Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: August 9, 2019

Today’s Takeaway

BC’s 2017 wildfires help US scientists model nuclear war

The Tree Frog Forestry News
August 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Smoke from BC’s unprecedented 2017 wildfire season is helping US scientists model the impact of nuclear war. In related news: soil moisture has resulted in fewer California wildfires; and more on yesterday’s UN report and the role of tree planting and wood use in helping fight climate change. 

In Business news: Nova Scotia’s premier isn’t budging on Northern Pulp despite jobs plea; John Brink on BC’s forest crisis; US mortgage rates fall while lumber rallies on interest rate cut; and Q2 results for Interfor, Louisiana Pacific and Cascades. Elsewhere: letters to various BC editors by Susan Yurkovich, Andrew Mitchell, Jim Lamberton and Brenda Gouglas.

Finally, BC industry warns of skills shortage while eastern-based EACOM recruits in the West.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Eastern Canadian lumber producer holding recruitment drive

The Prince George Citizen
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Representatives of a Montreal-based lumber producer will be in the Central Interior next week seeking to recruit sawmill workers for their operations in Ontario and Quebec. Over the course of three days, EACOM Timber Corp. woodlands operation supervisor Sam Haystead and production superintendent Pat Toupin will be travelling to six communities: August 12, Chetwynd and Mackenzie; August 13, Fort St. James and Quesnel; and August 14, Williams Lake and Clearwater. EACOM owns seven sawmills, a remanufacturing facility in Quebec and an engineered I-joists plant in Ontario, for a total of 1,100 employees. …”While EACOM is not immune to the industry climate, our wood basket in Northern Ontario and Quebec has benefited from more stable conditions,” the company said. “We are mindful that many workers may be looking for a fresh opportunity to pursue their careers.”

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‘Like being in prison’: Neighbours worry while province studies cancer rate near former Domtar site

By Jeff Labine
The Edmonton Journal
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Residents near the former Domtar site say they feel there’s nothing they can do while the province looks into why that area has elevated rates of three specific types of cancer compared to the rest of Alberta. …Last spring, residents near the 37-hectare former Domtar Inc. wood-treatment operation received letters warning their homes were near contaminated land. …The Domtar plant, which operated from 1924 to 1987 north of Yellowhead Trail, used toxic chemicals to treat railroad ties, poles, posts and lumber. …These contaminates could lead to an increased risk to human health over a long period of time or in large amounts, according to Alberta Health Services. …Alberta Health Services is asking current and former residents in the northeast Edmonton Homesteader neighbourhood to participate in a study.

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B.C. industry warns of labour shortage, increased regulation

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Business representatives have warned B.C. MLAs about skilled labour shortages, long waits for permits and overlapping regulations that slow resource development in the province. The B.C. legislature’s finance committee has released its recommendations for the province’s 2020 budget. …While industry and business groups outlined the struggle to maintain and expand forestry, mining and natural gas development in BC…Increasing corporate taxes and natural resource royalties were the top two suggestions for funding government programs in the online survey. …The Williams Lake and District Chamber of Commerce briefed the committee on the struggles of the B.C. forest industry. …The committee noted that labour shortages were mentioned in many submissions, with calls from the Kelowna Chamber of Commerce and others to increase investments in skills training and encourage immigration to boost an aging workforce.

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SPECIAL REPORT: An insider’s view of the forest industry crisis

Prince George Daily News
August 7, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

John Brink

You won’t get any argument from John Brink about how bad the forest industry crisis is in B.C. “I’ve never seen anything as serious as this,” says the founder and CEO of Brink Forest Products. However, you will get an argument from Brink over what should be, or can be, done about the spate of temporary and permanent mill closures hitting the Interior… His first argument is with the blame-game. …He points to the major changes to the Forest Act, brought in by the Liberals in 2003, as one of the drivers behind the wheel of an industry heading for the ditch (more on that later). …Brink says there are a couple of elements that have combined for a ‘perfect storm’ … one is the market and the second is a structural issue. …“The other part, which is more troubling, is what has happened with the allowable annual cut in the Interior,” says Brink. 

