The EPA study awards are part of $56.8 million awarded in Brownfields Assessment and Cleanup Grants by the EPA to 172 communities. The funds are aimed at under-served and economically disadvantaged communities through the assessment and cleanup of abandoned industrial and commercial properties and expand the ability of communities to recycle vacant and abandoned properties for new, productive reuses.

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Blue Lake Power Biomass Plant to Restart

Benzinga.com
June 25, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Blue Lake, CA — Blue Lake Power LLC announces its plans to restart its 12 MW biomass plant located in Blue Lake, CA in July 2017. The facility is a biomass power-generation unit designed to burn wood, create steam and operate a turbine to generate electrical power. The power will be sold into the power grid in Northern California. Blue Lake Power LLC is presently working to secure short and long-term supplies of high-quality fuel for ongoing operations. …Under its operating permit, the plant may burn fuel consisting of untreated wood including sawmill hog fuel, shavings, bark, branches, cull logs, tree tops, off-spec and waste lumber, skids, yard waste, walnut shells, similar woody agricultural waste, shredded lumber, woody materials from hazardous forest areas, etc.

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Georgia-Pacific to expand Palatka mill, add 80 jobs

By Roger Bull
Florida Times-Union
June 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Georgia-Pacific is going to spend $400 million expanding its paper and pulp mill in Palatka, adding an additional 80 jobs to a county with the highest unemployment in Northeast Florida. About 850 people work at the mill now. Georgia-Pacific had announced in March that it would make the $400 million investment in one of its locations, but didn’t say which one. Locations were considered in at least three other states, said Terry Hadaway, public affairs manager for the plant. At a Friday news conference in Palatka, the company made it official. It will add a new papermaking complex to make tissue and paper towels at its plant on County Road 216, a few miles northwest of Palatka. Engineering and related work is expected to begin immediately, with the project finished and operating in 2019.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Professor Hanington’s Speaking of Science: The science of wood preservation

Elko Daily Free Press
June 25, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Last week my son Joe mentioned that he should seal his new deck with some kind of wood treatment before the sun started baking it this summer. …Doing a little research on the subject of wood preservation I found some interesting things. All wood preservatives claim to extend the life of wood or timber of a structure. Extremes of weather and scorching sun try their best to systematically destroy decks, railings and outdoor stairways by wearing away the cellulose of the material. In addition, insects and fungus start their dirty work in ruining your property as soon as the last nail is set. …It is said that the treatment of wood has been practiced for almost as long as the use of wood itself. Ancient Greeks soaked their bridge timber in olive oil and Romans protected their ship hulls by brushing the wood with tar

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dRMM’s Oldham Maggie’s is the first CLT hardwood building in the world

By Jon Astbury
Architects’ Journal
June 26, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Designed by dRMM Architects in the grounds of the Royal Oldham Hospital, the centre has also completed during Maggie’s 21st year of operation. …The structure itself is the world’s first hardwood CLT building, with the interior walls and glazing curving around a central garden space above which the entire centre hovers. Once fully established it is estimated that the centre will support around 10,000 visits every year. dRMM is immersed in the orchestration of materials and the built environment, and how design makes people live and feel differently. Our pioneering work in timber construction included the UK’s first cross-laminated timber public buildings at Kingsdale School, London 2006-9. Why wood? In wood there is hope, humanity, scale, warmth, and nature’s clever plan to absorb carbon. Wood is a non-toxic, versatile, benign, anti-carcinogenic material. People like wood, but steel and concrete are the industry default.

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Brilliant woodland pavilion pushes the envelope of timber in tension

By Lucy Wang
Inhabitat
June 25, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building

Architectural Association students of the Design & Make program are pushing the envelope on lightweight timber construction. In the program’s most recent annual project, students completed the Sawmill Shelter, an experimental pavilion that uses tension to hold the structure together and create a sturdy roof resistant to snow loads and wind uplifts. Located in Hooke Park of Dorset, England, the sculptural structure’s roof was built from locally sourced Western Red Cedar. …“The structure adjusted, each lath carries up to two tonnes of tension, demonstrating the remarkable strength of wood under tension,” reads the project description. 

