Tree Frog Forestry News

Region Archives: Canada

Business & Politics

The US Court of International Trade Finds Commerce’s Ruling on Canadian Lumber Unlawful

Law360.com
November 13, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The U.S. Court of International Trade on Wednesday ordered the U.S. Department of Commerce to rethink its conclusion that certain cedar shakes and shingles made by Canada producers are subject to countermeasure tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber imports, saying that the determination is unlawful. Judge Jennifer Choe-Groves said that when the Commerce Department makes a determination on Whether an importer’s product is included in the scope of an anti-dumping or countervails duty order, the department must consider previous duty determinations made by Commerce and the US International Trade Commission, as  well as past scope rulings. [a Law360 subscription is required to access the full story]

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Pinnacle reports progress with plant improvement projects

By Erin Voegele
Biomass Magazine
November 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Pinnacle Renewable Energy released third quarter financial results on Nov. 12, reporting progress with upgrades at several existing wood pellet plants. Revenue also increased despite issues with ongoing sawmill curtailments in British Columbia. …Upgrades to the fiber drying and air filtration equipment at the Williams Lake, British Columbia, facility are progressing on schedule and are expected to be complete during the first quarter of 2020, McCurdy said. …The Aliceville, Alabama, pellet plant is also undergoing improvements McCrudy said. Projects at that facility aim to improve fiber flow, processing and operating efficiency. As a result of the improvement projects, McCurdy said the plant began experiencing ongoing operating improvements beginning in September that allowed it to set several new production records. …Pinnacle’s pellet plant in Smithers, British Columbia, reached full run rate capacity of 125,000 metric tons per year during the third quarter and is performing very well, McCurdy said.

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Bloedel Conservatory turns 50

By John Mackie
Vancouver Sun
November 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prentice Bloedel in 1971

Prentice Bloedel in 1951

In 1965, the Vancouver park board unveiled a dramatic vision for the top of Little Mountain: a $1.5-million floral conservatory, forest museum and planetarium. …and on April 27, 1966, the park board announced that the conservatory and “museum of the woods” would be built, thanks to a $1-million donation from Seattle lumber baron Prentice Bloedel. On Dec. 6, 1969, the Bloedel Conservatory opened to the public, attracting …500,000 the first year. Fifty years later, it remains a Vancouver icon. …Prentice Bloedel was partners with H.R. MacMillan in the forest giant MacMillan Bloedel. MacMillan was also civic-minded: he donated the money for the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre (i.e., planetarium)… A third MacMillan Bloedel executive, Whitford Julian VanDusen, gave $1 million to help convert the old Shaughnessy Golf Course to a public garden in 1975. “So the planetarium became MacMillan’s and the conservatory became Bloedel’s and VanDusen hunkered up a million dollars for the $3-million cost for VanDusen Gardens,” said Clark.

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CN Rail confirms job cuts as weakening economy cuts into freight volumes

Canadian Press in the Nelson Star
November 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canadian National Railway Co. is confirming job cuts as it deals with a weakening North American economy that has eroded demand for railroad transportation. The company said it is “adjusting its resources to demand” but wouldn’t say how many people will be affected. It said some employees will be placed on furlough and there will be reductions in both management and union job numbers. …Freight volumes came in below expectations in the third quarter and manufacturing has also fallen off, it said. The railroad also said it was affected by a slowdown in the B.C.’s forestry sector, where high log prices and dwindling timber supply have prompted shutdowns or curtailments in more than two dozen mills, and due to the weather-delayed grain crop on the Prairies.

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Conifex Announces Third Quarter 2019 Results

By Conifex Timber Inc.
Global Newswire
November 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, BC — Conifex Timber reported results for the third quarter ended September 30, 2019. Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations was negative $9.2 million for the quarter, which represented an improvement of $4.0 million over the second quarter of 2019, primarily attributable to increased operating earnings. A decrease in EBITDA from continuing operations of $12.8 million compared to the previous quarter was primarily attributable to a quarter-over-quarter negative variance on our gain from the sale of duty refunds. …“While we are encouraged by the $4.0 million improvement… we anticipate greater sequential improvement in the current quarter primarily due to cost elimination at our Fort St. James mill and cost reduction at our El Dorado mill”, said Ken Shields, Chairman and CEO. 