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Premier not budging on Northern Pulp despite jobs plea

By Andrew Rankin
The Chronicle Herald
August 9, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The premier isn’t considering a plea from the union representing Northern Pulp mill workers asking for permission to allow a new effluent treatment plant to be built right away. “We share a lot of similar concerns but the reality is we need to have something that actually has a permit,” Premier Stephen McNeil told reporters. “We made it clear to the company that they need to continue to do the work and work with the regulator to see if there is a way for them to be able to treat that effluent before it gets discharged.” Unifor president Jerry Dias publicly appealed to the premier on Wednesday asking that Northern Pulp be allowed “to put shovels in the ground immediately and to start to build the water treatment centre.” …McNeil …said that he believes the paper industry can coexist in a fishing community.

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EACOM Committed to Building Stronger Communities

EACOM Timber Corporation
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nairn Centre – EACOM Timber Corporation is joined today by Habitat for Humanity Canada at its Nairn Centre sawmill to announce the next chapter in their partnership. For the third year in a row, EACOM joins forces with Habitat Canada to make a lasting impact in Canadian communities. This year, the company is donating over $86,000 worth of lumber to support builds for Ottawa, Grey Bruce, Thunder Bay and Montréal, helping 19 families access homeownership and better living conditions. “We work hard to make affordable homeownership a reality for hundreds of families each year. We couldn’t do that work without generous donors like EACOM Timber Corporation, who not only support our vision of a world where everyone has a decent place to live, but work right alongside us to make it happen” said Mark Rodgers, President and CEO of Habitat for Humanity Canada.

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Sawmill owner rebuilding after devastating fire

By Alexander Violo
Bangor Daily News
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

A new sawmill is under construction at N.C. Hunt Lumber in Jefferson, as the business looks to bring the facility back up to full production in the wake of a March fire. Rob Hunt, president and co-owner of N.C. Hunt Inc., said the plan is to start up the new sawmill in September and have it running at full capacity by the end of November. “The plan is to start bringing on machines in five to six weeks, as we finish framing the building,” he said. “In seven months, we will have rebuilt. That’s phenomenal and we’ve built a first-class sawmill.” A new 70-by-170, two-story steel building will house the sawmill. …“Our goal is to get back to 80 full-time employees,” Hunt said.

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Is the forestry sector heading for disaster?

By Nicola Middlemiss
Insurance Business Magazine Australia
August 8, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Alarming new research shows the forestry sector is ignoring climate risk, with just 6% of the world’s most significant timber and pulp producers taking steps to assess potential impacts. Increasingly frequent droughts, extreme weather events and exposure to new pests and diseases are just some of the knock-on effects of climate change which are threatening the viability of the forestry industry – however, it seems few are doing much about it. When international conservation charity ZSL analysed 97 forestry companies, it found just six of those 97 were assessing the repercussions the sector is currently facing due to climate change. One of the most widely accepted methods for the forestry industry to mitigate climate change is via reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation – however, many of the companies involved in the research are yet to embrace the method.

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Finance & Economics

Louisiana Pacific Q2 Earnings miss estimates

Yahoo Finance
August 6, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Louisiana-Pacific reported net sales of $588 million, missing the consensus mark of $642 million by 8.4%. The top line also fell 27.5% from $811 million reported a year ago. Lower OSB prices negatively impacted its performance. The reported earnings declined 52.2% from the year-ago.

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Lumber Is One Of The Few Industrial Markets That Rallies After The Fed Cuts Rates

By Andrew Hecht
Seeking Alpha
August 9, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

While most commodities prices moved lower last week, the price of lumber moved just under 10% higher between July 26 and August 2. …The bottom line is that falling US interest rates cause mortgage rates to decline and demand for new homes to increase. …I never trade the futures, but I have learned to appreciate the predictive value of lumber prices when it comes to long-term trend changes in the world of commodities.

