Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: August 7, 2019

Today’s Takeaway

Amid trade war volatility, US housing market an unlikely stabilizing force

The Tree Frog Forestry News
August 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Amid the volatile backdrop of trade wars, the US housing market is an unlikely stabilizing force; while the housing rebound in Canada is driving up consumer confidence. In other Business news: more US duties on Chinese cabinets, and more voices on BC’s forestry crisis from Prince George; Terrace, Ashcroft, and the Peace River region.

Companies in the news include: Western Forest Products, Pinnacle, Fortress and Stella-Jones. Meanwhile, forest fires pick up in Ontario and BC while Russian officials say the Siberian wildfires were started on purpose by illegal loggers.

Finally, green living and the wood boom in Ontario’s condo construction.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Involving communities in their forests

By Robert Hart
The Interior News
August 7, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Robert Hart

Much-needed new policies to shape the renewal of the interior forest industry are now being discussed. Unfortunately these discussions, going on in many communities, involve just the forest companies and First Nations… there is no opportunity for others to do so other than through a government website. …It is way past time to put an end to large corporations creating major ecological and social damage on their way to profit creation and begin to develop community economies that operate in a truly sustainable way within their ecologies. Community by community we can create a healthy, diverse economy that includes manufacturing but is based on ecosystems, a forestry that is based on rich biodiversity, no species extinction, carbon storage and clean water.

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Smithers couple says Pinnacle Pellet plant noise is unbearable

By Trevor Hewitt
Smithers Interior News
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wooden sign hanging under the address for Terry and Shirley Hearnden’s house on Hudson Bay Mountain road reads Hearnden’s Hideaway. For the last eight months, it’s felt like anything but. The couple, who have lived in the area for over three decades, is concerned about noise coming from the nearby Pinnacle wood pellet plant, whose property is located a mere 300 metres or so from the Hearnden’s as the crow flies. Discussing the noise, which they said began around Christmas of last year, the couple paint a picture of a lifestyle completely changed by what they describe as an often times unbearable background noise. “Sometimes you swear it was a helicopter taking off in your back field and it doesn’t go away,” said Terry.

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Sawmill curtailments have an impact on our economy: Hall

By Brendan Pawliw
My Prince George Now
August 2, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Lyn Hall

The recent curtailments to numerous sawmills in Northern BC are on the minds of a lot of people lately, and none more so than Prince George Mayor Lyn Hall. Earlier this week, the forestry sector sustained another blow when the Sinclar Forest Products Group announced a two-week curtailment starting August 19th in Prince George, Fort Saint James, and Vanderhoof. Hall told MyPGNow.com when the nearby communities are suffering, it does have a negative impact on the city’s economy. “We’ve taken a regional approach when it comes to taking a look at our economy and we depend on our smaller communities in our region from an economic perspective, so not only does it impact Vanderhoof and Fort Saint James it has an impact on our economy here in Prince George.”

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Communities go it alone in forestry crisis

By Dan Davies, BC Liberal MLA for Peace River North
Alaska Highway News
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dan Davies

In what’s being described as the worst crisis in forestry in more than 40 years, I’m at a loss to explain why the provincial government is doing nothing to support the industry and help people who have lost their jobs. This is astounding because the NDP always likes to claim it’s sticking up for workers, yet they are currently missing in action. In fact, Forests Minister Doug Donaldson, who is from a forest community, is completely absent. I’m impressed with high level of co-operation between business and local government to work through this crisis together in our part of the world, but without provincial support we are bound to see more job loss. Last week, 21 mayors from across the province decided to go it alone and appeal directly to the federal government for help. 

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MP Blaney visits picket lines as Western Forest Products strike enters second month

By David Gordon Kock
The Campbell River Mirror
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rachel Blaney

New Democrat MP Rachel Blaney says she met with Western Forest Products workers Aug. 1 as they entered their second month on strike. The North Island-Powell River representative said she attended United Steelworkers (USW) picket lines at Menzies Bay and Big Tree, between Campbell River and Sayward. “We heard some stories from people in that area… talking about how hard it is, the concerns they have around the finances for their families,” she said. “They’re willing to fight this fight because they believe in what they’re doing.” Western and the USW entered negotiations in April to replace a five-year collective agreement that expired in mid-June.

