Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 7, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Peering at the world through a haze of smoke

Tree Frog News
September 7, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Fires in the Pacific Northwest continue to burn, and residents throughout BC, Washington and Oregon are feeling the impact. But policy makers are saying the effects will be felt long after the smoke has cleared. BC Forests Minister Doug Donaldson said “an estimated 53 million cubic metres of timber has burned, which calls for support of harvesters already licensed to collect trees within the fire zone while new licences are issued to salvage usable wood in areas that weren’t previously accessed”.  According to Tom Fletcher at BlackPress, the BC Wildfire Service estimates that “direct costs to the service have reached $473 million“. 

In an effort to control Oregon wildfires, the Portland Water Bureau has made the controversial decision to hit fires burning in the Bull Run watershed with chemical retardant. 

Mills are also impacted by the fires—Susan Yurkovich, president of the BC Council of Forest Industries, is quoted in both the CBC News and The Vancouver Sun saying that “although mill infrastructure hasn’t been destroyed by fires, the shortage of timber and wood fibre means companies can’t operate”.

As we head out to meet with delegates at the BC Wood Global Buyers Mission, it seems only appropriate to point out a couple of our wood stories today. Wood wouldn’t be what it is without cellulose, get a molecular perspective in today’s Prince George Citizen, and the secret is out – early adopters of CLT have the advantage in Rotorua.

— Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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Special Feature

BC Wood Group hosts 380 buyers from 18 countries

By BC Wood Specialties Group
Canadian Forest Industries
September 6, 2017
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West
BC Wood Specialties Group (BC Wood) is hosting 380 international buyers at its 14th annual Global Buyers Mission (GBM) Sept. 7-9 at Whistler, B.C.  The Global Buyers Mission is Canada’s largest and most important wood show for sellers and buyers of value-added wood products. More than 380 buyers and specifiers of wood products from 18 countries will join 300 manufacturers attending the 2017 GBM. Each year the show generates about $35 million in new direct sales, but according to BC Wood CEO Brian Hawrysh, “the larger benefit lies in the number of quality leads and relationships fostered for future sales, as well as the time and money saved by smaller firms who lack the critical mass to market overseas.” …In conjunction with the GBM, BC Wood is once again hosting the popular WoodTALKS event for architects, designers, developers, public officials and other wood specifiers.

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Business & Politics

Softwood dispute will only push cost of rebuilding Houston higher: economist

By Mia Rabson
Canadian Press in Vancouver Sun
September 6, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

OTTAWA — A growing demand for building materials — as Houston looks to reconstruct in the wake of hurricane Harvey — should put pressure on the White House to solve the latest softwood lumber dispute with Canada, a senior bank economist says. U.S. home builders already use virtually every log imported from Canada, and any increase in demand following the hurricane’s devastation will mean the U.S. looks to Canada for more wood, said Brett House, deputy chief economist at Scotiabank. “Rebuilding Houston means they are going to have to keep buying every single log they can get their hands on from Canada and that’s really going to provide an incentive to move forward on the softwood lumber discussions in a way that’s constructive for Canada,” House said Wednesday in an interview.

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TimberWest: Invitation to Identity: Art as Life

TimberWest
September 6, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

TimberWest and Vancouver Island University are pleased to invite you to attend the opening celebration of the seven-week TimberWest First Nation Cultural Art Showcase event – Identity: Art as Life featuring three First Nations artists from the three major language groups on Vancouver Island. The celebration takes place Thursday, September 14th from 4pm to 6pm at the Malaspina Theatre and The View Gallery at Vancouver Island University in Nanaimo, BC. The artists are: Curtis Wilson from Wei Wai Kum in the Kwakwaka’wakw territory, Richard Thomas with Snueymuxw representing the Coast Salish territory, and Vince Smith of the Ehattesaht tribe in the Nuu-chah-nulth territory. We look forward to celebrating culture, art and identity with three tremendous First Nations artists. Please RSVP at your earliest convenience. Please RSVP by Tuesday, September 12th at RSVP@TimberWest.com

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Nippon to resume normal operations

By Marissa Luck
Longview Daily News
September 7, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Nippon Dynawave is resuming normal operations after problems at its wastewater treatment facility forced it temporarily curtail paper production last week. Brian Wood, Nippon spokesman, said the mill was restarting normal operations Wednesday, but he declined further comment. An unknown problem at Nippon’s wastewater treatment system caused it to violate its wastewater discharge permit Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, according to the state Department of Ecology. The mill reported violated limits for suspended solids it can release into the Columbia River on all three days, said Dave Bennett, Ecology spokesman.