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Cascades Announces Record Sales for the Second Quarter of 2019

By Cascades Inc.
Cision Newswire
August 8, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Cascades Inc. reports its results for the three-month period ended June 30, 2019 . Q2 2019 Highlights Sales of $1,275 million (compared to $1,230 million in Q1 2019 and $1,180 million in Q2 2018. Operating income of $82 million (compared to $72 million in Q1 2019 and $73 million in Q2 2018.

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Interfor reports second quarter 2019 results

By Interfor Corporation
Globe Newswire
August 8, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Interfor recorded a net loss in Q2’19 of $11.2 million compared to a net loss of $15.3 million in Q1’19 and net earnings of $63.7 million in Q2’18. Adjusted EBITDA was $12.6 million on sales of $481.3 million in Q2’19 versus $16.3 million on sales of $451.2 million in Q1’19. 

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US Mortgage Rates Drop Significantly

Freddie Mac
August 8, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

Freddie Mac released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® showing that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate averaged 3.60%, the lowest it has been since November 2016. 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.60% with an average 0.6 point for the week ending Aug 8, down from last week when it averaged 3.75%. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 4.59%. 

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Forestry

Conflict of interest amid North Cowichan trees

By Larry Pynn, environmental journalist
Victoria Times Colonist
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Larry Pynn

We live in an era of reconciliation. Everyone wants First Nations to improve their situation, to prosper economically. But does that mean society should turn a blind eye when Aboriginals do something that would rightly subject non-natives to criticism? I don’t think so, and here’s why: Khowutzun Forest Services is owned by Cowichan Tribes, and the operations manager is Cedar Elliott, recently appointed to the municipality’s Forestry Advisory Committee. The FAC is tasked with advising council on logging issues within the forest reserve, far and away the most contentious issue to hit the community in years. A company headed by a member of the FAC receiving municipal forestry contracts should ring alarm bells, right? …council’s terms of reference for the FAC specifically state that “committee members shall absent themselves from discussions or decision-making at committee meetings if there is a potential conflict of interest.” 

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Share your ideas on the future of forestry

Letter by Susan Yurkovich, President and CEO B.C. Council of Forest Industries
Victoria Times Colonist
July 4, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Susan Yurkovich

Re: “Poorly managed forests responsible for mill closures,” comment, June 28. British Columbians know our forest industry is experiencing signifiant challenges. These issues are not new and have been building for several years.  The comment by John Bergenske mischaracterizes the reasons for recent curtailments and closures. Our world leading sustainable sector, which provides renewable products to B.C. and the world, has faced a reduction in timber supply from the mountain pine beetle crisis and increasingly severe wildfire seasons. Lumber prices are volatile, log costs are rising, and companies cannot access enough fibre inputs to keep their mills running. With continued trade challenges, too, including 20 per cent tariffs on B.C. softwood lumber by the U.S., we have a perfect storm of conditions. …We encourage British Columbians to share ideas and engage productively so, together, we can secure jobs that support families in every corner of B.C. and ensure community stability.

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Forests a witness to predictable outcomes

Letter by Andrew Mitchell, RPF retired
Victoria Times Colonist
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Share your ideas on the future of forestry,” letter, July 4. The CEO of the B.C. Council of Forest Industries proclaims that we have a “world leading sustainable sector,” and in the same letter points out many forest-dependent communities are facing the consequences of reductions in timber supply. This is more than poor forest management. It is the predictable outcome of our imprudent and improvident arrangements for managing public forests by a system of private timber harvesting rights. The unnaturally large mountain pine beetle epidemic was really an unwitting mountain pine beetle habitat enhancement project. …B.C. softwood lumber is experiencing export tariffs because the harvesting rights system is vulnerable to accusations of subsidy. The value-added wood products sector is underdeveloped because most public timber was allocated to sawn lumber and pulp producers. …The British Columbia government, the trustee of public forests, is avoiding any substantial discussion of the failed existing system in its present consultation. [This story is part way down the list of letters to the editor – you will need to scroll]