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High cost of logs hurting lumber mill workers throughout the Okanagan

By Rob Munro
InfoTel News
November 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mills throughout Tolko’s B.C. operations will be shut down for two weeks over Christmas the company announced Nov. 14, just a week after revealing the permanent closure of its Kelowna mill. …“Had there been viable cost logs coming into the mills that weren’t so highly-priced, that mill would still be running and still be making money,” Pat McGregor, president of United Steelworkers Local 1-423. “But because the cost of logs, which they’re telling us is over 75 per cent of their overall cost, the mill can’t run.” …The closure in Kelowna has a multi-million dollar economic impact to that city but the shutdowns and the uncertainties also impact other Okanagan towns, such as Armstrong, Lavington and Lumby. …Multiply that by the 200 union workers who lost their jobs in Kelowna and that adds up to an annual payroll of more than $12 million per year.

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Six BC mayors beg negotiators to get a deal done in ongoing forestry strike

By Renee Bernard
News 1130
November 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

PORT MCNEILL, BC — More than four months into a B.C. forestry workers strike, six mayors, mostly on Vancouver Island, have issued a letter describing how the job action has affected their communities. “As leaders of communities that are severely impacted by the Western Forest Products and United Steelworkers labour dispute, we are compelled to draw your attention to the economic devastation this dispute is causing for the families who live and work in our communities,” says the letter. …Port McNeill mayor Gaby Wickstrom was one of the mayors who put her name on the letter. …“It’s not just the forestry workers. They get strike pay, which is not a lot. But the contractors or businesses that rely the forestry industry – they are not getting anything and they are laying people off.”

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New Democrats have no plan, B.C. Liberal leader says

By Mark Nielsen
The Prince George Citizen
November 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Andrew Wilkinson

B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson is accusing the governing New Democrats of lacking a plan to guide the region – and the forest sector in particular – through the looming economic turmoil. “What’s the five-year plan in terms of where the economy is going to be?” Wilkinson said during a question and answer session with local media. “Because we’re in the midst of a lot of change here. He said such a plan should be drafted in anticipation of future industrial development and the changes that are occurring in the forest industry. …He accused the NDP of relying on “band aid programs” to ease the blow for the forest sector. …Wilkinson said the NDP is scrambling to make ends meet… and “living off the prosperity the B.C. Liberals generated.”

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City of Quesnel hosting open house at new Forestry Innovation Centre

BC Local News
November 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The City of Quesnel is inviting the community to an open house in the newly constructed Forestry Innovation Centre at City Hall Saturday, Nov. 16. The Centre, which officially opened Sept. 18, is a flexible work environment designed to foster innovation and collaboration. It houses the City’s Forestry Initiatives Program, as well as showcases locally-made structural and finishing wood products, local artisan furniture and art installations. There is also an interpretive centre that explains landscape-level management, fuel management and the future of forestry. The Forestry Innovation Centre won a Wood Works Award, which recognizes the support of the B.C. wood industry. …Fuel management is a big part of the Forestry Initiatives Program’s work… the City is working with partners for fuel treatment on 59 hectares of land this fall as part of the Community Wildfire Protection Plan.

