Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 17, 2019

Today’s Takeaway

Oregon to adopt cap-and-trade, join California and Quebec

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Oregon is poised to adopt a cap-and-trade program and link its allowance auctions with California and Quebec via the Western Climate Initiative.

In Business news, coverage on BC’s forestry crisis includes: a letter by the BC Liberal leader; CBC on jobs losses over the past 30 years; the Peace River pulp and OSB mill closures; and the BC Forest Minister, a local newspaper editor and a First Nations chief on Canfor’s proposed tenure transfer. Meanwhile: Brexit has the UK timber industry craving certainty; Conifex drops a shift in Arkansas; and a labor update at Clearwater Paper in Lewiston.

Finally, engineered wood is cool but if you like bourbon—restore white oak trees.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Editorial: Lesson for Vavenby: don’t let them dismantle

By Andru McCracken
Rocky Mountain Goat
June 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canfor is shutting down their mill in Vavenby. It’s terrible for the whole region’s economy and will make it an even poorer place. It will mean smaller returns for the Valemount Community Forest and it will hurt local operators. But the closure has the potential to devastate Vavenby and Clearwater. It reminds me of the shutdown of Valemount’s mill in 2006. …My advice to the community of Clearwater is simple. Don’t let them dismantle the mill. Pay union employees to guard it for the next five years. Don’t let Interfor remove a stick of wood for the next five years. You can bet your bottom dollar that the markets for softwood lumber will pick up again, but they won’t likely pick up enough to build a whole new mill from scratch. The province has just enacted Bill 22 that gives them some control in these situations. But the province needs to learn to play hard ball. And quick.

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Management of private forest lands the topic of latest review

By Timothy Schafer
The Nelson Daily
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

With the city surrounded by close to 90 per cent private forest land, and the recent issue of logging around Cottonwood Lake, the idea of how to regulate those tracts of land is imperative. For years wildfire mitigation and forest fuel treatment have been complicated around Nelson due to the large amount of private forest land bordering it. There is no legislation to compel private forest land owners to do anything on their land that is not in their own self interest, or will turn them a profit. Until now. People can provide input until July 9 on a program to help ensure the sustainable management of private forests in the West Kootenay — locally and around Cottonwood Lake — as well as across the province. …about 818,000 hectares [of private land in BC] — primarily located on southern Vancouver Island and the Kootenays — are managed as part of the Private Managed Forest Land Program and regulated under the Private Managed Forest Land Actand regulations. 

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B.C. Peace pulp and OSB mills affected by slumping lumber market

Canadian Press in Everything Grande Prairie
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A pulp mill and wood products mill in northeastern B.C. are the latest to feel the fallout from weaker lumber markets and the province’s pine beetle infestation. Canfor Pulp says its Taylor operation will close for five weeks beginning June 29, while Louisiana-Pacific’s Peace Valley OSB mill in Fort St. John closes indefinitely on August 9. Over the last several weeks, the Norbord mill in 100 Mile House and Tolko mill in Quesnel both announced closures in August, while shifts have already been cut in half at the Aspen Planers mill in Merritt, and Tolko reduces shifts by 50 per cent at its Kelowna mill next month. Canfor says all its sawmills except for the one north of Creston B.C. will suspend operations for at least two weeks, and up to a month at two northern locations starting Monday, while the Vavenby sawmill north of Kamloops closes permanently in July.

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Vavenby closure and tenure sale: Minister waits for proposal

The Rocky Mountain Goat
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Clearwater’s major employer, Canfor has announced they are closing their Vavenby mill and selling their forest license to Interfor Corporation for $60 million, but new legislation means the sale of a forest license is no longer strictly a matter between two corporations. Forest Minister Doug Donaldson says new legislation passed a couple of weeks ago brings up much more public oversight into the sale of the public asset. “They must come to us with a proposal to demonstrate how [the sale] is in the public interest,” Donaldson said in an interview with the Goat. He said he has not seen a proposal yet from Interfor. …Donaldson said changes in forestry legislation made by the BC Liberals in 2003 meant that government had very little say regarding the transfer of licenses. “Now we have another tool,” he said. “It’s just one of the things we have done to increase our oversight over the public resource.”

