Tree Frog Forestry News

Region Archives: Canada

Business & Politics

Global Wood Demand Slows in 2018: World Bank

Madison’s Lumber Reporter
January 21, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

In 2017, China imported US$8.83 billion of total lumber products from the United States, according to the World Bank. However, 2018 saw China impose a 10% retaliatory tariff on US lumber products and threatened a larger 25% tariff on US$60 billion of total US goods, said Freight Waves Freight Waves Tuesday.  The United States has cultivated a strong export market for lumber products in China. Prior to the escalating trade war, the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) stated that the growth of the Chinese market would be “unlike anything ever encountered in this industry.” The Council predicted that in the near future 60% of American hardwood goods will be exported from the US, with 54% of exports bound for China.

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The Canadian Wood Council is hiring a President and CEO

Canadian Wood Council
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Are you someone that is passionate, strategic and driven to succeed? If so, learn more about the job position and the possibility of working with the great team at the CWC! Passionate, strategic, and driven to succeed, the new President & CEO will have a particular affinity for fostering consensus and demonstrated experience in dealing with multiple stakeholder groups. An excellent listener and superb communicator, ideally in both official languages, the President & CEO has a talent for actualising the potential of others and understands the most important resource of any organization is the people working within it. The President & CEO is the primary liaison with stakeholders and will be a tireless advocate for the positive benefits of using wood products in construction.

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Industry on the rebound: Seeking growth among forestry stocks

By Peter Ashton
The Globe and Mail
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Most wood products and forestry stocks performed well for Canadian investors in recent years. …Red-hot demand for Canadian wood products pushed many forestry stocks to new highs in early 2018. However, falling lumber prices and signs of a slowing U.S. housing market began to take their toll in mid-2018. However, these stocks… have recovered well over the subsequent weeks. In fact, the forestry and wood products industry is one of the TSX’s best performing industries over the past month, up 10.8 per cent. …Topping our list is diversified wood products firm West Fraser. Ltd. …No company on our list suffered more in 2018 than Canfor. After reporting very strong results in October, Canfor has now started to rally – up 6.1 per cent in the past four weeks. One of the best performers on our list over the past four weeks has been Interfor, up 10.2 per cent. [to access the full story you will need a Globe & Mail subscription]

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Natural resources forum coming

By Frank Peebles
Prince George Citizen
January 22, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Natural Resources Forum drills deep into industries derived from the land like forestry, mining, petroleum, natural gas, agriculture, fisheries and tourism. Those who gather at the annual event are some of the primary figures in government, major corporations, First Nations, goods and services delivery, environmental protection, academia, trades and other stakeholder groups. This year’s forum runs Jan. 22-24 and as always it is held in Prince George at the Civic & Convention Centre. Chief organizer Dan Jepson of C3 Alliance Corp. has attended all 15 of the past forums and for the past five has been the lead coordinator. He doesn’t live in Prince George but insists this is the only place he would consider holding the event created by then-MLA Pat Bell. “This has to stay in Prince George. That’s one of the secrets of its success,” Jepson said. 

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Minister Donaldson Details the Solutions for Contractors’ Sustainability

Truck Loggers Association
January 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson

Vancouver – Minister Donaldson shared details for implementing the recommendations from the Contractor Sustainability Review including the elimination of the fair market rate test from the Timber Harvesting Contractor and Sub-contractor regulation (referred to by the forestry industry as Bill 13). These details expand on Premier Horgan’s announcement yesterday. The Minister announced the details during his address to a full room of 350 timber harvesting contractors at the Truck Logger Association’s 76th annual Convention & Trade Show. The fair market rate test is a forestry-industry method used to settle rate disputes between contractors and licensees, which have caused lengthy delays in reaching a settlement, contributing to the inability to operate sustainably their businesses. …government’s decision to eliminate the method in favour of models and experts will streamline the process that used to take months and years, which should now take up to a maximum of 14 days.