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Labour wants more wood processing done onshore, says Ardern

New Zealand Herald
September 7, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Labour leader Jacinda Ardern has announced policy to set up a new forestry service in Rotorua. The service will be established as part of the Ministry of Primary Industries but may be made into a stand-alone service. Ardern is campaigning in Rotorua and made the announcement at Red Stag timber, saying she wanted to see wood processed and manufactured onshore, rather than being sent overseas as raw logs. The Labour leader said her government will give first preference for using wood in new building projects, such as its “KiwiBuild” programme to build 100,000 affordable homes.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Call goes out for submissions to 2017 Wood Design and Building awards

Journal of Commerce
September 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Wood architecture practitioners are invited to show off their best work and apply to the 2017 Wood Design and Building Awards. Projects completed between Jan. 1, 2012 and Sept. 15, 2017 are eligible for entry, unless the project has won a previous Wood Design and Building Award. A jury of Canadian and U.S. architects will review entries based on creativity, appropriate use of wood materials in satisfying a clients’ building and site requirements and innovative design. Judging will occur on Dec. 1, 2017. …The deadline to submit a project is Nov. 21, 2017 at midnight PST.

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The miracle of cellulose

By Todd Whitecombe
Prince George Citizen
September 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

As the mass of plant-based life outweighs the rest of the creatures in the world, cellulose is the dominant biopolymer on the planet. Even some single celled organisms employ cellulose within their cell walls. Many types of algae are seen as potential sources of cellulose for papermaking or as potential feedstock for bio-energy. Cellulose is a tough material to break down or consume. This is a good thing, otherwise our houses and other wooden structures wouldn’t last very long. …Of course, chemists have found non-biological ways to break down cellulose. …Other chemists have been interested in modifying cellulose to generate new materials. The first thermoplastic polymer, celluloid, was synthesized from cellulose in 1870. Rayon was developed in the 1880s and 1890s from nitrocellulose or gun cotton. Rayon was the first synthetic fibre and was sold as synthetic silk. Cellophane followed suit in 1912.

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Early adopters gaining commercial timber advantages

By the Forest Industry Engineering Association
Scoop Independent News
September 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Now that two key players in the commercial building industry have caught on to the advantages of timber and off-site construction, the secret is out – the early adopters are already gaining the advantages inherent in building commercially with engineered wood systems like cross-laminated timber (CLT) and laminated veneer lumber (LVL). An upcoming national wood building conference is bringing those market leaders to Rotorua to share their expertise. Fletcher Building boasted last week of building a house using pre-fabricated components in a matter of hours rather than the usual months spent onsite.

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In practice: Stora Enso’s cost-effective move to champion cross laminated timber

edie.net
September 6, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

A new multi-million-euro investment looks set to transform packaging firm Stora Enso into a renewable materials company and the largest global producer of a low environmental impact timber solution to replace steel and concrete in construction projects. The challenge: As more construction firms look to reduce their carbon footprint by sourcing alternative, low-carbon building materials, Europe’s largest forest-based products company Stora Enso is faced with increased demand to produce sustainable forms of timber. Forecasts suggest that material demand in the construction sector will double by 2050, and many companies view cross laminated timber (CLT) solutions as the ideal replacement for carbon-intensive concrete and steel structures.

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Forestry

BC Forest Practices Board: 2016/17 Annual Report Released

BC Forest Practices Board
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board released its 2016/17 annual report today, which summarizes the board’s work over the past year and highlights current projects underway. “We produce this annual report to show what the board sees in forest practices and forest management performance, what the board is finding in our work, and to give the public an idea of the state of stewardship of our forests and where improvement can be made,” said board chair, Tim Ryan. “The board’s work illustrates a picture of forest stewardship today.” During 2016/17, the board published 28 reports, carried out 10 new audits, received 13 new complaints from the public, and started work on two new special projects.

