Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 3, 2019

Today’s Takeaway

Frank Dottori exits the business, names his replacement—Tony Wyszkowski

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Industry icon Frank Dottori is exiting the lumber business after naming his successor at WRC Timber (Tony Wyszkowski); and sadly, BC’s John Russell PhD, RPF—the world’s leading expert on western red and yellow cedars—has died. Other names making news include:

  • John Ackerly (Green Heat) on the conspiracy against wood stoves
  • Fan Williams (Architects’ Journal) on concrete’s unfortunate CO2 footprint
  • Lesli Allison (Western Landowners Alliance) on active management of US lands

Elsewhere: Nova Scotia improves trucking efficiency by allowing more B-trains; and home insurance is harder to find in Colorado due to wildfires.

Finally, the Tree Frog News supporter roll-over date is February 1, 2019. As our longtime readers know, we exist solely because of the generosity of our sponsors and our “frog-friends”. Bottom line, if you like the service—you can ensure we continue via our Friend of the Frog donations page. Your small contribution truly makes a difference!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Bright spots ahead for B.C. forest industry in 2019

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News in the Surrey Now-Leader
January 2, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

B.C.’s lumber industry went from record high prices to a steep decline in 2018, with B.C. sawmills cutting production as the reduction in Interior timber supply declines in the aftermath of the mountain pine beetle epidemic. For 2019, the industry is looking for new wood construction technology and Asia demand to make up for continuing trade disputes with the U.S. It’s been a year since the U.S. International Trade Commission declared Canadian imports were harming the U.S. industry, imposing import duties of about 20 per cent on Canadian imports, half of which come from B.C. And since then President Donald Trump’s trade war with China has led to a drop in U.S. lumber exports as well. …One potential bright spot for U.S. demand is a recommendation from the International Code Council (ICC), recommending building code changes for 2021 that would allow “mass timber” buildings up to 18 floors high.

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Agreement secures local forestry jobs

By Richard Froese
The South Peace News
January 2, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry companies in the region have a new forestry agreement for the next 20 years to harvest trees and ensure prosperity. A new Marten Hills Forest Management Agreement for Tolko Industries Ltd., West Fraser Mills Ltd. and Vanderwell Contractors Ltd. was signed with the provincial government, says a news release Dec. 13. The agreement involving all parties commits to sustainable forest management, including forest regeneration and forest operations. …“We are pleased to renew the agreement, a foundation for delivering sustainable resource development and economic prosperity for Albertans,” says Larry Gardner, West Fraser vice-president of Canadian woodlands. …“Ensuring forestry companies are able to provide high-paying and stable jobs for Albertans is a priority for our government,” says Oneil Carlier, MLA for Whitecourt – Ste. Anne.

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No One Thinks of Lumber: Putting Forest Products Careers on the Radar of the Next Generation

By Mike Zenko
The Merchant Magazine
January 3, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Mike Zenko

It wasn’t much of a surprise that I landed in this industry. My father has been in the lumber business for more than 50 years. …Just as people like us essentially only think of lumber during our careers, there are many talented people out there in other industries who simply… don’t. They’re thinking of the stock market. Or cars. Or software. …Some of the most talented people in the pipeline may never think of lumber as a potential career path, but maybe, just maybe, we can put it on their radars. …Forest products may not be top-of-mind at universities or with those embarking on new career paths, so it’s up to us to share our successes and sing the praises of what we do. The survival of our industry may depend upon us doing so.

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Frank Dottori exits lumber business

Northern Ontario Business
January 2, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Forest industry icon Frank Dottori is retiring from the lumber business in northwestern Ontario, and has announced his successor. Tony Wyszkowski is the new CEO of WRC Timber Inc., a private holding company with assets that include White River Forest Products, Hornepayne Lumber and Hornepayne Power. Wyszkowski spent 19 years with Parker Hannifin, a Cleveland-based motion and control technology giant and Fortune 250 global company. …Dottori departs the scene as one of the legends in the Canadian forestry industry. Well known as the founder of Tembec, Dottori came out of retirement in 2013 to revitalize the shuttered former Domtar mill in White River, before heading up Highway 631 in 2016 to acquire the idled Hornepayne mill and adjoining co-generation power plant.