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B.C. First Nation ‘dismayed’ by lack of consultation on Canfor forest tenure transfer

CBC News
June 16, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The chief of the Simpcw First Nation in the North Thompson Valley is unhappy with the recent announcement that the Canfor sawmill in Vavenby would be closing and says local First Nations were not part of the decision making process. …Chief Shelly Loring told Daybreak Kamloops host Shelley Joyce that she and her people were shocked… adding that they found out about the mill closure because of a news story; they were not contacted about it in advance. …Simpcw Resources Group Ltd. had been in discussions with Canfor about a desire to acquire more licences within its territory. …If the Simpcw First Nation was able to take over some or all of the land tenure, they would continue logging while taking into consideration wildlife protection and the environmental impacts of their actions.

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Former B.C. sawmill gets fresh start as wood pellet plant

By Courtney Dickson
CBC News
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A sawmill in McBride, B.C., that shutdown 13 years ago is getting a new life as a wood pellet plant. Boreal BioEnergy, a B.C.-based forestry company, has purchased the site and started building the new plant in the community about 200 kilometres southeast of Prince George in the central Interior. “We’re well into our engineering and we’re hoping to start our civil works this fall,” company CEO Jason Janus told Daybreak North host Carolina de Ryk. Construction is expected to start early next year and the plant will begin operations in late 2020. Once it’s fully operational, it will produce up to 250,000 tonnes of black pellets each year, creating 50 to 60 jobs for the region. The plant’s first shipment of wood pellets is scheduled to arrive in Japan in 2021.

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British Columbia’s forest industry crisis being made worse

By Andrew Wilkinson, leader, B.C. Liberal Party
Victoria News
June 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Andrew Wilkinson

In the past few weeks we’ve seen shift curtailments, mill slowdowns, and complete shutdowns across the province. The fact that Canfor – one of the companies to announce cutbacks – is only curtailing its operations in B.C., not in Alberta or any U.S. state, should be a red flag for Premier John Horgan. Couple that with the fact that NDP policies are being imposed on forestry-dependent communities without consultation and that the industry lost 6,600 jobs between 2017 and 2018, and it’s hard to deny that B.C. is in a crisis. As recent weeks have shown, 2019 is shaping up to be even worse. Horgan needs to immediately start working with the forestry communities that are paying the price for his government’s irresponsible policies. I’ve written him a letter asking for him to take action, starting now.

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‘Nothing lasts forever’: small towns in B.C. concerned this spate of mill closures won’t be last

By Justin McElroy
CBC News
June 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

For decades, it was said that forestry was responsible for fifty cents of every dollar generated in British Columbia.  “It wasn’t that high, but it was really major,” said Bob Williams, B.C.’s forestry minister for three of those years in the 1970s. Over the last month, Williams has looked on in sadness as the announcements of mill closures or slowdowns have piled up across the province. But he also knows that the forest industry has been in perpetual decline in the province for decades, a once great bulwark being chipped away at year after year.  “It’s the chickens coming home to roost … it’s a scandalous waste of riches and it’s been true for the last 50 years,” Williams said. In the past week, both the government and opposition party have pledged support and offered policy proposals to help the battered industry and the towns across B.C. reliant on it. 

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House approves amendment that could prevent transfer and closure of Job Corps Centers

By Bill Gabbert
Wildfire Today
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

On Wednesday the House of Representatives voted 313-109 to approve an amendment to an appropriations bill that would preserve the Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center program administered by the U.S. Forest Service. The Trump Administration’s intends to transfer the management of  25 Job Corps Centers from the Forest Service to the Department of Labor (DOL) and permanently close 9 of those 25 centers. The amendment introduced by Oregon Congressman Peter DeFazio would prohibit the government from spending any funds to “alter or terminate the Interagency Agreement between the United States Department of Labor and the United States Department of Agriculture governing the funding, establishment, and operation of Job Corps Civilian Conservation Centers”. It would also prohibit funds being used to close any of the 25 Job Corps centers that are now operated by the Forest Service.

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Lewiston’s paper plant is living with uncertainty

By Elaine Williams
The Lewiston Tribune
June 16, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Clearwater Paper executives and hundreds of union employees who work at the company’s Lewiston plant could be in a stalemate. Members of United Steelworkers Local 608 and Local 712 are working under a contract that was originally intended to last for three years, ending Aug. 31, 2017. Talks are anticipated to resume this summer, but no date has been set. What could happen next is difficult to predict, because neither side is disclosing what options are under consideration. …Clearwater Paper acknowledged it is seeking changes to medical coverage to address the rising cost of health care. …Clearwater Paper is one of Lewiston’s largest employers, and about 900 people are covered by the union contracts of locals 608 and 712. 

