Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: October 5, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Remembering Tony Kozak – the last Soproner to exit the building

Tree Frog Forestry News
October 5, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956—a student-initiated revolt against Soviet-imposed policies—ended with 250 forestry students and 50 professors fleeing to Vancouver (and the Sopron Division of the Faculty of Forestry at UBC was born). Key among them was Dr. Antal (Tony) Kozak, Professor Emeritus, who died peacefully on June 22, 2017 at the age of 81. Remembering Tony Kozak is a feature story in Branchlines by his son Rob Kozak (who currently holds in the position first held by Tony). Those who wish to honour Tony’s memory can donate to the Tony Kozak Scholarship in Forest Measurement at UBC or “raise a glass of mediocre Scotch to the last Soproner to exit the building”.

In other news, mill fires were reported in Thunder Bay (Resolute Forest Products) and Lumby (Valley Wood Manufacturing), wood and bio-mass is called a next-generation material, concrete is featured in passive house design, and Penticton’s new Lakeside Resort wins its first commercial building award.

Forestry headlines include:

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry

Canada’s forests need protection

Dan Kraus, Nature Conservancy of Canada
The Province
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Forests define our Canadian geography and identity. One-third of our country is covered with trees, and forests occur in every province and territory. Jobs in forestry employ more than 200,000 Canadians and support many Indigenous and northern communities. It’s easy to think that our forests are endless, and it’s a mindset we’ve held for a long time. But we need to change our thinking. Although there are vast areas of forest in our northlands, these places represent some of our planet’s last stands of large intact forests. In southern Canada, we have lost and degraded many of our forests, impacting both nature and people. …Canada may rank third for total forest cover (behind Brazil and Russia), but if there’s anywhere in the world where intact forests can be maintained, my bet is on Canada.

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Remembering Tony Kozak

By Rob Kozak
Branchlines
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tony Kozak

Tony and Rob Kozak

On the tennis courts, at the card table, in the classroom, or at the IBM punch card machine, Tony Kozak was a force to be reckoned with. …An influential and always dogged scientist, Tony is best known for his pioneering forest mensuration work on developing tree taper volume models, which have been fitted in many countries and for many tree species around the world and have now come to be generically known as “Kozak Taper Equations”. …Dr Antal (Tony) Kozak, Professor Emeritus, died peacefully and surrounded by family on June 22, 2017 at the age of 81 after a short illness. He will be dearly missed by colleagues, friends, family, and the generations of students that he cared for so deeply. Those who wish to honour Tony’s memory can donate to the Tony Kozak Scholarship in Forest Measurement at UBC (https://memorial.support.ubc.ca/tony-kozak/) or raise a glass of mediocre Scotch to the last Soproner to exit the building.

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Board to audit 11 woodlots in Burns Lake and Francois Lake area

BC Forest Practices Board
October 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board will examine forest planning and practices on 11 woodlots in the Nadina Resource District, starting Oct. 10, 2017. Auditors will examine whether harvesting, roads, bridges, silviculture, fire protection and associated planning, carried out between October 2015 and October 2017, met the requirements of the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Forestry is a major activity in the Burns Lake area, where the abundance of mature pine stands was a significant factor contributing to the mountain pine beetle epidemic. The beetle has killed most of the harvestable timber, leaving many of the woodlot licensees in this audit with challenges to salvage the dead timber.

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Fort Nelson First Nation announces boreal caribou action plan in Northeast BC

By Chris Newton
Energetic City
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT NELSON, B.C. — The Fort Nelson First Nation has released a plan of action to address an emergency that has caused the rapid decline of boreal caribou in BC. The Medzih Action Plan delivers recovery actions for boreal caribou habitat within the Liard watershed in northeastern British Columbia. The First Nation says that the plan is the first, and so far only, recovery plan in BC to spatially identify and protect critical habitat for boreal caribou. The Fort Nelson First Nation says that it came up with the plan to address the ongoing failures by both the provincial and the federal governments to take the steps necessary for boreal caribou recovery. 

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B.C. Wildfire Service offers preliminary tally of costs from disastrous summer

Canadian Press in the Victoria Times Colonist
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS, B.C. — British Columbia has spent more than $500 million battling dozens of wildfires during the 2017 forest fire season. Fire information officer Kevin Turcott says total suppression costs to date amount to almost $548 million. He says that’s nearly nine times the original budget of $63 million and far above the $382 million spent in 2009, which officials say was the previous highest cost. Hundreds of wildfires have been recorded in the province since April 1 as B.C. endured its worst-ever fire season. Several fires continue to burn, including six in the southeastern B.C. More than 45,000 people were forced from their homes at the height of the fire season.