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Tolko to temporarily shut down B.C. lumber operations over holiday season

By Nick Eagland
The Vancouver Sun
November 14, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forest-products firm Tolko Industries says it will be shutting down operations across B.C. for two weeks over the holiday season due to low lumber prices and high log costs. The Vernon firm made the decision to take the downtime from Dec. 21 to Jan. 6 after looking at log costs, market conditions and “cumulative policy burden”. The company also has divisions in Kamloops, Williams Lake, Armstrong, Coldstream, Lumby and Richmond. …Troy Connolly, vice-president for solid wood, said… it will reduce output by approximately 21 million board feet of lumber production and 10 million square feet of panel production. …In September, workers at Tolko’s Kelowna sawmill who were expecting to go back to work after a six-week shutdown learned that the facility was staying closed indefinitely. …Over the summer, Tolko also permanently closed its Quest sawmill in Quesnel with the loss of 150 jobs.

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Grants given to retrieve salvage wood fibre

By Mark Nielsen
The Prince George Citizen
November 13, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ministry of Forests parliamentary secretary Ravi Kahlon was in Prince George on Wednesday to promote a mixture of new and ongoing projects to make better use of wood fibre that otherwise would have been burned as slash. …Kahlon said nearly $28 million in grants have been distributed to 38 projects through the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. (FESBC). The FESBC is a provincial Crown agency created in 2016 to administer a program aimed at wildfire risk reduction, reforestation, forest rehabilitation, wildlife habitat restoration and raising awareness of the FireSmart program. Opposition forest critic John Rustad welcomed the news but added funding for the FESBC is running low. “The B.C. Liberals put $235 million into FESBC,” he said. “There is about $5 million left from that initial investment that we made…it’s concerning to see that this government refuses to put additional funding into FESBC.” Without additional funding, FESBC will close its doors in about two years, Rustad said.

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Striking WFP workers ‘hopeful’ as mediation continues

Chek News
November 13, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fresh mediation talks are sparking optimism in the B.C. coast’s forestry communities after a four-and-half-month long strike. “I’m hoping that everything gets sorted out,” said striking Cowichan Bay Western Forest Products worker Murray Shiell. …“It’s feeling a little more promising, that they haven’t stepped away from the table, so hopefully no news is good news. ” said striking Chemainus WFP worker Greg Heyes.On Wednesday, WFP and United Steel Workers Local 1-1937 (USW)  met for a second straight day of mediation in Nanaimo to try and resolve the strike that is draining bank accounts and economic activity fast in coastal communities. …Due to a media blackout, neither side is commenting on the talks that continue.

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Northern Pulp, affiliate company owe Nova Scotia government more than $85 million

By Aaron Beswick
The Chronicle Herald
November 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Northern Pulp and an associated company owe the province more than $85 million. While the company and the Nova Scotia government have acknowledged the existence of outstanding debts to the taxpayer, neither have been willing to disclose the amounts. The Chronicle Herald received the details on the interest-bearing loans via a Freedom of Information request. News of the magnitude of the debt comes as staff at the Nova Scotia Department of the Environment prepare a recommendation to Minister Gordon Wilson on whether to approve the construction of Northern Pulp’s proposed new effluent treatment facility. That decision must come, according to legislated timelines of the Environmental Assessment process, no later than Dec. 13. “We knew there were loans outstanding but we didn’t know the amount was that high,”  James Gunvaldsen Klaassen, a lawyer with the firm Ecojustice, said of the three outstanding loans totalling $85,478,537.48 to Northern Pulp and an associated company. [This story is only available to Chronicle Herald subscribers]

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Outaouais flooring company stops logging, lays off 165 people

CBC News
November 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A western Quebec hardwood flooring company is no longer logging and laying off 165 people, blaming the closure of a nearby paper mill. Lauzon Planchers de bois exclusifs in Papineauville, Que., announced Friday it was shutting down its logging operations because it sold wood chips to Fortress in Thurso, Que., which closed temporarily in October. Fortress had blamed the ongoing trade dispute between the United States and China, as well as the weakening of China’s domestic demand for textiles and clothing, for its closure. The next day, the Quebec government announced it would give the paper mill a maximum $8 million loan to help it find a strategic partner to reopen by the end of this month.

