Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 7, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

US ENGO at odds with Canada on how to account for carbon in forests

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 7, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US-based Natural Resources Defense Council says Canada is failing to measure carbon emissions from clear-cutting in the boreal forest and needs to “live up to its rhetoric“. In response, FPAC and the Ontario government say the NRDC doesn’t account for carbon stored in wood products and “forestry can help mitigate the effects of climate change“. 

The US forest/fire debate continues with claims that Senator Daines’ wildfire survey  is “over-simplified and politically skewed“. Related headlines include: Logging isn’t the right response to forest fires; After decades of fire suppression US forests were ready to burn; and Senator Tester asks the Forest Service to let fire scientists attend [a climate change] conference.

No one seems to be interested in forestry policy any more” (in Campbell River), according to William Wagner RFP, although the future of forests and forestry on Vancouver Island will be the focus of an upcoming six-city ENGO tour.

In Business news, New Brunswick sawmills say they are unfairly singled out, the extent of Tolko’s mill fire is becoming apparent [not good], and a fire destroyed the Libby lumber mill in Montana.

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

 

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Forestry

No one seems to be interested in forestry policy any more

Letter by William L. Wagner, PhD, RPF
Campbell River Mirror
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

William L. Wagner

Many of us fairly new to Campbell River assume that most people in the city and the region are interested in forests, their conversation and their sustainable use by the forest industry. Still, in truth, almost no one seems to be. …Still, as long as the policy of “wasting” or “using up” public-owned forest values in the name of creating a world competitive forest industry, our public forests are in jeopardy. Let’s fact it, the industry is based in regional geo-monopolies made up of major timber tenure holders mostly owned by multi-national corporations. These corporations are not responsible to local interests and this should even heighten public concern.

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Nanaimo event focuses on the future of forestry

By Nicholas Pescod
Nanaimo News Bulletin
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The future of forests and forestry on Vancouver Island will be the main focus of an upcoming open house in Nanaimo. Representatives from Sierra Club B.C. and the Wilderness Committee, a non-profit society dedicated to protecting Canadian wilderness, will be discussing the status of old-growth forests and the forestry industry at an open house at Vancouver Island University on Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. …The upcoming event in Nanaimo is one of six stops for the Wilderness Committee and the Sierra Club, who have called their Island campaign the Let’s Talk Forests tour. The organizations have already held presentations in Port Hardy, Campbell River and Duncan and will also stop in Port Alberni and Courtenay. …The open house begins at 7 p.m. at VIU in Building 250, Room 125.

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BC VIEWS: The limits of Indigenous rights

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in Victoria News
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Scott Niedermayer, Kathryn Teneese and Adrian Dix

The 20-year battle against a year-round ski resort proposal in the Purcell Mountains has finally ended in defeat for the Ktunaxa Nation and its allies, with a 7-2 decision by the Supreme Court of Canada. Led by Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin … the court ruled that constitutional protection for religious expression does not extend to the Ktunaxa’s claims about Jumbo Glacier, as the East Kootenay alpine basin is known. …Retired hockey player Scott Niedermayer came up from his California home to add his vague notion of grizzly bear habits to the message, which was to reject a B.C. environmental permit to build Jumbo Glacier Resort. …This expensive public relations and legal offensive was supported by a U.S.-based environmental group called Yellowstone to Yukon, which wants to extend national park status far into Canada.

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Glyphosate causes disease in animal organs, biologist says

By Elizabeth Fraser
CBC News
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Even light doses of glyphosate can cause disease in organs later on, says a biologist opposed to spraying the herbicide to kill weeds and young hardwoods in New Brunswick and elsewhere. “Glyphosate accumulates in all our organs,” said Thierry Vrain, a soil biologist and former president of the International Federation of Nematology Societies. The New Brunswick forest industry uses glyphosate to kill maple, oak and other hardwood growth, and by NB Power uses it to kill hardwood growth near transmission lines.  The main ingredient Roundup, glyphosate is also sprayed on farmland around the world, despite a finding by the cancer and water branch of the World Health Organization that it is “probably carcinogenic to humans.”