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Impact of tariffs on wood manufacturing industries is direct and may be long lasting

By Bill Esler
Woodworking Network
January 3, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

In recent white papers, research firm Freedonia Group outlines effects of U.S. tariffs on metal parts, fasteners, lumber, windows, doors, flooring and cabinets. …These threats have companies worldwide bracing for the impact on global supply chains, as some fear a trade war will lead to another global financial crisis. …The steel and aluminum tariffs also carry significant implications for the US fasteners industry, which is an intensive user of foreign-made steel and aluminum. …Further loss of business to foreign firms that can manufacture the same goods for lower costs is expected going forward, as is the continued offshoring of production operations currently based in the US. Mid-Continent Nail, for example, stated it is looking to relocate its manufacturing activities to Mexico, where it would evade impact of the tariffs.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Mass Timber Design – CLT, NLT,GLT, and beyond!

By Wood WORKS! Alberta
The Canadian Wood Council
January 2, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Timber has become the material of choice for sustainably-minded designers due to its high strength-to-weight ratio, speed of construction, and positive environmental performance. This seminar will present a variety of mass timber products such as cross-laminated timber (CLT), glue-laminated timber (glulam), nail-laminated timber (NLT) and other engineered and composite systems. The attendees are expected to learn: Overview of mass timber products and their utilization in construction; Design requirements for CLT, NLT, GLT, and DLT systems according to the latest timber design standard (CSA O86); Design for gravity and lateral loads including combined loading, connections, and fire design; Design for serviceability including deflection and vibration; and Design for composite floor systems. Early bird rate $325+GST ends January 4, 2019, two back-to-back events run January 21 in Edmonton followed by a second show in Calgary on the 22nd. 

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Advanced BioCarbon 3D develops engineering grade wood-based 3D printer filament

By Umair Iftikhar
3D Printing Industry
January 2, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Canadian bioplastic company, Advanced BioCarbon 3D (ABC3D), has developed wood-based bioplastic materials for use in 3D printing. … The mission of ABC3D is to develop sustainable carbon-free plastics for 3D printing to alleviate the deteriorating environmental situation. …ABC3D’s bioplastic filament is made from waste wood [that] comes from poplar (or cottonwood) trees… And since there is no market for poplar trees they are left in the forest. The 3D printing filaments made by ABC3D are a mixture of 60% plastic and 40% wood blended using ABC3D’s proprietary method in which resin is extracted from the waste wood.

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Forestry

Obituary: Scientist John Russell was top expert on yellow, western red cedars

By Richard Watts
Victoria Times Colonist
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

John Russell

John Russell, a B.C. forester and the world’s leading expert on the western red and yellow cedars, has died. He was 63. Russell was the principal research scientist examining growth, genetics and survivability of the western red cedar and yellow cedar for the B.C. Ministry of Forests. He co-authored more than 40 papers in scientific journals and organized an international symposium in Victoria on the two species in 2010. Russell, who lived in Maple Bay, died Dec. 20. He had kidney cancer. …Barb Hawkins, a professor in the Centre for Forest Biology at the University of Victoria, said Russell’s work was part of a provincewide effort begun in the 1950s to improve the forest health of various tree species. Russell’s work on the two cedar species took him all over B.C., she said. …Russell is survived by his wife, Valerie, and three grown children, Heather, Andrew and Christopher. A celebration of his life is being planned, possibly for the spring.

