Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 27, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Not to confuse but – today is National Tree Day and National Forest Week

September 27, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tree Canada is celebrating National Tree Day by planting its 82 millionth tree, while the Great Lakes Forestry Centre is celebrating National Forest Week by opening its labs to show off its research work. Others with notable messages include:

On the forestry and fire front: UBC prof urges BC to do more to reduce the fire hazard around rural communities; UC Berkeley prof speaks to how sustainable forestry can help; and debate continues on Secretary Ryan Zinke’s call for more aggressive fire suppression efforts.

Finally, one of the few barrel factories in Canada—manufacturing wooden barrels for the fishing industry—is celebrating 100 years of operation.

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry

Tree Canada celebrates 25th anniversary on National Tree Day

By Tree Canada
Canada Newswire
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Tree Canada, the nation’s leading national tree planting charity, is celebrating its 25th anniversary on National Tree Day this September 27th by planting its 82 millionth tree in Canada.Over the past twenty years, Tree Canada has engaged communities, governments, corporations and individuals in the pursuit of a greener and healthier living environment, and provides Canadians with education, technical expertise, and resources to plant and care for urban and rural trees. In the midst of its most impactful year to date, in 2017, Tree Canada announced a more than $1 million investment to restore the forests destroyed by the devastating Fort McMurray wildfires last year.

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2017 BC wildfire season ‘the new normal’: province urged to act

By Megan Turcato
Global News
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dr. Lori Daniels

…Professors from UBC and the University of Northern British Columbia, along with fire ecologists, have drafted a letter to the province saying they believe 2017’s record-setting fire season “represents the new normal and is part of a global trend of increasing mega-fires.” They have come up with dozens of recommendations they believe the province should implement to address the wildfire challenge.  “Moving forward, the types of warm, dry, windy conditions that we saw this summer are projected to become more and more common because of climate change. With our forests in their current state, we will become susceptible year after year to wildfires,” said Dr. Lori Daniels, a professor of forest and conservation sciences at UBC and one of the authors of the letter. 

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Federal NDP prods Liberals for wildfire assistance

By Trevor Crawley
Cranbrook Daily Townsman
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The federal government defended their response to local wildfires in Question Period last week, as an NDP MP from a neighbouring riding demanded the Liberals commit to recovery efforts. Ralph Goodale, the Minister for Public Safety, said the federal government has made sure resources are available to BC and Indigenous communities, made a major contribution to the Red Cross and established a special committee of cabinet to engage all federal assets in recovery efforts. Goodale was responding to Richard Cannings, the MP for South Okanagan-West Kootenay, who asked if Prime Minister Justin Trudueau would commit to full financial assistance to communities devastated by wildfire.

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Caribou Range Plan looms over region

By Peter Shokeir
Whitecourt Star
September 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Opinions are still divided on Alberta’s Carbiou Range Plan that seeks 65 per cent undisturbed environment for the Little Smoky and A La Peche ranges. The Whitecourt Chamber of Commerce hosted the Caribou, Forestry and You Public Information Awareness Panel. The panel included environmentalists, forestry industry representatives and elected officials from all levels of government. Alberta Forest Alliance (AFA) director Ray Hilts, who sat on the panel, said it was well attended by concerned citizens worried about how the plan might hurt forestry jobs and the local economy. …Carolyn Campbell, a conservation specialist with the Alberta Wilderness Association, said she appreciated the level of turnout from the audience and how the panel reflected a diverse number of opinions.

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Minister replies to county issues of interest

By Dan Singleton
Mountain View Gazette
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Oneil Carlier

Alberta’s minister of Agriculture and Forestry has responded to a series of issues of interest forwarded to his department by Mountain View County. In July, the county sent a letter to Oneil with comments regarding the Enhanced Protection for Farm and Ranch Workers Act (Bill 6), agricultural plastic recycling, and forestry management areas setbacks. …In his reply letter, Oneil said that, “Alberta’s foresters design, plan and supervise forest harvesting, silviculture, ecological restoration and management of protected areas to ensure the maintenance of long-term environmental, economic and social benefits to Albertans.”