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Association of BC Forest Professionals ready to participate in government review of professional reliance

The Association of BC Forest Professionals
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Association of BC Forest Professionals, the regulatory body for BC’s 5,400 forest professionals, looks forward to participating in the government’s review of professional reliance to ensure it meets the needs of the people of BC.  “Forest professionals work for governments, industry, First Nations, and academia in communities across the province. They know both personally and professionally the importance of having an effective management regime safeguarding our forest and ecosystem resources,” said Christine Gelowitz, RPF, Association of BC Forest Professionals CEO.

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Clearcutting our losses

By Joan Baxter
Halifax’s The Coast
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

…The clearcutting from this past June was on a 6,184-acre piece of land that Nova Scotians had financed for Northern Pulp (or more specifically its sister company, Northern Timber). Both companies are subsidiaries of Northern Resources Nova Scotia Corp., which counts former Progressive Conservative premier John Hamm as its board chair. A year after the land deal, that whole family of businesses was bought by Paper Excellence Canada, a company that owns six pulp mills in Canada and is linked to the billionaire Widjaja family of Indonesia. What was happening in Wentworth—the clearcutting of Acadian forest by a large foreign-owned pulp mill and a government bending over backwards to accommodate it—was nothing new in Nova Scotia. Nor was the public outcry. It had been going on for a very long time, ever since big pulp moved in.

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Species at Risk policy fires up Northern leaders

By Ian Ross
Northern Ontario Business
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada
Municipalities, industry, First Nations fear habitat protection rules could devastate forestry. Queen’s Park can expect fierce resistance from Northerners if the province attempts to finalize controversial Species at Risk policy without proper consultation, said Kenora’s mayor. “If they want to rush it through, they’re going to have a backlash like they’ve never seen before,” said Dave Canfield, past president of the Northwestern Ontario Municipal Association. “There’s going to be a lot of us standing shoulder-to-shoulder.” At issue are the new Species at Risk rules, designed to protect 28 species in Northern Ontario, which will be woven into the fabric of the Endangered Species Act.

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The boreal caribou preservation plan could cost over $740 million a year

The Montreal Economic Institute
October 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The attempt to save 79 caribou a year could cost 5,675 direct jobs in the province of Quebec and more than $741 million in lost economic activity, according to calculations carried out by the MEI based on the federal government’s recommendations. Ottawa had given the provinces until October 5 to submit their plans in this matter. “If Quebec implements all of these recommendations to the letter, the reduction in the harvest would represent a loss of 72 direct jobs for the uncertain preservation of a single caribou,” explains Alexandre Moreau, Public Policy Analyst at the MEI. “This would represent a total cost of $9.4 million per caribou, with no guaranteed results, for the three regions affected by the boreal caribou recovery plan, namely the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean, the North Shore, and Northern Quebec.”

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Walden cheers Trump administration wildfire funding

By Barney Lerten
KTVZ.COM
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Greg Walden

WASHINGTON – Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore.,  applauded word of additional wildfire funds and a call to action on forest management reform in a supplemental budget request Wednesday from the Trump administration. The Office of Management and Budget included $576.5 million in wildfire funding in their supplemental budget request…, as well as recommendations that active forest management and forestry reform be part of the solution to curb wildfire borrowing. …”Another fire season winds down and, once again, the Forest Service needed to rob money from important fire prevention work to pay for fighting wildfires,” he said. “We must not only supplement those accounts to pay for the cost of this fire season, but it’s past time that we fix how we pay for fires and treat them like the natural disasters they are.”

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Timber industry gets a dose of good news

By Steve Cameron
Bonner County Daily Bee
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, International

Bob Boeh

Nothing is set in stone — or wood — but there were smiles throughout Idaho’s timber and logging industries on Wednesday. The Committee on Agriculture of the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” clearing the way for the bill to reach the House floor. This is the so-called “Westerman Bill,” a wide-ranging forest management initiative sponsored by Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Ariz. …Bob Boeh, vice president for government affairs with the Idaho Forest Group, was careful to say Wednesday that nothing had been finalized, but he noted the House had taken a huge step toward improving forestry management issues. “We’ve pushed for arbitration instead of lengthy and costly court proceedings because it’s the fairest means of settling these disputes brought up by certain groups,” Boeh said after getting the news from Washington, D.C.