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Input sought on moose winter tick survey

By Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Wildlife Health Program is again asking for help assessing the effects of winter ticks on the province’s moose population as part of its annual moose winter tick surveillance program. The program relies on observations from wildlife professionals, wildlife enthusiasts and the general public to: monitor the number of animals with hair loss; assess the amount of hair loss on each animal; and estimate the overall prevalence and distribution of winter ticks. Tick infestations can, at times, result in severe behavioural and physiological changes and directly affect the survival rates of moose, especially in younger animals. Winter ticks can have a significant impact on moose populations when climate and habitat conditions promote high tick numbers. …The findings of the surveillance program will contribute to the Provincial Moose Research Program, which was initiated in 2013 to investigate factors influencing moose populations in British Columbia.

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Windstorm ravages BC Forest Discovery Centre

By Kyle Christensen
My Cowichan Valley Now
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

DUNCAN, BC — Staff at the BC Forest Discovery Centre are assessing the damage after the windstorm levelled more than 20 trees. Trees crushed one of the buildings that house three logging trucks and some big trees blocked the train tracks. General Manager Chris Gale says it was heartbreaking to see the damage. “The trouble is all the volunteers, all of us walked around the property and it almost brings a tear to your eye when you see all the work we’ve done and the changes that happened overnight,” said Gale. …A couple exhibits are destroyed, but the Forests Forever exhibit, set to open in the spring, didn’t suffer any damage.

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Time for more enlightened forest management

By Roger Wiles, Cowichan Land Trust
BC Local News
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Roger Wiles

I attended North Cowichan council chambers on Dec. 19, where many concerned citizens eloquently challenged the existing management regime that governs our municipal forest reserve. …Notably included among the speakers was a coterie of naysaying, retired foresters who thought current policies were just fine. During their careers, this fraternity had dutifully served their corporate masters, and mutely acquiesced to the final liquidation of Vancouver Island’s native forests. …But stop and think! Hasn’t our reliance on these established experts often been ill founded? …It is time to consult a new breed of progressive forester who understands the vital importance of biodiversity, the cumulative impacts of poor management, and the holistic balance of all intrinsic values.

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Chichak looks forward to maintaining core services in new year

By Taryn Brandell
The Whitecourt Star
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Maryann Chichak

Looking back on 2018, Whitecourt Mayor Maryann Chichak said that compared to previous years, it was a rather “flat year for the Town.” …This was due partially to a number of events that occurred during the year that were beyond the control of the Town. “Things like the ice jams at the beginning of 2018 along the Athabasca River and two floods — one at the Carlan centre and the other was at the Forest Interpretive Centre. …Two of the major initiatives that the Town will move into 2019 is working with the forest and energy sectors, the provincial and federal governments regarding the Caribou Range Plan and the Mountain Pine Beetle strategy. “It’s still such a huge issue for not only industry but for us as a municipality and for local business owners,” Chichak explained.

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Province reduces regulatory burden for truck and forestry industries

By Danielle McCreadie
Halifax Today
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Road reclassifications to allow efficient truck axle configurations will help make the trucking and forestry industries in Nova Scotia more competitive. “The department has worked with the trucking and forestry industries to identify undue regulatory barriers,” said Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Lloyd Hines in a news release. …The change allows B-trains – two trailers linked together by a fifth wheel – to travel on additional roads, enabling the movement of more materials at one time. This configuration reduces damage to roads as the weight is spread out over more axles. …This change represents annual savings of $7 million to the industries. It contributes to government’s $25 million red tape reduction target. Government expects the change to become effective by next fall.

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If we take care of the land, it will take care of us

By Lesli Allison, Western Landowners Alliance
The Hill
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Lesli Allison

Sometimes it takes cataclysmic events to prompt federal action. On Dec. 21, in the wake of California’s devastating fires, President Trump signed an executive order calling for active management of our public forests and rangelands. …There is no question that we need better land management, but …If we really want to improve the condition of our public lands, here are five things Congress and the federal administration should do immediately: 1. Learn from history… 2. Provide the resources necessary to execute sound management… 3. Establish a restoration policy for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which oversees one-tenth of the nation’s entire landmass… 4. Partner with states, local communities and private landowners… 5. Address climate change. The executive order rightly identifies the condition of our public lands as a national priority.

