Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 2, 2018

Today’s Takeaway

Forestry commentators and critics abound. Too much chocolate perhaps?

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 2, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Forestry commentators and critics dominate the Easter weekend headlines. In Mongabay, an article on the effectiveness (or not) of advocacy campaigns on forest conservation (with a focus on the Great Bear Rainforest). Elsewhere: It’s time to press BC’s NDP/Green government to take our forests back; Community-run forests could reverse depressing news about Nova Scotia’s forests; and NY State logging results in damaged roads, concerned residents.

On a more positive note: White pine blister rust-resistant trees are making headway in Idaho; Climate trends and forest impacts are being tracked in Nova Scotia; researchers in Minnesota are trying to replace coal with torrefied biomass; and a “wildfire whodunit that will make your head spin“.

In Business news: more push back from small US publishers on newsprint tariffs; an Ontario wood pellet mill is expanding; and Westervelt plans to build a new lumber mill in Tuscaloosa.

Finally, Canfor gets high praise for its efforts to improve air quality in Prince George, BC.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

What Canfor got right, and why other businesses should follow suit

By Dave Fuller, People’s Action Committee for Healthy Air
The Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A few years ago I was involved with a small team of people in my community of Prince George that gathered together with the sole goal of improving the air quality. …At first Industry tried to tell us that it wasn’t their problem. Government said that the air issues were caused by road dust.  …But then something changed. Our group started testing the air independently and our suspicions proved true.  …We approached many different industrial companies in Prince George but our focus was the pulp mills.  …It took some convincing, but Canfor got it right. …At first they tried to sway us their way of thinking but as our independent research and evidence grew, and our pressure mounted, Canfor got on board. Canfor started looking for ways to reduce emissions and odour. 

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Expansion in the works for Atikokan wood pellet mill

By Ian Ross
Northern Ontario Business
March 29, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The new Northern Ontario owners of an Atikokan wood pellet plant are in expansion mode, with plans to add jobs, diversify their product mix, and explore export opportunities. BioPower Sustainable Energy Corporation, a green energy startup, has taken control of the former Rentech plant, which has an existing supply contract to provide the nearby Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Atikokan plant with commercial-grade pellets. BioPower is a spinoff venture of True North Timber (TNT), a Chapleau forestry contractor. 

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Taxpayers won’t likely shoulder full cost of Boat Harbour replacement, minister says

By Michael Gorman
CBC News
March 29, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Infrastructure Minister Lloyd Hines says the public should be prepared to pay for a portion of the new effluent treatment facility for Northern Pulp, but he does not expect taxpayers to shoulder all the costs. “It’s highly unlikely the province will be on the hook for the entire solution,” he told reporters at Province House on Thursday. The Liberals passed legislation in 2015 to close the Boat Harbour treatment lagoons by 2020 and clean up the site. The move requires a new treatment site for the Pictou County pulp mill’s waste. While cleanup costs have been pegged at more than $130 million, the cost of a new treatment facility remains unknown. An indemnity agreement the government signed with the mill’s former owner in 1995 suggests the province would be entirely on the hook for costs, but Hines said that’s part of the “process of the past.”

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Investigation cleared Gerry Byrne, forestry department of wrongdoing in Botwood timber dealings

By Ryan Cook
CBC News
March 29, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Gerry Byrne

Gerry Byrne clapped back on Thursday after being accused of intentionally tanking discussions with a company for timber rights near Botwood. The Department of Fisheries and Land Resources, of which Byrne is the minister, released a report from an internal investigation into a complaint about its handling of dealings with Bulk Logistics and Harold Sheppard Ltd. (HSL). The investigation by the department’s compliance unit was launched after someone complained that an agreement in principle granting timber rights to the two companies was revoked “without due consideration.” It also alleged the government did not consider policy when dealing with timber allocations.

