Tree Frog Forestry News

Region Archives: US East

Business & Politics

Another threat to Oregon’s timber industry

The Editorial Board
The Capital Press
March 21, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Some folks sure know how to start a conversation. Take, for example, a bill in the Oregon House of Representatives that could lock up more than 1 million acres of Oregon forestland. …Such a “conversation starter” is more like a punch in the nose for the state’s timber industry. Under the bill… the lawsuits would start flying. …It’s clear that this bill, like others making the rounds during the legislative session, is just another anti-logging, anti-jobs and anti-economy measure aimed at shutting down an industry that has been part of the state’s backbone. …Well-managed forests have long been a large part of Oregon’s history — and its future, if the legislature and environmentalists don’t shut it down. …“House Bill 2656 is an unnecessary and extreme solution in search of a problem,” said Mary Anne Cooper, VP Oregon Farm Bureau.

Read More

Georgia-Pacific to invest $30 million in Rome Lumber facility

By Georgia Pacific
Lesprom Network
March 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Georgia-Pacific to invest $30 million in its Rome Lumber mill in Georgia, US. The dimensional lumber facility, which currently employs 163 people, will use the investment to purchase and install new equipment in the coming months. This new equipment includes a new planer, grader and trimmer. Along with a new sorter that will serve 65 bays, a significant increase from the current 26 bays. …Preparations for new structures and equipment is beginning now, with concrete work to be underway by June. …The facility will then shut down briefly to initiate and test the new equipment with plans to reopen in early December. This is the largest investment since Georgia-Pacific acquired the facility in 2013 as part of the purchase of International Paper’s Temple-Inland Building Products division. 

Read More

Registration Opens for Forest Products Expo

Forest Products Machinery & Equipment Exposition
March 15, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Registration is now open to attend the 35th Forest Products Machinery & Equipment Exposition – EXPO 2019. This three-day event will be held June 26-28 at Atlanta’s Georgia World Congress Center. Sponsored and conducted by the Southern Forest Products Association (SFPA) every two years since 1950, this event has traditionally included many of the biggest names in the business, attracting key representatives from the nation’s largest wood products manufacturers. The show for 2019 is shaping up to be another record event – larger than the 2017 show – continuing to benefit from an industry-wide recovery and many companies with ongoing upgrades underway. More than 150 companies are set to exhibit the latest equipment and services for the forest products industry, across nearly 55,000 square feet of indoor space. “More than 92% of the floor plan is under contract,” notes SFPA exposition director Eric Gee.  “Many exhibitors returning from the 2017 show have expanded their displays for EXPO 2019, plus we have many first-time exhibitors,” he adds.

Read More

Lumber Liquidators to pay regulators $33 million in flooring scandal settlement

Reuters
March 12, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Lumber Liquidators Holdings Inc has agreed to pay a $33 million criminal penalty to settle federal charges it misled investors about the safety of its laminate flooring made in China and sold to U.S. customers. The settlements announced by the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday came four years after Lumber Liquidators was alleged to be selling products with illegally high levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The Justice Department settlement includes a deferred prosecution agreement, under which the government agreed not to prosecute Lumber Liquidators for securities fraud so long as the company upgrades oversight and cooperates with its ongoing probe for three years. The hardwood flooring retailer knew that products made by its largest Chinese supplier had failed third-party formaldehyde emissions testing, but the company had misled investors, regulators said.

Read More

Georgia timber industry hurt by storms, driver shortage but there’s reason to be optimistic

By Maggie Lee
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
March 10, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Andres Villegas

ATLANTA — The timber plots that blanket something near two-thirds of Georgia are, for their owners, a retirement, or a kid’s school tuition maybe… Most Georgia timberland is held by relatively small, often family, enterprises. Hurricane Michael … wiped away three-quarters of a billion dollars in timber alone. The state is still counting up the damages from storms last weekend that hit Harris and Talbot counties hard. And then there are other stresses for the industry: it’s hard to find log truck drivers; and insurance, equipment and fuel for them isn’t getting any cheaper. It takes years just to grow little trees that will be thinned for pulp — maybe two decades or more for the sturdy trees that become, say, telephone poles. In the meantime, there are costs like property taxes to be paid. …Andres Villegas, CEO of the Georgia Forestry Association [is] optimistic about the industry, though there are some challenges.

Read More

GROWTH PLAN: Study says state’s hardwoods underutilized

By Roger Schneider
Hendricks County Flyer
March 9, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

GOSHEN — The largest agriculture sector in Indiana, the hardwoods industry, wants to expand, and a new study may help it do so. The “Indiana Hardwood Assessment” is a study undertaken by the Indiana State Department of Agriculture and Purdue University’s Center for Regional Development. The study was completed in December and presented to the Indiana Hardwood Lumbermens Association in February. Ray Moistner, executive director of the association, said a lot of Hoosiers, including state legislators, are surprised when they hear that hardwood lumber is the top agriculture segment in the state. Moistner said the industry has a $10 billion footprint in Indiana. “The reason hardwoods is the largest ag industry by far is because of the vertical integration of our industry here,” Moistner said. “We grow the trees here, we process and have sawmills and veneer mills.”