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Herbicide Ban Signatures Filed

By Matthew Denis
Eugene Weekly
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Community Rights Lane County and the Freedom From Aerial Herbicide Alliance handed over about 15,000 signatures calling for the ban of aerial herbicide spraying by timber corporations to the Lane County Clerk’s Office on Friday, Sept. 29. Timber companies apply aerial herbicides to eliminate brush and any tree growth other than groves of single-species, cash-producing trees — primarily Douglas fir. Opponents argue that aerial spray can contaminate the air and water, harming human health.  If the office verifies at least 11,000 of the signatures, then voters in Lane County’s May 15 primary election ballot will decide whether to impose the spraying ban. Proponents expect significant opposition from the timber industry. While advocates say the majority of Oregonians support such a ban, the timber industry has a powerful lobby in the state Legislature.

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Big wildfires are 5 times more common in the West now than in the ’70s

By Bruce Lieberman
Yale Climate Connections
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Tania Schoennagel

Wildfires have always been a natural part of forest ecosystems in the western U.S. But now climate change is causing hotter, drier conditions. And the decades-long practice of putting out fires instead of letting them burn has greatly increased the amount of available fuel. As a result, there now are more big fires. Schoennagel: “In the seventies, we had 20 large fires per year occurring in western forests, and recently, well over 100 large fires per year occur.” Prescribed burns and thinning trees can help keep fires from burning out of control. Tania Schoennagel, a fire ecologist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, says less than one percent of western forests burn each year. That makes it almost impossible to predict where a fire will occur. So to make the best use of limited resources, she recommends applying preventive measures where people live.

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New Approach to Salvage Logging – Opinions Still Clash

By Andi Bourne
Seeley Swan Pathfinder
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SEELEY LAKE – More than a million acres of Montana burned this fire season. Of the more than 750,000 federal acres that burned, nearly 160,000 acres were on the Rice Ridge Fire near Seeley Lake. Due to the large geographical area and scope of the post-fire recovery efforts, Region 1 of the Forest Service launched a new approach to assessing the burned areas and pursuing salvage logging opportunities. While many people, including Pyramid Mountain Lumber, Inc., want to see the process expedited, others see salvage logging as a burden to taxpayers and one that harms critical habitat. This is the first time the Forest Service has assigned an Incident Management Team (IMT) at the regional level to help coordinate post-fire recovery efforts amongst all the forests in the region. The IMT will oversee the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) assessments and will determine the opportunities for salvage across forest boundaries.

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Wildfires Burning Through Cash, Not Just Landscape

By Ryan Levi
KQED.org
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Steve Hawks

Wildfires continue to strain government resources throughout California, creating a vicious cycle of fires and land burdened with excess fuels, which leads to bigger fires. Nobody knows that better than Steve Hawks. The nearly 30-year firefighter [oversees] Cal Fire’s Wildland Fire Prevention Engineering Program. But this time of year, he wears another hat. “Well, I guess in essence it kind of is a fire accountant,” Hawks says with a laugh of his other role with Cal Fire. The actual job title is Finance Section Chief, and Hawks is one of six throughout the state. It’s part of the Incident Command System Cal Fire uses on major wildfires. When Hawks is sent to a major fire as the Finance Section Chief, it’s his job to oversee a small team that handles all things money for the fire. 

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‘Managing’ forests is about profit

Letter by Andrew Van Atta
The Register-Guard
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

I agree wholeheartedly with the title of Jeff Winter’s guest viewpoint of Sept. 30: “Smoke shows need for better forest management.” But my agreement ends with the title. For someone like myself, who regularly visits our public (and private) forestland whether it be logged or unlogged (rare), burned or unburned, it’s obvious our “management” of the forests is the problem. …So you think more logging (thinning) is the answer? Think again. It is the old-growth untouched forest that best survives periodic fire events, as they have for millions of years before we arrived to “manage” things. The only thing that gets “managed” are timber company profits.

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Study finds surprising ponderosa regrowth after severe wildfires

By Emery Cowan
Arizona Daily Sun
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

More than a decade ago in the midst of a string of severe drought years, the Pumpkin and Rodeo-Chediski fires whipped through a combined 484,000 acres of Arizona’s ponderosa pine forests. Large areas experienced complete or almost complete tree mortality. But now, a team of Flagstaff and Colorado researchers has found some encouraging signs of ponderosa pine regrowth in those high-severity burns. Their paper, set to publish in December, recorded regeneration in all burned areas and also found evidence that the new trees may come back in lower densities than before and intermixed with more drought-resistant species, making the entire forest more resilient to climate change and wildfires in the future. “I don’t think we can prevent all (high severity fires) so if they do occur I do think there is hope,” the paper’s lead author Suzanne Owen said in an interview.