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Labour Relations Board upholds right of labour movement to declare “hot edict” in WFP strike

By Robert Barron
The Cowichan Valley Citizen
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Strike at Western Forest Products enters second month. The BC Federation of Labour has the right to use a hot edict to put economic pressure on Western Forest Products during the ongoing labour dispute, B.C.’s Labour Relations Board has ruled. On July 29, the LRB ruled on a challenge by WFP that sought to limit the scope of the hot edict and have it struck down. …The strike affects all of the company’s Steelworkers certified manufacturing and timberlands operations in B.C. The company and the union have both said they want mediation but have disagreed over who should take on the role. Khunkhun said WFP is hopeful that the LRB will appoint a mediator soon.

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Public input sought on Interior forest sector

By Barbara Roden
The Ashcroft-Cache Creek Journal
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government is looking for public input when it comes to shaping the Interior forest sector, in order to make it more innovative, create more jobs, and support Interior communities. …Specific policy areas where the public is being asked for input include forest tenure and fibre supply; climate change and forest carbon; manufacturing capacity and fibre use; wood products innovation; reconciliation with Indigenous communities; and fibre and sustainability of timber and non-timber forest values. …Public sessions are scheduled in Kamloops, Merritt, and Williams Lake during the week of Aug. 11–17. A “What We Heard” report on feedback received through the Interior Forest Sector Renewal process is expected to be released in late fall 2019.

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U.S. Slaps Duty on $4.4 Billion of China Cabinets Amid Trade War

By Joe Deaux
Bloomberg Economics
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, International

Add $4.4 billion in imported cabinets to the long list of Chinese goods slapped with U.S. levies in the escalating trade dispute between Washington and Beijing. The Commerce Department said it will ask the U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of the wooden cabinets and vanities from China based on subsidy rates of as much as 229%. Commerce issued a preliminary determination in response to a petition filed earlier this year by the American Kitchen Cabinet Alliance, alleging at least $2 billion in harm from the Chinese shipments. …Commerce is scheduled to issue a final determination in December and the U.S. International Trade Commission by Jan. 30, according to the statement.

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Truckers and Loggers Started a Rebellion in Oregon. Political Insiders Took It Over.

By Nigel Jaquiss
Willamette Week
August 7, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The loggers were everywhere. At three June rallies, streams of honking timber trucks converged on Salem as burly lumberjacks and truckers swarmed the Capitol in hard hats and suspenders.Oregon’s wood products industry provided the outstanding visual of the 2019 legislative session. They got what they wanted: the death of House Bill 2020, the carbon-reduction bill known as “cap and trade.”In a state where Democrats hold a voter registration advantage of 10 percentage points over Republicans and enjoy super-majorities in both legislative chambers, the show of muscle by a grassroots group called “Timber Unity” provided a rare political highlight for mostly Republican rural Oregon.”It was a win,” says Eric Fruits, an economist and former Multnomah County GOP chairman. “I think Timber Unity was as important to killing the bill as the GOP senators’ walkout.”

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Salvage timber sales fall short

By Mark Freeman
Mail Tribune
August 6, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

The timber industry’s appetite for salvaging timber from the Chetco Bar and other 2017 wildfires has dried up quickly, with charred timber going unsold, keeping the Forest Service from reaching its logging targets here this year. The past three salvage sales offered by the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest have failed to receive any bids, including one that went unsold and was revamped to make it more economical, but still went unsold. Three Chetco Bar salvage sales were part of a group of 10 salvages sales that were mostly a mix of timber cut and stacked as part of firefighting and fire-line construction, and those sales totaled 10.6 million board-feet that sold between August 2018 and Feb. 14, according to Forest Service statistics.

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Finance & Economics

Fortress Global Enterprises Reports Second Quarter 2019 Results

By Fortress Global Enterprises
Cision Newswire
August 6, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada

Fortress Global Enterprises reported 2019 second quarter operating EBITDA loss of $9.5 million compared to operating EBITDA loss of $9.7 million in the previous quarter and operating EBITDA of $2.7 million in the prior year comparative period.  The Dissolving Pulp Segment incurred operating EBITDA loss of $8.5 million. 