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Forestry

Upper Clearwater logging is shameful

Letter to the Editor by Cheryl Thomas
Clearwater Times
June 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sadly I gazed at our beautiful Clearwater Valley from the Shaden viewing platform and picnic area last week. The damage caused today will affect our future incomes for many, many years – long after the money gained from the lack of thought and care for the trees and wildlife has been spent and those folks have moved away. I have nothing against ‘forest management’. Indeed, it would no doubt be healthy to harvest perhaps as many as ¼ of these trees. Carefully, one tree at a time. Harvesting only the big ones. Leave tobacco – be grateful. These trees are just doing their jobs as assigned by the Creator.

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Province says calls for logging moratorium premature

By Barb Brouwer
Salmon Arm Observer
June 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Placing a moratorium on logging operations in the Sicamous area would be premature, says the province. At the Columbia Shuswap Regional District’s April board meeting in Salmon Arm, directors unanimously supported a resolution to make recommendations to Tolko Industries Ltd. (Lumby) and the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (FLNRO) that a moratorium be placed on future logging in the Hummingbird Creek and Mara Creek watersheds due to the history of large debris flows and that Tolko hold public engagement meetings in communities where they plan to log. Mark Hopkins, provincial tenure and First Nations officer in the Okanagan Shuswap Resource District, addressed those concerns in a May 13 letter to CSRD chair Rhona Martin on behalf of ministry executive and Ray Crampton, district manager of the Okanagan Shuswap Natural Resource District.

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Rustad Named BC Forests Minister, Maintains Aboriginal Relations Portfolio

By John Crawford
CFTK
June 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Legislature has a new speaker — and that means John Rustad has a new job. Rustad is taking over the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, after former minister Steve Thomson was acclaimed as speaker yesterday. Rustad will also continue as Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation. And the Nechako Lakes MLA says there’s a big job ahead. “I look forward to the work we have, there’s a lot on the plate and things that need to get addressed right away and so I have solid forestry background and obviously forestry is an important component of my riding and really throughout the north and it’s actually an interesting combination with Aboriginal Relations as well, but I look forward to the work that needs to be done, there’s obviously some very important issues with respect to softwood lumber, with flooding that’s going on, as well as timber allocations and other things so it’s going to be a busy time, even though it may be a short time,” he said.

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Trees Communicate Via a Vast Underground Network of Fungi

By Dan Franck
Nature World News
June 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Suzanne Simard wants you to think about trees differently, not as rugged individualists bravely facing the world alone, but as part of a vast social world connected by an invisible underground network. Her views are firmly rooted in scientific research and her ideas represent nothing less that a paradigm shift in ecological thought. For over 30 years, Simard has been watching and listening to trees. She is a forest ecology professor at the University of British Columbia’s Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences in Vancouver. Simard’s views are hard-won, and she came upon them not by looking above ground in the forest but below. She concentrated on a little-understood aspect of forest biology: the extensive fungal networks that form enormous underground connections unseen to the casual observer.

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County urges clear-cutting moratorium, presses province over WestFor deal

By Emma Smith
CBC News
June 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A rural municipality in southwest Nova Scotia is pushing back against the provincial government and a mill consortium over concerns it has with clear cutting, and is urging for a moratorium on the practice in its region. The County of Annapolis wants Crown land that falls within its boundaries excluded from an agreement between the province and WestFor, a consortium of 13 mills that manages western Crown land. Warden Timothy Habinski has twice asked the province to leave land within Annapolis County out of the agreement for one year. He also wants to see a copy of the licence agreement, but the response to both requests has been no.