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San Francisco Using Data-Mapping Tech to Count Its Trees — and Save Millions

Bt Data-Smart Solutions
Techwire.net
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

While high-quality roads, appealing architecture and effective public transportation have long been seen as catalysts of economic growth, policymakers have paid little attention to industrial infrastructure’s arboreal counterpart: trees. The Urban Forest Map — a visualization of every tree in San Francisco — seeks to change that. It turns out that trees too have economic and environmental benefits via their capacity to conserve energy, filter stormwater, capture air pollutants and remove carbon dioxide from the environment.

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National forests need active management

By Nick Smith, executive director, Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities
The Bend Bulletin
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Nick Smith

As Oregon’s wildfires near containment, there are discussions in Salem and Washington, D.C., about the causes of this summer’s fires and the staggering costs of fire suppression to taxpayers. It’s too late to reverse the damage of this year’s fire season, but it’s not too early to start thinking about protecting our forests and communities from future wildfires. Many believe reducing heavy fuels on our federally owned forests through active forest management is the best solution. We can’t stop fires, but logging, thinning and prescribed fire can help reduce their size and severity and can help mitigate the impacts of drought and climate change. Others believe that fixing federal budgeting for wildfire suppression is key. Both views are correct. … We can responsibly increase harvests on federal land to help restore forest health and resiliency to fire, but the U.S. Forest Service lacks the legal tools, funds and personnel to better manage our forests. Not surprisingly, tree mortality is increasing as wildfire suppression is exhausting more of the Forest Service’s budget.  

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Daines, Tester Trying To Reverse Court Ruling On Lynx Habitat

By Nate Hegyi
Montana Public Radio
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Montana’s senators are trying to reverse a controversial federal court case out of Bozeman they say is partly to blame for the state’s devastating wildfires. But some environmentalists say it’s actually an assault on the Endangered Species Act. At a congressional hearing last week, Republican Senator Steve Daines said there’s a saying in Montana: “Either we’re going to manage the forests, or the forests are going to manage us.” And he says a recent 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling known as the Cottonwood decision means the forests are managing Montana. Daines testified alongside Democratic Senator Jon Tester in support of their bill to reverse the Cottonwood decision, which says the U.S. Forest Service needs to draw up a new management plan for 12 million acres of critical Canada Lynx habitat. The animals are on the threatened species list. But Tester says a new forest management plan can take decades to write.

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Study points to win-win for spotted owls and forest management

By Kat Kerlin
University of California, Davis
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Remote sensing technology has detected what could be a win for both spotted owls and forestry management, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station and the University of Washington. For 25 years, many forests in the western United States have been managed to protect habitat for endangered and threatened spotted owls. A central tenet of that management has been to promote and retain more than 70 percent of the forest canopy cover. However, dense levels of canopy cover leave forests prone to wildfires and can lead to large tree mortality during droughts. In the study, published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management, scientists found that cover in tall trees is the key habitat requirement for spotted owl — not total canopy cover. It indicated that spotted owls largely avoid cover created by stands of shorter trees.

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Let forests regenerate

Letter by Scott Mathes
The Oregonian
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Every year forest and wildland fires make headlines across Oregon and the nation. We are told by our legislators and land management agencies that these fires are catastrophic to our natural resources and must be suppressed and stopped. However, fire ecology science and research informs us that most wildfires that occur in our forests and grasslands are crucial to the health and long term survival of many species and should be allowed to burn as they have for thousands of years. …The firefighting methods employed by the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau Land Management, and other agencies do not restore forest health or protect species and natural resources. On the contrary, firefighting often destroys and alters habitat and reduces biodiversity, forever altering the delicate balance and natural regeneration of vegetation and soils that nature so proficiently handles on its own.