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Housing rebound helps drive Canadian consumer sentiment higher

By Chris Fournier
Bloomberg Real Estate
August 6, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada

The Bloomberg Nanos Canadian Confidence Index… rose to 58.6 last week, up from 58.3 at the end of June. The measure is probably benefiting from a rebound in economic growth, lower borrowing costs and easing concern about a major housing correction. The share of respondents who see local real estate prices rising in the next six months climbed to… the highest month-end reading since December 2017.

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Stella-Jones Q2 revenue slips as challenges affect sales of some products

Canadian Press in Prince George Citizen
August 6, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Stella-Jones Inc.’s second-quarter sales revenue was down slightly from a year ago.  The company’s net income increased to $52.3 million or 76 cents per share in the quarter ended June 30, up from $58.1 million or 69 cents per share in the 2018 second quarter. Sales dipped to $661.8 million from $662.3 million, boosted by an $18.2 million positive impact from currency conversion.

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Homebuilders Have Already Had Their Recession

Seeking Alpha
August 7, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

Amid the volatile backdrop of trade wars and geopolitical uncertainty, the US housing market may be an unlikely stabilizing force. 2019 continues to be a year of rejuvenation for the single-family homebuilders after falling into a “mini-recession” in 2018. Sharply lower mortgage rates have eased affordability concerns. …While slower-reacting data sets remain soft, forward-looking metrics like mortgage demand, homebuilder sentiment, and commentary from homebuilders have painted a brighter picture for the second half of 2019.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Canada Invests in New Forest Sector Technologies in Trois-Rivières

By Natural Resources Canada
Cision Newswire
August 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

TROIS-RIVIÈRES, QC – When we invest in Canadian businesses, our economy grows and our communities benefit. That’s why the Government of Canada is investing in the development of innovative new technologies in Canada’s forest sector. The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, on behalf of the Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, today announced an investment of $2 million to Kruger Biomaterials Inc., making them the first in the world to operate a commercial-scale facility manufacturing cellulose filaments. Derived from natural and renewable wood fibres, cellulose filaments are a revolutionary bio-based material that can enhance the strength, durability and overall functionality of many consumer and industrial products, including in specialty papers, plastic and concrete. They can replace chemical-based materials with applications in various markets, such as automotive, construction and aerospace.

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Green living goes up, up, up: The wood boom in condo construction

By Denise Deveau
The National Post
August 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

The mid-rise condo at the corner of St. Clair and Caledonia may seem like nothing new, but the SCOOP project by Graywood Developments is one of the city’s first six-storey, mixed-use, residential timber projects. For years, wood has been a popular design element for residential homes and showpiece commercial projects, such as the AGO’s Frank Gehry addition or the Mountain Equipment Co-op headquarters. Now, thanks to changes in Ontario’s Building Code, mid-rise buildings can follow the latest trend as well. Not only does lumber offer important environmental and cost benefits, architects and designers are starting to use wood elements both externally and internally to create a warmer, more natural look that appeals to many buyers. In the case of SCOOP, a 72-unit property, developers are using pre-manufactured, wood panelling from local suppliers to substitute for concrete and steel infrastructure elements. 

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Auburn professor obtains patent allowing soy flour to replace petroleum-based adhesives in wood component manufacturing

By Teri Greene, School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences
Auburn University Newsroom
August 5, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Brian Via

Soy flour could soon replace petroleum—at least in adhesives used in the manufacturing of particleboard. Professor Brian Via of the Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences has obtained a patent that will allow soy flour to replace petroleum-based adhesives traditionally utilized to manufacture wood components in particleboard, an engineered wood product commonly used in indoor furniture. This innovative method will provide a more cost-effective and ecofriendly alternative to commonly used petroleum-based products, thus lowering the amount of formaldehyde released from formaldehyde-based adhesives. …The binder, or glue, used in manufacturing these wood components comprises a large portion of the manufacturing price, so substituting a less expensive component such as soy flour could significantly reduce the product’s cost.

