Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 20, 2019

Today’s Takeaway

Amid BC curtailments, Steelworkers ratify fire-year contract

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 20, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Central BC sawmill workers ratified a five-year contract amidst closures and layoffs. In related news: Canoe Forest Products curtails its plywood plant one week; BC’s Finance Minister rules out financial relief for BC mills; Northern BC mayors create an emergency centre; and Trump and Trudeau to talk timber (aka softwood duties) today. Elsewhere, BC Business magazine features West Fraser’s Ted Seraphim and Prince George’s BID Group.

In Wood Product news: McDonalds incorporates CLT in new building design, tests new ‘green concept‘ by adding [wood] fibre to the menu. In other news: Oregon’s prescribed burns meets new smoke rules; California efforts to avoid another fire catastrophe; Oregon loggers protest cap-and-trade bill; and ENGO’s protest US Forest Service policy changes.

Finally, sad news. Dr. Bob Kennedy, UBC alumnus and former Dean of the Faculty of Forestry at UBC, passed away.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Trump and Trudeau to confront disputes over uranium, lumber

By Josh Wingrove
BNN Bloomberg
June 20, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau plans to take up trade disputes with President Donald Trump on Thursday and meet with congressional leaders on the proposed U.S.-Canada-Mexico trade pact. Trudeau is set to talk with Trump and U.S. cabinet officials at the White House before meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The prime minister will make the case against potential U.S. tariffs or quotas on uranium… and American tariffs on softwood lumber. …The Trump-Trudeau meeting comes as congressional Democrats have raised objections to the USMCA, and Canada’s Parliament is about to adjourn for the summer without passing a bill to ratify the pact. “We have an ability to recall Parliament if we need to” to pass the trade deal this summer, Trudeau told reporters in Ottawa.

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The Stumpage problem for the layperson

By Russ Cameron, Independent Wood Processors Association of BC
Tree Frog Submitted Editorial
June 20, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Russ Cameron

There seems to be a misconception that the BC Government is currently imposing crushing stumpage rates. In reality, they are being imposed by the Market Pricing System (MPS) that was introduced in the Forest Renewal Act of 2003. That’s the same Act that took away the now restored ability for our Government to have a say in who gets the rights to harvest our timber. …In 2003, the BC Government created BC Timber Sales (BCTS) and switched to the MPS. The justification was that it would help us avoid softwood lumber disputes with the USA. It didn’t, and it has turned out to be problematic for BC. …Solution. Get rid of the Market Pricing System and go back to some version of the more responsive Comparative Value Pricing. Restore a share of the public’s resource for non-tenured companies to bid on. Use the newly restored ability of the Minister to take-back Tenure on transfers and add it to that share. 

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Frustration continues to build as more mills announce closures

By Scott Brooks
Energetic City Fort St. John
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Frustration continues to build within the B.C. Forest industry as more mills announce closures and curtailments. To date, there have been about 50 sawmills and plants that have announced curtailments or closures this year. Most recently, the Peace Valley OSB Plant announced that it will be closing this summer and the Taylor Pulp Mill has issued more production curtailments. With these announcements, the B.C. Liberals say Premier John Horgan has been ignoring their calls for his Government to take action on this growing issue. According to the Liberals, Finance Minister Carole James announced that the Government would not be providing any new funding to the forest sector but only offer their sympathies to the affected workers. The Liberals blame the NDP for the closures because of the new Forest Amendment Act, Bill-22. Local Conservative M.P., Bob Zimmer, says he, along with other Conservative M.P.’s from B.C., has been briefed on the situation.