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Restoration efforts underway to repair land damaged by the Pioneer Fire

By Lucy Darrow
KIVITV.com
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Nearly 200,000 acres of land were charred in the 2016 Pioneer Fire that burned near Idaho City. With the help of EcoFlight, reporter Lacey Darrow as able to get a birds eye view of the burn scar.  …While the area of land it touched is hard to grasp from the ground, the dead and dying trees are easy to pick out from the air.  …The US Forest Service with the support of the Boise Forest Coalition has been in the process of removing some of the dead trees and will be planting new ones. Representitives from the Idaho Conservation Leage said the trees pose a risk to may of those who use the lands to recreate. …While they said they are not usually for salvage logging, in this case they felt that the project struck a balance. The funds from the logging will then help pay for some of the restoration work in the area.

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Meteorite may have sparked a N.H. blaze that’s been burning since Tuesday

By Ben Thompson
Boston Globe
October 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A three-alarm forest fire burning in the White Mountains for more than a day could grow larger Wednesday, and a witness claims it was started by a meteorite, Woodstock, N.H., fire Chief John MacKay said. The fire was first reported around 6:15 a.m. Tuesday and has extended over 22 to 25 acres in the area of Kinsman Ridge in Lost River Gorge, MacKay said. The “fairly good-sized fire” has been hard to contain, he said, as it has spread across “very steep, rocky slopes.” “It’s not a large fire, but it’s a difficult fire because of the steepness of it, and the elevation,” MacKay said. As of Wednesday morning, two helicopters and more than 50 people were working to suppress the blaze, which MacKay said could expand throughout the day. “I expect it to grow, especially with the sun coming up,” he said.

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Northland timber processors call for government controls on exports to save jobs

New Zealand Newsnow
October 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Northland timber processing companies are calling on the next government to slow harvesting and regulate log exports to protect local jobs. Seven Sharp reports that 15-years after the government called for investment in forestry, ‘the great wall of wood’ that was predicted is about to collapse, putting local livelihoods under threat. “They said there was a wall of wood coming and they wanted processors here to process it for them,” said Garth Mortensen of North Sawn Lumber. “We believed we had long-term sustainable harvest no matter what happened.” But Mr Mortensen says a review has found that 3.2 million tonnes of logs is sustainable, down one million tonnes from what was originally expected.

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Company & Business News

Blaze impacts mill jobs

By Richard Rolke
Vernon Morning Star
October 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

There’s an uncertain future for workers at a rural Lumby mill. Fire roared through the main production facility at Valley Wood Remanufacturing on Dure Meadow Road Tuesday afternoon. “We can’t operate. We’re shut down,” said Alistair Bain, company manager. There are 25 employees at the site. “There’s so much uncertainty. In the short-term, we can’t operate here so we’re looking at options. We want to get as many people back doing something as soon as possible.” Any decisions will be partly influenced by insurance. The fire does not impact the company’s second facility in Lavington.

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Thunder Bay firefighters called to structural fire at Resolute Forest Products

CBC News
October 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

Firefighters were called to Resolute Forest Products’ site in Thunder Bay, Ont., Wednesday morning to battle a reported structural fire. The call came in around 8 a.m. The fire was reported to be in one of the wood chip silos at the facility; early reports indicated that the fire may have been caused by overheating machinery. Firefighters remained on the scene as of about 10:30 a.m., but reports from the city’s fire department indicated the fire was contained, and the focus was on ensuring it was completely out and that no smouldering wood chips remained to re-ignite.

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Port eyes next year’s spending

By Paul Gottlieb
Peninsula Daily News
October 4, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — The Port of Port Angeles’ status quo $8.28 million draft operating budget for 2018 includes $150,000 for dredging and foresees a continuation of end-of-2017 log yard activity. …Log-yard activity is expected to increase from $1.74 million projected revenue in the 2017 budget to $2.33 million projected for 2018. …Revenue for 2018 will include three wood-chip vessels that will be loaded in Port Angeles for destinations in Asia. Nimmo said at the meeting Monday that he’s expecting more barge revenue next year than in 2017. That’s due in part to a joint venture that will begin in October between Southport Forest Products LLC of Coos Bay, Ore., and Atlanta-based Georgia Pacific to barge logs from Canada to Port Angeles to Coos Bay.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Quebec pyrolysis plant to produce bio-coal products

By Tamar Atik
Canadian Biomass
October 4, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Quebec-based pyrolysis plant Xylo-Carbone is recieving $1.5 million in funding from the Quebec Government to build a charcoal production plant that will produce bio-coal products. The $6.6 million plant is being constructed in the town of Saint-Tite, Que. The company’s website states that it specalizes in converting wood to bio-carbon products for the BBQ cooking industry, biochar in agriculture, and for water purification applications and air through activated charcoal.