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Forestry

Stoney Hill blow-down harvest was very responsible

Letter by Sig Kemmler, North Cowichan
Cowichan Valley Citizen
August 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Great news for our municipal residences. The Stoney Hill windfall recovery is complete and the site ready for planting! I am proud to have been a resident of this municipality for over 40 years and having had both the memorable opportunity to work with great people in the forestry department back in the 80s as a forest technician and now on an actual harvest program in a managed stand that was thinned and cared for all these years. North Cowichan really does have some of the best managed forests in the country! There has been much said about this and other harvest plans in North Cowichan… There are however some inconvenient facts that have been omitted by some of the opponents that may lead to a misunderstanding of what is so. The actual logging sites have been portrayed as large clear-cuts and that just is not a fact. 

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Forest bathing takes root in Canada: Meet B.C.’s first certified forest therapist

By Clare Hennig
CBC News
August 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Haida Bolton

…Haida Bolton… is B.C.’s first certified forest therapy guide. “The emerging forest therapy practice came from the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs out of California”. “They were inspired by the Japanese practice of forest bathing and it’s just a newly evolving practice.” She completed the program and got her certification in 2016. …While some people may find a similar sense of peace by hiking or trail running through the forest, Bolton emphasized that forest therapy is quite different from those kinds of outdoor activities. …”[Forest bathing] is about slowing down and really, really feeling everything with your heart and your fingers and your sense of smell and hearing.”  The first way to practise forest therapy? Just go be still in nature and take it in, Bolton said. 

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Bitterroot National Forest plan to log 1,300 acres of elk winter range draws protests

By Laura Lundquist
Missoula Current
August 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Bitterroot National Forest has approved a project east of Darby that would change the road system across more than 27,000 acres to improve access. But at least one organization opposes the 1,300 acres of logging proposed in and around elk winter range. Bitterroot National Forest Supervisor Matthew Anderson issued the decision to move ahead with the second phase of the Darby Lumber Lands project, based upon a Finding of No Significant Impact related to a 2018 environmental assessment.  In his decision, Anderson said the project would improve the road system in the Sapphire Mountains east of Darby and provide timber jobs while reducing tree density on mountains slopes in the Harlan Creek watershed north of Darby. Until recently, a lot of the land belonged to the Darby Lumber Company.

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Leaders seek to expose community to timber industry, potential jobs

By Ben Meyer
WJFW-TV
August 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RHINELANDER – More than 64,000 people in Wisconsin work in the forest products industry, which accounts for $1.4 billion in exports. But many peoples’ view of the industry remains stuck in the past. “These folks are out there with their flannel and their chainsaw,” said Crystal Rohde with the Wood Industry Collaborative. Rohde sees it as her job to shift that perception. “As a collaborative, a big part of what we’re trying to do is change that, to really get the younger generation aware of the job opportunities,” she said. Rohde helped organize Monday’s timber tour in the Rhinelander area. It included a visit to an active logging site in the Elcho area, where machines cleared downfall from storms. The group then continued to the paper mill in Rhinelander and Ponsse’s North American headquarters.

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Phil Goff announces 1.5 million more trees to be planted

By Mayor of Auckland
Scoop Independent News
August 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Phil Goff

Mayor of Auckland, Phil Goff today launched the first of his environmental policies, with at least 1.5 million more native trees to be planted around Auckland over the next three years. More than a million trees have already been planted as part of Mayor Goff’s Million Trees programme – a key policy of his during the 2016 mayoral election campaign. “Last election, I promised a million trees would be planted under my Mayoralty. Thanks to the hard work of the Council staff, community groups, the Department of Corrections, mana whenua and the public, we’ve exceeded that number. That’s great news for our city, but there’s no reason we should stop there. “So this election, we’re aiming even higher; for a 50 percent increase in our planting programme which will see at least 1.5 million more native trees and plants planted all over Auckland during the next term of Council,” said Mr Goff.