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Smoke from 2017 B.C. wildfires helps research on potential impact of nuclear war

The Canadian Press in the Penticton Western News
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Unprecedented smoke from B.C.’s wildfires in 2017 is helping scientists model the potential impacts of nuclear war on the Earth’s climate. The enormous plume of smoke formed the largest cloud of its kind ever observed… says the study published Thursday in the peer-reviewed academic journal Science. The cloud… sent black carbon high into the atmosphere, said the study’s co-author Alan Robock, a professor at Rutgers in New Jersey… where there is no rain. …The smoke lasted more than eight months in the stratosphere, where there is no rain to wash it away, the study said. …“This natural occurrence validated what we had done before in our climate models, so it gave us more confidence that what we were doing was correct.” …In the case of nuclear winter resulting from a nuclear war, Robock said temperatures would dip below freezing in the summertime and stay there for years.

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Attention Forest Minister Donaldson

Letter by Jim Lamberton
Barriere Star Journal
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I am thoroughly disgusted about the article, “Vavenby Closure Will Help Adams Lake Mill Stay Alive” in Kamloops This Week. The article stated that Brad Bennett, Woodlands Manager with Interfor’s Adams Lake Division, asked for Salmon Arm Council’s support for the takeover of the Canfor timber rights in Clearwater. Bennett pointed to an overall timber supply gap of about one million cubic metres. …I propose that you purchase the Canfor timber supply and the sawmill in Vavenby. You can shut down your Adams Lake Sawmill and haul your timber supply to Vavenby. It’s a win-win situation. 

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Timber is being hauled out of Fort St. James

Letter by Brenda Gouglas
The Caledonia Courier
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Brenda Gouglas

It is not a rumour, Conifex timber has been leaving Fort St. James for months. …Contrary to what the Mayor and Councillors believe, and what they want the laid off Conifex workers and the public to believe, Conifex timber has been leaving our community for months. …Visually those loads would have been indistinguishable from all the others leaving our community. …All of that seems to make a mockery of Conifex’s rationale that there is “too little saw log supply to maintain operations as it has in the B.C. Interior,” leading to the sale of their mill and timber rights to Hampton.

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City to decide fate of ash trees in Fredericton as emerald ash borer inches closer

By Phillip Drost
CBC News
August 9, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Mike Glynn

NEW BRUNSWICK — Fredericton city staff will spend the next few months deciding which ash trees are worth saving and which will be left to die, as the city prepares for the arrival of the emerald ash borer. “What we need to know for the next season … is what we’re going to treat, trees that we’re going to remove, any potential increases to our planting program,” said city forester Mike Glynn. …The invasive species, which destroys ash trees, has been found in Oromocto and could arrive in Fredericton any day now — if it hasn’t already. …Glynn said the city has traps set up to detect the beetle, though staff have yet to find one of the bugs in the provincial capital.

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Government of Canada invests in Métis Nation leadership through the Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program

By Environment and Climate Change Canada
Cision Newswire
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

OTTAWA – Indigenous peoples have a special relationship with the environment, caring for the land, water, ice, plants, and animals for generation after generation. Indigenous stewardship and traditional knowledge are invaluable tools in Canada’s efforts to fight climate change and protect a healthy environment for future generations. Indigenous Guardians programs protect healthy habitats for marine and terrestrial wildlife, advance reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, and demonstrate global leadership in protecting our nature. The federal government is investing $3 million, over three years, to support five Métis Nation-led projects through the Indigenous Guardians Pilot Program. …Métis Guardians will use traditional knowledge and scientific practices in the protection and conservation of their land, water, and the plants and wildlife that call these places home. 