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Tree Canada president Michael Rosen says cities must be ‘aggressive’ in stomping out such threats as emerald ash borer

By Jeffrey Ougler
The Sault Star
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Michael Rosen

SAULT STE. MARIE – A good chunk of Canada’s character may be tied to trees. The “sad truth,” however, is that forest cover in Canada’s cities has been chipped away over the past two decades, reports an Ottawa-based group that promotes the planting and nurturing of trees in urban and rural areas. And this is happening despite ample public awareness about environmental issues, says Tree Canada president Michael Rosen. “This is the biggest irony,” Rosen told the Sault Star in a telephone interview from Ottawa. “We are much more green, we are much more conscience of the environment, people want trees.

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Great Lakes Forestry Centre research centre in Sault is largest in Canada

By Sara McCleary
Sault This Week
September 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

To commemorate National Forest Week, Great Lakes Forestry Centre opened its doors and its labs to show off its work. As the largest regional forest science research centre in Canada, the GLFC employs more than 120 staff, scientists, technicians, and researchers working to contribute to the body of research that promotes sustainable forest management across Canada, said Jessica Portelli-Ward, senior communications adviser for the Ontario Region at Natural Resources Canada. …Two of the primary Turkey Lakes researchers, Kara Webster and Paul Hazlett, explained their study, which has continued and grown since its early days in 1979. …“This research is informing the Government of Canada policy on climate change impacts on forest ecosystem function including impacts on forest growth, soils, greenhouse gas production, and water quality and quantity,” said the researchers.

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Oregon redwoods ‘severely burned’ by Chetco Bar Fire

By Zach Urness
Statesman Journal
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

One of the last groves of Oregon redwoods was “severely burned” by the Chetco Bar Fire, according to U.S. Forest officials.  Oregon’s largest wildfire, burning in southwest Oregon, roared into the Wheeler Creek Natural Area and torched 25 percent of the area’s old-growth redwoods, U.S. Forest Service officials said last week.  There are around four groves of naturally-occurring redwoods remaining on Oregon soil, located mostly in small patches just north of the California state line.  The Wheeler Creek redwoods are located in a 600-acre preserve in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, about 20 miles southeast of Brookings near the more popular Oregon Redwoods Trail. The Wheeler Creek grove is considered the best of the Oregon redwoods, with many trees eclipsing 200 feet, according to “This Land: A Guide To Western National Forests” by Robert Mohlenbrock. 

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Oregon lawmaker calls for sweeping forest management reforms after Eagle Creek Fire

By Simon Gutierrez
KPTV.com
September 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

U.S. Representative Greg Walden

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE, OR – As the work begins to assess the damage done to the Columbia River Gorge by the Eagle Creek Fire, conversations are beginning about what should be done to repair that damage. Recently, U.S. Representative Greg Walden, whose district includes the Gorge, has called for sweeping reforms to the way public forests are managed. In September, Walden introduced House Resolution 3715, which calls for fast-tracked salvage logging in the burned areas of the Gorge, with the idea of removing burned and damaged trees and quickly replanting the area afterward. “Year after year after year after year we have these catastrophic wildfires on federal lands, some of which have been set aside and managed in a way that they have no management,” said Walden while speaking on the House floor.

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Western senators say fire-funding fix must be ‘on the next bill’ Congress passes

By Betsy Z. Russell
The Spokesman-Review
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Western senators, led by Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo and Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, are launching a full-court press to get a fix for the nation’s wildfire funding system through Congress now, while the nation is still gasping from a record fire season and coping with disasters from Texas to Florida to Puerto Rico. “We have a crisis occurring now,” Crapo declared Tuesday at a briefing with U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and a group of western senators. “We need to come together and say, ‘No more waiting – it needs to be on the next bill.’” …The idea, which Crapo, Wyden and other western lawmakers have been pushing for years, is to fund catastrophic wildfires like other national disasters, ending so-called “fire borrowing,” in which the U.S. Forest Service borrows from all its other programs – including all those designed to prevent wildfires and make forests more resilient – when the firefighting bills mount.