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Forest Practices Board to audit Canfor’s Fort Nelson operations

Alaska Highway News
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Forest Practices Board will undertake an audit of Canfor’s operations in the Fort Nelson area starting next week. The company has not harvested any timber under its forest licence in the Fort Nelson Timber Supply Area since 2008, the board said in an announcement Wednesday.  The audit begins Sept. 11 and will focus on the company’s activities between September 2016 and September 2017, including road and bridge maintenance, silviculture obligations, and fire protection. The findings will be compiled in a report, with the company and any other impacted parties given a chance to respond before a final report and recommendations are publicly released.

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Damage tallied as BC wildfire battle continues

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Alberni Valley Times
September 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s largest wildfire season has affected 220 homes and more than 200 other buildings, with more likely to be found as areas become safe to survey. Central B.C., where fires continue to rage in the Cariboo-Chilcotin and elsewhere, has 214 identified structures destroyed or damaged. Another 212 have been located in the Northeast and five more in the Southeast, said Chris Duffy of Emergency Management B.C. at Wednesday’s province-wide update on conditions. The B.C. Wildfire Service had 158 fires on its active map as of Wednesday, with three new starts recorded on Tuesday. The latest estimate of the record total area burned is 11,539 square km, and direct costs to the service have reached $473 million.

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B.C. forest industry faces big setbacks after summer of wildfires

By Linda Givetash
Canadian Press in CBC News
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Recovering from a historic wildfire season is expected to take British Columbia’s forest industry at least five years, the province’s Forest Ministry said on Wednesday. The ministry said in a statement that although wildfires will likely remain active into the fall, plans to help the industry rebound are already underway. …Susan Yurkovich, president of the B.C. Council of Forest Industries, said although mill infrastructure hasn’t been destroyed by fires, the shortage of timber and wood fibre, especially in the Interior, means companies can’t operate. “We’re not able to get into the forest obviously to do logging because of the fire activity so that’s going to have an impact on mills being able to run,” she said in an interview Wednesday. …As fires are extinguished, Yurkovich said salvaging timber and looking at other areas to harvest wood are priorities to allow mills and the communities around them to get back to work.

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‘Sustained’ rain needed to end devastating B.C. wildfire season: officials

Canadian Press in Vancouver Sun
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

INVERMERE, B.C. — Hundreds of homes have burned and nearly half a billion dollars has been spent, but officials say there’s no end in sight for British Columbia’s devastating wildfire season. Kevin Skrepnek with the B.C. Wildfire Service said Wednesday that many areas of the province are still tinder dry and in desperate need of rain. The forecast is calling for showers across the province in the coming days, but Skrepnek said that won’t be enough to douse the flames, especially in the southeastern part of B.C., where a number of aggressive fires are burning. …Susan Yurkovich, president of the B.C. Council of Forest Industries, said salvaging usable timber to allow mills and the communities around them to get back to work is a priority. Although mill infrastructure hasn’t been destroyed by fires, Yurkovich said the shortage of timber and wood fibre, especially in the Interior, has left companies unable to operate.

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BC wildfires to have lasting consequences for logging industry: minister

Jonathon Hayward
Canadian Press in The Globe and Mail
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

British Columbia’s Forests Minister says a historic wildfire season that has charred more than 11,500 square kilometres of land will have lingering implications for the logging industry. Doug Donaldson said an estimated 53 million cubic metres of timber has burned, which calls for support of harvesters already licensed to collect trees within the fire zone while new licences are issued to salvage usable wood in areas that weren’t previously accessed. Those efforts are well underway, along with long-term plans focused on the sustainability of the industry, Mr. Donaldson said on Wednesday.