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Lolo Forest looks to recover some of the economic value of timber that burned

By Perry Backus
The Missoulian
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

After nearly 10 percent of the 2-million-acre Lolo National Forest was hit by this summer’s wildfires, officials are working to decide how much burned timber can be salvaged before its economic value is lost. While Montana lumber mills say the salvage sales could provide much needed logs for their operations, environmental groups are leery about the amount of timber that will be harvested and impacts to the forest that could occur. “Based on our Forest Plan allocations and past experience with fire salvage, we can expect around 10 to 15 percent of the areas that burned to be identified for salvage,” said Lolo National Forest Supervisor Timothy Garcia. So far, the Lolo Forest has announced plans to do salvage logging on 2,718 acres on the Sunrise Fire that burned a little over 26,000 acres near Superior.

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Logging isn’t right response to forest fires

By Ernie Niemi, president, Natural Resource Economics
The Register-Guard
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Ernie Niemi

Most of us know the saying, “There’s no such thing as a free lunch.” When somebody offers us something valuable for free, we hold tight to our wallets and purses, because it’s usually a con job. … Hold extra tight these days, in response to promises of wonderful things for free if we let the timber industry salvage-log trees killed in Lane County and elsewhere in Oregon by last summer’s forest fires. Like all good cons, the sales pitch sorta makes sense on the surface.  …To see inside the con, look back to 2002, when the Biscuit Fire burned 500,000 acres in southern Oregon. Oregon State University researchers visited the site several years later and found that unlogged areas had enough naturally occurring tree seedlings to satisfy the Forest Service’s management standards for the area.

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After decades of fire suppression, U.S. forests were ready to burn, specialist says

By Morgan Sussman
Phys.org
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Stephen Creech

With wildfires causing widespread destruction in California, Montana and other western states, it’s understandable why officials have been investing in fire suppression efforts for decades. However, nature eventually must run its course—which contributed to record-breaking fires this year, according to a firefighter and wildfire consulting specialist. The fires in the western states were inevitable, said Stephen Creech, who responded to three firefighting assignments in Montana this summer for a total of 48 days. “What people don’t know is that these ecosystems are -adapted,” said Creech, who teaches firefighting certification courses at Purdue University. “Fire is a natural part of the system out here.” And after nearly 100 years of fire suppression across the United States, Montana, California and other western states were susceptible to fires, according to Creech. “Fuel feeds the flames,” he said.

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Sen. Daines’ wildfire survey takes simplistic view

Letter by Joshua C. Dickinson, PhD
The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Sen. Danes

Sen. Daines recently circulated a survey asking what most contributes to catastrophic wildfires in Montana: mismanagement of federal forests; environmental groups and judges who block timber harvests; or global warming? The “survey” is over-simplified and politically skewed. Studies by University of Montana forest scientists indicate that almost 50 percent of Western wildfires are climate change related, with the unusually dry 2017 summer being a notable example. Fire has been integral to the ecology of Western forests and grasslands for millennia, with plants and animals adapted to fire. Indigenous peoples of the region utilized fire to maintain desired wildlife habitat. Fire suppression has proved to be counter-productive. Fire damage can be mitigated, but not eliminated, by forest thinning, and particularly prescribed burning, which can reduce accumulated fuels.

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Tester asks Forest Service to let fire scientists attend conference

By Rob Chaney
The Missoulian
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jon Tester

Sen. Jon Tester has asked the U.S. Forest Service to remove limitations on which fire-science experts can travel to an international conference after reports last week that many Missoula-based personnel weren’t allowed to attend. The Forest Service is sending fewer than a third of the fire experts it sent two years ago to the same conference. Organizers of the International Fire Ecology and Management Congress told the Missoulian they were expecting 44 people from the Rocky Mountain Research Station this year, but were only getting six. In a letter to Forest Service Chief Tony Tooke sent on Monday, Tester said it was “in the best interest of Montanans that these public servants are permitted to share their knowledge with other wildfire experts from across the country and around the world.”

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Weyerhaeuser responds to aerial spray concerns

By Kelly Sullivan
The Monroe Monitor & Valley News
November 6, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Snohomish County environmental group that asked the Department of Natural Resources and various timber companies to rethink aerial spraying in the Sky Valley has received a response. The Seattle-based Weyerhaeuser timber company — one of the world’s largest lumber producers — sent a letter to the Sky Valley Environmental and Economic Alliance in October. SVENA had addressed its petition to Weyerhaeuser president and CEO Doyle Simons. North Washington Region manager Travis Ridgway replied. “Herbicides are an important tool in our ability to practice sustainable forestry and we will continue to use them, as appropriate, in a safe and efficient manner,” he wrote. …“The Weyerhaeuser response to the petition against aerial spraying is pretty much the same corporate rhetoric I’ve been hearing from them for 35 years,” wrote resident and SVENA member Diane Hardee in an email.