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Forest Service releases draft review for logging, other projects in central SE Alaska

By Joe Viechnicki
KFSK Community Radio Alaska
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service has released the draft of an environmental review of a 15-year plan for logging, recreation and stream restoration projects around Wrangell, Petersburg and Kake in Southeast Alaska. The review follows the same approach as a larger project on Prince of Wales Island that’s the center of a legal challenge. The draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Central Tongass Project could mean logging up to 150 million board feet of old-growth timber over 15 years on the islands and mainland of central Southeast. Another 80 million board feet of young growth trees could also be cut during that time. This project and a much larger offering on nearby Prince of Wales Island make up the bulk of what the federal agency expects to offer for timber sales in Southeast Alaska in the near future.

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Siskiyou Rappellers prepare for lightning strike

By Caitlin Fowlkes
Mail Tribune
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A crew of firefighters who rappel from helicopters geared up for practice Thursday morning in anticipation of lightning storms forecast for Friday. One of the newest crew members, Scott McIntyre — a rookie rappeller — said if the crew goes two weeks without working on an active fire, then they practice at the Siskiyou Rappel base at the Grants Pass airport to stay sharp. Another recruit this year, Eric Parrinello, said the rappellers are up in the air in 10 minutes or less from the time a call comes in. Their specialty is stamping out small, remote fires before they can spread. “We’re doing our job correctly if you don’t hear about us or the fire,” Parrinello said. He said having a rappelling crew in Southern Oregon is extremely beneficial because there’s a lot of forest land that’s steep and nearly impossible to get to with a vehicle. 

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There’s a Big Reason Why Southern California Hasn’t Seen Large Wildfires Yet This Summer

By Anthony Yanez
NBC Los Angeles
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

So far, California has been spared the large wildfires that ravaged the state in 2018, a year that included the largest, most destructive and deadliest wildfires on record in the Golden State.  From January to early August last year, more than 3,660 wildfires burned a staggering 615,000 acres in California. During that same period this year, about 2,900 wildfires have burned only 22,900 acres, according to CALFIRE statistics. California’s five-year average for that period is about 3,500 fires and 245,800 acres of burned land. So, what’s behind the significant decrease in the number of fires and acres burned? It’s due to several factors, but one of the most important is soil moisture. …Soil moisture is 40 percent above average for most of California. …The combination of steady winter rainfall, an active monsoon season and high humidity has kept vegetation full of moisture.

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We can’t see the wood for the trees in telling the story of forestry

By Stuart Goodall, Chief Executive of Confor
The Scotsman
August 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Stuart Goodall

Trees cover 68 per cent of Sweden. Forestry and wood manufacturing claim to make up 10 per cent of its economy and statistics show the wildlife in its forests is increasing. Sweden is also home to wood-using giant IKEA and high levels of personal happiness. While these facts aren’t necessarily connected, and Scotland’s comparable numbers are more modest, we have aspirations to improve our ­forest cover of 19 per cent, so I was interested to learn more on a recent visit to Sweden. Perhaps the most surprising point was hearing repeatedly that the ­sector must do more to tell the story of Swedish forestry – to Swedes. It has long frustrated me that awareness of forestry in Scotland, while increasing, is still relatively low. ­However, it appears well-wooded countries with established ­forestry sectors face similar communications ­challenges.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

5 ideas to fight climate change through better land use

By Emily Chung
CBC News
August 9, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, International

Growing more crops in the shade of the forest, fertilizing crops with charcoal, and using trade policies to ensure imported food is grown without damaging landscapes and widening deserts overseas are some of the ways we can fight climate change by using land more sustainably, says the co-author of a new UN-backed climate report. The report focused on the links between climate change and land use. It noted that climate change is putting extra pressure on forests, farmland and other landscapes that are already strained or threatened by human activities like farming and forestry. …Hurlbert, a University of Regina professor and Canada Research Chair in climate change, energy and sustainability policy, was in charge of the chapter on risk management …highlighted some of the land use strategies that can help: Agroforestry… Biochar… Producing more wood… Thinking outside the plot… and Sustainable sourcing.