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A paper mill’s closure hurts surrounding forests, too

Letter by Paul Howe, Virginia Forestry Association, Frank Stewart, West Virginia Forestry Association and Dave Tenny, National Alliance of Forest Owners
The Washington Post
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The June 2 Metro article “A paper mill goes silent” on the closing of the Verso mill in Luke, Md., was a gut-wrenching read. It described the human toll of the mill’s closure, but it missed a vital part of the story: the significant blow to the health, resiliency and productivity of working forests in the area. For more than 130 years, the Verso mill drove demand for wood from a more than 90-mile radius of working forests in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Now, local forest landowners will face tough decisions about whether to invest in their forests without the local markets to ensure an economic return. Many forest owners may forgo forest health investments, including treatments to prevent insect infestation and disease, thinning and replanting trees after harvest. 

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Northport woman to lead Project Learning Tree

VillageSoup Waldo
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Christine Anderson-Morehouse

AUGUSTA — Christine Anderson-Morehouse of Northport has been hired as Maine TREE Foundation’s new Project Learning Tree®  coordinator. Project Learning Tree uses trees and forests as windows on the world to increase students’ understanding of the environment and actions they can take to conserve it. Anderson-Morehouse joins Maine TREE after decades of guiding school leadership teams and teachers in educational approaches, often incorporating suitable outdoor education and first-hand learning experiences. …Anderson-Morehouse brings her degrees in forestry and science and environmental education, and her experience over 30 years of working in those fields, to her work with Project Learning Tree. “I’m thrilled to have this opportunity to apply my experience in forestry, as a middle school teacher and as a coach for science educators to Project Learning Tree,” Anderson-Morehouse said.

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Recent Georgia Pacific job losses won’t impact Albany plant

By Marilyn Parker
WALB News 10
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Johnnie Temple

ALBANY, Ga. (VIDEO) – Georgia Pacific is just months away from opening its new state-of-the-art lumber production facility in Albany. Company leaders shared the progress of the project at a town hall Thursday. In January Georgia Pacific left the communication paper business, impacting around 700 jobs, but that decision will not impact this plant, and 40 of the 140 jobs the plant will create have already been filled. “They help, and they continue to help us, and some of the people that we’ve met in this community have been some of the best people, so we are pretty excited, and we are ready to get started,” said Plant Manager Johnnie Temples.

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Conifex Reducing Shift at its Glenwood Sawmill

By Conifex Timber
GlobeNewswire
June 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Conifex Timber Inc. announced today that commencing June 17, 2019, it is implementing a temporary curtailment with operations moving to one shift at its Glenwood, Arkansas sawmill for the foreseeable future, due to log supply shortages and poor market conditions. The reduction is expected to reduce Conifex’s planned US South lumber production by approximately 4 million board feet in the second quarter of 2019. 

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Forest sector craves certainty

By Stuart Goodall, Confor
The Timber Trades Journal
June 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Stuart Goodall

UNITED KINGDOM — Between thinking about this column and writing it, Theresa May resigned and the prospects of a no deal Brexit became more likely. …Confused, uncertain? I know I am. And that is the problem for the UK forestry and wood processing industry, all this uncertainty impacts on confidence. Confidence, for example, to make decisions, to invest, to buy timber ahead and what price to pay. And also influencing those decisions will be the actions taken by timber importers, for example to stockpile or not. …The uncertainty has definitely (negatively) affected the value of sterling and that has given UK producers a competitive advantage. …Looking across the sector as a whole, staying in the EU would be the least disruptive option for the industry. Further delay and uncertainty over Brexit will likely keep sterling depressed, but businesses don’t like uncertainty.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Woodrise is proud to announce its Master of Ceremonies

WoodRise 2019
June 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Jean-François Lépine

Woodrise 2019, to be held in Quebec City September 30 -October 4, 2019… announcing that Jean-François Lépine, eminent journalist and now Director of Quebec’s representations in China, will be the Master of Ceremonies. During more than 40 years,  Jean-François Lépine has been a well-respected figure in the Canadian media. …Since January 2016, Jean-François Lépine has been Director of Quebec’s representations in China. …Only a few days left to take advantage of early registration. …The registration period is in full swing for the Woodrise 2019 event, which will be held in Quebec City September 30 – October 4, 2019. Take advantage of the early registration rates by signing up no later than June 20. For more information: www.woodrise2019.ca.