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Forestry trade mission encourages wood construction, strengthens relationships

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
November 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TOKYO – Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, and 35 senior executives from B.C. forest companies and associations have concluded their 2019 forestry trade mission to Asia. The delegation promoted British Columbia’s innovative wood products to the province’s two largest markets outside of North America from Nov. 10-15, 2019. “Over the past five days, we’ve met with construction, business and association representatives in China and Japan, and Japanese policymakers, to enhance and expand existing and future business opportunities for wood in both markets,” Donaldson said. “What we found were clients and customers that were eager to talk about B.C. and Canada’s high-quality wood products.”

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Finance & Economics

Benchmark softwood lumber prices flat, some specialty items soar

By Keta Kosman
Madison’s Lumber Reporter
November 13, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Remaining flat after recent climbs, the price of benchmark lumber commodity Western Spruce-Pine-Fir KD 2×4 #2&Btr stayed flat last week at U.S. $396 mfbm. Last week’s price is +$28, or +8%, more than it was one month ago. Compared to one year ago, when prices were at the beginning of a terrible slide, this price is up +74% or +23%.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Zero-emission student housing planned at UBC Okanagan

BC Local News
November 17, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

UBC Okanagan will soon offer substantial environmentally friendly student housing. A plan to bring a $18.7 million and zero emission housing project has started on campus and for Dave Waldron, it represents a window into the future. The new affordable housing project for students, called Skeena, is being built to an energy-efficient Passive House standard that will run without using fossil fuels. …“Part of the beauty of the Passive House concept is its simplicity. Essentially, what you’re doing is making a super-efficient shell compared to conventional buildings.” …it will house 220 students on six floors, five of which will be built with a wood frame on a concrete base. …”With Passive House buildings, you invest in your structure as opposed to a bunch of fancy mechanical and electrical bells and whistles, which makes it really long lasting because there aren’t as many moving parts.”

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Terrace projects get funding for wood fibre use

By Brittany Gervais
Terrace Standard
November 15, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Terrace Community Forest (TCF) and Coast Tsimshian Resources LP each received grant money from the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. (FESBC) for projects to add value to wood waste that would have otherwise been burned. TCF was approved for $443,400 to transport the wood waste from their forest thinning project near Onion Lake to a pellet plant in Burns Lake. Coast Tsimshian Resources LP was awarded $874,562 to fund their project spanning 94,000 cubic metres. The Terrace Standard has reached out to the business for more information. …The Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (FLNORD) says these projects will employ forestry contractors and mill workers who produce electricity, wood pellets and pulp at mills, turning wood waste into a potential source of electricity, heat energy, and pulp products.

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154 rental units pitched on former recycling site

By Carla Wilson
Victoria Times Colonist
November 13, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

A developer is proposing to build a six-storey, wood-framed rental building at the corner of Vancouver and View streets in Victoria. Vancouver-based J. Gordon Enterprises is seeking rezoning permission from city hall to build 154 rental units on the site, once home to a bottle recycling operation. …A key issue is that the site comes with what Mancini describes as significant geological challenges because it is close to the Juan De Fuca fault line. That’s why the plan is to build a partially sunken concrete parkade and a wood-framed building above, resulting in a relatively light-weight construction, he said. That is also why a parking reduction to 41 stalls, from the required 56 is being sought, along with a variance in the rear setback. The goal is to “minimize the excavation depth and associated complicated excavation and shoring requirements,” Mancini said.

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That’s no stack of rocks, it’s an osmosis between man and nature

By Lloyd Alter
Treehugger
November 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Quebec architects propose a 48 storey tower in a forest, “a new relationship between humans and their natural habitat.” There are many ways of defining sustainability and it has always been a moving target, but this new project by MU Architecture called PEKULIARI is particularly peculiar. It is a giant tower full of luxury apartments in the middle of nowhere, well no, it is somewhere:  Diametrically opposed with the concept of urban sprawl, this impressive tower that stands in the heart of the vast forest of Quebec greatly diminishes its impact on nature and the destruction of more and more rural land. Straight out of the imagination, this iconic and enigmatic structure asserts itself as a world’s first. …I love the idea of a sustainable and green “paleo-futuristic tower in the nordic immensity.” They don’t say if it is built out of local NordicLam Cross Laminated Timber, which would certainly add to its vegetal character. 

