Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: December 7, 2018

Today’s Takeaway

TREEditions, tree footprints, tree density and tree flocking. Must be Friday.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 7, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Prefering incentives over strong-arming, BC’s business community signs onto the government’s climate plan. In other Business news: Madison’s says lumber prices are “waffling“; Northern Pulp is taking legal action and forest farmer Chuck Leavell talks policy and the Rolling Stones.

In Forestry news: BC’s wolf kill is protested while the government talks moose protection in the Cariboo; fishers are reintroduced in Washington state; and SFI sums up their successful conference in Colorado.

Finally, tree footprints, tree density and tree flocking, and our first reader-submitted, family-friendly TREEdition (thanks Brian Barber). Must be the weekend for Christmas tree shopping. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Special Feature

Starting new TREEditions on Vancouver Island

By Brian Barber, RPF, Select Seed Co. Ltd
Letter to Tree Frog Editors
December 7, 2018
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Brian Barber

My wife and I started a new holiday tradition last year. On the first weekend in December, we drive up Island (from Victoria) to get a couple of Nordmann fir Xmas trees from Don Pigott, Hon. Member (ABCFP), Yellow Point Propagation, or his neighbour, Yellow Point Cranberries.  We take in a hike and visit with colleagues on the way up, and enjoy Ladysmith’s Xmas lights on the way back. Recommend going on a Saturday when Ladysmith’s Old Town Bakery, famous for its cinnamon buns, is open and finishing the day with a  Christmas Express train ride at the BC Forest Discovery Centre in Duncan.

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Business & Politics

Canada Grows on Trees

The Canadian Business Journal
December 7, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The Forest Products Association of Canada has been the acknowledged go-to voice in representing the country’s wood and pulp & paper producers nationally and internationally in government, trade and environmental affairs. Headquartered in Ottawa, FPAC has been in existence for more than a century when factoring in its precursor organization, which was known as the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, dating back to 1913. National forest products is a near $70 billion dollar a year industry and accounts for about 2% of Canada’s entire gross domestic product. FPAC represents 17 members and Canada’s forest industry operates in more than 600 forest-dependent communities from coast to coast, and directly employs 230,000 Canadians across the country. The Canadian Business Journal recently spoke with FPAC CEO Derek Nighbor about the evolution of the forestry industry and the path it’s looking to take in the future.

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Softwood Lumber Dimension Prices Stop Falling, Some Even Pop Back Up

Madison’s Lumber Reporter
Cision Newswire
December 6, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

VANCOUVER – The best description to characterize the movement of North American construction framing dimension softwood lumber wholesaler prices last week is “waffling”. Indeed, benchmark Western Spruce-Pine-Fir KD 2×4 #2&Btr price landed exactly where it had been two weeks ago, with Friday’s print in Madison’s Lumber Reporter at US$354 mfbm, having lost 1% (or $4) from the previous week’s US$358. WSPF 2×6 exhibited the exact same price changes. Trading of lumber futures on the Chicago Mercantile Commission, meanwhile, went from being on-par with the cash market for the January 15 contract to a discount of approximately $10 Monday. Trading volumes remained low as demand was muted in the usually-quiet week following the US Thanksgiving long weekend. What orders were booked were for fill-in and immediate needs only.

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BC trade trip to Asia to boost lumber markets

By Derrick Penner
Victoria Times Colonist
December 6, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. forest minister’s trade mission to Asia has become something of an annual tradition that, this year, has an air to it of battling back against tough markets that have crimped the province’s exports of forest products. In past years, the event heralded B.C.’s breakthrough into the Chinese market, which rapidly took over as the province’s No. 2 export market after the U.S. for lumber. This year, however, as Forest Minister Doug Donaldson leads about 40 company executives, civil servants and Indigenous leaders on a 10-day sales trip to Korea, Japan and China, B.C. is in the fourth year of a slide in lumber sales to China. That is a concern, Donaldson said, but the province recognizes that economic conditions have been tough in some of the places they are visiting, particularly in China, which is why their efforts will remain on selling higher-value products. 

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B.C. climate plan opts for incentives over strong-arming

By Justine Hunter and Ian Bailey
The Globe and Mail
December 6, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada West

The B.C. business community signed onto the NDP government’s plan this week, calling it a tremendous economic opportunity. The endorsement reflects a full year of backroom discussions which resulted in a plan that is, for the most part, all carrot and no stick. The plan is also expected to offer a painless transition for consumers. Greg D’Avignon, president and chief executive of the Business Council of B.C., said his organization approached Premier John Horgan, asking to work together to develop a climate strategy that would not drive industry out of the province. “If you use too much stick, you might reach your [greenhouse gas] reductions because the capital will have fled.” …Susan Yurkovich, president of the Council of Forest Industries, said her sector is ready to do its part, but it has to be done in a way that allows industry to remain competitive in international markets.