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Planting Trees Is Good. Eliminating Deforestation is Better.

By Jackie Flynn Mogensen
Mother Jones
August 8, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

Every year, an estimated 15 billion trees are chopped down across the planet to make room for agricultural and urban lands and other uses. …Planting more trees is one way to offset deforestation. But now, a report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change finds that to have a shot at combatting the climate crisis, among other efforts, we’ll need to cut down fewer trees to begin with. …One partial solution to the effects of deforestation is simply to plant more trees. …Thursday’s IPCC report didn’t exactly advance or refute the findings of the Sciencepaper. It did, however, underscore the fact that planting trees will be part, by necessity, of any climate solution. But its authors note that “there are limits” to afforestation—planting trees in new places—and doing so potentially has some drawbacks. …For example, tree planting could push agricultural operations onto less-suitable land. 

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American Forests Supports the Climate Stewardship Act of 2019

By American Forests
Business Wire
August 9, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — American Forests, the nation’s first forest conservation organization founded in 1875, announced its support for the Climate Stewardship Act that will be introduced with leadership from U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) when Congress reconvenes in September. When introduced, this bill will be the most ambitious reforestation proposal in our nation’s history, surpassing even the New Deal. It will make an immense dent in the climate crisis, capturing enough carbon dioxide emissions in newly planted forests to offset more than two full years of America’s greenhouse gas emissions, and will support more than 200,000 forestry jobs in the first ten years alone. …Title II of the Climate Stewardship Act provides funds to plant 4.1 billion trees by 2030 and 16 billion trees total by 2050. 

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Export of wood pellets to Japan to rise

Vietnam+
August 8, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

HCM City – Vietnam’s Eastwood Energy JSC and Sweden’s CellMark Group signed a long-term contract in Ho Chi Minh City on August 8 to supply wood pellets to the Japanese market. Under the contract, the first of its kind inked by the two sides, at least 300,000 tonnes of wood pellets will be shipped to Japan each year as from 2021. Pham Trung Cang, Chairman of Eastwood Energy, said Vietnam has huge potential for wood pellets production, adding that with a wooden furniture market worth about 20 billion USD, the production of pellets from by-product of wood processing will bring about many opportunities to businesses. Eastwood Energy aims to export over 500,000 tonnes of wood pellets to the Republic of Korea (RoK) and Japan in 2019, and at least 300,000 tonnes to the Japanese market alone in 2021, he said. 

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Forest Fires

More crews sent to B.C.’s southern Okanagan wildfire as weather shift possible

The Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
August 8, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — A stubborn wildfire in British Columbia’s southern Okanagan has now charred an estimated 12.5-square kilometres of trees and bush near the community of Oliver and fire crews are working against time as bad weather looms. BC Wildfire Service information officer Nicole Bonnett says additional crews are arriving, in part to respond to “potential forecasted weather events,” and also to help carry out other firefighting duties. The added staff bolsters a crew of 100 that has been working around the clock on the blaze which broke out Sunday. The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen expanded its evacuation alert Wednesday night, adding another 41 properties to the 206 placed on alert one day after the fire was spotted.

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Idaho hot springs area near McCall evacuated due to wildfire

By Keith Ridler
The Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
August 8, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

BOISE, IDAHO — A wildfire burning in dense timber has nearly tripled in size and led to evacuations of a small community and a popular rustic resort hot springs, Idaho fire officials said Thursday. The fire near Burgdorf Hot Springs grew to 1.5 square miles and jumped across roads leading into an area that are now closed to the public. …The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office issued a full evacuation for the lightly populated area about 25 miles (40 kilometers) north of the vacation area of McCall. About 350 personnel are assigned to the blaze that’s burning mostly in the Payette National Forest. Several U.S. Forest Service campgrounds in the area have been closed.

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