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Restrictions on B.C. log exports don’t make a lot of sense

Peter Pearse, retired UBC Resource Economist
The Province
January 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Exporting raw logs remains highly controversial in B.C. because of the forest industry’s economic importance and because most of our vast forests are public property. The policy also perversely undermines the value of our precious forest resources. The often confusing debate usually centres on jobs. …Often forgotten in this debate are the restrictions on exporting logs that our federal and provincial governments now have in place. …The second important feature is that provincial export permits require recipients to pay a hefty tax on the timber they export. …Restrictions constrain the demand for our logs, depress their domestic market price and hence also the quantity produced. So the direct beneficiaries are the local buyers. …But, for the same reason, those involved in producing logs suffer from the reduced production and value of their product. …stumpage revenues are reduced accordingly, shifting the ultimate burden of log export restrictions onto us, the hapless taxpayers.

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Logging contractor sustainability review completed

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
January 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson

As a result of the final phase of the logging contractor sustainability review, the ministry will amend the Timber Harvesting Contract and Subcontract Regulation to make forest-sector contractors and licensees more sustainable and competitive in the long term. Amending the regulation is the recommendation of former provincial premier Dan Miller, who facilitated the last phase of the review. “This review was done to make sure logging contractors’ paycheques accurately reflect the work they do and their cost of doing business, while also keeping licensees competitive.” said Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. …“As allowable annual cut levels decline and forest-sector economics shift, it is ever more critical that contractors and licensees – being codependent in the B.C. forest sector – find ways to work together to improve competitiveness,” said Miller.

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Trial Turns Spotlight on Pension Funds’ TimberWest Purchase, Rich Coleman’s Role and a Hells Angels’ Connection

By Andrew MacLeod
The Tyee
January 20, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rich Coleman

A lawsuit involving a logging contractor, a major forestry company, two public sector pension funds, former forests minister Rich Coleman and the Hells Angels is scheduled to get underway in Nanaimo this week. At its core, the suit filed in the BC Supreme Court alleges that the defendants — TimberWest, two associated companies and three senior TimberWest officials including former CEO Paul McElligott — deliberately drove Ted LeRoy Trucking (TLT), a major contractor for TimberWest, into bankruptcy. “The Plaintiffs’ claims are based in conspiracy and fraud,” a Dec. 31 court filing says. “Specifically, the Plaintiffs assert that the Defendants engaged in a pre-orchestrated plan to drive TLT into bankruptcy. …In 2007 Ted LeRoy Trucking employed about 530 people, had assets worth more than $80 million and revenues of about $70 million a year.

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Frustration mounts as Enterprise pellet mill held up over development permit

By Kirsten Murphy
CBC News
January 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Brad Mapes

While 320 hectares of land near Enterprise, N.W.T. remains covered in snow, the CEO of a proposed multimillion-dollar wood pellet plant is growing increasingly frustrated by the most recent delay in a series of setbacks preventing the company from beginning construction. Hay River businessman and former mayor Brad Mapes is at odds with the Hamlet of Enterprise over a development permit which would allow him to break ground. Mapes wants to get the permit this winter so his company can clear trees before the summer months. He said that he won’t do the work in the summer, citing a need to protect nesting birds and wildlife. “We can’t clear the trees in the summertime,” he said. Without receiving a permit in the short term, the construction of the plant will get pushed back another year.

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Lumber loss caused layoffs at Port

By David Wiwchar
93.3 The PEAK
January 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

2018 was a tough year for the Port Alberni Port Authority. Local docks haven’t seen a lumber ship in more than a year as Western Forest Products now trucks lumber from their Alberni Pacific Division Mill to Duke Point in Nanaimo for shipment to foreign markets. Director of Operations Mike Carter says the lack of lumber led to layoffs on the docks and in the office. “We had a mechanic, forklift operator and a foreman working in the yard, and those positions are not here today,” said Carter. “We’re down two office people as well as we had to curtail our operations.” While raw log exports were down 3%, domestic log transfers were up 42%

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B.C. government unveils plan to reform the province’s forestry industry

By Richard Zussman
Global News
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There has been growing concern in the forestry industry over raw logs being shipped out of the province and processed there. That has led to a decrease in jobs and fears that more job losses would come in an industry which was once the backbone of B.C.’s economy. In addition to making changes to ensure bids on timber sale licences are independently made, Horgan is also working on business-to-business relationships between BC Timber Sales, major licensees and First Nations.