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Canoe announces curtailment at plywood plant

RISI Fastmarkets
June 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

EUGENE, OR, June 18, 2019 (Random Lengths) -Canoe Forest Products has announced that its plywood plant in Canoe, B.C., will be down the week of July 1 due to high log costs and market conditions. The curtailment will impact about 150 employees. [RISI subscription required to access more]

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Taylor and Fort St. John Councils working to deal with recent mill closures

By Tracy Teves
Energetic City Fort St. John
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mayor Lori Ackerman

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Fort St. John and Taylor Councils coming together to address recent mill closures. Mayor Lori Ackerman says Fort St. John Council is working with the District of Taylor Council. Both Councils are aware that the closure at the Peace Valley OSB Mill and the temporary curtailment at the Canfor facility in Taylor will affect residents in both communities. By creating an emergency operations centre, so to speak and bringing in the resources needed to accommodate and manage the impacts of the emergency,” says Ackerman. …The Mayor …wants other industries that are operating in the area to “local hire and local contractors,” with the hopes that laid-off employees get opportunities to transition into one of the other industries.“We need to ensure our forestry workers completely understand that their Councils are not letting this go and we are not going to let them down,” said the Mayor

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The 2019 Top 100: This Prince George forestry-services company is making its mark

BC Business
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

BID Group made its Top 100 debut last year, at No. 87. The company has proven that wasn’t a fluke. This time around, BID—a turnkey supplier to the wood-processing industry—moves all the way up to 70th. Its 75-percent revenue jump, to $700 million, is the fourth-highest such gain on our list. …2006 marks the beginning of its steady rise. That’s when BID turned toward strategic acquisitions aimed at diversifying its offerings, starting with DelTech Manufacturing, a Prince George–headquartered specialist in forestry energy solutions. Such takeovers have only become more of a priority in the past 10 years. …The company has regional offices in Prince George, Washington State, Montreal and South Carolina. Hofer estimates that about 35 percent of BID’s 1,800 employees are in the US. A couple of hundred ply their trade in B.C., with the balance in Quebec.

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Finance Minister rules out financial relief for forestry sector in crisis: B.C. Liberals

By Rattan Mall
The Indo-Canadian Voice
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

John Rustad

The BC Liberals said on Wednesday that Premier John Horgan and the NDP continue to ignore the BC Liberals’ calls for action as the forestry sector slides deeper into crisis. Despite an ever-growing list of shift curtailments and complete shutdowns of mill operations across the province, Finance Minister Carole James announced on Tuesday the NDP has ruled out any new funding to assist the province’s forest sector – instead, offering only her sympathies to workers. …MLA John Rustad… “John Horgan has sent out his finance minister to deliver the bad news and meanwhile, he won’t even answer his phone.” …Sympathies from Horgan and the NDP don’t cut it. Hard-working B.C. families struggling to deal with this crisis deserve action, not words, added the B.C. Liberals.

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More must be done to support ailing forestry sector

Letter by Bob Zimmer, MP
Alaska Highway News
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Bob Zimmer

I know many residents who depend on the forestry sector are being directly affected by these closures and curtailments and my thoughts continue to be with those families. Many within the industry are pointing to a growing sense of uncertainty within the province’s forestry sector as the reasoning behind these closures, including the low lumber prices, a declining annual allowable cut, and how mill operations will be affected by the current draft caribou recovery plans. …In these uncertain times, it looks as though this may just be the beginning, which is why I, along with other Conservative Members of Parliament from British Columbia, have been briefed on these closures and curtailments and possible next steps. It is clear that both the federal Liberal government and provincial NDP government are simply not doing enough to support this important industry and its workers.

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The 2019 Top 100 All-stars: West Fraser Timber Co.

BC Business
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ted Seraphim

Despite having spent a good chunk of his career with Vancouver-based West Fraser Timber Co., Ted Seraphim calls himself a “short-termer.” That’s because after six years in the CEO chair, he’ll be retiring this summer. …Still, Seraphim has seen plenty of changes since he moved to the forestry products outfit as vice-president, pulp and paper sales, in 1997. …The business he will leave behind—No. 6 on the Top 100 list, with revenue of more than $6 billion in 2018—has 47 mills between B.C., Alberta and the southern U.S., and just under 9,000 staff. …”We’ve really grown, but our bases are still in B.C.” At the same time, he notes that it’s tough to see the B.C. industry’s expansion continuing as it has. That’s why West Fraser has diversified and will keep doing so: at 21, the company’s U.S. mills almost double those in its home province. …“Last year it was really strong, and this year it’s quite poor,” Seraphim says of forestry in general.