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Taking the classroom into the woods

TimberWest
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Robin Williams has been a forest educator for over 25 years, and has made it her mission to bring the secrets of the forest into the classroom. For the last five years TimberWest has invested in the Forest Education Program Robin currently delivers to elementary students in Campbell River, Quadra Island and Courtenay – with past delivery to the communities of Woss, Gold River, Tahsis, Zeballos and Sayward. One of the first questions Robin asks her students is, “Who do you know that works in the forest?”, and it comes as no surprise that a majority of the hands in the class shoot up with students somehow directly or indirectly related to someone in the forest sector. 

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Logging threatens Ymir water

Letter by Isabelle Herzig, Ymir Water Action Team
Nelson Star
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

My home is adjacent to Quartz Creek, the creek that is at the heart of Ymir’s watershed and has been the centre of much discussion around logging. BCTS wants to log in our very tiny, very fragile watershed. This will impact the water flow and quality of our creek. …I am not opposed to logging. I fully support sustainable and smart logging. I oppose BCTS’s Quartz Operating Plan to log in our watershed. There are other options. The community of Ymir and the Ymir Watershed Action Team are actively working on other plans that could meet all our needs, including BCTS’s.

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Bypass logging route near Youbou not wanted by community

By Robert Barron
Cowichan Valley Citizen
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Most in attendance at a town hall meeting in Youbou on Aug. 28 were not in favour of the construction of a new bypass route around Youbou Road for logging trucks. In a letter to the TimberWest forest company which is proposing the bypass road, Youbou’s Alison Coley-Donohue said the majority of the more than 100 people who attended the meeting, and the community itself, want another option to be explored. TimberWest and the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure called the meeting to consider options to deal with ongoing dust and mud problems on Youbou Road that are related to logging trucks.

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Glyphosate spray meeting leaves crowd agitated and annoyed

By Shane Fowler
CBC News
September 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A public meeting in Petitcodiac to address the controversial spraying of the herbicide glyphosate may have been the victim of its own success. Scientists, regulators and J.D. Irving personnel were on hand to answer questions on the forestry practice of using glyphosate, deemed a “probable carcinogenic” by the World Health Organization, to regulate forest growth.   But the meeting, organized by JDI, became deafening and difficult to navigate when 150 people were in the room, seeking information in an open-house format.  Dozens of people complained that in their quest for answers to particular questions, they were directed elsewhere in the room, only to have their questions redirected once again. 

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Loggers Urge Congress to Address Wildfire Crisis, Fix Forest Management Policies

By The American Loggers Council
PRWEB
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The American Loggers Council (ALC) today urged the Trump Administration and United States Congress to take action to address the nation’s wildfire crisis. So far this year 47,000 fires have burned nearly eight million acres across the country. As the national organization representing America’s professional timber harvesters, ALC believes the federal government should actively manage its forests through logging and mechanized thinning to reduce the risks of severe fire and protect adjoining state and private lands. With 193 million acres in the National Forest System alone, much of America’s forest land is controlled by the federal government.

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Montana’s senators, congressman highlight wildfire devastation on national stage

Billings Gazette
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Daines, Tester, Gianforte

U.S. Sens. Steve Daines and Jon Tester took to the Senate floor Wednesday to bring attention to the wildfires burning across Montana. Tester linked fires to a historic drought that’s blasted Eastern Montana and extended to the west. “Climate change is real, and we can’t continue to sit on the sidelines,” he said “We have to take proactive steps to keep it at bay.” Tester also cited powerful hurricanes, and a $7.85 billion aid package to help victims of Hurricane Harvey, which inundated large swaths of Texas in historic floods. “I am all for sending help to those folks,” he said. “I will be making sure that the folks in this body understand that we also have to get resources to folks along the northern tier. … We are seeing natural disasters across this country. This isn’t a contest or comparison of devastation.”