 

VIDEO: The new plan aims to increase the amount of B.C. logs that are processed in-province. Nadia Stewart looks at what the B.C. government thinks it can do to reinvigorate the sector.

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B.C. vows to curb raw log exports, wood waste with sweeping policy reforms

By Jon Hernandez
CBC News
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

David Elstone

The province has vowed to keep raw logs in B.C. after unveiling a two-year plan to revitalize forestry along the coast. In a room filled with loggers, Premier John Horgan unveiled policy reforms aimed at incentivizing companies to process raw logs in B.C., with the goal of bucking a decades-long trend of local mill closures and increased log exports. …TLA executive director David Elstone said he was hopeful some of the changes the government is making will benefit the industry, but he says he’s unsure of the economics when it comes to curbing log exports. “There’s no markets. There’s no domestic processing facilities that are able to utilize that fibre.” said Elstone, noting that log exports make it economically feasible to harvest second growth wood. “There’s businesses that are based on the current parameters,” he added. “We need to know how it’s going to work.”

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Horgan pledges forestry revitalization, but it’s easier said than done

By Vaughn Palmer
The Vancouver Sun
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vaughn Palmer

VICTORIA — Premier John Horgan announced measures Thursday to begin revitalizing the coastal forest industry by reducing log exports and increasing domestic production. A tall order to be sure and Horgan acknowledged as much. …The premier drew applause by pledging to reform the existing “fair market rate test” for payments to logging contractors. The test is regarded as anything but fair — indeed close to ruinous — by the truck loggers themselves. …But with the good news out of the way, the premier was met with less enthusiasm when outlining steps the New Democrats will be taking to implement their longstanding opposition to log exports. …Mindful of the need to proceed carefully, Horgan set no targets. …This time last year, Horgan suggested the New Democrats might bring back “appurtenancy,”…But that possibility was soon disavowed as outdated and unworkable by his own forests minister.

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B.C. government extends coastal log export rules for six months

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government has extended its log export orders for Northwest B.C. by another six months, allowing coastal logging contractors north of Vancouver Island to export a large share of their harvest. But “raw log” export policy is about to change for all producers who export logs from B.C. Crown land, Premier John Horgan said Thursday. …Horgan announced a revitalization plan with five goals, including rebuilding solid wood and pulp milling to process more wood in B.C., improving harvest efficiency, tightening up timber bidding systems to make sure bids are independently made, and auditing private forest land logging. …Cabinet orders for log exports out of the Haida Gwaii, Mid Coast, Nass, North Coast and Northwest Interior timber supply areas were extended Thursday, but only to July 2019. …The northern regions have been subject to relaxed log export rules for many years, due to a lack of mill capacity within economic reach of remote areas. 

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Premier Announces Monumental Change for Timber Harvesting Contractors

Truck Loggers Association
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

David Elstone

Vancouver – Following the completion of the long-awaited Contractor Sustainability Review and its resulting recommendations, Premier Horgan announced a significant change to the Timber Harvesting Contractor and Sub-contractor regulation, which was the elimination of the fair market rate test. The Premier made his announcement during his address to a full room of 350 timber harvesting contractors at the Truck Logger Association’s 76th annual Convention & Trade Show. “Today’s announcement is what we were hoping for and will result in a fundamental shift in the relationship between contractors and their employers across the province,” says David Elstone, executive director of the Truck Loggers Association. “Elimination of the fair market rate test is a monumental change for our industry, allowing contractors to more equitably share in the value of the timber resource.” The Premier also made a commitment today to exploring solutions that the TLA has put forward to address the industry’s acute skilled labour shortage.