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Foresters warn: Leaving 300 stems will kill sustainable forests

By Mark Phelps
Queensland Country Life
August 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Aaron and Glen Marshall

NANANGO based professional timber getters, brothers Aaron and Glen Marshall say the forestry industry faces a bleak future if it is forced to leave 300 trees to the hectare. “What’s the point of locking forestry up if it is only going to become like a national park,” Glen said. “It’s no secret that when there are too many trees the forestry industry is just not sustainable.  “That’s no good for anyone, especially not our timber dependent communities.” Glen said at 300 stems to the hectare the trees would be competing against themselves. “At that density they will always remain stunted and just do not have the opportunity to grow into millable timber,” he said. “Inferior trees are a consequence of poor timber management.” At present, a minimum of 150 stems at least 2m tall and 40mm in diameter must be left on each hectare.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Without the Amazon, the planet is doomed

The Editorial Board
The Washington Post
August 5, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, International

President Trump and Bolsonaro

One of the easiest ways to combat climate change is to stop tearing down old trees. This is why it is everyone’s problem that new Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro seems determined to chop away at the Amazon rainforest, the world’s greatest reserve of old-growth forest. According to a recent analysis in the New York Times, “enforcement actions by Brazil’s main environmental agency fell by 20 percent during the first six months of the year, compared with the same period in 2018.” …This is not to say that the fight against global warming is as easy as planting a few, or even billions, of trees, if such a thing were politically or logistically feasible. …But it does suggest that leaders such as Mr. Bolsonaro, who are leading in the opposite direction, can do particularly extreme damage to the effort to restrain climate change.

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Environmental groups accuse state of ‘deeply flawed’ review of biomass changes; call for more input

By Peter Goonan
MassLive.com
August 6, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

SPRINGFIELD — Six environmental groups say that when it comes to proposed changes to ease subsidies for wood-burning plants — four public hearings in recent months, hundreds of written comments, and a future state study are simply not enough. The organizations, all fighting against any easing of state renewable energy regulations on biomass plants have urged the state to confer with environmental advocates and climate scientists ahead of a future study. …The groups alleged that the process used thus far in evaluating state regulation changes has been “deeply flawed.” The groups said that in light of the flaws, they request “a stakeholder process that includes environmental advocates and climate scientists to inform the scope and finalization of the proposed study.” The state is considering changes to the Renewable Portfolio Standard, (RPS), which requires that a percentage of electricity that utilities sell come from renewable resources. 

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See the forest for more than the trees — why reforestation isn’t working

By Lucienne Cross
Inhabitat
August 6, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

We can all agree planting a tree is good for the environment — right? According to a recent study in Nature, the global crusade for reforestation as a remedy for climate change is largely missing the mark. So where did it go wrong? The new evidence reveals that most of the countries with large-scale tree-planting programs are actually developing tree plantations, which might help the economy but fail to sequester the carbon that the countries originally pledged to. … In 2014, more than 100 nations signed on under the New York Declaration of Forests, increasing the target to 350 million hectares by 2030. Unlike many lofty development goals, most countries are actually on track to exceed their promises, at least at first glance. In fact, the world actually has more forest cover now than it did in 1982. So, what’s the problem? 

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Health & Safety

Speed a possible factor in logging truck crash near Campbell River

CTV News
August 6, 2019
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada, Canada West

Police say speed and an unsecured load may have been contributing factors that resulted in a logging truck flipping north of Campbell River Tuesday morning, spilling its load across Highway 19. “We have several witnesses that described it as the driver did, which is saying that as he was coming into the corner, his trailer started going onto his side,” said Const. Dave Dormuth of North Island Traffic Services. …The driver was uninjured but the truck, owned by Critical Site Logging, was damaged when it landed passenger-side down facing north in the southbound lane. …Dormuth said logging truck crashes are unfortunately not a rare occurrence. “We average four or five a year on different various roads here due to corners and speed.” 