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Modest wood fiber cost increases and substantial rise in market pulp market

By Wood Resources International
American Journal of Transportation
April 2, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Pulp manufacturers in many countries have seen their wood fiber costs go up during 2017, with the biggest increases in US dollar terms occurring in Western North America, Europe, Russia and Australia, according to the Wood Resource Quarterly (WRQ). The Global Softwood Fiber Price Index (SFPI) increased for the third consecutive quarter to reach $89.08/odmt in the 4Q/17, 4.0% higher than in the same quarter in 2016. Hardwood fiber prices have also trended upwards over the past year, with the Global Hardwood Fiber Price Index (HFPI) reaching its highest level in almost three years during the 4Q/17. In US dollar terms, hardwood fiber prices have gone up the most in Europe, Russia and Indonesia during 2017. The only region that has experienced a decline in wood fiber costs has been the US South, where hardwood pulplog prices were 2.3 % lower in the 4Q/17 than in the 4Q/16.

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Local mill, Canadian companies disagree on effect of softwood imports

By Emily Hoard
The News-Review
April 1, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

…Canadians in the softwood market Steven Rastja and Ron Chantaj both say Canadian softwood is hurting the U.S. markets. Chantaj, a trading group manager for Timber Mart in Ontario, Canada, said lumber prices are through the roof, so it doesn’t make sense to say Canadian softwood is hurting the U.S. market. “If we’re at a point where we’re paying the highest prices and there’s the best mill return that in many cases mills have ever seen, how can they sit back and say it’s because Canada’s dumping wood in the U.S.,” Chantaj said. “The mills have never had such high returns in regards to the cost of lumber.” Rustja, vice president of trading for Weston Forest, also based in Ontario, Canada, said his company buys panels Swanson Group produces.

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Tariffs hurting us right here, right now

Editorial Board
The Kenwood Press
April 1, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Here at the Kenwood Press we are “hyper-local.” …Then we expand our circle of coverage to include the wider Sonoma Valley, and Sonoma County. …So we were dismayed to find out that tariffs of 29 to 32 percent on Canadian uncoated groundwood papers will directly affect our bottom line. And not only ours, but those of other newspapers, paper producers, and book publishers throughout the country, and other further down the supply chain (ink and equipment manufacturers, for example). …This country can’t afford to lose any more newspapers or book publishers. We’ll be contacting our representatives to urge Congress to reject these counterproductive tariffs.

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New Chinese tariff boosts local timber industry

By Devin Gooden
KOBI-TV NBC 5
March 30, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Medford, Ore. – Congressman Walden toured the Timber Products facility today to see first hand how the tariff on China’s imports have already benefited the local product. He heard from many employees who say they are grateful for the his efforts. Representative Walden is back at the Timber Products plant for the first time since he helped to raise tariffs on Chinese plywood imports. “The trade case that we fought and won at the ITC is making a real difference for the Rogue Valley in terms of getting new jobs to mills all across southern Oregon,” Walden said. Representative Walden last visited Timber Products in August of 2017, that’s when the workers brought forward concerns about how the Chinese trade was affecting local output. 

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Tuscaloosa company plans new lumber mill

By Stephen Dethrage
Tuscaloosa News
April 1, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A 130-year-old Tuscaloosa company is preparing to build a new lumber mill in south Alabama, which is expected to create more than 100 jobs and produce 250 million feet of board annually. The Westervelt Co. said in a news release the new facility is still in the planning phase, but its specific location and design should receive final approval from its board of directors soon. The new mill will complement Westervelt’s existing lumber facility in Moundville, which the company called the second-largest southern yellow pine production facility in the United States. “The Westervelt Company has a long history in lumber manufacturing and environmental stewardship,” Brian Luoma, Westervelt Co. president and CEO, said in the release.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Self-cleaning camera developed at UBC proves its worth at Canfor sawmill