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B.C. Premier Horgan announces policy reforms to rebuild coastal forest sector

By Hina Alam
The Canadian Press in The Globe and Mail
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Photo @ForestechTim

VANCOUVER — Plans are in the works to rebuild the wood and secondary timber industries in British Columbia by ensuring more logs are processed in the province, said Premier John Horgan. …The actions will reverse a systematic decline that has taken place in the coastal forest sector over the past two decades, he said, adding the plan will be implemented through a series of legislative, regulatory and policy changes over the next two years. …This will be a phased-in process and will apply to new sales through B.C. timber sales programs, he said. …TLA Executive Director David Elstone said the announcement addresses growing concerns about forest management on the coast. …The B.C. Green caucus said in a statement that widespread mill closures, large-scale exports of raw logs, growing amounts of useable waste fibre left at cut locations, intensifying wildfire seasons and pest outbreaks are all challenges the government must take seriously.

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B.C. to curtail log exports, rebuild forestry industries

By Hayley Woodin
The Prince George Citizen
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier John Horgan revealed on Thursday the pillars of a “conscious and deliberate strategy” to curtail exports of minimally processed lumber. The goal: to rebuild the province’s solid wood and secondary forestry industries, and to turn profits from processing abroad into investments in BC. “The changes that were made by the BC Liberals have enabled log exports to be the easiest way to make quick money. We’ve seen Canadian companies investing in U.S. mills, not investing in BC. We want to turn that around,” the premier told attendees of the 76th annual TLA Convention. “Shareholders are happy with that, British Columbians are not.” …The plan will include reforms to raw log export policies, as well as carrot-and-sticks measures to eliminate surrogate bidding, penalize waste, encourage fibre production and discourage high grading – a type of logging where the highest grades of timber are selectively removed from a forest.

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Forest policy reforms to rebuild coastal forest sector

Jen Holmwood, Deputy Communications Director, Office of the Premier
Government of British Columbia
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

To create and support good jobs in British Columbia’s coastal forest sector, government is making policy changes to increase the processing of B.C. logs on the coast and to reduce wood waste by redirecting it to B.C.’s pulp and paper mills. The changes, as part of the Coast Forest Sector Revitalization Initiative, were announced by Premier John Horgan at the annual Truck Loggers Association (TLA) convention. Government is taking steps to reverse a systemic decline that has taken place in the coast forest sector over most of the last two decades. …Effective July 1, 2019, the fee charged for log exports will be revised to be based on harvest economics. New criteria for log exports from certain geographic areas, based on local harvesting economics and subject to engagement and consultation with First Nations, will be developed. Changes to waste policy are designed to redirect … wood waste on the coast … to pulp and paper producers and the bio-products/bioenergy sector, supporting CleanBC’s renewed bioenergy strategy.

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Are you at the Truck Loggers Convention?

Truck Loggers Association
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

We’re watching the action through the TLA Twitter feed. You can too, just follow #2019TLA

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Skeena Sawmills audit good overall, but fault found in tree planting

BC Local News
January 17, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A recent audit of Skeena Sawmills found five cutblocks in the Kitimat area were in non-compliance with provincial regulations governing silviculture. At issue was the planting of seedlings outside the allowable elevation zone. The finding by the Forest Practices Board was the only fault discovered in a random audit last summer to ensure the company’s practices are in line with the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act. Planting seedlings in the wrong elevation can potentially lower their overall survival and productivity rates. Skeena Sawmills’ woodlands manager, Greg Demille, says the seedlings were placed about 80 metres outside the proper elevation zone. The contractor responsible is no longer employed by the mill, due in part to the error. “It wasn’t very far outside the zone, so we’re quite confident the trees there will survive and grow as they should,” Demille says. “Aside from that, it [the audit] was a great experience.