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N.S. pulp mill takes legal action against fishermen’s blockade of survey work

By Andrew Vaughan
Canadian Press in The Province
December 5, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — The Northern Pulp mill is taking legal action after fishermen blocked survey boats hired to examine a route for a contentious undersea effluent pipeline. Kathy Cloutier, a spokeswoman for Northern Pulp’s parent company Paper Excellence Canada, said the mill has initiated action seeking an interim injunction to prevent blockades or obstructions of the survey work in the Northumberland Strait. “Our hope was that the surveying would be allowed to occur without incident or obstruction, however actions indicated that the environmental assessment survey work would not proceed without the company seeking a court injunction,” Cloutier said in an email. A group of fishermen has vowed to block any survey boats from entering the Strait.

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Growing a Future for Our Communities

The Canadian Business Journal
December 6, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Mike Legere

Forestry is the single-largest contributor to New Brunswick’s economy from the private sector, which translates into about 3.5% of the provincial GDP. Over the last five years the forestry component has grown five times more rapidly than the rest of the manufacturing sector as a whole. For more than six decades Forest NB is New Brunswick’s has served as the advocacy voice on behalf of the entire sector in the province and staunchly supports the efforts to provide for economic, social and environmental needs of its communities with a reliance on the scientific community to educate and ensure the proper path is being taken in order to meet each important obligation. As an association that represents one of the province’s most valuable and renewable resources, Forest NB puts strong emphasis on responsible forest management and giving back to local communities as a means of maintaining a strong economy and healthy New Brunswick forest.

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Chuck Leavell talks policy, the Rolling Stones and why the Correspondents’ Jam might not happen

By Helena Andrews-Dyer
The Washington Post
December 6, 2018
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

It’s been a busy few days for Chuck Leavell — or make that a busy few decades. The longtime touring keyboardist for the Rolling Stones and dedicated environmentalist is not only prepping for a new tour (and album and TV show), but is also trying to convince official Washington that the trees need their help. We caught up with Leavell, 66, after a packed D.C. trip — meeting with Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment Jim Hubbard — to talk about balancing rock and roll with climate change recommendations. …Then [Tuesday] was the bigger day where we had meetings with Secretary Perdue and some of the upper echelon from the U.S. Forest Service. We talked about Hurricane Michael damage, recovery efforts and the price of lumber.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Wood Design Awards in BC: Final submission deadline TODAY

Wood WORKS! BC
December 7, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

FINAL deadline is today for the call for NominationsWood Design Awards in BC. Do you know of any exceptional wood structures completed in the last 3 years? Nominate a deserving architect, engineer or building owner for an innovative and inspiring wood project today! There is no fee required to nominate a project.  Nominations are accepted in up to two categories and self-nominations are encouraged.  Projects must have been completed in the past 3 years i.e. since December, 2015 and may not be resubmitted to win a second time in the same category. 

  

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Wood-based products: is wood the material of the future?

The Scitech Europa
December 7, 2018
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Frédéric Pichelin

In an interview with SciTech Europa, the department’s Professor Frédéric Pichelin [Bern University of Applied Sciences] discusses both the applications of wood-based products and many of the challenges that technologies are facing, and describes some of the work that is taking place which, hopefully, will enable wood to compete with other materials such as concrete and steel. …With new technologies emerging to help enhance many of the material’s properties – including fire resistance and strength – these potential application areas are expanding. …We will be exploring solutions to the pre-fabrication challenges, of course, while we will also be investigating the full use of wood biomass not only in the construction sector, which is important, but in all sectors. We hope that wood will come to replace some petroleum-based plastics for insulating foam used in composites in the aerospace industry, for example. 

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Forestry

Revelstoke-area petition to end wolf cull submitted to province

By Liam Harrap
Revelstoke Review
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Conservation group Wolf Awareness submitted a petition last month to the B.C. government to end wolf culling. “Wolves didn’t put caribou in this terrible situation. We did,” says Sadie Parr, executive director of Wolf Awareness. The petition has over 3,000 signatures from across the province. The aerial wolf management program was introduced in 2015 and was scheduled for five years. So far, 527 wolves have been killed province-wide. The program included the Revelstoke area in 2017. …“I am extremely concerned that my tax dollars are funding an inhumane wildlife program that is being done under the guise of conservation,” says Parr. …According to Wildsafe B.C. there are approximately 8,500 wolves in B.C and the B.C. government says that number is increasing. …The B.C. government also states that the forestry sector has a significant impact on caribou habitat. Parr says conserving habitat is more important for caribou. Much more so than killing other wildlife.