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Engineered wood stays 12 degrees cooler, saves AC costs by up to 60 percent

By Robert Dalheim
Woodworking Network
June 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The research team behind “super wood” is at it again – this time engineering a wood that’s capable of staying 12 degrees cooler than regular wood. Researchers at the University of Maryland and the University of Colorado hoped to find a passive way for buildings to dump heat sustainably. The solution is wood – it is already used as a building material, and is renewable and sustainable. Using tiny structures found in wood – cellulose nanofibers and the natural chambers that grow to pass water and nutrients up and down inside a living tree – the researchers engineered wood that radiates away heat. The UMD team soaked basswood in a solution of hydrogen peroxide, which destroys the wood’s lignin. …Researchers tested the bright white material – which reflects virtually all incoming light – [the] wood stayed an average of 5 to 6 degrees cooler than the ambient air temperature, even during the hottest part of the day. 

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Like bourbon? Restore white oak trees

By Tom Martin, American Forest Foundation
The Hill
June 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

June 14th marks National Bourbon Day, and I hope Americans across the country raise a glass to this classic American tradition. But what about the National Bourbon Days 20 to 30 years from now? I hope this celebration continues year after year, but that may depend on Congress’ support of an unlikely issue: the restoration of white oak trees. You might be wondering, ‘what does white oak have to do with bourbon?’: All bourbon must, by federal law, be aged in new, charred oak barrels. Wood from American white oak trees is the preferred and traditional material used for this process. In fact, almost all of the color and more than half of the flavor of a Kentucky bourbon or Tennessee whiskey comes from white oak. …But due to the popularity of bourbon, combined with ecological challenges and more, the demand for white oak logs is outpacing the regeneration of new young white oak trees for the future. 

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Forestry

UN says Canada isn’t doing enough to save Wood Buffalo National Park

By Judith Lavoie
The Narwhal
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The federal government’s plan to halt the declining environmental health of Wood Buffalo National Park falls short, according to a UNESCO World Heritage Centre draft decision. The draft “notes with serious concern” the downward trend of the park’s ecosystems, especially in the Peace-Athabasca Delta, and says continued deterioration could result in Canada’s largest national park being included in the list of World Heritage in Danger. “Considerably more effort will be needed to reverse the negative trends at a time when climate change combined with upstream industrial developments and resource extractions are intensifying,” it says. …The report card on Canada’s action plan contained some encouragement, including applauding Bill C-69, which aims to improve environmental assessments, and the creation of provincial parks, which act as a Wood Buffalo buffer zone.

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Winnipeg doses ash trees for 2nd year as destructive invasive beetle continues to spread

By Bryce Hoye
CBC News
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

There’s no real hope for Winnipeg’s ash trees long term, but the city is doing what it can to slow the spread of the invasive emerald ash borer and the inevitable collapse of the ash canopy. The city of Winnipeg begins its seasonal emerald ash borer management program Monday. For the second year, city crews will inject a number of healthy ash trees with insecticides meant to provide some protection against infestation. …At 350,000 trees, green ash is the second most common species in Winnipeg and makes up 30 per cent of the entire urban forest canopy, said La France. About 100,000 of those are found on municipal boulevards and in parks. …The treatments are effective for two years, said La France.

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On Vancouver Island, trees are vanishing…

By Jordan Heath-Rawlings
Toronto City News
June 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In today’s Big Story podcast, timber poaching is exactly what it sounds like: People entering public forests, chopping down trees and carting them off. It’s not an easy way to make a buck, and it’s not legal either, but some people are desperate. What’s driving the spike in poaching of Vancouver Island’s forests? How does the changing makeup of the island contribute to it? How awful a crime is it, really, to take a single tree from a forest full of them? And also, how exactly is it done? [Podcast with Lyndsie Bourgon]

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Logan Lake earns community forest award

BC Community Forest Association
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Logan Lake Community Forest Corporation has taken top spot in 2019 for community forests, winning a community forestry award along with a $10,000 grant. Established in 2016, the Robin Hood Memorial Award for Excellence in Community Forestry and accompanying grant are given annually to the community forest that best exemplifies the values exhibited by the late Robin Hood — a British Columbia community forest pioneer — and the B.C. community forest program. These values include innovation and leadership in land management, building and maintaining social license and involvement with the local community and First Nations, and providing social, economic, cultural and environmental benefits to the local community and First Nations. …Approximately 260,000 cubic metres of fibre have been harvested under the community forest’s tenure, with more than $3 million of the revenue being directed back into the District of Logan Lake and its citizens through more than 40 different community groups and initiatives.