By the UBC Faculty of Applied Science
UBC Applied Science
March 29, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A self-cleaning camera created by ExcelSense Technologies, a UBC-based venture, has cut maintenance downtime at one of the log lines in a British Columbia sawmill by almost 60 per cent. By providing the ability to see a critical but previously invisible process on the worksite, the technology enabled millworkers to prevent a recurring clogging problem from developing on multiple occasions.  …Owned and operated by Canfor, the BC mill had been dealing with frequent clogs at the outfeed of one of its log lines — an enclosed area where sawdust, oil and pitch would accumulate. So Canfor, always looking to increase safety and productivity at its sites, agreed to test out the ToughEye: a robust, one-piece self-cleaning camera that ExcelSense claimed would not only supply clear visuals for the lifetime of the unit — about 90,000 cleaning cycles — but also do so without using water, detergents, pumps or compressors. 

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Adera singled out with three wins at the Georgies

By Robin Brunet
Vancouver Sun
March 26, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

For nearly 50 years, family-owned Adera Development Corporation’s track record of building over 10,000 homes, condos, townhomes and over four million square feet of commercial space has been matched by its constant drive to innovate in order to make the best possible buildings that offer the most value to their clients. …It’s therefore unsurprising that Adera was well recognized at the 2018 Georgie Awards, garnering six nominations and three wins… Innovation for Adera means taking the lead and setting new standards through design and sustainable features, and on that score Andreasen says: “Wood-frame condo development is really our sole focus, with wood being increasingly recognized for its superior sustainable attributes. In recent years, we’ve expanded into mass timber construction and the use of cross laminated timber (CLT), and this has helped distinguish projects such as Virtuoso at the University of British Columbia campus, as well as our upcoming Crest development in North Vancouver.” 

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Toronto gets a tall wood tower – and, maybe, an architectural masterpiece

By Alex Bozikovic
The Globe and Mail
March 30, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

To take Canada from hewers of wood to fabricators of high-tech tall timber buildings –that’s the promise of a new building proposed by Toronto’s George Brown College. It’s an exciting prospect. And if built, the structure will be a technical landmark. But will it also – as it should – elevate the art of architecture? Dubbed “The Arbour,” the building represents a move by the college to make a mark with a building of international significance. The 12-storey facility on a rectangular site near the city’s waterfront is set to house, along with classrooms and other uses, a new Tall Wood Research Institute. …George Brown wants to make this building not just a learning environment, but a laboratory for building science and a showpiece for tall wood construction in Canada.

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Vancouver (Washington) waterfront to get wooden high-rise

By Troy Brynelson
The Columbian
April 1, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Another new high-rise is heading to The Waterfront Vancouver, but it goes a little against the grain. Called Timberhouse, the project is a 12-story apartment with offices and ground-level retail, according to filings with the city of Vancouver this week. Timberhouse is to include 251 apartments with 12,000 square feet of retail. It will be built at Block 3 of the waterfront development, on the west side of Esther Street down the street from Vancouver City Hall. The building sounds like a carbon copy of other mixed-use projects around Clark County, except it will be made of cross-laminated timber. Cross-laminated timber, or CLT, is billed as a greener alternative to steel and concrete. It is made by gluing, heating and pressing boards of lumber together to form large panels.

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Consultants to analyze Peavy mishap

By Bennett Hall
Corvallis Gazette-Times
March 30, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Oregon State University has hired KPFF Consulting Engineers to conduct an independent analysis of what caused a massive cross-laminated timber panel to collapse at the George W. Peavy Forest Science Center, an 80,000-square-foot classroom and laboratory building under construction on OSU’s Corvallis campus. A 4-foot-by-20-foot section of CLT subflooring between the second and third stories delaminated at one end and fell on the morning of March 14, the university announced last week. Although no one was hurt in the mishap, OSU officials pledged to bring in outside experts to evaluate what went wrong and determine whether any other cross-laminated timber elements in the project were at risk of failure. Because there were no injuries, the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division does not plan to conduct its own inspection, a spokesman for the state agency said Friday.