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Natural Resources Research Institute roasting wood to replace coal

By John Myers
Duluth News Tribune
October 4, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

COLERAINE — It seems like much of the world is plunging headlong toward renewable energy and away from fossil fuels and the carbon dioxide pollution they create. Ontario has eliminated coal-burning power plants. China is phasing out internal combustion engines for new cars, as are General Motors and Ford. …But Don Fosnacht, associate director of the Natural Resources Research Institute at University of Minnesota Duluth, says the reality is that it will take years, even decades before the U.S. grudgingly moves to eliminate coal and oil from its energy mix. “Until then, we need a bridge, a transition that has fewer emissions than coal but can still be used in existing technology,” Fosnacht said. …Fosnacht is leading the NRRI’s Renewable Energy Initiative team that’s developing a coal substitute made from roasted wood.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Lakeside Resort wins at commercial building awards

By Steve Kidd
Princeton Similkameen Spotlight
October 4, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Though it just opened to visitors a few months ago, the new extension to the Penticton Lakeside Resort is drawing attention. The “West Wing,” which features wood-primary construction in the six-storey, 70-unit expansion earned the Lakeside top honours in the hospitality category at the ninth annual Thompson Okanagan Kootenay Commercial Building Awards last month. …The glulam beams, columns and cross-laminated panels were built and supplied by Structurlam and the general contractor was Greyback Construction Ltd. …The Osoyoos Indian Band administration building, in Oliver, also features wood construction and took home the award for that category at the gala on Sept. 29. Greyback was the contractor for that building as well, and it was designed by Womer and Associates.

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Material Strategies for Sustainable Construction

By Blaine Brownell
Architect Magazine
October 4, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Next-generation material approaches must increasingly address material effects both within and beyond an architectural project. …The currency of sustainable design is carbon, yet we still treat it as an abstract concept based on estimates of how much carbon dioxide is produced throughout a material’s life cycle. Although conceptual carbon accounting is an important process for measuring environmental effects, we forget that carbon is also literally stored within certain substances. …biomass, such as wood or other plant materials, acts as a carbon sequester, storing more carbon than it releases. Unless the material decays or is destroyed, the carbon will remain embedded within. …The recent surge of interest in tall wood construction is, in large part, a testament to the environmental appeal of “depositing” carbon versus effectively “withdrawing” it in a concrete or steel structure. 

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Tiny Minimalist Home

By Christine Walsh
Jetson Green
October 3, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The firm Escape has been making tiny homes for a while now, and their latest offering, the so-called Escape One, is just as well built as all the others. It features a charred wood façade and an interior layout that maximizes the available space in the most thoughtful way possible. The Escape One is built atop a 25 ft long trailer and measures 276 sq ft. The home is clad in wood throughout, and the exterior cladding was treated with the traditional Japanese Shou Sugi Ban method, which both preserves the wood and protects it from pests and decay naturally. The interior walls are also clad in wood, but these were left in their natural state.

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Concrete House Strong, Flexible, Fossil-Fuel Free

By Jon Kalish
WNPR News
October 4, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

In …Vermont a so-called “net zero” house is being built that will not use any fossil fuel. …There are other houses like this but what makes this home unusual is that the nationally acclaimed architect building it is using an unconventional material, concrete. …“A five-inch concrete wall is probably a hundred times stronger than a stud wall,” architect Dave Sellers said. “Cement uses a lot of energy in its manufacture and so it has a fairly high carbon footprint,” said George Harvey, a writer for Green Energy Times. But, because the house is expected to be maintenance-free for 500 years, Harvey says its carbon footprint is the equivalent of eight to 10 conventional homes.

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Architect introduces first mass timber high-rise in the United States

By Stephen Lanzi
The Plainsman
October 4, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Founder and Principal Architect of the Portland-based architectural firm, Lever Architecture, Thomas Robinson spoke to Auburn students and community members Wednesday evening on his involvement with, and the industry as a whole, using cross-laminated timber. Robinson and Lever Architecture are on the forefront of the use cross-laminated timber, CLT, and just received a permit to build the first mass timber high-rise in the United States.  “We have people who are interested in our work coming from Europe and I’m actually going to be speaking in Germany at the end of this year,” Robinson said. The new building, referred to as Framework, will be 12 stories tall in Portland, Oregon. The client of the building is a community development bank.“They wanted a building that related to their goals of economic justice and sustainability,” Robinson said.

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