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Planning for future Haida Gwaii wildfires catches on

By Andrew Hudson
Haida Gwaii Observer
December 5, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Masset and Port Clements will join Sandspit, Skidegate, Queen Charlotte in seeking funds for a community wildfire plan. On the heels of another record-setting wildfire season in mainland B.C., Doug Donaldson, B.C.’s forests minster, recently announced a $50-million, three-year program to help local governments and First Nations reduce their wildfire risk. As a first step, elected leaders on Haida Gwaii are looking at a provincial grant of up to $25,000 that can be used to hire professional wildfire protection consultants. If every islands community signs on, it may be less costly to do.

 

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Responsible Forestation: Growing Trees and Growing Jobs

The Canadian Business Journal
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Ontario Forest Industries Association (OFIA) is a provincial trade association and is the home of CLA Grading and Inspection. For the past 76 years, the OFIA has represented big and small companies that manufacture every type of wood product in Ontario. Ontario’s renewable forest products sector supports over 172,000 direct and indirect jobs in 260 Ontario communities. Since 1943, the Ontario Forest Industries Association has represented forestry companies ranging from multinational corporations to family operated businesses producing advanced manufactured products and technologies. The Canadian Business Journal recently spoke with OFIA CEO Jamie Lim and its Director of Forest Policy Ian Dunn about the current initiatives and future hopes and expectations for the organization as it continues to promote the responsible use and regrowth of Ontario’s forests. The forest industry has a value of $15.5 billion for the provincial economy on an annual basis.

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Roundtable discussion focuses on efforts to protect moose in Cariboo Chilcotin

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development; Chief Joe Alphonse, Tribal Chairman, Tŝilhqot’in National Government; and Scott Fraser, Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, have commented on the first roundtable discussion on efforts to protect moose in the Cariboo Chilcotin: “Government representatives, First Nations and a variety of stakeholders met in Williams Lake on Dec. 4, 2018, to discuss lasting solutions to benefit moose,” said Donaldson. “Moose are an essential part of the way of life for many people who live in the region. Unfortunately, their habitat has been affected by pine beetle, the recent wildfires and a variety of land management activities. These events and other factors are affecting the abundance and distribution of moose and other species. Given the complexity of these issues, it is important to ensure everyone is a part of the solution.

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Tech revolution imminent in forest harvesting

HarvestTECHX
December 4, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Globally, technologies are transforming forest management and harvesting. Control innovations for harvesting equipment are removing workers from the ground while improving safety and productivity. A few years ago, innovative logger Dale Ewers recognized how the speed of technology could transform his operations.  He brought his experienced loggers into the office to work with application and research specialists. They learned from other industries as well.  Now, they are poised to bring step-change technologies to the forest. As one of the keynote speakers at the HarvestTECHX 2019 Conference in Vancouver in March, Dale Ewers, internationally-recognized logger and innovator from DC Equipment (DCE) will outline the development his 15 logging sites are beginning to pilot test in their operations.  

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Who benefits from logging our local mountains?

Letter by Rowan Hamilton, Medical Herbalist
The Cowichan Valley Citizen
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rowan Hamilton

On Wednesday, Dec. 19, at 1:30 p.m. in the North Cowichan Municipal Hall the future of the Cowichan Valley mountain forests will be reviewed.  I have one question for this community regarding this proposed logging. …Who benefits from the denuding of our Valley? …Since 2003 the big logging companies are no longer obligated by the provincial government to operate lumber mills processing our timber. Does the revenue from this logging even stay on the island in our community or does it benefit shareholders and foreign companies? …The logging companies leave just enough trees along roads and lines of sight for the people to believe they live in a forest. This is like the fringe on a bald man.

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A Christmas tree farm owner explains how Christmas trees are flocked

By Jason Lee
The Idaho Statesman
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

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Successful SFI Annual Conference Shows How Forests Are the Answer

Sustainable Forestry Initiative
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

This year’s SFI Annual Conference was held in Colorado. A wide range of attendees, including CEOs of multinational companies, conservationists, community representatives, Indigenous leaders, forest managers, university faculty and students, and government officials, participated in sessions designed to educate, engage, and encourage action around the theme – Forests Are the Answer. See our summary to learn more about the conference and why forests are the answer to so many of our conservation, community, and supply chain challenges.