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Effective forestry reform must transcend Lahey’s recommendations

By Dale Smith
The Chronicle Herald
June 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

When it comes to the responsible stewardship of the province’s publicly owned lands and forests… Nova Scotians have arrived at a critical point along the path toward addressing the morass of issues that challenge our collective interest. …A comprehensive review of forestry practices… Prof. Bill Lahey. …The most far-reaching of the Lahey’s recommendations, in terms of potential for positive impact, call for and support the transition from the dominance of industrial forestry on Crown lands to an approach that would give priority to the protection and maintenance of natural ecosystems and biodiversity. …In fairness, the minister… announcement of acceptance of the “spirit and intent” of Lahey’s recommendations should be taken as positive. At the same time… specific commitments regarding implementation mostly have been left to the future – unstated and to be phased in over time. 

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A chimney swift brings logging to a halt in this Nova Scotia forest

By Michael Tutton
Canadian Press in the Toronto Star
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — Endangered birds filmed swooping above the canopy of a Nova Scotia forest have helped convince the province to halt further logging in the area. The province’s minister of lands and forestry said Friday the possible presence of the chimney swift has prompted an investigation into a proposed harvest in about 80 scenic hectares of mixed forest between two lakes in Annapolis County.“We understand there could be potential sightings of species at risk,” said Iain Rankin, in an interview, referring to the chimney swifts — a dark-coloured bird known for its acrobatics, distinctive chirping and living in dark hollows such as chimneys. “This is under our mandate, and we take those concerns very seriously and decided it warrants further investigation on the ground.”

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Welch proposes bill to tackle invasive species

By Keith Whitcomb Jr.
Rutland Herald
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Peter Welch

State forest experts say a bill proposed by U.S. Rep. Peter Welch will help stop the spread of invasive species in Vermont, and other afflicted regions. On Thursday, Welch, D-Vt., announced that he has introduced H.R.3244, the “Invasive Species Prevention and Forest Restoration Act.” Among other things, it makes funding available for rapid, early responses to invasive species infestations, and for efforts to help forests recover. Barbara Schultz, forest health program manager for the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation, said in a Friday interview the bill, if passed, will be a great help in stopping the spread of invasive species, and in researching ways of helping afflicted forests recover. …Early intervention efforts were successful at stopping the Asian long-horned beetle in certain areas where it was reported, Schultz said. The same can’t be said for the emerald ash borer.

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Grebner named Mississippi State University forestry department head

By Karen Brasher
Mississippi State University Newsroom
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Donald Grebner

STARKVILLE, Miss.—A 21-year Mississippi State veteran is the new head of the university’s Department of Forestry. Donald L. Grebner, George L. Switzer Professor of Forestry, begins his role on July 1 in the department that operates within the College of Forest Resources. A forest economist with a research focus in natural resources and forest management, Grebner is a certified forester in the Society of American Foresters and a registered forester in the Mississippi Board of Registered Foresters. During his MSU tenure, Grebner has co-authored five textbooks and 60 refereed journal articles. He has garnered more than $3 million in research support and mentored 20 graduate students. He teaches several different courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

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Arkansas forestland owners visit D.C., support African-American land retention

By Will Hehemann, UAPB School of Agriculture, Fisheries and Human Sciences
The Pine Bluff Commercial
June 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Sequoyah Browning and Dora Woods