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What aspen trees have in common with the clone wars (seriously)

By Anne Herbst
9NEWS.com
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

KUSA – If there ever was a movie shot on Kebler Pass near Crested Butte, Dr. Jonathan Coop from Western State Colorado University might have the perfect name for it. “It’s ‘Clone Wars,’” said Dr. Coop, who is an associate professor of environment and sustainability and biology. Dr. Coop studies the aspens on the pass, and said these are not clones to be nervous around—they are clones that are making Colorado falls colorful. …The huge stands of aspen on Kebler Pass are impressive to see in the fall, but it is their way of reproducing that has led some to believe they could be the largest organism in the world.

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Keep fighting the ‘roadless rule’

By the Editorial Board
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner
September 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Alaska needs to be able to see the natural resources within its borders developed and done so in a responsible manner. Other states likewise need to be able to see natural resources developed. But a federal judge in the District of Columbia apparently doesn’t think so. The judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit challenging a rule issued during the administration of President Bill Clinton that limited logging and road construction in national forests around the nation. …In Alaska, the rule has sharply limited the activity in the Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska. The administration of Gov. Bill Walker is deciding whether Alaska should appeal. It should. …It is the impact on the Tongass National Forest that has been the greatest on our fellow Alaskans. Southeast Alaska once had a thriving timber industry, with the communities of Ketchikan, Sitka, and Wrangell, for example, synonymous with mighty Alaska logging.

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The déjà vu of opposing aerial herbicide spray

By Lisa Arkin, executive director, Beyond Toxics.
The Register-Guard
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lisa Arkin

Nancy Fadeley’s Sept. 8 letter, “Field-burning tragedy led to a book,” reminds us that once upon a time, Oregonians believed field burning was an essential and unstoppable agricultural practice. …Yet against these odds, in 2009 Oregonians won a ban by proving that field burning affected people’s health and safety of people in unacceptable ways. That successful legislative campaign, led by Rep. Paul Holvey, D-Eugene, was supported by the work of Beyond Toxics and the Western Environmental Law Center. …The drive to ban field burning is analogous to today’s struggle to ban aerial herbicide spray and the demonstrable need to protect public health and safety. . …Change often brings not bankruptcy, but innovation.  …If it were required to use alternatives to aerial herbicide sprays, the timber industry could likewise innovate to enhance profits

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Huge Southern California wildfire is 15% contained as anxious residents wait for word

By Joseph Serna, Anh Do and Alene Tchekmedyian
Los Angeles Times
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

… “It was just a tragic wind shift,” DeYoe, a firefighter and spokesman with the Corona Fire Department, said of the wildfire that has charred 2,000 acres and threatened 1,900 homes. “I don’t think those residents were really prepared.” …After racing along the border of Orange and Riverside counties Monday night, the fire slowed Tuesday as Santa Ana winds weakened and weather conditions improved. By Tuesday evening, the blaze was 15% contained. But the fire was a forceful reminder that Southern California’s fire season is just beginning to reach its peak. October traditionally brings hot Santa Ana winds that can quickly spread brush fires, and autumn is generally when some of the region’s most destructive fires have occurred.

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Federal fire suppression memo gets mixed response

By Stephen Hamway
The Bend Bulletin
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Near the peak of one of the most disruptive fire seasons in recent memory across the Western United States, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke called for more aggressive fire suppression efforts. …However, forestry experts and forest managers in Central Oregon said that while the memo had some good ideas, some of its approaches were too broad for the region’s complex ecosystem, and limited without being accompanied by funding. …John Bailey, professor at OSU’s College Of Forestry in Corvallis, agreed that Secretary Zinke was correct to call for increased management of forests in Central Oregon and beyond, but added that the memo lacked detail.  …Ed Keith, Deschutes County forester, said he liked the intent behind more aggressive reduction of fuels, but added that would be difficult for federal agencies to implement unless the directive is accompanied with additional funding for controlled burns and thinning. 