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Industrial mat company puts down stakes in northwestern Ontario

Northern Ontario Business
November 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Alberta-based Northern Mat & Bridge is opening an office at Fort William First Nation, next to Thunder Bay. The company provides large mats and portable bridges used by crews in the oil and gas industry, mining, forestry, power line and general construction work to move heavy equipment into remote areas for large-scale development projects. With now seven offices across Canada, Northern Mat bills itself as Canada’s leading provider of environmentally responsible access solutions. …A separate manufacturing space is also in the works but the company isn’t divulging where that will be located. …“Through this business alliance, we now have even greater capacity to supply temporary access bridge solutions to industries across Eastern Canada,” said project manager Steve Lessard.

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Forestry

This American caribou is the last of its kind—and it lives in Canada

By Adrienne Tanner
Maclean’s Magazine
November 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

High in the mountain wilderness outside Revelstoke, B.C., lives Canada’s most unusual permanent resident: America’s last surviving mountain caribou. The cow was born into the South Selkirk herd, known presciently as the Gray Ghosts, which once roamed between southeastern British Columbia and the northern reaches of Idaho, Montana and Washington. …The departure of the Gray Ghosts means that caribou in the United States are now considered extirpated. But that didn’t stop the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last month from declaring all southern mountain caribou—including 15 remaining herds in Canada—an endangered species. …Legally, the ruling holds no sway over Canada, says Sean Nixon, a lawyer with Ecojustice. But it may provide moral suasion. …The fate of the species now rests entirely within Canada, say biologists, and DeGroot, for one, sounds less than optimistic about their recovery prospects.

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Doosan Infracore Europe partners with Ritchie Bros. to increase used equipment remarketing efforts in Europe

By Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers
Cision Newswire
November 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, International

AMSTERDAM — Doosan has selected RB Asset Solutions, a cloud-based SaaS solution from Ritchie Bros., and its suite of remarketing tools to support its European dealer network and strengthen its used equipment business. With the help of Ritchie Bros. and its RB Asset Solutions technology, Doosan has launched early this year, a new mobile-friendly used equipment website: usedDoosan.com, which is supported on the backend with RB Asset Solutions’ inventory management system and equipment inspection app. …RB Asset Solutions brings together a customizable suite of tools and services to help customers better manage, analyze, and sell their assets.

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An opportunity for bold conservation action in B.C.’s north

John Weaver, carnivore conservation biologist
Victoria Times Colonist
November 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

We also need to take bold steps to protect the wild places — and wildlife — we love in the face of growing climate pressures. Fortunately, here in B.C., we have an opportunity to make a huge difference for wildlife, starting in a vast area in the north-central part of the province… B.C.’s Muskwa-Kechika is a spectacularly wild region of rugged mountains, verdant valleys, glaciers and boreal forests. Four times the size of Vancouver Island, it is an area with few roads (98 per cent roadless) and little resource development. The result is intact forests, clean waters and healthy wildlife populations. Caribou, for example, are thriving in the Muskwa-Kechika… The Muskwa-Kechika Management Area was established in the late 1990s in a first effort to protect some of its most important pieces. …Wildlife Conservation Society Canada has mapped a larger and better-connected network of protected areas across the Greater Muskwa-Kechika. 