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Growing program puts air quality specialists on wildfires

By Felicia Fonseca
Helena Independent Record
August 6, 2019
Category: Health & Safety
Region: United States, US West

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Among the hundreds of firefighters, aircraft and engines dispatched to fight a recent wildfire in northern Arizona were two women whose focus wasn’t on flames. Their concern was smoke. Because of the health hazards from wildfires spewing smoke into the atmosphere, Congress earlier this year said all top-tier federal teams battling wildland blazes should have at least one specialist assigned to monitor smoke. The smoke itself can be more problematic than the flames that produce it. Smoke that poured into Seeley Lake, Montana, from a nearby wildfire in 2017 got so bad that health officials warned residents to leave or find somewhere else to sleep at night when smoke is at its worst. Other places have opened respite centers or set up air filtration systems in buildings to give people a place to go when it’s too smoky. 

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Forest Fires

New wildfire burning northwest of Sechelt

CTV News
August 6, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The BC Wildfire Service has confirmed crews are battling a wildfire roughly 45 kilometres northwest of Sechelt, on the Sunshine Coast. The fire broke out in the late afternoon Monday in a wooded area south of Sakinaw Lake. It nearly doubled in size overnight to 3.8 hectares. “The helicopters’ [are] still very active, picking up water from the lake since the early morning,” wrote resident Tom Hassan in an email. Hassan noted it was relatively windy near the lake, with “hazy smoke” pluming from the blaze. Sixteen personnel, two water tenders and two more helicopters are currently on-site, while a 20-person unit crew is on its way, the wildfire service tweeted Tuesday afternoon.

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Ontario’s forests are heating up

By Elaine Della-Mattia
The Sault Star
August 6, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

Forest fire conditions in the central and southern portion of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry Northeast fire region remain high to extreme. Two new wildfires were discovered late Monday, the MNRF reports. …Pembroke 3 is about 40 kilometres northwest of Barry’s Bay, southeast of Algonquin Park. Five other active fires are also on the MNRF’s radar across the region, with two listed under control, two classified as being held and the final one under observation. …The Northwest region of the province is seeing much more forest fire activity. …There are currently 37 active fires in the region. They include three which are classified as not under control, three are being held, nine under control and 22 under observation.

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Larger fire sizes affected more areas this forest fire season in northwestern Ontario

CBC News
August 6, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

There have been far fewer forest fires in northwestern Ontario this year, according to the ministry’s fire information officer, but the amount of area that’s been burned has been much more than last year. Two large fires in the area, Red Lake 23 and 39 contributed to the massive burn as all those fires prompted the evacuation of residents in First Nation communities nearby. “Red 23 near Keewaywin, that fire grew to over 96000 hectares fairly quickly. Also Red 39 at Pikangikum was also a very large fire that counts for a lot of that area affected by fire,” Chris Marchand told CBC News. He said this year, over 300 fires have burned compared to the total of 984 last year throughout the April to October forest fire season.

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Smokejumper recounted Mann Gulch recovery effort in photos

By Thom Bridge
Helena Independent Record
August 6, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

On Aug. 6, 1949, the U.S. Forest Service sent a recovery mission to the site of the Mann Gulch fire after tragedy struck the smokejumpers the day before. On that recovery crew was smokejumper Richard “Dick” Wilson, who carried a small film camera in the collar of his jumpsuit and captured some of the only photos of the aftermath.  In a 2017 interview published on Youtube, Wilson recounts that day and the mission to rescue those who fell victim to the Mann Gulch fire. The rescue crew hiked in 150 pounds of first aid supplies, but upon arrival realized medical aid was useless because the smokejumpers were already deceased. They did find use for the sleeping bags they brought.

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Russia says Siberian wildfires started on purpose by illegal loggers

By Tom Balmforth
Reuters
August 6, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: International

MOSCOW – Russian prosecutors said on Tuesday that some of the vast Siberian wildfires that environmentalists have dubbed a climate emergency were started on purpose by arsonists trying to conceal illegal logging activity. President Vladimir Putin called in the army last week to help firefighters battle fires raging in remote Siberian forestland that had spread to an area larger than Belgium and blanketed hundreds of villages and towns in smoke. The Emergencies Ministry said on Monday that the fires, which have prompted states of emergency to be declared in some regions, had been reduced by a quarter, while the Federal Forestry Agency put the affected area at 2.5 million hectares. …The General Prosecutor said it had identified cases in which forest fires in the Irkutsk region of Siberia had been deliberately started in order to conceal illegal wood felling, RIA news agency reported.

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