Read More

College of the Ouachitas receives $25,000 gift

Malvern Daily Record
March 5, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Read More

Sherwood Lumber Sells Northeast & Mid-Atlantic Engineered Lumber Business to U.S. Lumber Group

By Sherwood Lumber
Blue Book Services
February 28, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Sherwood Lumber has sold substantially all of the assets comprising its Northeast & Mid-Atlantic Engineered Lumber Business to US LUMBER.  This deal will provide the supply channel with two powerful options when making their selection for purchases of Forest Products and Engineered Lumber. …This transaction is part of Sherwood’s plan to focus on its largest and most successful component,  the wholesale distribution of Forest Products.  Sherwood Lumber remains committed and is excited to continue to distribute LP commodity panels, Flameblock, Legacy, and WeatherLogic.  Sherwood Lumber has been in the lumber and panel business for over 65 years and this transaction puts them in a place to thrive with extreme focus.  

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

East Texas, nation’s ‘wood basket,’ prepares to rise

By R.A. Schuetz
The Houston Chronicle
March 22, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

LUFKIN, TEXAS — Tall pines blanket much of East Texas. …The region’s native trees have been harnessed into what’s known as the “wood basket” of the nation by foresters such as Rob Hughes, president of the Texas Forestry Association. …Mostly used until now to frame single-family home and for everyday products such as paper and furniture, the southern yellow pine grown along the Gulf Coast could soon be destined for structures unlike anything United States has ever seen: wooden high-rises 18 stories tall. …The new code has the potential to transform both foresting communities and cityscapes. …It will likely take another two years before cities begin adopting the code, but developers have begun to push up against current limits. Houston-based Hines has built multiple 85-foot-tall wooden buildings (which is the current height limit) and says there is no reason it could not go higher when limits increase.

Read More

Are Iowa City apartments safe?

By Anna Banerjee
The Daily Iowan
March 14, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

…Justin Fox recently published an interesting project in Bloomberg titled, “Why America’s New Apartment Buildings All Look the Same.” …Except these aesthetic concerns are only the very beginning of the problems that these apartment complexes pose. Yes, they’re ugly, but are they even safe? Fox reports that stick framing… can pose major concerns in terms of fire safety for these apartment types. …The dangers of stick-framing were further extrapolated in the Fox piece. He cited the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, which was devastating because of the wood-framing used throughout thousands of buildings. This type of construction is dangerous if it comes into contact with situations such as a large fire. That it is so prevalent in construction across the country, and in Iowa City, is a cause for concern.

Read More

University of Arkansas residence hall to open on time, on budget

By Jeff Della Rosa
Talk Business & Politics
March 13, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The nearly $79 million Stadium Drive Residence Halls under construction east of Bud Walton Arena are on budget and will open before the move-in period starts Aug. 17, said Christopher Spencer, assistant director for marketing and strategic communications for University Housing at the University of Arkansas. …This is the first large-scale mass timber residence hall project in the United States, and Ashley Rao of Leers Weinzapfel Associates, said constructing the structure with cross-laminated timber and glulam beams and columns cost about 3.5% more than if steel were used in their place. University officials chose to use CLT because it comes from “sustainably sourced trees” and is “less environmentally impactful than traditional materials like steel and concrete,” Spencer said. Also, timber is a large industry in Arkansas, and the hope is the project would serve as a “showcase for what timber products could be used for in the state.”

Read More

Nation’s Top Green College Plans a New Green Building

By Scott Gibson
Green Building Advisor
March 13, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

The … number one green college in the U.S. has announced plans for a new campus center that will be built to the German Passivhaus standard… In a news release, the College of the Atlantic said that the 29,000-square-foot Center for Human Ecology will be a multipurpose teaching and gathering space. …Key to the design is the use of mass timber components to replace concrete and steel, a move that will substantially lower the carbon footprint of the $13 million project. …“It’s mostly nominal lumber, but a large portion of the structure is mass timber framing, glue-laminated beams, with a deliberate attempt to move away from steel and concrete as a construction method,” GO Logic Project Architect Tim Lock said. …Substituting glulam beams for steel and concrete provided a significant drop in embodied carbon and also beat steel and concrete in cost by a “fair margin.” 

Read More

Apartment fire reignites concerns over materials used by builders

By Nathan Morabito
WCNC News
March 12, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — As arson investigators try to track down suspects in two separate Charlotte apartment complex fires, the city’s fire chief said he’s concerned about the material crews are using to build the massive apartments taking over Charlotte’s landscape. “It is worrisome to me,” Chief Reginald Johnson said. “Now, we have a five-story wood framed apartment that we really need to be concerned about. Those fires can get pretty big in short order.” Our Defenders investigation raised similar concerns nearly a year ago about apartments made of wood frame that could fuel massive fires in highly populated areas. The fire chief said CFD is now reviewing its procedures to make sure firefighters are fully capable of responding to that kind of fire. …The fire inspector said the biggest concern is when crews are in the construction phase.