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Despite promising advances, costs keep wood biocoal on backburner

By Frank Jossi
The Energy News Network
April 2, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

At a research lab in the northwoods of Minnesota, scientists are roasting tree waste until it turns into something that looks and burns like coal — without the heavy metal pollution. The finished product is called “biocoal” or “torrefied biomass,” and a team of University of Minnesota-Duluth researchers hope it might someday displace coal to fuel power plants, reinvigorating the region’s forestry economy and reducing carbon emissions at the same time. …It’s been successfully tested in a Milwaukee tourist train and a large, coal-fired power plant owned by Minnesota Power, the investor-owned utility in the area. Yet for all its promise, the product still faces a major barriers to market. Unlike wind and solar power, which cost less than coal, biocoal costs more. …And while its potential to boost forestry economies its clear, it’s purported carbon benefits are controversial and disputed.

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Blast Testing Shows CLT Can Take the Heat

By Rebecca Wallace
USDA Forest Service
March 30, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

At the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), researchers sometimes get a little destructive. They bend and break wood samples of all sizes, and even shoot lumber out of a cannon at 100 miles per hour. But explosions? That’s a bit out of their wheelhouse. Not that wood can’t handle it. Particularly when it’s used in engineered products like cross-laminated timber, or CLT, which FPL researchers have studied from many angles, including fire performance, use in earthquake-prone regions, and the effects of moisture on CLT. …Recent tests of CLT structures show just how tough this material can be. …The objective of these studies was to demonstrate the capability of CLT structures to resist airblast loads, thereby allowing the military to incorporate mass timber materials like CLT into their construction projects. The structures survived blasts with charges large enough to potentially cause lethal injuries.

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Forestry

Province ‘negligent’ in containing cervid disease, says MLA

By Clare Clancy
Edmonton Journal
April 2, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The spread of a fatal neurological illness affecting elk, moose and deer in eastern Alberta is reminiscent of the onset of Canada’s mad cow disease crisis, says an Alberta legislator.  Liberal MLA David Swann warned that chronic wasting disease  — a prion disease in the same family as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), scrapies and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, which affect cattle, sheep and humans respectively — needs to be contained before irreparably harming the environment, agriculture industry and human health. “This provincial government is negligent,” he was recorded as saying in Hansard last month. He called on the NDP to implement more stringent policies to restrict the movement of animals in an effort to quell the spread of the disease.

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Time to get FireSmart

By Donna Barnett – Cariboo Chilcotin MLA
BC Local News
April 1, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

We have already suffered a few grassfires so far this year, so it is a good time to remind ourselves that wildfire prevention is everyone’s responsibility. The FireSmart manual published by the provincial government provides useful advice that can help reduce the risk of losing your home to wildfires. While there is no guarantee against fire damage, you can take steps that can make a world of difference. Most preventative measures cost very little and can significantly reduce the risk of fire damage. The FireSmart manual provides all the information you need to know for a well thought-out fire protection plan.

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Edmonton air tanker firefighting company flying high

By Gordon Kent
Edmonton Journal
April 1, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bruce Gordon

An Edmonton company that has fought forest fires in Western Canada for more than 50 years hopes to spread its wings to more business in countries around the world. Air Spray Ltd., bought in the early 1970s by the late aviation pioneer Don Hamilton and now owned by his daughter Lynn Hamilton, supplies the air tankers that drop cascades of colourful fire retardant or water to contain blazes until ground crews put them out. The company has had long-term contracts with the Alberta and B.C. governments since 1967 and also works in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, said chief operating officer Paul Lane, Hamilton’s husband. But in recent years it has boosted American operations as well, winning contracts with such agencies as the U.S. Forest Service and several states including California, where it has set up a base in the northern California city of Chico.