Two Arkansas forestland owners recently traveled to Washington, D.C., to participate in the annual American Forest Foundation (AFF) Fly-in and advocate on behalf of the “Keeping it in the Family” (KIITF) Sustainable Forestry and Land Retention (SLFR) Program. KIITF is administered by the Small Farm Program at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, according to a news release. Dora Woods, Columbia County landowner, and Sequoyah Browning, Ouachita County landowner, met with Arkansas senators and representatives to share feedback on the practical and financial impact farm and forest legislation has on forestland operations. The KIITF-SFLR program began in 2016 to aid African-American landowners in turning their forested properties into economic assets. It is a partnership of the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and USDA Forest Service.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Cap-And-Trade Bill Gets Last Minute Tweaks In Surprise Hearing

By Dirk VanderHart
Oregon Public Broadcasting
June 14, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Less than a week ago, Oregon’s idea for a landmark carbon reduction program appeared ready to move. …At issue Tuesday were a flurry of last-minute amendments over the contentious proposal — some aimed at placating industrial opponents, others meant to calm the nerves of senators who could tank the bill. …House Bill 2020 would place a cap on Oregon’s greenhouse gas emissions, and lower that cap over time as a tool to push businesses to get greener. …Those credits would be bought at auction, and could then be traded among regulated parties. …Oregon would link its allowance auctions to the Western Climate Initiative, which also includes California and Quebec. …Another more vague amendment lawmakers adopted was requested by the forest industry. Its language seeks to ensure that mills in the state won’t lose access to lumber, even as forest conservation projects are prized under the program.

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Progressive climate policy poised to pass in Oregon

By Sarah Zimmerman
The Associated Press in the Washington Post
June 17, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming. …Cap and trade has been a top priority this year for Oregon’s majority Democrats, and Gov. Kate Brown has said she would sign the measure. …Though the program’s approval is shaping up to be a sure bet, a decade’s worth of baggage from California’s cap-and-trade program has fractured support for the policy among environmental groups. …Stimson Lumber, west of Portland, laid off 60 sawmill workers in anticipation of cap and trade and other new taxes pursued by Democrats. CEO Andrew Miller said in a statement that rural and agricultural communities are paying the price for “Oregon’s assault on businesses.” …And opponents from both parties note cap and trade likely won’t radically reduce emissions.

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Forest Fires

Barkerville Historic Town and Park takes big steps to protect site against wildfire

By Lindsay Chung
The Quesnel Cariboo Observer
June 15, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

In 2017, a wildfire came within12 kilometres of Barkerville Historic Town and Park, the largest living-history museum in western North America. Since then, a lot of work has gone into protecting the property, which was declared a National Historic Site of Canada in 1924 and a Provincial Heritage Property in 1958, and a complex fuel mitigation project covering a 52-hectare area has just been completed. …The planning and treatment of this first phase of the fuel mitigation plan presented several challenges due to the high elevation of Barkerville at 4,300 feet, challenging fuel types, and the need to protect heritage and other resource values located in the treatment area. Very few fuel management projects have been done in this type of physical environment, so it was completely new ground for Coleman and his team, according to the release.

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Thunderstorm leaves small fire near Adams Lake in its wake

By Jim Elliot
BC Local News
June 16, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC Wildfire Crews are working to extinguish fires left in the wake of the thunderstorm which rolled over the Kamloops Fire Centre on Thursday evening. An information officer from the Kamloops Fire Centre said that three firefighters from a rappel crew, who use helicopters to access fires in remote areas, are trying to establish a fire guard around a small fire burning in dense undergrowth near Adams Lake.  …It took until Saturday to locate the fire, when the rappel crew roped in and got to work; the crew spent the night on the mountain and continued their suppression effort the following morning. …The cause of another fire near Kamloops remains uncertain. Suppression efforts are ongoing on the fire burning in the Beresford Lakes area south of Kamloops after it was reported on the afternoon of June 15.

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19 active fires burning in Arizona, red flag warning issued in Tucson area

By Jasmine Demers
The Arizona Daily Star
June 17, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

Wildfire season is in full swing with 19 active fires burning across Arizona, according to the Department of Forestry and Fire Management. There are an additional four prescribed or controlled fires burning across the state. As of June 12, 682 wildfires have burned over 45,000 acres in Arizona this year. Of these fires, 641 have been human-caused. Arizona is experiencing fewer wildfires than previous years, however. This time last year, there were 889 wildfires burning over more than 81,000 acres. “The abundant moisture we received last year significantly helped push us out of the severe drought conditions we faced last summer,” said Tiffany Davila, public affairs officer for the Department of Forestry and Fire Management. 

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