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As wildfire risk increases in Colorado and the West, home insurance grows harder to find

By Sophie Quinton
The Denver Post
January 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BOULDER — A few months after Chris Cook and his family moved from California into a four-bedroom house nestled among ponderosa pines in the foothills here, they received a letter saying their home insurance policy had been canceled. The insurer, Allstate, had concluded — after an assessor visited the property — that the house was too likely to be destroyed by a wildfire. …Mortgage companies require homes to be insured, so the cancellation put Cook’s financing at risk. …As more and deadlier fires sweep through Western states, it’s becoming harder to get home insurance on a property surrounded by forest, reachable only by backroads, or on slopes where a wildfire is likely to run. While most homeowners in fire-prone places can still get policies, insurers often make coverage conditional on homeowners managing trees and undergrowth.

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Correcting myths about wildfire behavior

By Lois Olsen, retired US Forest Service Ecologist
The Helena Independent Record
January 1, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On Nov. 27, 2018, the IR published a piece where Michael Garrity states “sagebrush only burns every 100 to 200 years, while juniper burns on average every 200 to 400 years. This is not true for the forests in our area. …Prior to 1900, there was fuel (grass, shrubs, trees); there was lightning and Native Americans to start fires; there was nothing to put them out…Most of us are familiar with different forest types — think about how forests change by elevation and aspect. Fire was a frequent visitor to these forests before 1900. It is difficult to realize how much the forests and how wildfire behavior has changed — it has been drastic. …The bottom line is that our forests and grasslands are “out of whack” compared to pre-1900. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The Conspiracy Against Wood Stoves

By John Ackerly President, Alliance for Green Heat
Biomass Magazine
January 3, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

John Ackerly

In recent years, we’ve heard more and more from people who believe the government is trying to regulate wood stoves out of existence. One surprising angle is that they feel the pellet lobby is partly to blame. …In truth, most of the companies making wood pellets for domestic heating are little more than mom-and-pop companies based in the Northeast and Northwest. …My organization, the Alliance for Green Heat, is sometimes accused of being part of this conspiracy. …The current policy debate is not about stoves, but about whether wood furnaces and boilers that sell for as low as $3,000 should get a two-year sell-through that would allow them to stay on the market through 2022. We believe it’s critical to prevent these furnaces and boilers from being installed in thousands more neighborhoods. …Our best shot at being a top tier renewable energy technology is to leave that dirty legacy behind. 

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In North Carolina, wood pellet foes see opportunity in Cooper’s climate order

By Elizabeth Ouzts, Dogwood Alliance
The Energy News Network
January 2, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Undaunted by critics, biomass company Enviva is bidding to make North Carolina the country’s top exporter of wood pellets, a popular coal substitute in Europe whose purported climate benefits have come under increasing scrutiny. For years, environmental advocates and many scientists here have fought toxic air pollution from pellet mills and tried to rebut claims that wood pellets are carbon neutral — both with limited success. But just as an international report warns that time is running out to avoid the worst impacts of global warming, advocates say a recent executive order on climate change by Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, gives them new leverage to push back against Enviva’s proposed expansion. “It’s time to put the brakes on this runaway train,” Danna Smith, executive director of the advocacy group Dogwood Alliance.

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Concrete responsible for 8 per cent of all CO2 emissions, says report

By Fran Williams
The Architects’ Journal
January 2, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Architects have been urged to reconsider their use of concrete after research found that cement – its key ingredient – was responsible for 8 per cent of global CO2 emissions. Research by the think tank Chatham House, underlines the need for drastic changes in the production and use of concrete, the world’s most used man-made material, because of the way in which cement is made. …Responding to the research, carbon emissions expert and adviser to the RIBA Stirling Prize jury Simon Sturgis called on architects and engineers to develop a ‘much better understanding of the materials they specify’. There are alternatives to cement such as… timber alternatives by architects including SOM. Anthony Thistleton, a pioneer and champion of the use of cross-laminated timber (CLT) on multistorey buildings, called on architects to move out of the ‘concrete age’ and into the ‘timber age’.

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