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If you care about old growth trees in B.C. now’s your chance to speak up

By Chad Pawson
CBC News
November 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The province will spend months collecting more public feedback on how old-growth trees should be protected or cut down in yet another round of engagement over new rules for forestry and conservation in B.C. …However, conservationists say the review is a stalling tactic. …Right now, two professional foresters are travelling the province meeting with conservationists, unions, First Nations and the public to ask about the ecological, economic and cultural importance of old growth trees and forests. Garry Merkel, a natural resource expert and member of the Tahltan Nation, along with Al Gorley, a former chair of the Forest Practices Board, will collect submissions. Biologist Wayne McCory, a director with the Valhalla Wilderness Committee, was concerned though that two former foresters with resource development backgrounds were appointed to the panel and not someone with a ecological background.

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B.C. wildlife experts urge hunters to switch ammo to stop lead poisoning in birds

By Brenna Owen
Canadian Press in Alberni Valley News
November 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Hunting season in B.C. is having unintended toxic consequences for birds of prey and two local raptor experts say it’s time to get the lead out of ammunition to stop them from being poisoned. The Orphaned Wildlife Rehabilitation Society, or OWL, in Delta, is currently treating two eagles for lead poisoning and it can see up to 20 raptors each year, said long-time raptor caretaker Rob Hope. The birds ingest lead when they scavenge the carcasses of animals killed with lead shotgun pellets or rifle bullets that contain the toxin, Hope said. The Canadian government banned lead for hunting waterfowl two decades ago, and non-toxic shot is now required to hunt most migratory game birds across the country. Lead shot is also prohibited for all types of hunting in 55 national wildlife areas. But pellets and bullets containing lead are still widely used to hunt large game and upland game birds, such as grouse or pheasant.

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Yellow Point Ecological Society advocating for protection of private forests

By Cole Schisler
Nanaimo News Bulletin
November 15, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In partnership with Arrowsmith Media, the Yellow Point Ecological Society, (YES), has released a short video detailing concerns around the protection of private forest land. Guy Dauncey of YES said that the group is worried about losing forest land in the Yellow Point, Cedar area. “It’s our concern locally, that 90 percent of the forests in our area have no protection of any kind. People love this region for that magical combination of ocean, farmland, and forest,” Dauncey said. The video references a 60 acre parcel of land in Yellow Point that was sold to a private company. YES attempted to find a way to save the forests. Dauncey said through that process, YES found that there is limited protection for forests, unless they are nearby riparian areas and watersheds. Dauncey calls this ‘ecological abandonment.’

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Investigators fan research flames to study wildfires

By Barb Glen
The Western Producer
November 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When a fire is burning out of control, the usual priorities are to fight, control and extinguish it. Research is not top of mind. But there is a place in Alberta where fire research is paramount: the Pelican Mountain FireSmart Vegetation Management Research Site in northern Alberta near Sandy Lake. David Schroeder, the prescribed fire program co-ordinator with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, said that site and other studies represent a new era of research underway to better predict fire behaviour and manage fuel to mitigate its damage. It includes tests at the research site as well as prescribed burns to protect communities. “Our prescribed fire program in Alberta within the forest protection area, it is very much focused on burning grass,” Schroeder said during a public presentation at the University of Lethbridge. …“Burn, learn and then return,” is the motto, said Schroeder.

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Harvesting plans presented

By Richard Froese
The South Peace News
November 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

HIGH PRAIRIE, ALBERTA — Forest products companies operating in the High Prairie outlined their proposed harvesting plans at an open house Nov 5. West Fraser and Tolko Industries presented their proposed plans as part of the Lesser Slave Lake Regional Forest Management Plan. “We’re still on track to submit the regional forestry management plan to the provincial government before October 2020,” West Fraser planning forester Constance Schanzenbacher says. “The map shows the potential forest stands that could be harvested in the next 20 years.” West Fraser operates High Prairie Forest Products. …Tolko has a smaller territory in the plan area.