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Amid closures and cutbacks, forestry workers ratify five-year contract

Kamloops This Week
June 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS, BC — Forestry workers have ratified a new five-year contract amidst various closures and layoffs at area sawmills. The agreement is for five years, with about two per cent increases every year, retroactive to July 1, 2018. It was approved by United Steelworkers Local 1-417, which represents workers in Kamloops, by a margin of 84 per cent. Locals for the Kamloops, Kelowna and Cranbrook areas were tabled a final offer from the Interior Forest Labour Relations Association (IFLRA). Though the offer wasn’t signed off on by the union’s provincial bargaining committee, it was put to membership for a vote. The new contract will expire on June 30, 2023. …USW Local 1-417 represents forestry workers in areas including Kamloops, Clearwater, Salmon Arm, Merritt and Clinton.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

New book explores the story of B.C. wood

By David Wylie
The REMI Network – Real Estate Management Industry Network
June 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s leadership in the wood building sector is progressive and inspiring. Naturally Wood  is packed with stories and insights from industry leaders, innovators and thinkers, captured in first-person and by a variety of B.C. writers. This collection of perspectives and projects in the book underscores B.C. wood innovation and history in a tribute to one of our most important industries in B.C. It makes a cohesive and convincing argument that wood is a natural choice and a building material that can help provide solutions to our biggest challenges in the decades to come, including affordable housing and sustainable building systems. “Wood is a limitless material in so many ways — renewable and with extraordinary expressive potential,” says Darryl Condon, founder of HCMA Architecture + Design. “As British Columbians, it makes sense that we are drawn to building with wood and we’ve really embraced pushing the envelope with what you can do with wood.”

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McDonald’s will test their “Green Concept” restaurant in Vancouver

Vancouver is Awesome
June 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

… Now McDonald’s Canada has revealed their plans to test out some aggressive new eco-friendly packaging and recycling strategies at a “Green Concept” restaurant that will operate in Vancouver. …McDonald’s Canada will use their location at 3444 E Hastings Street in Vancouver, as well as a London, Ontario location, as “incubator” restaurants to try out some new stuff. …Those items include: A fully re-pulpable cup for cold beverages. In a first for quick-serve restaurants (QSR) in Canada, this cup uses an aqueous coating that is acceptable in recycling streams, and will be in the medium size; New fibre lids. In another Canadian QSR first, the lids are made from 100% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood fibre and are recyclable. The lid allows for direct sipping so customers can skip the straw. This lid will be tested on all cold cup sizes; Wooden cutlery; Wooden stir sticks and Paper straws

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McDonald’s will test their “Green Concept” restaurant in Vancouver

By Lindsay William-Ross
Vancouver is Awesome
June 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

McDonald’s Canada has revealed their plans to test out some aggressive new eco-friendly packaging and recycling strategies at a “Green Concept” restaurant that will operate in Vancouver. …McDonald’s Canada will use their location at 3444 E Hastings Street in Vancouver, as well as a London, Ontario location, as “incubator” restaurants to try out some new stuff. Those items include: 

  • A fully re-pulpable cup for cold beverages. …this cup uses an aqueous coating that is acceptable in recycling streams.
  • New fibre lids. …made from 100% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood fibre and are recyclable. The lid allows for direct sipping so customers can skip the straw.
  • Wooden cutlery
  • Wooden stir sticks
  • Paper straws

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Why do we still build homes out of wood in wildfire country?