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COFI Convention 2019: addressing the state of the industry, policy and more

By Ellen Cools
Wood Business – Canadian Forest Industries
January 16, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

What’s the largest gathering of the forestry community in western Canada? The annual B.C. Council of Forest Industries (COFI) Convention. “Each year, this event brings together industry executives, managers, suppliers, businesses and government and First Nations leaders, to discuss key issues and opportunities in the B.C. forest industry,” COFI’s president and CEO Susan Yurkovich told CFI. This year’s convention is no different, although it has a new location: the new Parq Vancouver Hotel and Convention Centre. From April 3-5, attendees will hear updates on markets, policy, trade and technology from several speakers, panellists and presenters. In the past year, lumber prices reached an all-time high and then experienced a precipitous drop. …At the conference, B.C.’s forestry CEOs will share their views on the state of the industry during the popular CEO panel.

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Nova Scotia’s forest industry faces unknown future without Northern Pulp

By Michael Gorman
CBC News
January 22, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Jeff Bishop

It was a few months ago that Jeff Bishop noticed a growing unease about the future of Nova Scotia’s forest industry. Bishop, the executive director of Forest Nova Scotia, was suddenly taking more and more calls. On the other line were concerned industry members, all taking stock of what the potential loss of the Northern Pulp mill in Pictou County would mean for their livelihoods. As the legislated closure date of the mill’s Boat Harbour treatment facility looms and no replacement approved, the future of the mill — which takes between 35 and 40 per cent of the pulpwood from the provincial market — remains murky. While there are differing opinions on the mill in terms of its history, operation and environmental footprint, there is mostly consensus on the role it plays within the forestry industry, both direct and indirect.

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Repap Resources “cautiously optimistic” about bid for Fort Frances mill

By Gary Rinne
Thunder Bay News Watch
January 16, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

FORT FRANCES, ON — Repap Resources Group, an unincorporated private six-member investment group, has had preliminary discussions with Resolute Forest Products about its proposed purchase of the idled pulp and paper mill in Fort Frances. No formal purchase offer has been submitted as yet. Seth Kursman, a vice-president at Resolute, told Tbnewswatch his company does not negotiate through the media or the public, adding only that Resolute continues to evaluate “options” for its Fort Frances property. Repap spokesperson Sean Twomey said he is “cautiously optimistic” that he and his partners can achieve “a win-win transaction” with Resolute. It’s the first public comment the company has made since informing the town of Fort Frances about its plans in late 2018.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Tall timber towers taking root in Canada as builders look to go green

By Ian Bickis
Canadian Press in the Vancouver Sun
January 20, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Michael Green

TORONTO — Six years ago Vancouver architect Michael Green took the stage at a TED conference and called for a global era of wood-framed skyscrapers. Some were skeptical. “People really thought I was an idiot,” said Green in a recent interview. …tall wood buildings have defied skeptics and are sprouting up in cities across Canada as the wood industry sees opportunity, developers embrace new designs and momentum builds to reduce the heavy carbon footprint of concrete and steel in construction as the urgency of the battle to combat climate change grows. “For me it all comes back to the carbon story. It all comes back to choosing renewables to build our cities,” said Green, principal at Michael Green Architecture. ……rules could change next year to allow 12-storey towers in the 2020 update of the national building code… Builders are exploring the possibilities of mass timber and looking at how tall their ambitions will reach.

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This 18-story building went up in 66 days thanks to the right mass timber products

By Antonio Pacheco
The Architects Newspaper
January 17, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

When it came time for Acton Ostry Architects to select a manufacturer for the mass timber components of the 18-story Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, Structurlam stood out. “Experience, qualifications, supply, schedule, cost” all worked to Structurlam’s benefit, according to Russell Acton, principal at Acton Ostry. Acton explained that along with supplying mass wood structural components, Structurlam provided end-to-end oversight and support by “[collaborating] with the structural engineer, construction manager, and mass wood erector to refine the design and optimize cost, quality, and constructibility considerations for the mass wood components.” As a result of Structurlam’s comprehensive approach, the hybrid concrete-and-mass-timber structure building was erected in record time: just 66 days.