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Why California needs more smart forestry

By Richard B. Standiford, UC Berkeley, forest management specialist
The Modesto Bee
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Richard B. Standiford

… It’s no secret that our forests are in crisis. They are unnaturally overcrowded and competing for resources. When combined with a prolonged drought, our forests are at an increased risk of catastrophic wildfires that degrade wildlife habitat and watersheds, emit tons of greenhouse gases and stunt rural economies. …A recent study by the Public Policy Institute of California found that management techniques, including prescribed fire and mechanical thinning, can help rebuild resilient forests. They also support private landowners who have been sustainably managing their lands for years, working with various state agencies on environmental review of timber harvest plans, the most stringent in the world. I’m proud to say that our private landowners often go beyond what is required.

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Catastrophic Fires: Don’t buy ‘climate change’

By Jim Geisinger, executive vice president, Associated Oregon Loggers
Pamplin Media Group
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jim Geisinger

Federal agency representatives, academics and certainly our liberal political representatives are already touting “climate change” as the cause of this summer’s catastrophic wildfire season. …What I am certain of, however, is that the climate influences all lands the same when, in fact, significant changes occur. Climate change does not differentiate between private, state, federal or private forest lands. I think we can agree that these influences affect all ownerships the same, can’t we? So why aren’t the experts explaining to us why 95 percent of the large wildfires are on federal forest lands? …The Forest Service and the Department of Forestry are in charge of protecting roughly the same amount of land, between 15 million and 16 million acres. So, why this huge disparity if climate change is the cause of the catastrophic wildfire season? 

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Assessing and promoting biodiversity requires collaboration throughout the value chain

MENAFN
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Assessing and promoting biodiversity requires collaboration throughout the value chain – Promoting biodiversity is an inherent part of a forest-based company’s operations and responsibility principles. However, the impacts of forest operations on biodiversity are not well characterized using existing life cycle assessment (LCA) methodologies. This makes it difficult for businesses to distinguish between well-managed and poorly managed forests in terms of biodiversity. UPM Raflatac has partnered with Quantis and Nestle Research Centre to study and capture the biodiversity impacts of forestry practices in life cycle assessment. The study shows how biodiversity in the boreal forest can be captured in LCA, allowing users of wood fibre-based products to differentiate between alternative sources of fibre and inform responsible sourcing decision making. 

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NATO Allies and partners help Georgia fight major forest fire

North Atlantic Treaty Organization HQ
September 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

NATO Allies and partners have helped Georgia contain a major forest fire in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region. Georgia approached NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre for assistance on 23 September 2017, and the request was immediately circulated to NATO Allies and partners. On Sunday, Turkey deployed two firefighting helicopters and Azerbaijan also provided a firefighting helicopter. Today, the fire has been contained.

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Company & Business News

How NAFTA’s Chapter 19 could save Bombardier’s C Series

By Barrie McKenna
The Globe and Mail
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

Bombardier has lost another round in its fight against Boeing and the U.S. government. …Tuesday’s preliminary duties ruling by the U.S. Commerce Department is a vivid reminder that NAFTA’s Chapter 19 is worth fighting for.  …Chapter 19 has fallen into disuse in recent years. Canada has filed just three cases in the past decade. The U.S. hasn’t used it against Canada since 2005. …But Mr. Trump’s aggressive trade agenda could change that. Beyond Bombardier, Canada is a target of several ongoing cases involving steel, aluminum, solar panels and, of course, softwood lumber. Canada has successfully used Chapter 19 in the past to get duties on lumber removed.

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U.S. swears in new ambassador to Canada, amid rising trade tensions

By Alexander Panetta
The Canadian Press in The Victoria Times Colonist
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

Mike Pence and Kelly Knight Craft

WASHINGTON — The United States has just sworn in its next ambassador to Canada at a moment of trade tensions between the countries, with mushrooming disputes running parallel with the renegotiation of NAFTA. Kelly Knight Craft was sworn in on the same day that the U.S. Commerce Department clobbered Canada’s aerospace giant Bombardier with a preliminary duty of 219 per cent, atop recent duties on softwood lumber. The philanthropist and Republican donor was sworn in by U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence at the White House, surrounded by a large gathering of Washington power-players.