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228 Hoosier scientists to Holcomb: Stop the logging of Yellowwood

Emily Hopkins and Sarah Bowman
Indianapolis Star
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

More than 200 scientists from across Indiana are urging Gov. Eric Holcomb to stop a scheduled timber sale in the Yellowwood Backcountry Area, which is among the only remaining wild areas in the entire state. The sale, scheduled for Thursday, would be the first time this particular section of the forest has been logged since the area was designated as “back country” in 1981. The area is meant to offer visitors a forest experience “much the same as it may have appeared a century and a half ago,” according to a DNR article from that same year. David Leblanc, a professor of biology at Ball State University who specializes in forest ecology, was among the 228 scientists who signed the letter, which was delivered to Gov. Holcomb’s office last week.

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Forestry here far from FSC theory

By Dame Anne Salmond
The Gisborne Herald
November 7, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Anne Salmond

Last week I attended the annual conference of the Environment Institute of Australia and New Zealand, where a representative of the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) in Bonn spoke about her organisation. …Given the number of raw logs that leave Tairawhiti, the refusal of some FSC-registered forestry companies to support local processing, breaches of resource consents, endless complaints about severe damage to the roading network and to waterways, coasts and harbours from sediment and slash, there seems to be a radical disjunction between FSC theory and practice in our region. In particular, the expectation that local ratepayers (many of whom live on low incomes) should heavily subsidise forestry companies by paying for damage to the roading network.

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Company & Business News

Allnorth and FPInnovations partner to bring innovation, value to pulp and paper industry

By Allnorth Consultants Limited
Canada Newswire
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, United States

NORFOLK, VA – Today Allnorth and FPInnovations announced a strategic partnership of two of the industry’s leading players that will bring a new level of innovation and added value to pulp and paper clients throughout North America. The new partnership, announced at the TAPPI PEERS New Technology Showcase, will allow a larger number of pulp and paper organizations to benefit from an integrated solution toward energy management. FPInnovations, working with CanmetENERGY of Natural Resources Canada, has developed a unique approach to identifying opportunities to minimize energy use, as well as increasing revenue from power sales. …”FPInnovations and CanmetENERGY have successfully teamed up to deliver our proven approach to more than 13 of our member company mills,” said Pierre Lapointe, President and CEO of FPInnovations.

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Update 4: Fire at Tolko’s Lakeview Mill, Williams Lake

Tolko Release
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

The fire at Williams Lake proved itself stubborn as flare-ups continued over the weekend and into early Monday morning. The fire, located largely in the offices’ section of the sawmill, continued to burn between the ceiling and roof. Given the location of the fire, it was difficult to get at from the outside and we could not safely access to fight the fire from inside the building. …This afternoon, we were able to complete a very early and high-level assessment of the damage and structural engineers have now started the work required to determine the integrity of the building. This work will be completed over the coming days and will help us determine our recovery plan for the mill. Our CEO, Brad Thorlakson, and members of the executive were also in Williams Lake today to survey the damage and speak to employees.

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Stubborn fire still flaring up at Williams Lake sawmill

By Monica Lamb-Yorski
BC Local News in Vernon Morning Star
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada, Canada West

Flare-ups have kept firefighting crews and Tolko busy at Tolko’s Lakeview Division in Williams Lake where a fire broke out in the sawmill at about 6:20 p.m. last Thursday. “It appears the fire is hiding in the ceiling a bit, and that’s what we are dealing with,” communications advisor Janice Lockyer told the Tribune Monday. …Deputy Fire Chief Rob Warnock said his crews were there for 25 hours straight from 6:36 p.m. Thursday and then back late Friday, Saturday for about 10 hours and again Sunday evening for a few hours. “Tolko had employees monitoring and they had their own equipment so they could get in and rip the siding and plywood off so we could get our equipment and manpower into the mill,” Warnock said. “There is plywood up against the tin roof and if there is dust inside that is what keeps catching on fire.”