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B.C. government seeks public input on old growth forest management

By Scott Weston
CTV News
November 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

BC’s old growth forests are being scrutinized and an independent panel is being charged with gathering input on managing the forests for ecological, economic and cultural values. In July 2019, the government appointed panel members Garry Merkel and Al Gorley to lead an old growth strategic review and provide a report to the Minister of Forests. The primary purpose of the review is to inform future policies and new old growth strategies for B.C. …The panel was tasked with looking at old growth management from a variety of perspectives, including employment and economic benefits, social, cultural, and environmental value and the need to address climate change. …British Columbians can share their views on old growth forests in B.C. through the panel’s website online here. Feedback is open until Jan. 31, 2020,

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Huu-ay-aht First Nations ‘optimistic’ about Bamfield road upgrades

The Alberni Valley News
November 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Huu-ay-aht First Nations announced this week that the Nation is “optimistic” that Premier John Horgan’s recent visit to the Nation’s main village will lead to significant upgrades to the road. Horgan travelled the Bamfield Main road to Anacla on Thursday, Nov. 14 and met with stakeholders—including Western Forest Products, Mosaic, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, the City of Port Alberni, the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District and MLA Scott Fraser—to discuss future upgrades. During Thursday’s meeting, Horgan directed Ministry representatives to form an action group with Huu-ay-aht and other key stakeholders to create a plan to upgrade the road. …Dennis says that an engineering report carried out by the province does not dispute that there is an urgent need for upgrades, but focuses on what approach to take.

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Over $27 million to help more wood fibre use

Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
November 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Ravi Kahlon

More than $27 million in project grants that will help create jobs throughout British Columbia will also help increase the use of wood fibre that otherwise would have been burned as slash. This was done by the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C., which distributes the grants, in partnership with the B.C. government and the Government of Canada. …Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Forests… made the announcement at the Pacific BioEnergy plant in Prince George. These projects will employ forestry contractors, some of whom might otherwise be unemployed. In addition, it will help to employ mill workers who produce electricity, wood pellets and pulp at mills that produce these products specifically. As result, more wood waste will be turned into electricity, heat energy and pulp products to help achieve B.C.’s and Canada’s climate change targets.

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Higher-volume woodlot licence allocated to First Nations in new Quesnel timber sharing agreement

By Lindsay Chung
The Quesnel Cariboo Observer
November 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Chad Stump

A new sharing agreement for the Quesnel Timber Supply Area is giving local government, First Nations and community more of a say in how forests are managed. Ravi Kahlon, Parliamentary Secretary for Forests, announced the new sharing agreement, called apportionment. …The apportionment is a vision of how government would like to see the allowable annual cut of a management unit distributed amongst the forms of agreement. It categorizes, by licence type, the breakdown of available volume within the allowable annual cut of a timber supply area that has already been determined by the chief forester or deputy chief forester. …The announcement includes an increase in available First Nations woodland tenure from 42,650 cubic metres to 162,500 cubic metres. …As well, 77,000 cubic metres have been earmarked for new community forest agreement opportunities.

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Looking back at the life of a lumberjack

CBC News
November 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

If you were a New Brunswick lumberjack in the 19th century, you’d be heading into the woods just about now to work at a lumber camp for the winter. Young men just starting out and older farmers with families, looking to make money while fields were frozen over, would go off to camps for months at a time to chop down trees.  James Upham, head of public programming for Resurgo Place in Moncton, said machinery has replaced much of the manpower in the forestry industry, but the heyday of the lumberjack is not too far in the past.   “It wasn’t that long ago where it was a physical person with an axe and a horse, and that was, you know, that was the basis of the provincial economy,” he said. It wasn’t until the mid-20th century that these forestry jobs switched from axe-swinging to operating machines.

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Recreationalists concerned over forest access after Wagner Forest Management posts no tresspassing signs

By Jeff Walters
CBC News
November 15, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

An abandoned railway tunnel, where many people from Thunder Bay, Ont., choose to hike or walk, now requires an access permit from a forestry company. The Flett Tunnel, located west of the city near Shabaqua, was part of the former CN Rail tracks than ran through to Graham and Sioux Lookout, Ont. The tunnel itself is on Crown land, but Wagner Forest Management controls the forestry blocks in the area. Recently, the company put up signs telling those who want to access the entranceways to the tunnel require a permit. “The forest companies are not able to limit access,” said Michelle Nowak, an outreach specialist with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.