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Billions of dead trees force US fire crews to shift tactics

By Dan Elliott
Associated Press in the Washington Post
September 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ALBANY, Wyo. — Vast stands of dead timber in the Western U.S. have forced firefighters to shift tactics, trying to stay out of the shadow of lifeless, unstable trees that could come crashing down with deadly force. About 6.3 billion dead trees are still standing in 11 Western states, up from 5.8 billion five years ago, according to U.S. Forest Service statistics compiled for The Associated Press. …Researchers have long disagreed on whether beetle infestations have made wildfires worse, and this year’s ferocious fire season has renewed the debate, with multiple fires burning in forests with beetle-killed trees. But no one disputes that dead trees — snags, in firefighter parlance — present an unpredictable threat, prone to blowing over onto people or getting knocked down by other falling trees. Amid the noise and distraction of a fire, firefighters sometimes get little warning.

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Wildfire apocalypse: Is climate change or forest management to blame?

By Linda Baker
Oregon Business
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A science-based approach focuses on the complex web of factors that are exacerbating conflagrations around the state. The spate of mega natural disasters is bringing new scrutiny to existing policies, practices and countermeasures. Hurricane Harvey called attention to the perils of overbuilding in a floodplain. And Oregon’s wildfire apocalypse raises questions anew about forest management and human-caused climate change.  Are fires in Oregon intensifying because of poor forest management strategies?  Or are hotter, drier summers at fault?  Letting go of either-or thinking is the first step in reckoning with the problem.

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Woodworkers call for ban on timber exports

GhanaWeb
September 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Woodworkers in the country have called for a ban on the export of timber and timber-related products in the wake of severe shortage of the commodity to sustain their operations. “There is no need to continue exporting timber when there is increasing demand on the local market. The future of the timber industry is very bleak for local actors whose activities revolve around the processing of logs and lumber to feed big infrastructural enhancement projects and for domestic use,” Isaac Avor, Secretary to the Timber Markets Association, told the B&FT. According to Mr. Avor, there is the need for government to consider halting the exportation of timber so as to retain the “little timber in the system” for the local market.

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Forest Fires

Crews pulled off of all three fires south of Elko

By Alexandra Heck
BC Local News
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

ELKO—All fire crews have been told to retreat from the three wildfires burning out of control south and east of Elko after the province, following the closure to the back country in the Rocky Mountain Forest District. “We don’t have any crews on any of those fires,” said Karlie Shaughnessy, with the BC Wildfire service. “Because of the extreme behavior that the fires are exhibiting. So for safety reasons we had to pull all the people off.” Over the past days since the closure, all three blazes have grown steadily; the Lodgepole fire has spread to over 1,750 hectares, the Soowa Mountain fire has grown to and estimated

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University of Idaho researcher says summer wildfire smoke will become more common across Inland Northwest

By Wilson Criscione
Pacific Northwest Inlander
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The entire region is so clouded with smoke, the light from the sun is struggling to break through. The air is so unhealthy to breathe that schools have canceled outdoor activities and people avoid leaving their houses. Is this becoming more common for Inland Northwest summers? The answer is yes, says John Abatzoglou, a University of Idaho climate scientist. Ironically, work to put fires out has actually contributed to increased wildfire activity in the region. Coupled with human-caused climate change, more wildfire activity will continue in the future, he says.

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Firefighters make progress; Eagle Creek Fire is 5 percent contained

KATU
September 7, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

CASCADE LOCKS, Ore. – The Eagle Creek Fire was 5 percent contained Wednesday night. Fire officials issued an update at 11:30 p.m. The more-than-32,000-acre fire is burning in the Columbia River Gorge. It started Saturday. Crews worked to build fire lines near Cascade Locks and Bridal Veil on Wednesday. More than 900 people are involved in fighting the fire. Firefighters are taking extra precautions to protect homes and other structures near the fire. Fire officials said some roads are opening for access and potential future fire breaks southeast of the fire. Union Pacific said the rails in the Gorge reopened to train traffic early Tuesday morning.

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Water bureau OK’s fire retardant drops in Portland’s Bull Run watershed

By Rob Davis
The Oregonian
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The Portland Water Bureau has approved fire retardant drops in the Bull Run watershed, a decision that allows firefighters to dump toxic chemicals in the city’s pristine source of drinking water. The city agency did not publicly announce the decision, confirming it Wednesday only after repeated inquiries from The Oregonian/OregonLive. “The Portland Water Bureau has authorized unified command to use whatever measures are necessary to fight the fire within the watershed and are prepared to support their efforts in any way we can,” Nicole Adams, a bureau spokeswoman, said in an email. “During this very critical time of trying to contain the fire, the Water Bureau will not impede the efforts of the firefighters.” Use of chemicals to protect the forest in Bull Run could be controversial in a city that has fought for years to keep fluoride out of its water. 