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A washed-out road sharpens concerns about a Bitterroot timber project

By Alex Sakariassen
Missoula Independent
June 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It was a hell of a rainstorm. Starting June 12, the Sapphire Mountains east of Hamilton got hit with 48 hours of record precipitation—more than 2 inches in some places, as much as 3.7 inches in others. The impact on Willow Creek Road was alarming. A portion of the upper road sloughed away, creating a landslide that swept mud, logs and boulders down the hillside and across the lower roadway clear to Willow Creek itself. “I don’t believe that road was in good shape even before it blew out,” says Larry Campbell, a Darby resident and member of the nonprofit Friends of the Bitterroot. “The fact that it did blow out is Mother Nature’s audit.” Campbell’s concern stems not just from the fact that Willow Creek Road washed out. The Bitterroot National Forest had previously identified the road as a primary haul route for its proposed Gold Butterfly timber project.

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Do beetle-killed trees make wildfires worse? Brian Head blaze may provide surprising answers

By Brian Maffly
Salt Lake Tribune
June 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The wildfire threatening a southern Utah resort town this week raced through a forest that lost hundreds of thousands of spruce trees in a devastating bark-beetle outbreak. While it remains unclear how much of a factor all that barren timber played in the Brian Head Fire, the area’s glut of dead wood raises concerns about firefighter safety and how wildland blazes could behave in the 2 million acres of Utah forests that have turned gray from the phloem-munching beetles. For now, officials believe the Dixie National Forest trees perished so long ago that they no longer increase the likelihood of a catastrophic fire. Instead, hot, dry winds whipped this week’s flames. “The fine needles and smaller fuel fibers [from those dead trees] have fallen on the ground or they are gone, so there isn’t that flashy fuel. That reduces the intensity. It’s like trying to light a giant log with nothing around it,” Dixie spokeswoman Cigi Burton said. ost of these snags and logs are considered a “1,000-hour fuel,” referring to the amount of time a piece of dead wood takes to respond to changes in moisture conditions.

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Alabama’s 60,000-year-old underwater forest spills its secrets in new documentary

Al.com
June 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The ancient cypress forest found 60 feet underwater in the Gulf of Mexico, due south of Gulf Shores, Ala., is about 60,000 years old, says a team of scientists who have studied the site. The forest appears to be a wholly unique relic of our planet’s past, the only known site where a coastal ice age forest this old has been preserved in place, with thousands of trees still rooted in the dirt they were growing millennia ago. It is considered a treasure trove of information, providing new insights into everything from climate in the region to annual rainfall, insect populations, and the types of plants that inhabited the Gulf Coast before humans arrived in the new world. 

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Gypsy moth caterpillar assault overwhelming region’s trees

By John Penny
Norwich Bulletin
June 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Hundreds, if not thousands, of acres of forest throughout Windham County have been stripped to bare branches as gypsy moth caterpillars continue to devastate normally lush canopies. For long stretches along Interstate 395, running from Plainfield to Woodstock and across the back roads of Scotland and Sterling, drivers speed past large patches of brown denuded woodland that in past years were an unbroken stream of green. Hillside trees now resemble those of late fall or early spring with whole sections devoid of leaves or buds. “All our oak trees are wiped out, totally stripped,” Plainfield First Selectman Paul Sweet said. “They’ve moved on to the maples and our roads have all turned brown from the caterpillar waste. This is the second year we’ve seen this and if it goes into a third, we start to lose trees.”

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Proposed timber project near Copperhill draws opponents

By Ben Barton
Times Free Press
June 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

COPPERHILL, Tenn. — A proposed logging project in the Cherokee National Forest in Polk County, Tenn., has conservationists worried for the upper waters of a sparkling trout stream that winds through hemlocks and beech trees. The project includes “a mixture of clearcuts, seedtree cuts, shelterwood cuts, and thinning. These are some steep slopes on sensitive soils,” according to a statement from Tennessee Heartwood, a nonprofit group that addresses issues in the Cherokee National Forest and other public lands across Tennessee. Officials said the Forest Service’s timbering work combines efforts to remove species not characteristic to the area — such as stands of white pine — and replace them with characteristic species. Removed trees can be a commercial benefit to the community, while replacing them helps replenish original species.