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CA wildfires: Most sweeping forestry changes out of key bill, sources say

By Tai Kopan
The San Francisco Chronicle
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON — A typically noncontroversial part of Congress’ must-pass farm bill has become a flash point in the aftermath of California wildfires that President Trump blamed on neglected forests, prompting House and Senate leadership to intervene in negotiations over how to regulate federally owned woodlands. Still, sources say it’s not clear whether the bill will result in many new tools to combat increasingly devastating fires. And lawmakers have largely resisted a push to include the most contested provisions sought by House Republicans and the Trump administration. …Congressional negotiators working to reconcile starkly different House and Senate versions of the bill say they have reached a deal in principle on legislation that will be sent back to both chambers for a vote.

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Fishers released into North Cascades

By Kimberly Cauvel
The Skagit Valley Herald
December 5, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. Six fishers — cat-sized, furry carnivores related to weasels — were released Wednesday morning into the North Cascades near the national park visitor center in Newhalem. …The release was the latest in an ongoing effort to restore fishers throughout the state, according to a news release from the National Park Service. The release was also the first in the North Cascades, where partner agencies plan to release about 80 of the animals from now through 2020. Fishers disappeared from Washington in the mid-1900s due to being overharvested for their furs and the loss of habitat due to logging and development, according to state and federal agencies. Despite protection since 1934, when rules were established regarding fur trapping, the fisher has not returned on its own, according to the state Department of Fish & Wildlife.

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State: About 13 percent of Rhode Island forest trees dead

The Associated Press
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A combination of heat, drought and insect infestations have killed about 13 percent of trees in Rhode Island’s forests since 2015, according to state environmental officials. The 45,000 to 50,000 acres of dead trees are concentrated across the western half of the state. …Rhode Island has about 369,000 acres of forest. …The majority of the dead trees are species of oak, the leaves of which are the preferred source of food for gypsy moth caterpillars, an invasive insect that exploded in numbers three years ago. Southern pine beetles have moved north as winters have become milder, reaching Rhode Island in 2015. The emerald ash borer, an invasive species from China, was confirmed in Rhode Island for the first time this year.

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Australian Company Develops New Bushfire Protective Cladding

Design Build Source
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Californian bushfire tragedy reminds Australians that our own fire season is imminent, with bushfires raging out of control in Queensland and other areas – no one wants to lose their home over the summer, but it can be hard sometimes to know what you can do to protect it! The good news for homeowners, builders, architects and designers is that an Australian company has introduced a new fire-proof building product that will revolutionise the fire-proofing of Australian homes in all areas, and, without breaking the bank! …This amazing new product made from a special IP and magnesium sulphate composite called (MgSO4) is about to change how houses are externally clad and built, to withstand major Firestorms.

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Fake or fir? Your Christmas tree’s carbon footprint

BBC News
December 7, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

They’re the ultimate Christmas decoration and millions are bought in the UK each year. But what impact do Christmas trees – real and artificial – have on the environment? Reality Check’s Lora Jones takes a look. 

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Britons want to save the rainforests

By Katie Wells
The Overtake
December 6, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The equivalent of 40 football fields of trees were felled every minute last year, according to a new report from the University of Maryland and the Global Forest Watch. This makes 2017 the second-worst year on record of tropical tree cover loss. …A total of 85% of British adults would support UK government action on protecting rainforests. One of the main causes of this excessive deforestation is illegal and unsustainable logging practices. …China’s timber trade is infamous for being involved with illegal logging practices. China has no regulations on whether its timber imports are logged legally and no qualms about sourcing their supply of timber from countries like the Democratic Republic of Congo, where illegal logging practices are particularly prevalent.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

How Do You Measure How Much Carbon Is In A Tree?

By Patrick Skahill
New England Public Radio
December 6, 2018
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

The latest national climate assessment says forests play a key role in keeping our air clean. According to the report, America’s forests stored the equivalent of 11 percent of the country’s carbon dioxide emissions over a 25 year period. …But how scientists determine the amount of carbon stored in a tree is a question open for debate. When Bob Marra [uses] a hammer — his magic sonic hammer. …Marra’s recording sound waves. Measuring how fast sound travels from the nail he hits, to all the other nails around the tree. It’s called “sonic tomography.” Think of it like a CAT scan for trees. A way to peer inside a trunk without drilling to see if a tree is rotting — or solid wood. “The denser the wood, the faster the sound waves,” Marra said. Dense wood is really good at storing carbon. …He found dozens were rotting inside, even ones that on the outside, looked good.

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