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Timber! Why an age-old building material is making a 21st-century comeback in Ontario

By Diane Peters
TVO.org
January 21, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

One of the University of Toronto’s latest building projects, a 14-storey academic building on top of the Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport, next to Varsity Stadium, is going back to basics — with a twist. It’ll be constructed mainly of mass timber, and when it’s done, it’ll be one of the tallest mass-timber-and-concrete hybrid buildings in North America. Yes, wood is back. The building material comes with a number of benefits — environmentally friendly, lightweight — and support from the Ontario government. “You know what they say: everything old is new again. If you think about it, wherever trees grow, people have been building with wood,” says Marco VanderMass, associate and project design architect at Kirkor Architects and Planners in Toronto. “Over time, we lost faith in wood because of big fires.”

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Forestry

Researcher exposes money trail behind U.S.-based campaign to kill the oilsands

By Licia Corbella
Vancouver Sun
January 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

Vivian Krause

Anyone in Canada who knows anything about the target on the back of Canadian oil and gas knows the name Vivian Krause. …Krause’s name has become synonymous with the fight against the concerted effort by U.S. oil interests working to land-lock Canadian oil and gas by using environmental groups to protest against the industry with the stated aim of grinding development to a halt. …Krause said she was actually optimistic that the Tar Sands Campaign might “turn the page” and end after achieving all of those wins, but no, the pressure continues. Notley’s government then created the world’s largest boreal forest preserve, something the U.S. foundations through groups like Tides pushed for. …“(Notley’s) done everything they’ve asked for… so why is this campaign still being funded?”

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Pembina and Tree Canada continue partnership to green communities

Pipeline News North
January 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Tree Canada will continue to help green dozens of schoolyards and neighbourhoods thanks to a $225,000 multi-year contribution from Pembina Pipeline Corporation. Now in its second year, this initiative supports Tree Canada’s annual grant program and an estimated 40 new tree planting projects are planned between 2018 and 2020. Tree Canada, Canada’s leading national tree-planting charity, will help schools and communities improve their tree canopy and grow better places to live. Trees are critical to strong communities. They help us to live healthier lives by providing multiple environmental, social and economical benefits to our cities such as absorbing CO2, cooling our homes and reducing our stress. Research shows that living near trees lowers the risk of mortality from common causes and helps to improve our mental health. The effects of climate change in our cities can be mitigated by increasing our urban canopy.

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Protect the Carmi trails from logging

Letter by Michelle Parry
Pentiction Western News
January 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Please remove the Carmi recreation trails near Penticton from the BCTS sales inventory.  Our forests are crown assets and should be managed for the people of B.C. by skilled foresters, biologists and economists, not a sales team who don’t care if they give the trees away for a net financial loss to the communities and our province. …Your policies reflect desperation, short-sightedness and poverty thinking. Are we so poor in B.C. that we have to log small recreation areas valued for so much more than timber? Values that create healthy, intelligent and sustainable communities. Communities that are needed to pay your pension. Is this the legacy you want to leave? Please leave our recreation trails alone, we do not want them logged.

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British Columbians view natural environment and climate as key to quality of life in BC, support strong penalties including jail time for polluters

By the Real Estate Foundation of BC
Cision Newswire
January 22, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – Today, the Real Estate Foundation of BC (REFBC) shared the results from a public opinion poll it commissioned on British Columbians’ views on land use, sustainability and regional planning throughout the province. Conducted by McAllister Opinion Research, the poll drew on a cross-section of British Columbian residents. Questions focused on quality of life, sustainable economy, local needs, land protection, penalties for polluters, First Nations as partners, and regionally specific concerns. REFBC, a philanthropic organization that helps advance sustainable land use in B.C., commissioned the poll to better understand B.C. residents’ values, opinions, and knowledge on land use issues. By sharing the findings from Sustainable Land Use: A Public Opinion Survey of British Columbians, REFBC hopes to help policy makers, governments, First Nations, non-profits, and others make decisions that align with public values.