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Eating frogs is a health hazard: Forest Dept

Oherald
June 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

PANJIM: The Forest Department has cautioned the frog eaters of serious health hazards while also warning them as well as poachers of legal action under Wildlife (Protection) Act. “Consumption of frogs over a period of time could trigger paralytic strokes, cancer, kidney failures and other deformities as the toxic recalcitrant residues from the agrochemicals used in the fields to get biomagnified in the food chain, may get accumulated in the fat deposits of these frogs,” reads an advisory issued by the Chief Wildlife Warden. The department also emphasized that killing of frogs leads to imbalance in the food chain which further affects the terrestrial and aquatic eco system. 

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Climate change in drones’ sights with ambitious plan to remotely plant nearly 100,000 trees a day

By Jake Sturmer
ABC News Australia
June 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An Australian engineer is hoping to use drones to plant 1 billion trees every year to fight an unfolding global catastrophe. Deforestation and forest degradation make up 17 per cent of the world’s carbon emissions — more than the entire world’s transportation sector, according to the United Nations. Burned or cleared forests release their stored carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, and land restoration experts say technology must play a big part in addressing the problem. Dr Susan Graham has helped build a drone system that can scan the land, identify ideal places to grow trees, and then fire germinated seeds into the soil. Drones can plant in areas previously impossible to reach, like steep hills.

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Latest policy proposals would have done nothing to resolve issues in Tasmania’s forestry industry

By Peter Henning
Geelong Advertiser
June 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

DIVISIONS within Tasmanian society run wider and deeper about forestry issues than any other public policy area, and that has been the case for several decades. The latest policy proposals by the Hodgman Government, had they passed the Legislative Council, would have done nothing to resolve any of those divisions, and nor were they intended to do so. Forestry policy in Tasmania has long been determined by perceptions of partisan political advantage, including the flow of money into parties’ election campaigns, rather than any concern about the public interest or sustainability of the industry.

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Polish protesters demand halt to logging in primeval forest

By Vanessa Gera
Associated Press in the Journal Gazette
June 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

WARSAW, Poland — Hundreds marched in Warsaw on Saturday to protest widespread logging in Europe’s last primeval forest, a project undertaken by Poland’s conservative government. The ruling Law and Justice party has allowed increased logging in the Bialowieza Forest, a vast woodland that straddles Poland and Belarus, alarming environmentalists who say it threatens a natural treasure. The forest has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The government says it has increased logging to fight an outbreak of bark beetle, which has infected many spruce trees. But ecologists see that as a pretext to increase timber production for profit.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Maine institutions collaborating to build a greener lobster boat

By Mary Pols
Press Herald
June 25, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

ARUNDEL — Students at the Landing School have built nearly 400 boats since the school was founded in 1978. But nothing quite like the one the school is about to start on…which is known colloquially as a “green lobster boat.” “It’s like a skiff on top of a canoe, with two small canoes at the back of the skiff,” said Richard Schuhmann, the president of the Landing School. “It looks like a Batmobile in a way.” …From design to materials, this boat is intended to have a smaller carbon footprint, burning less fuel than the busy lobster boats already working in Maine’s waters. …They succeeded by using only U.S.-grown wood and pulling off a last-minute woodworking feat involving a Maine-made version of plywood, versus the typical plywood made in and shipped from the Pacific Northwest.

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This urban ‘tree’ cleans as much polluted air as an entire forest

By Amanda Froelich
Inhabitat
June 26, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Air pollution might be invisible, but it results in 7 million premature deaths each year. Fortunately, there’s a solution – the CityTree is a high-tech green wall that scrubs the air of harmful particulates – and it has as much air-purifying power as 275 urban trees. As you might have guessed, the CityTree isn’t really a tree. Instead, it’s a moss culture. Zhengliang Wu, co-founder of Green City Solutions said: “Moss cultures have a much larger leaf surface area than any other plant. That means we can capture more pollutants.” The CityTree is under 4-meters-tall, approximately 3-meters-wide and 2.19 meters deep. Two versions are available – one with or without a bench – and a display is included for information or advertising.