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Down to earth forestry

The Belleville Intelligencer
November 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

BATAWA, ONTARIO — Local residents have been invited to attend the 30th Annual Trenton Woodlot Conference for an opportunity to ‘Return to Our Roots with Down to Earth Forestry,’ hosted by the Ontario Woodlot Association and Hastings Stewardship Council. This premier forestry event, scheduled for Friday, Nov. 22,  is designed to inform woodlot owners and those who love forests in the community. Sebastian Belliard, soil management specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs, will present “What’s Under the Leaf Litter. …Thom Snowman, retired professional forester will present “The Inclusive Forest: Wetlands, Water, Wildlife and Wood. …For more information click here.

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Campaign announced to help replace trees damaged by post-tropical storm Dorian

Canadian Press in CTV News Atlantic
November 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — A non-profit organization is mounting a $500,000 funding campaign to help plant trees in municipalities across Atlantic Canada that suffered damage from post-tropical storm Dorian in September. Tree Canada, a national charity, announced the campaign known as OperationReLeaf, today in Halifax. CEO Danielle St-Aubin says once the money is raised, homeowners, private landowners, and institutions who want to plant a tree can apply for grants to help purchase them. St-Aubin stresses the storm damage is still being assessed, and the campaign funding target is an early estimate. The first funding operation by the organization was launched following 1996 floods in Saguenay, Que. Since then, Tree Canada says it has helped plant more than 82 million trees across the country.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Indigenous biochar program looks at experimental carbon sequestration methods

By Trevor Hewitt
Interior News
November 13, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

…community group Voices for Good Air (VFGA) was awarded a $100,000 EcoAction Community Funding Program grant by Environment and Climate Change Canada for its ‘Forest Waste to Biochar’ initiative. The initiative focuses on the viability of turning forest waste into biochar, or charcoal made from plant matter, and stored in soil as a potential (but experimental) means of removing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases such as methane from the atmosphere through carbon sequestration. This includes experiments with the soil additive in agriculture and gardening throughout the region. …On the operational side of things, Chris Howard of Whanau Forestry is general manager of field operations. …While he is excited about the possibility of a future in which biochar has applicable uses in carbon sequestration (while also potentially doubling as things such as fertilizer) Howard stressed the techniques and concept are experimental.

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Health & Safety

WorkSafeBC investigating death of 19-year-old at forestry worksite near Creston

By Simon Little
Global News
November 15, 2019
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada, Canada West

Kaydon Booth

WorkSafeBC and the B.C. Coroners Service are investigating the death of a 19-year-old man at a forestry worksite on Thursday. Friends have identified the victim as Kaydon Booth of Creston, B.C. “I’m still in shock that he’s gone,” said friend Ella McCallum, who described Kaydon as the “type of person that would give you the shirt off his back.” …McCallum said she was told a Kaydon was pinned by a piece of machinery and suffered critical internal injuries. …Creston RCMP confirmed the incident happened in an area between Salmo and Creston. WorkSafeBC said it was notified of the incident shortly before 3 p.m. Thursday and that it would not comment further while it was investigating to determine the cause of the incident.

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Forest Fires

B.C. prepares to send firefighters to help tackle massive bush fires in Australia

By Marcella Bernardo
News 1130
November 13, 2019
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS, BC –  As wildfires are tearing up southeastern Australia, it looks like they’ve reached out to the BC Wildfire Service to take a look at how things are going. Fire Information Officer Kyla Fraser tells Radio NL in Kamloops that Canada will know soon if resources will be asked to go there. “If there was a request it may also be filled by another province other than B.C. But we would look around at what we have and do our best to meet whatever request they might have.” …Three people have died and dozens have been injured because of brush fires in New South Wales.

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