Letter by Mike Roddy
The Los Angeles Times
June 20, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Building homes with lumber is a much bigger problem than whether they are located in the wildland-urban interface. (“California’s wildfire commission delivers its reform plan, only to be promptly ignored,” editorial, June 17). The U.S. has one of the highest rates of fire deaths in the developed world. Many countries build houses in forests, and we are not the only ones who have forest fires. Examples are Sweden, Germany, and China. The houses and their people tend to survive fires because they build with masonry or reinforced concrete. …What’s needed is a wildland-urban interface fire code, especially in California. There might still be contents fires, but death and damage would be much reduced. This has not occurred because of the strength of our timber industry.

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McDonald’s new global flagship moves the company in a bold new design direction

By Shane Reiner-Roth
Archinect News
June 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Though the majority of the over 37,000 McDonald’s outlets around the world hardly rise to the definition of “architecture,” the company is no stranger to spectacular design. …In response to the company’s recent rebirth of its brand, McDonald’s has recently unveiled a shockingly clean and modern design for its new global flagship in Downtown Chicago. Not only is the Ross Barney Architects-designed building an aesthetically pleasing take on the fast food chain, but it also features several innovative features, including cordless phone charging, a mini-arboretum with harvestable apple trees and 27-foot windows. …Ross Barney Architects introduced several sustainable features into their design, including the Cross Laminated Timber implemented in the building’s structural system, a solar pergola and permeable paving “used to reduce storm water runoff and the heat island effect.”

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Mile-high skyscrapers ‘could be made out of wood’

By Hannah Smith
Metro UK
June 20, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

The buildings of the future could be more than a mile high, made out of plywood or covered in algae. Building taller, given rising population density in cities, has been the case for New York, London, the Middle East and so many other cities. When there’s not enough room on the ground, the only way is up. By 2050, a study predicted, there is a 9% chance the world’s tallest building will be a mile high. Concrete and steel have been the favoured building materials for tall buildings but, with climate change intensifying, the pressure is on the find more sustainable alternatives. …We need to move beyond that and look at alternative mechanisms of construction.’ Some architects are choosing to build instead with wood. …Aside from wood, some more futuristic materials may have applications in construction eventually.

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Forestry

In Memoriam: Prof. Robert Kennedy

UBC Faculty of Forestry
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dr. Bob Kennedy

It is with sadness I want to inform our Faculty community of the passing of Dr. Robert (Bob) Kennedy, UBC alumnus, professor, and former Dean of the Faculty. He passed peacefully at age 87 in the early hours of June 17, 2019, surrounded by family. Dr. Kennedy was a wood scientist who combined a university career and research in forest products and wood behaviour for industry. His association with the UBC Faculty of Forestry began following his graduation from the State University of New York, where he received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1953. While at UBC, he was awarded the degree of Master of Forestry in 1955 and served as an instructor between 1955 – 1961.

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Brothers crossing Canada on wooden bikes to promote jobs in the outdoors

By Jacob Carr
CTV News
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Zac and Nick Wagner are cycling across the country on wooden bikes to get people thinking about finding a job outside. The brothers will travel over 8,700 kilometres and are using eco-friendly bikes made of sustainable materials by Montreal-based company Picolo Velo. Zac Wagner is the manager of Green Jobs, a branch of Project Learning Tree Canada. Green Jobs exposes people aged 15-30 years old to outdoor employment opportunities across Canada, such as ecosystem and wildlife management, or conservation and research. “We’re in a time where young people are spending more and more times indoors, and getting them exposed to outdoor employment is just one way that we can help them develop an appreciation and respect for the environment,” says Zac Wagman.

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Comments invited on proposed area for protection

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Comments are being accepted until Aug. 23, 2019, on proposed resource objectives for Pipi7iyekw, an old-growth forest and sensitive area located in the shared territory of Lil’wat and St’at’imc Nations, in the Cascades Natural Resource District. The proposed area for protection totals 864 hectares and is located adjacent to the recently established Nlhaxten/Cerise Creek Conservancy. The proposed resource objectives will protect large stands of old-growth forests and sensitive ecosystems, which are important for conserving biodiversity. They will also protect and support ongoing traditional gathering activities by Indigenous peoples and preserve unique Lil’wat and St’at’imc Nation cultural landmarks within their traditional territory.