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Take our forests back

By Murray Dobbin, freelance writer
The Powell River Peak
April 2, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

News that the local Catalyst Paper Corporation paper mill is facing potentially fatal anti-dumping duties courtesy of our trade “partner,” the United States, is discouraging. …Canada signed the first free-trade deal with the United States in 1989, and NAFTA in 1993, precisely to rid ourselves of such arbitrary attacks on our exports. But it was not an agreement between equals. It was like signing a peace treaty with a schoolyard bully. …In the longer term, the provincial government needs to revisit just how we do forestry in this province. We have an incredible resource yet over the last couple of decades and more we have been receiving fewer and fewer community benefits. …It’s time to press the NDP/Green government to do the right thing.

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Scientists study the future of BC’s most treasured tree

Natural Resources Canada
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cosmin Filipescu, a research scientist with the Canadian Wood Fibre Centre of Natural Resources Canada, is leading a series of projects to answer key questions about the future of British Columbia’s Western redcedar, one of the province’s most valued trees. Although Western redcedar has served a multitude of uses to society over thousands of years, scientists know little about it. at’s the main reason a multi-year research project is looking at Western redcedar from a range of viewpoints covering economics, ecology, diseases, quality and value of forest products, and climate change. Recently published, An Economic Assessment of the Western Redcedar Industry in British Columbia, shows Western redcedar is a $1.3 billion annual industry, providing 1,900 jobs across B.C. It is also important for its cultural value to First Nations and for its ecological value as wildlife habitat and for biodiversity.

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Future in concrete?

Letter by David Kipling
Coast Reporter
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Once there was a forest” by Ross Muirhead, Letters, March 23. Ross Muirhead must know, being familiar with the last 80 years of published forest science research, that logging clearcuts create open space that many plants and animals need to flourish. Yet he and ELF will not publicly accede to this fact of nature. Because a clearcut receives more sunlight, it creates optimal growing conditions for shrubs, herbs and grasses that provide forage for animals such as deer, elk, and black bears – you can go and look – as well as habitat for pollinators such as moths, butterflies and bees. The number of different vascular plant species in clearcut openings is usually double that of mature forests, something confirmed over and over in both North America and Europe. What is so upsetting about this that it must be denied or kept out of sight?

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Province made this mess

Letter by Gord Bell
Coast Reporter
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Chapman watershed has been a site of conflict for 50 years. This watershed, our primary source of water, has been logged extensively. The park created at the headwaters was the only means of protection available to stop further logging in the high elevations. It was not a recreational initiative, it was a legal measure to prevent logging company access and ensure our water supply remained viable. If you look at Google Earth you can see what happened to the valley downstream. It is now the site of landslides, regrowth of alder and stream degradation. This has certainly affected the quantity and quality of our water supply. Our provincial government took stumpage fees from this shortsighted behavior and legislated that the flow of wood take precedence over our need for water.

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Do environmental advocacy campaigns drive successful forest conservation?

By Mike Gaworecki
Mongabay.com
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When a final agreement to protect the Great Bear Rainforest was announced in February 2016, it was hailed as a major victory for First Nations and environmental activists.  …But while protests and blockades were halting loggers’ work in one valley, the next valley over might be razed to the ground — and this fragmentation of the forest was jeopardizing the health of the ecosystem as a whole. …Such campaigns are now quite common and seen as increasingly influential. Through them, NGOs seek to pressure a target — usually a corporation, a government, or a governmental body — to adopt some policy or course of action intended to increase forest conservation. These campaigns employ a variety of tactics and make different demands of their target. …So how effective are advocacy campaigns at driving permanent policy changes that lead to forest conservation results?

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TimberWest outlines public access rules

By Mike Youds
Alberni Valley News
March 30, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Port Alberni city council got a grounding in TimberWest’s public access policy Monday. Domenico Iannidinardo, the forest company’s chief forester and vice-president of sustainability, gave an overview at the invitation of the city. Access to the backcountry has become a hot-button topic in recent years due to the frequent closure of gates on forestry roads on the Island. MLA Scott Fraser is preparing a report on solutions to the issues after hosting a pair of stakeholder consultations. Most of TimberWest’s forest operations are spread along eastern Vancouver Island rather than around Port Alberni, Iannidinardo noted. “Public accessibility on our lands is a community responsibility,” he said. The company prefers to work with organizations and groups to provide that access.