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Forestry Key To BC Economy

CKPG News
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ed Morrice

VIDEO—This is National Forestry Week and there’s is no better place to celebrate it than in BC. According to a survey done by PriceWaterhouseCoopers, the forest industry generated one in every 17 jobs last year. That is 60,000 direct jobs and 81,000 indirect jobs, generating $8.6 million in wages. The report goes on to say “forestry continues to be foundational to the BC economy, generating $33 billion in output and $12.9 in GDP. Additionally, the sector contributed $4.1 billion in payments to municipal, provincial and federal governments from forestry industry operations.” That figures includes $200 million in taxes to local government.

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Regional District of Central Kootenay directors hear from lumber industry

By John Boivin
The Castlegar Source
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ken Kalesnikoff

The people who run sawmills and forestry operations in the BCs Southern Interior launched a charm offensive at the Regional District of Central Kootenay meeting last week. The Interior Lumber Manufacturer’s Association gave a presentation on its operations and told directors they wanted to address people’s concerns about protecting local watersheds. …Waving the usual 15-minute limit for presentations, Ken Kalesnikoff, ILMA Chair was given more than an hour of the monthly board meeting to talk about forestry, working in watersheds, and the need for people to co-operate. …Kalesnikoff said he wanted to get a message to the board that lumber operations are taking residents concerns into account, are listening to and trying to address conflicts, and that modern forestry practices are designed to protect watersheds or limit the impact of logging.

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Fires claim a year’s worth of timber in the province

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Of all the business sectors in B.C. affected by this summer’s forest fires, one of the hardest hit is – for obvious reasons – the forestry sector. In what government officials say was the worst forest fire season on record, fires have scorched 1.19 million hectares in B.C. …“In the aftermath of the devastating storm, demand for softwood lumber is expected to increase dramatically as homebuilders and remodellers repair and replace housing in Houston and across Texas,” NAHB chairman Granger MacDonald. “The repair and remodelling side of the world” would experience increased sales, said Susan Yurkovich, CEO of the Council of Forest Industries. “That’s actually had pretty good growth – probably four to six per cent year-over-year growth before the hurricanes – so I think we will see a bit of an uptick.” …Russ Taylor, managing director for Forest Economic Advisors, isn’t so sure about that. Counterintuitive though it may sound, history shows that lumber demand actually falls after a hurricane, he said.

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Study finds BC forest industry remains cornerstone of economy

By Dean Stoltz
CHEK News
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The sounds of a busy forest were always a good sign for the BC economy and while it may not be the heydays of the 1960’s, forestry in BC is doing really well right now. “I think the message for this is that forestry in British Columbia remains a cornerstone industry across the province” stated Rick Jeffery, President and CEO of Coast Forest Products Association. “140 communities are reliant on forestry.” …Forestry generates a total of $8.6 billion in wages. “They’re high paying, family supporting jobs, so it’s still an important industry on the coast.” said Jeffery. The study found that forestry generates $33 billion in output and $12.9 billion in GDP. Additionally, the sector contributed $4.1 billion in payments to municipal, provincial and federal governments in 2016.

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Truck Loggers Association boss David Elstone targets ailing contractor-company relationship

By Tyler Nyquvest
Business in Vancouver
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

David Elstone

Chopping wood or kayaking around Howe Sound driftwood are intrinsically gratifying activities for David Elstone. …After completing his undergraduate degree at the University of British Columbia, Elstone spent nearly a decade as a financial analyst at ERA Forest Products Research – a position he felt might seem controversial given his love for Canada’s bountiful forests. “There is an issue that we often talk about, our top advocacy issue, and it is a brewing crisis that could have just as big or even a bigger impact on the forest industry in B.C., and that is the issue of what is happening with our contractors.” Elstone has been at the helm of the TLA for more than two years but admits ties with logging contractors have been fraying since early 2000 when a large number of new policies that benefited tenure holders were instituted. …“The problems are wide-ranging, but the relationships between contractors and their tenure holders, the major forest products companies … that relationship is broken,” he said.