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Where’s the outrage over nest destruction in Nova Scotia?

Letter by Bev Wigney
The Chronicle Herald
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Over the past week, we’ve been hearing a lot about forestry operations and their impact on migratory birds during nesting season. The very knowledgeable naturalist-author-photographer Scott Leslie… said how difficult it is, even for very experienced birders, to locate the nests of migratory songbirds. A few days before, however, a spokesperson for the forest industry stated on the same program that operators are informed on how to find and avoid bird nests. To any of us who know much at all about birds and their behaviour, this claim would be laughable if the net results of such a fallacy were not so lethal. We in Canada have been quick to condemn governments and people of other countries… But here in Nova Scotia, we seem oblivious to the widespread destruction of forests during peak migratory nesting season.

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‘Our focus is on impact with speed’: Stéphane Renou talks Forestry 4.0

By Maria Church
Wood Business – Canadian Forest Industries
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Stéphane Renou

FPInnovations launched its Forestry 4.0 Initiative last year with the goal of bringing burgeoning IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) technology to the forest industry. Projects like log truck platooning, which researchers began testing late last year, fall under that umbrella – and there’s more to come. CFI spoke with FPInnovations’ president and CEO Stéphane Renou to get a sense of where the initiative is at, what challenges they face, and what loggers and sawmillers can do now to embrace the new wave of technology advancements. …”My focus, and what we’ve seen in FPInnovations in the last year, is really a stronger focus on impact and impact with speed. We’re really centering ourselves to transfer technology to the industry now and to have an impact now. And by now I mean one to five years,” said Renou.

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U.S. proposes rules that could cause faster destruction of national forests

By Jean Lotus
UPI
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

DENVER — U.S. environmental groups are sounding the alarm that one of the oldest environmental laws in the United States is being weakened on multiple fronts by the Trump administration. The U.S. Forest Service last week proposed changes to the agency’s participation in the National Environmental Policy Act that could potentially fast-track logging, oil and gas exploration and grazing in U.S. forests. This week, an environmental group sued the Environmental Protection Agency for withholding information on how the agency abolished an oversight grading system used with the act. The forest service announced in the Federal Register that it would overhaul how it analyzes the environmental impacts of projects on its 193 million acres of national forest land. Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen said in a statement that the agency has long been understaffed and has recently had to put a majority of the agency’s resources toward wildfire prevention.

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Can California avoid a third year of fire catastrophe? Here’s what’s been fixed — and what hasn’t

By Kurtis Alexander, Peter Fimrite, J.D. Morris and Kathleen Pender
The San Francisco Chronicle
June 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

All signs point to another busy fire year in California. Already, a heat wave this month triggered hundreds of wildfires. …Here is a look at what is changing — and what is not. …The U.S. Forest Service and the state’s Cal Fire agency are working to reduce the unhealthy growth. They’re thinning trees, clearing brush and setting controlled burns on more acres than they have in years. …With experts predicting more perilous conditions to come, Cal Fire is hiring more firefighters, deploying more equipment. …California has among the most stringent building codes in the country, yet the rules that help safeguard homes from wildfire cover only a fraction of the state’s at-risk structures. …Regardless, Cal Fire is working to create a list of home upgrades that it intends to promote. 