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Port Blandford families take to the woods to protest commercial clear-cutting plan

CBC News
April 1, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

It was just a typical rural Newfoundland boil-up in the woods: soup and sandwiches, hotdog roasting — and signs protesting a clear-cutting plan. “There’s been a lot of concern, people getting sad and angry,” said Abigail Hann. Roughly 100 people turned out for Saturday’s event in Port Blandford, just south of Terra Nova National Park in central Newfoundland, to show solidarity against a plan to allow commercial woodcutting in the area. The proposal is that 158,000 cubic metres of wood be harvested from four distinct areas surrounding Port Blandford. …Hann said she’s concerned about the environmental impacts, like the Middle Ridge caribou herd, pine marten, and that the watershed is in the area. Minister of Fisheries and Land Resources Gerry Byrne had said government is open to changes to the plan.

 

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Community-run forests could generate rural revenue with carbon offsets

Letter by Geoff Le Boutillier
The Chronicle Herald
April 2, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Day after day, we’re pummelled with depressing news about Nova Scotia’s forests. Western Nova Scotia Crown lands… are handed over to a consortium of mills dominated by Northern Pulp.  That paragon of corporate responsibility sprays and clearcuts our forests into an even-aged monoculture, pollutes the stink out of Central Nova, dings the taxpayer for the cleanup, tries to pump its effluent into the Northumberland Strait, and lines the pockets not of Nova Scotians, but of some offshore corporation. …Meanwhile the people, fight for reform —e.g., the restoration of a healthy, uneven-aged forest, biodiversity, ecosystem services, the protection of habitat, the reduction of clearcutting as set out in our hard-won Natural Resources Strategy, removing biomass from the approved list of green energy sources recognizing that it is, in fact, worse than coal. But maybe things are about to change.

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Design By Humans and One Tree Planted Work Together on Reforestation Efforts

By Design By Humans
Cision Newswire
April 1, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Trees clean the air we breathe, house endless biodiversity, and provide us with unimaginable beauty. The more than 60,000 tree species on earth – the oldest proudly boasting almost 5000 years – provide us with immeasurable benefits. Design By Humans (DBH) is teaming up with the organization, One Tree Planted, to protect this awe-inspiring natural resource. DBH hopes to encourage deforestation awareness and sustainability efforts across their global community with the “Buy a Tee, Plant a Tree” campaign. One Tree Planted’s mission – started in 2014 – aims to “create a world full of trees” by working with reforestation organizations to plant trees in North America, South America, Asia, and Africa. Design By Humans pledges that for every nature-inspired item purchased in the month of April – from the DBH Eco Collection – it will donate funds to One Tree Planted. One dollar = one tree.

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A 65,000-acre wildfire whodunit that will make your head spin

By Kathleen Parker
The Washington Post
March 30, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

When the country’s second-largest lumber producer tries to take the U.S. Justice Department to the Supreme Court over a forest fire that started under the distracted gaze of a watchtower forester — who at the time was reportedly peeing on his own bare feet — you can expect a few sparks to fly. You also might want to sit down, take out a scratch pad and prepare to be entertained, if somewhat overwhelmed, by allegations of prosecutorial fraud, coverups, sham damages, fictionalized reports, a presiding judge’s tweet too far, and millions of dollars in losses and judgments — all part of an environmental whodunit that spelled catastrophe for 65,000 acres of timber… In brief: A fire started in September 2007 on property leased by Sierra Pacific Industries.

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White pine blister rust: Restoring the Idaho state tree

By James Byler, Ph.D. & John Schwandt, Ph.D.
Coeur d’Alene Press
March 30, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In the last issue of Northwest Mining & Timber, we discussed blister rust disease on whitebark pine. Here we address the rust on western white pine. Whitebark pine is a high elevation species of critical ecological value, while western white pine is a mid-elevation species valued for its timber. The impacts of white pine blister rust have been devastating on both species. …Current control efforts involve planting rust-resistant trees and pruning young trees. While western white pine was highly susceptible to the rust, an occasional tree would appear totally healthy, even though its neighbors would be heavily infected. …When disease-free trees were crossed with each other, many of the seedlings from those crosses also remained free of cankers, thus demonstrating genetic resistance. 