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Logging lift from technology

HarvestTECHX
January 21, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Leading loggers in Canada & USA have been quick to take up new mechanised harvesting machinery for forests on steep slopes. Now a new set of remote operation technologies is set to be unleashed. Labour and safety gains will result and productivity will follow. These new operating systems are already proven in mining operations. The early adopters will make the greatest gains in logging when they take advantage of this new technology. On the horizon are prototypes nearing commercial scale in automated yarder tree felling, remote and fully hydraulic controls to run more equipment more easily and with less people on the ground. Logging crews will be much smaller as a new generation of machine control technologies comes to market.  The ability to control machines remotely (both on and eventually off-site) will bring even more safety to logging. With no men out on the steep slopes where tree stems are being accumulated, they can’t be injured. 

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B.C. forest fires would be less severe if we didn’t kill off the broadleaf trees

By James Steidle, Stop the Spray BC
The Vancouver Sun
January 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Last summer a huge amount of Central Interior forest that burnt were “managed” forests, those being younger conifer plantations that were established by the conventions of our present forest management regime. …But to get there, it has been deemed necessary to eliminate the natural early “pioneer” vegetation. …The Conifer-dominated forest type we are actively encouraging, is highly flammable, while the Broadleaf Aspen forest type we are actively eliminating, is incredibly fire resistant. That’s why its standard procedure for firefighters to tie their firebreaks into deciduous stands. …Allowing broadleaf to grow in our new forests won’t be the silver bullet stopping fires next year. But…If the best time to let more aspen and broadleaf grow was thirty five years ago, the next best time is now.

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Haida Gwaii home to a distinct but vulnerable pocket of northern goshawks

By Hina Alam
Canadian Press in the Vancouver Sun
January 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Haida Gwaii’s population of northern goshawks are the last remnant of a highly distinct genetic cluster of the birds, a new study by University of B.C. researchers has found. Researchers estimate the population of birds may have been evolving separately on Haida Gwaii for 20,000 years — right around the last time the glaciers melted, causing the sea levels to rise and potentially separating the birds from their kin. While the birds can fly long distances … they don’t seem to like travelling over water, which could account for their long-term isolation, said study co-lead Armando Geraldes. “There don’t seem to be strong geographic barriers anywhere on the continent but then you get that body of water — about 70 kilometres of water between Haida Gwaii and the mainland — and that is apparently enough to isolate that population,” he said. Only 50 of the raptors are left on the archipelago.

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Heli-logging expanding to manage Douglas fir beetles

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
January 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Helicopter logging operations underway in the Williams Lake area to minimize the spread of Douglas fir beetles on Crown land are being expanded to treat two additional areas over the winter. Douglas fir beetle populations are higher than normal in some parts of the Cariboo, but helicopter logging (used to selectively remove infested trees and protect other trees nearby) and related containment treatments have helped slow the spread of the beetles around Williams Lake. …This is the third straight year that heli-logging has been used in the area to decrease their numbers. …In addition to the direct harvesting of infested trees, the Williams Lake Beetle Management Unit 2018 Treatment Plan includes the following activities: The anti-aggregative pheromone methyl cyclo hexenone…; “Trap trees” will be established by cutting down large, healthy Douglas fir trees…;  some infested trees may be cut down and burned on site…; Funnel traps in mill yards

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Investigation finds harvesting at Wilson Creek appropriate

BC Forest Practices Board
January 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – An investigation of a public complaint on the Sunshine Coast has found that the Sunshine Coast Community Forest took the appropriate steps when planning and harvesting a cutblock near Wilson Creek. “The issue of sediment in water and impacts on fish habitat is a serious one. This investigation highlights the reasonable steps a forestry licensee should take when working in areas with natural terrain hazards that are also important for fish, water and community interests,” said Kevin Kriese, board chair. The complainant was concerned that the community forest had not assessed the risks of logging the cutblock and had caused sediment to enter Wilson Creek, a fish-bearing stream. The investigation found that the community forest had followed all legal requirements and completed several voluntary assessments, which found that forest harvesting would not pose a significant risk to terrain stability, water flows or fish habitat.