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169 architecture exemplifies the principles of zero-carbon design in Paris

Design Boom
June 25, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

This temporary cover project in the heart of paris follows the initiative of the city, which aims to promote the use and re-use of bio-sourced materials. The design team defined several principles for the realisation of this project in order to limit its carbon impact. Firstly, the load carrying part of the structure, with a max span of 15m, is constructed in laminated timber. Similarly, the structure of the façade, acting as protection railing, is made up of a wooden frame in the form of vertical units of brackets, in timber as well. This structure was deliberately designed using the principles of a very low-carbon construction, encouraging the use of short supply chains.

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Forest Fires

Forest fire burns southeast of Port Alberni

By Susie Quinn
Ladysmith Chonicle
June 24, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A forest fire is burning 15 kilometres southeast of Port Alberni, near Mount Arrowsmith. As of Sunday morning, the fire was still estimated at 20 hectares in size. The fire had seen “minimal growth” overnight, according to Ryan Turcot, fire information officer with the Coastal Fire Centre. There are now twenty-seven firefighters on site, as well as air support. The fire was first noticeable from Port Alberni at approximately 4:30 p.m. Saturday, according to one person at Pacific Rim Centre. “The fire is currently 20 hectares in size. That’s an estimate,” said Turcot on Saturday.

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Fire near Lac La Hache is contained but B.C. Wildfire Service worried it could still spread

By Patrick Johnston
Vancouver Sun
June 25, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

A 36-hectare fire 40 kilometres southwest of Lac La Lache is contained, but the B.C. Wildfire Service remains cautious. “We’re not confident at this time it won’t spread,” Cariboo Fire Centre fire information officer Natasha Broznitsky explained Sunday about a fire the BCWS is still listing as “out of control.” With temperatures approaching 30 C and some winds in the area, “the weather is certainly playing into it.” There are 50 firefighters on scene, backed up by a helicopter and some heavy equipment. Crews are working to reinforce the containment lines which were established on Saturday around the entirety of the fire. The fire’s cause has been confirmed to be lightning.

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Crews respond to wildfire west of Tatla Lake

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Governmet of BC
June 25, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Wildfire Service is responding to a new wildfire approximately 20 km west of Tatla Lake and approximately 200 km west of Williams Lake. The fire was discovered on June 25 and is estimated to be 6 hectares in size. It is classified as being ‘Out of Control’ as of 3:30 p.m. on June 25. This wildfire does not pose an immediate threat to public safety or homes at this time. Smoke from the fire is visible from Highway 20. There are no impacts to the highway at this time. There are currently airtankers, two helicopters and 10 firefighters on site. Heavy equipment is en route. The cause of this fire is under investigation. Smoke will be visible this afternoon from nearby areas.

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Peninsula firefighters train for wildland blazes

By Cydney McFarland
Peninsula Daily News
June 23, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

PORT LUDLOW — Firefighters from agencies across the North Olympic Peninsula recently got a jump on fire season by participating in wildland fire training in Port Ludlow. Firefighters from Port Ludlow Fire &Rescue, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue, Quilcene Fire &Rescue, Brinnon Fire Department, Discovery Bay Fire Department, Clallam Fire District 2 and Clallam Fire District 3 participated in the daylong training on the closed Trail Nine at the Port Ludlow Golf Course on Saturday. Area firefighters trained alongside personnel from the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR), U.S. Forest Service and Olympic National Park to test the skills needed for wildland fires. The inter-agency training is meant to help build trust between the agencies that come together to fight a wildfire, according to DNR.