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Timber and environmental interests shouldn’t be at odds

By Josh Kelly, MountainTrue & Jim Sitts, Columbia Forest Products
Asheville Citizen-Times
April 1, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When it comes to our national forest, timber and environmental interests are often kept out of the same room – let alone the same sentence, unless it’s about conflict. But we don’t think they have to be. That’s why we gathered in Boone on March 22 to speak at “The Future of Nantahala and Pisgah National Forests: An Expert Panel,” sponsored by MountainTrue and members of the Nantahala-Pisgah Partnership. We spoke with each other, along with mountain biking, bird watching, and equestrian representatives, and shared our vision for a balanced and sustainable forest plan. For this vision to become a reality, we need you – and your friends, coworkers, and neighbors – to tell the U.S Forest Service why the activities you love in our national forests matter to you and our region.

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State forest logging leaves damaged roads, concerned residents

By H. Rose Schneider
The Altamont Enterprise
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RENSSELAERVILLE — While state forests were created in New York with intent to log them, some residents in Rensselaerville who live near a state forest were surprised and concerned with the way trees are being cut down there. At Rensselaerville’s last town board meeting, on March 8, planning board Chairman Richard Amedure told the board that clear-cutting and other practices were leaving the forest “an absolute disaster.” Highway Superintendent Randall Bates also expressed his dismay to the board about the way the forest was left after logging; he said that the roads were being damaged as well. The board discussed sending a letter to the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation, expressing these concerns.

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World’s top cocoa producers fight to protect forests

Associated Press in CBC News
March 29, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Park rangers in the world’s top cocoa producer, Ivory Coast, are waging a campaign to protect national forests from the illegal farming of the raw ingredient in chocolate. Last year the governments of Ivory Coast and other top cocoa producer Ghana, along with food giants Nestle, Mars and Hershey, pledged to work together to end deforestation in the West African nations. …Last year an investigation by environmental group Mighty Earth found that many of Ivory Coast’s national parks and protected areas “have been entirely or almost entirely cleared of forest and replaced with cocoa-growing operations.” One of them, Mont Peko National Park, is home to endangered species such as chimpanzees and pygmy hippopotamuses.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Natural Resources keeps its eye on climate trends

By Ian Fairclough
The Chronicle Herald
March 31, 2018
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Climate change could pose a large threat to Nova Scotia’s forests, but it’s not just because of increasing temperatures. The forest industry and researchers say that while fire is what most people think of when it comes to climate change’s impact on the province’s forest, there are other issues as well. Aldona Wiacek, an assistant professor at Saint Mary’s University’s department of environmental science, said there has been an increase in forest fires across the country as a whole. She said the consensus is emerging that the increasing frequency of forest fires is climate-related. Much of the research she has read is based on the boreal forests of Central and Western Canada.

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In Finland, biomass is not a dirty word

Letter by Harold Alexander
The Chronicle Herald
March 30, 2018
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: Aaron Beswick’s March 17 article, “Old-growth burning reignites debate.” This article is another in a steady stream of similarly negative articles and opinions in The Chronicle Herald about the biomass power plant at Port Hawkesbury Paper. I will provide another opinion that is based on facts rather than hearsay and innuendo. …I am a forester who has lived and worked in Digby County for more than 38 years. …In 2016, I organized and participated in a forestry learning tour to Finland. One of the stops on our tour was a large district heating facility in a city of 100,000 people, Kuopio. …Fifty per cent of the fuel for this plant is woody biomass residues from manufacturing facilities, and residues and round wood from area forests, with the remaining fuel being mostly peat. 

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