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Katerra to build giant new CLT factory in Spokane, Washington

By Lloyd Alter
Treehugger
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

…Construction startup Katerra is trying to change all that. We have noted before that Katerra is shaking up the construction industry, literally and figuratively with their attempt to bring Silicon Valley thinking (and money) to the construction industry. Their pitch: Katerra is bringing fresh minds and tools to the world of architecture and construction. We are applying systems approaches to remove unnecessary time and costs from building development, design, and construction. They are not only investing in factories to build wood frame buildings, but are now in the plumbing and electrical businesses. They are buying architecture and engineering and construction management firms, and today they have announced that they are building a 250,000 square foot factory in Spokane, Washington to crank out our favourite building material, Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT).

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Wood products to bring 150 jobs to Spokane Valley

By Becky Kramer
The Spokesman-Review
September 26, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

A new factory planned for Spokane Valley is part of a California company’s efforts to streamline the U.S. building industry, making construction faster and cheaper. Menlo Park-based Katerra plans to open a 250,000-square-foot manufacturing facility … early next year. The plant will make engineered wood products, employing about 150 people initially with potential for growth. The factory will produce cross-laminated timber and glulam. The engineered products can replace concrete and steel in wooden high-rise buildings and parking garages. They also can be used for other applications, such as walls and flooring. The environmentally friendly products are made from wood scraps, which are compressed and glued together in layers, forming structural panels and beams.

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Luxury toilet paper brand is accused of plundering ancient forest for wood pulp it uses to make its products

By Victoria Allen
Daily Mail
September 27, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: International

A luxury toilet paper brand has been accused of damaging protected forest land to make its products. …Environmental group Greenpeace says the pulp made into toilet roll for British homes is supplied by logging companies which are devastating a region’s last remaining historic trees. It comes from the Great Northern Forest in Sweden, which makes up almost a third of the remaining forest land left on Earth. Conservationists say the forest is vital for storing carbon produced by human pollution, while it is home to 1,300 threatened species including the lynx and Bechstein’s bat.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Shelburne cooperage, one of the few barrel factories left in Canada celebrates 100 years of operation

By Sue Deschene
The Chronicle Herald
September 26, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Donna Rhuland

2017 marks the 100th year of a cooperage in Shelburne. In 1917, J. Chandley Smith opened his cooperage on the north end of Dock Street. …With only a handful of cooperages remaining throughout Canada, the art of making wooden barrels is slowly dying out. The Shelburne Barrel Factory is unique because it is not a museum or craft cooperage; the factory manufactures wooden barrels for the fishing industry. These barrels are used for salt herring and mackerel for lobster bait in the winter. …Donna Rhuland, whose previous job was building offshore lobster traps, started working at the barrel factory in 1977. So Donna is also celebrating an anniversary this year: her 40th year as a cooper … a rarity in what has traditionally been a male-dominated industry.

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World Green Building Week: How Good Are The Numbers?

By Jerry Yudelson
Reinventing Green Building Blog
September 26, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

This week is “World Green Building Week,” in which green building councils all over the world will celebrate their certified green buildings and their mission of greening the built environment. But what exactly are we celebrating? …What are the “true facts” about green building performance? …From a 2012 paper by Professor John Scofield, physics professor at Oberlin College in Ohio… “we find that LEED median-energy buildings, on average, use 10% less site energy but no less source (or primary energy) than do comparable conventional buildings. LEED office buildings achieve 17% reduction in site energy, but again, no significant reduction in primary energy use relative to non-LEED office buildings”. With all the hoopla going on about “zero net energy” buildings, we need to recognize that what really matters are the source energy (carbon emissions) and carbon emissions embedded in building materials.

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Prefab Macquarie Uni building constructed in just five months

Architecture and Design
September 26, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

An Architectus-designed prefabricated building has opened at Macquarie University in Sydney, and it took just five months to construct. The timber-designed Incubator has been conceived “as a pair of pavilions”, and will nurture, equip and accommodate entrepreneurs as they grow a business idea or social venture into a successful start-up. “Each [of the pavilions have] flexible layouts that lend themselves to the future adaptations and functions of the start-ups inside,” says Luke Johnson, Architectus principal. …The building incorporates a blend of timbers and cork. The materials were constructed offsite, minimising disruption to classes. It was completed within just five months of construction commencing.

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