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Surging Wildfire Reaches Watershed For Portland Area’s Drinking Water

By Amelia Templeton and Ryan Haas
Oregon Public Broadcasting
September 5, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Officials say the Eagle Creek Fire entered the Bull Run watershed Tuesday. The watershed provides drinking water for around 1 million Oregonians. “At this time, the fire is not near the drinking water reservoirs or water supply infrastructure,” said Jaymee Cuti, public information officer for the Portland Water Bureau. The watershed is on 100 square miles of protected federal forest south of the Columbia River Gorge. It is the primary source of drinking water for Portland and many of its largest suburbs, including Gresham and Beaverton.

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New Fire On The Stanislaus National Forest

By Tracey Petersen
My Mother Lode
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Tuolumne County – Stanislaus National Forest officials report a lightning strike Sunday ignited a blaze on the Mi Wok Ranger District. The Creek Fire has burned 133 acres and is located in the Bourland Area of the district. Currently, there is no containment and no structures are threatened. The total personnel assigned to the Fire is 27. Forest officials say a strong thunderstorm cell moved through the area Sunday. The storm left washed out roads making it difficult for firefighters to access the blaze. Steep terrain and heavy tree mortality is also a concern in the area. Crews are bracing for the possibility of continued scattered thunderstorms with erratic and gusty winds.

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‘Do you realize you just started a forest fire?’: Witness to teen suspect

KGW.com
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon State Police have identified a 15-year-old Vancouver teen as a suspect in starting the Eagle Creek Fire. Police believe the teen and others may have used fireworks that started the fire Saturday. Police said they contacted the teen suspect in the parking lot of Eagle Creek Trail on Saturday night and interviewed him. The wildfire, which started along the Eagle Creek trail, has burned more than 20,000 acres and forced evacuations of approximately 400 homes. …Liz Fitzgerald was hiking the Eagle Creek trail on Saturday when she stumbled across some teenagers. One threw what looked like a smoke bomb into the canyon below. …”I said, ‘Do you realize you just started a forest fire?’ And the kid said, ‘What are we supposed to do about it now?'” Fitzgerald said she was flabbergasted at how quickly the fire grew.

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Smoke from western wildfires causes health concerns

CBS News
September 6, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

TROUTDALE, Ore. — A growing Oregon wildfire covered parts of Portland’s metropolitan area Tuesday with ash and prompted the shutdown of a lengthy stretch of highway through the state’s scenic Columbia River Gorge. It was one of dozens of wildfires burning in western U.S. states that sent smoke into cities from Seattle to Denver – prompting health warnings and cancellations of outdoor activities for children by many school districts. According to CBS Denver, doctors say residents, especially those with lung or heart problems, should avoid the outdoors until the haze clears up. …”You can’t really stand outside without getting rained on” by ash, said Joanna Fisher as she walked to work at a Troutdale, Oregon naturopathic clinic with Calla Wanser, who was wearing a red bandanna around her mouth to keep the ash out of her lungs.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Pines displace livestock emissions

By Federated Farmers
New Zealand Herald
September 7, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The ability of trees to lock up carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere has been known for a long time but only now is it assuming significance in New Zealand’s effort to reduce the level of greenhouse gases which cause climate change. The huge volume of carbon made into wood in our forests should come as no surprise, but the ratio of carbon/trees to the livestock which produce half of New Zealand’s greenhouse gases is not well appreciated. It doesn’t take many trees to mop up what a lot of stock produce. Doing the sums, you can see that a single 20-year-old pine will hold within its timber the same amount of carbon that a single sheep has breathed and farted during its entire life. The same sums will give you three trees for every year of a dairy cow’s emissions.

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