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Change To Oregon Smoke Rules Seeing Early Results For Prescribed Burns

By Jes Burns and Maya Miller
Oregon Public Broadcasting
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Prescribed fire is widely seen as one of the best tools we have to restore forests and manage the risk of severe wildfire. But there’s a broad acknowledgment that we’re not getting nearly enough fire on the ground to achieve those goals. Federal funding for prescribed burning remained stagnant over the past five years as spending on wildfire suppression continued to rise at an alarming rate. Across the Western United States, funding and capacity issues are the primary barriers to getting more prescribed fire on the ground according to a 2018 paper. …The one exception to this was the Pacific Northwest. “In Oregon and Washington, one of the things that we found in the interviews is that burners… said that air quality regulation is a major barrier to the burning that they’re doing,” said researcher Heidi Huber-Stearns. …But it appears this barrier is starting to crumble.

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U.S. Forest Service proposed to cut more trees by cutting public input

Southern Environmental Law Center
June 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…the U.S. Forest Service proposed sweeping policy changes that would eliminate environmental review and public involvement for most Forest Service decisions, including logging projects, road construction, and pipelines. The proposed rule includes a new loophole for commercial logging that would allow up to 4,200 acres—6.6 square miles—of clearcutting without prior notice or public involvement. …Although logging is one use of our national forest lands, logging in the wrong places and at the wrong times can cause severe harm to other important ecological, social, and economic values. …The national forests of the Southern Appalachians are especially vulnerable to the proposed changes. …According to Attorney Sam Evans, leader of SELC’s National Forests and Parks Program, “the claim that the Forest Service can log up to 4,200 acres at a time without public input or environmental review doesn’t pass the laugh test.”

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Days of log trucks may be numbered

By Chris Morris
Otago Daily Times (New Zealand)
June 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A multimillion-dollar project to deepen part of Otago Harbour- and help get log trucks off State Highway 88 – is being considered, Port Otago says. The company has been investigating a long-term project to remove heavy vehicles heading to and from its Port Chalmers facility via SH88 since early last year. At present, about 60% of container traffic heading to Port Otago went by rail, but 70% of log traffic – or 100 trucks on average per day – travelled on SH88 to Port Chalmers, Port Otago chief executive Kevin Winders said. The volume of heavy traffic using the highway has prompted safety concerns for some residents, most recently when a fully-laden log truck trailer tipped over at Maia last month. Mr Winders said yesterday the solution was not as simple as transferring log trucks’ loads to rail partway through their journey.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Carbon Project: a progressive new vision for the Municipal Forest Reserve

By Larry Pynn
Cowichan Conversations
June 18, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry experts from the University of British Columbia painted a new sustainable vision for the 5,000-hectare Municipal Forest Reserve this week — one that recognizes the economic value of saving trees rather than chopping them down. The UBC experts appeared before the Forestry Advisory Committee to discuss the potential for the municipality to earn carbon-credit cash by agreeing not to log areas within the forest reserve over a set period of time, typically 30 years. …Brad Seely, a PhD research associate at UBC’s Faculty of Forestry and a consultant with 3GreenTree ecosystem services, urged North Cowichan to develop a “forest carbon project” to manage the Municipal Forest Reserve to “protect or enhance forest carbon stocks.” Based on an annual harvest of 20,000 cubic metres per year in North Cowichan, he estimated: “You can generate (carbon) revenues that are similar in range to what you’re generating from timber harvesting in this kind of approach.”

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Timber families take last stand against climate bills at Oregon Capitol

By Sierra Dawn McClain
The Capitol Press
June 19, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

SALEM, Ore. — Timber families, truckers and others representing rural industries — more than 300 in all — assembled at the Oregon Capitol Wednesday to protest House Bill 2020, also known as cap and trade, which they say will crush their industries and leave many of them jobless. This was the second Wednesday in a row a convoy of logging trucks convened. …Farmers and industry members… say that Oregon’s cap-and-trade legislation will put them out of business. …May 31, Stimson Lumber, west of Portland, laid off 60 sawmill workers — 40% of its workforce — in anticipation of cap and trade and other new taxes. Protesters said they do not want to become another statistic like Stimson Lumber. …June 17, the legislation they are protesting passed the Oregon House 36-24 after more than 6 hours of debate on the House floor. The bill now goes to the Senate for the final vote.

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