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New Brunswick exports up as softwood lumber, NAFTA talks loom

By Jordan Gill
CBC News
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

New Brunswick exports appear to be surging after a poor performance last year, says an economist with the Canadian export credit agency. Peter Hall, Export Development Canada’s chief economist, said 2016 was not a good year for many provinces. …Hall said the discussion over increased softwood lumber duties comes after the industry has had a decade of sub-par performance. “The drop in U.S. housing demand after the great recession was cataclysmic and really affected the province quite substantially,” he said. The industry is in a better position to weather the duty storm now, he said. U.S. housing starts are up, for both good and bad reasons. “We don’t want to capitalize on misfortune, but the storms that have ravaged the south of the U.S. are really boosting demand as well,” said Hall. “At the same time these duties are being imposed, prices have soared.”

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New Brunswick sawmills say they are unfairly singled out for U.S. anti-dumping duties

By New Brunswick Lumber Producers
Woodworking Network
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: Canada East, Canada

FREDERICTON, N.B. – New Brunswick lumber producers took issue with the U.S. Department of Commerce punitive tariffs issued last week, stating the antidumping duties set for softwood lumber “excluded all of the Atlantic Provinces except New Brunswick in its final determination of duties on softwood lumber.” …”There is no good news for any sawmill in New Brunswick with today’s announcement and the 20.83 percent disadvantage that we now face compared to other Atlantic Canadian producers,” said .the group. …”The change in treatment of New Brunswick essentially comes down to an auditor general’s report which speculated, without providing any hard conclusions, that there may be some distortion in the New Brunswick market which might make [softwood sawlog] prices higher or lower than they might otherwise be,” according to attorney William Barringer.

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Fire destroys Libby lumber mill where 30 worked

By McKayla Haack
NBC Montana
November 6, 2017
Category: Company & Business News
Region: United States, US West

LIBBY, Mont. – A fire has destroyed a lumber mill in Libby that officials say employed 30 people and was one of the last lumber companies in town. Two structures are a complete loss after a fire broke out Sunday at a Libby lumber mill. Lincoln County Undersheriff Brandon Huff said they got the call just after 2 p.m. for a fire at the SK Fingerjoint, Inc, a mill with 30 employees.  …The business is located at the old Stimson Lumber Company site which closed down in 2008. Their website says SK Fingerjoint opened in 2014 under a former Stimson employee, Dan Kneller.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

U.S. environmental group raises alarm on clear-cutting in boreal forest

By Ainslie Cruickshank
The Toronto Star
November 6, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

U.S.-based Natural Resources Defense Council has taken issue with Canada’s commitment to climate leadership through a new report that says Canada is largely failing to measure and report carbon emissions from clear-cutting in the boreal forest with potentially huge global ramifications. Canada needs to both “live up to its rhetoric” and “ratchet up its ambitions,” said report author Josh Axelrod, an NRDC policy analyst, ahead of the annual UN climate change conference. …The Forest Products Association of Canada and the Ontario government, meanwhile, say forestry — which contributed $23 billion to Canada’s nominal GDP in 2016 — can help mitigate the effects of climate change. “In Ontario, protecting forests does not necessarily result in the creation of a carbon sink,” Jolanta Kowalski, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, said in a statement.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

‘Plywood on steroids’ can benefit climate, forests

By Paul Koberstein
Portland Tribune
November 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

When “Framework,” Portland’s next iconic building, tops out at 12 stories, it will be the nation’s tallest structure — and one of the tallest in the world — built entirely of wood. But Framework’s most towering achievement may be its stellar environmental performance, including its role in fighting climate change…. Tall all-wood structures once were rare, but now are being embraced by developers in Portland and around the world. They are designed to meet the same fire and earthquake safety performance criteria as comparable steel and concrete structures. But their stellar environmental credentials give them an advantage over other types of structures, according to researchers at the Oregon State University School of Forestry. In a study released in May, OSU researchers attempted to quantify the environmental benefits of wood over other building materials.

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Chen Zalkind creates a series of wooden furniture using pressure as a bonding method

By Lynn Chaya
Designboom
November 7, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Holon Institute of Technology graduate Chen Zalkind has created his own studio, ‘ZALKIND’, specializing in furniture and consumer products made using a wide range of materials and technologies. having grown up on a kibbutz, zalkind was surrounded by many industrial factories and small workshops teaching him about the various uses of materials. in his latest collection, ‘internal pressure’, zalkind developed a special joint that consists of two wooden dowels that were locked into a pipe using pressure, without the need for glue or screws. ‘the pipe was switched out for a wooden plank and the joints continued to evolve.‘ explains the designer. ‘this stage was full of experimentation with the materials and the many different ways I could use the joint that I was developing.’

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