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Student Ranger Program accepting applications for 2019 season

By Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy
Government of British Columbia
January 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Young adults interested in learning a diverse range of job skills while working outdoors this summer can now apply for the BC Parks Student Ranger Program. Now in its second year, the Student Ranger Program provides 48 young adults training and employment opportunities in B.C.’s parks and protected areas, with a 30% Indigenous hiring target. “The student rangers play a key role in environmental stewardship while preserving the natural, cultural and historical values that British Columbians cherish,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “I hope the program inspires young adults to consider a meaningful and rewarding career looking after B.C.’s beautiful parks and protected areas.” Funded by the federal and provincial governments, the Student Ranger Program offers hands-on work experience related to conservation, recreation, community outreach and Indigenous relations.

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Thinning forest in Simcoe County promotes growth

By Bryan Myers
Simcoe.com
January 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Simcoe County foresters are thinning a section of the Museum Tract to improve the health of the forest and promote regeneration. While Simcoe County is home to the largest municipal forest in the province, a hundred years ago, it was desolate wasteland. Since 1922, the county has worked to grow and maintain the forest to its current size of — 13,300 hectares and growing. “Much of that (forest) is plantation-based, formerly cleared for agricultural use,” Graeme Davis, a forester for the county, said. Over decades, trees planted have helped restore the soil quality and the quality of the growth. …But thinning also serves another purpose: It helps generate revenue that helps to grow the program.

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Logging limits urged after discovery of old-growth trees in Algonquin Park

By Kristin Rushowy
The Toronto Star
January 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A report from researchers who found large swaths of old-growth trees in Algonquin Park — including a 408-year-old hemlock in a logging zone — will be taken into consideration for the next forestry management plan for the area, the Ontario government says.  The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, responding to a recent Star article about the discovery of the rare four-century-old tree in the popular park, said consultations will be a key part of the updated plan. Justine Lewkowicz, a spokesperson for Minister John Yakabuski, said forest management plans are done every decade for the park located about three hours north of Toronto, and involve “a rigorous process which includes stakeholder, public and Indigenous community input and involvement, as well as consideration of the broader Algonquin Provincial Park Management Plan.”

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As emerald ash borer invasion grows, Europe looks to Fredericton scientist for help

CBC News
January 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Peter Silk

Peter Silk has spent years studying how to mitigate the damage caused by emerald ash borers, and now the Fredericton-based research scientist is headed to Europe to share his expertise about the “green menace.” As one of the world’s leading experts on the destructive beetle, he’s been invited to a meeting in Tallinn, Estonia, where an infestation of the borers is in its infancy. Silk knows all too well what comes next. The tiny but invasive emerald ash borer has devastated ash tree populations throughout the United States and five Canadian provinces, including New Brunswick. As its name suggests, the beetle bores into ash trees and disrupts the tree’s ability to feed, killing it. The insect arrived in North America after voyaging in wooden crates from China about 20 years ago. It’s now spreading through Europe.

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Lakehead University announces new Finnish Studies chair

The Thunder Bay News Watch
January 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Jaana Laine

THUNDER BAY — Lakehead University has named a professor from Finland its new chair in Finnish Studies. Dr. Jaana Laine will teach at the Thunder Bay campus and conduct research on the human-forest relationship, focusing on Finnish-Canadians in northwestern Ontario. Laine’s doctor dissertation at the University of Helsinki was entitled Rules of the Timber Trade. Timber trade between private forest owners and forestry industry in eastern Finland, 1919-1939. …A statement from Lakehead University notes that she is interested in hearing from Finnish-Canadians and their descendants for her research project on the human-forest relationship.

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