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Payson watershed at risk

By Peter Aleshire
Payson Roundup
June 23, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Payson has spent 20 years and some $50 million to secure rights to 3,000 acre-feet annually from the C.C. Cragin Reservoir — enough to make Payson one of the only places in the state with an adequate, long-term water supply. But we could lose it in an afternoon. The now-contained Highline Fire demonstrated the danger in dramatic form, as flames rushed up the steep, 1,000-foot-high face of the Mogollon Rim. All those ravenous tongues of flame had to do was top the Rim, scatter glowing embers a mile deep into the thick, overgrown forest on top and rush toward the C.C. Cragin Reservoir (also known as Blue Ridge). Studies suggest that a crown fire racing through the watershed leading into the reservoir could trigger subsequent massive mudslides and ongoing erosion that could fill in the deep, narrow reservoir in a couple of years.

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Frye Fire at 29,000 acres; second fire burning to south

By David Sowders
Eastern Arizona Courier
June 23, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West


SAFFORD — As of Friday morning, the Frye fire was burning across 29,424 acres in the Pinaleno Mountains. The fire, being fought by over 800 firefighters in 21 crews, was reportedly 10 percent contained. It had earlier been estimated at 16 percent containment. The eastern side remained the fire’s most active area, with strong north winds pushing the flames southeast to Marijilda Canyon. According to the incident management team, the fire’s northwest and southwest perimeters have been backing slowly. “Good progress has been made with the support of firefighters and aerial ignitions to limit high severity impacts,” said a team statement, adding that resources are taking advantage of fuel transitions, cooler temperatures and higher humidity.

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Utah evacuees watched flames draw closer, smoke get thicker

By Michelle L. Price
Associated Press in ABC News
June 23, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

A wildfire menacing a southern Utah ski town for nearly a week flared again, doubling in size for the second night in a row and torching more homes after residents fled the flames, officials said Friday. The blaze was one of several burning in the U.S. West as extreme heat challenges firefighters. The Utah fire that’s charred 51.5 square miles (133.5 square kilometers) near the town of Brian Head has destroyed a total of 13 homes, Forest Service spokeswoman Cigi Burton said. No one was injured because the homes and cabins were among 600 evacuated a day earlier from the alpine community that is home to the Brian Head Resort and near several national monuments and parks in Utah’s red rock country.

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The Latest: Officials say better weather limited Utah fire

Associated Press in The Washington Post
June 25, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Officials say that better weather conditions have limited the growth of a wildfire in Utah that has prompted the evacuation of 1,500 people from hundreds of homes and cabins. In a statement, Incident Commander Tim Roide says Sunday was “a good day for firefighters, who were able to have success securing areas of particular concern, including the many structures affected by the Brian Head Fire.” Officials say the fire currently covers nearly 67 square miles (174 square kilometers) and is 10 percent contained. Officials say firefighters on Sunday put in barriers against the flames and air tankers dropped fire retardant in anticipation of winds coming in from the southwest on Monday.

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Crews battle wildfires in Farmington, Midway, Box Elder County, Spanish Fork

By Tiffany Frandsen
Salt Lake Tribune
June 23, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Firefighters responded to a brush fire in Farmington on Friday evening. The 100-acre brush fire was reported near 1500 North on Compton Road at 5:15 p.m., according to U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Kim Osborn. The fire came close to one house, Osborn said, but burned grass, sage brush and oak brush east, up a hill, away from homes. “These homes are really fortunate they had great defensible space behind their homes,” Osborn said. “It could have been a different story.” As of Friday evening, there was zero containment, she said. Crews from South Davis Metro Fire, Layton, Farmington, the Forest Service and the state fought the blaze from the air and the ground, Osborn said. Rocky Mountain Power reported more than 3,500 homes without power Friday evening.

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Forest fire in southern Spain hits Donana National Park

Aljazeera
June 25, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

A forest fire in southern Spain threatening a national park famous for its biodiversity has forced the evacuation of at least 1,500 people, according to local authorities. The flames advanced eastward on Sunday and entered Donana National Park, one of Spain’s most important nature reserves, a tourist attraction and a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1994. The park, which has over 50,000 hectares of wetlands and woods, is an important stop for migratory birds from Africa and Europe. It is home to a variety of animals, including the highly endangered Iberian lynx and the Iberian imperial eagle.

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