Read More

Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants

By Chris Barncard
University of Wisconsin-Madison
March 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable — but frustratingly untapped — bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics. Researchers, like those at the University of Wisconsin–Madison-based, Department of Energy-funded Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, hoping to turn woody plants into a replacement for petroleum in the production of fuels and other chemicals have been after the sugars in the fibrous cellulose that makes up much of the plants’ cell walls. …“They say you can make anything from lignin except money,” says Miguel Perez, a UW–Madison graduate student in civil and environmental engineering. …Enter the bacterium, which was first isolated while thriving in soil rich in aromatic compounds after contamination by petroleum products. Where other microbes pick and choose, N. aromaticivorans is a biological funnel for the aromatics in lignin.

Read More

Busch Gardens announces tallest hybrid rollercoaster in North America

By Benjamin Coren
Travel Weekly UK
March 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Busch Gardens Tampa Bay has started construction of what it says will be the tallest hybrid rollercoaster in North America. The yet-to-be-named ride, to be constructed from wood and steel, is slated to be the fastest and steepest hybrid coaster in the world. It will be more than 200 feet tall and feature restored elements of Gwazi, a wooden rollercoaster which operated in the park from 1999 to 2015. It is due to open in 2020…

Read More

Inventors of bullet-proof wood create fire-proof wood

By Ian Randall
Chemistry World
March 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

A fire-retardant structural material can be made by chemically softening and compressing wood to remove the spaces between cell walls. When burnt, the resulting material forms a protective char layer on its outside which helps preserve its internal strength. The use of wood in structural applications is limited by both its inherent flammability and susceptibility to rapid collapse on burning. Wood can be made more fire-proof by chemical treatments – such as through injections of halogenated flame retardants, or coatings of inorganic nanoparticles – but these approaches are typically either prohibitively expensive, fail environmental and health standards, or result in insufficient structural strength. Liangbing Hu and colleagues of the University of Maryland in the US show that their process to create bullet-proof wood through densification also confers fire-resistant properties without recourse to potentially toxic or environmentally-unfriendly materials.

Read More

Your doctor’s office may soon be less germy because of a Maine paper mill

By Lori Valigra
The Bangor Daily News
March 6, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Sappi, once synonymous only with large forests and paper mills, during the past 30 years has turned its expertise with wood to the fashion runways and even doctors’ offices. …More recently, Sappi’s texturing expertise is being tested in the medical world to create surfaces with miniscule textures on them. Potential uses are in doctors’ offices and in ambulances. The physical structure of the surfaces inhibits microbial growth without requiring chemicals. The textured papers also can be used to make tiny patches for patient diagnostics. The reason for the technology focus: Sappi’s legacy commercial and publishing paper business is shrinking and will continue to shrink, said Beth Cormier, vice president of research and development and innovation at Sappi North America’s Technology Center in Westbrook. “Sappi has used research and development on how to get into new markets,” she said.

Read More

Forestry

Behind the ‘black line’: Women in Fire Exchange brings global female fire workers to Tallahassee

By Nada Hassanein
Tallahassee Democrat
March 21, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Using a drip torch, a woman bends to carefully ignite a line of slow-burning embers. Charring away at greenery, the smolders catch along the edge of a stretch of forest in northern Tallahassee. The air is heavy with smoke, but the women seem unfazed, wearing helmets and smocks, thick yellow jackets and green pants. This week and through the end of March, about 45 women fire workers gather in the outskirts of the capital city to carry out prescribed burns and train in the forests of Tall Timbers, a fire ecology research lab. Prescribed burning, a conservation method, is a male-dominated line of work. Women make up only about 12 percent of permanent firefighting positions, according to the International Association of Wildland Fire.

Read More

Hungry wolves may get new home at Isle Royale National Park

By John Flesher
Associated Press in Times and Democrat
March 21, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich.  — A U.S.-Canadian team prepared Thursday for another mission to relocate gray wolves to Isle Royale National Park in Michigan from a second Lake Superior island, where the predators are in danger of starvation after gobbling up a caribou herd. The targeted pack is on Michipicoten Island… which was home to hundreds of caribou until ice bridges formed in recent years, enabling wolves to cross over from the mainland and feast on their helpless prey. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources airlifted some of the last surviving caribou to another island last year. Before long the wolves were the ones in trouble, with only small mammals such as snowshoe hare left to eat. …They’ll be … taken to their new home, where there will be no shortage of prey. Isle Royale’s booming moose population is believed to exceed 1,500.

Read More

Working forests benefit us all

By Dotty S. Porter, Trustee for the Sessoms Timber Trust and a Member of Georgia Forestry Association
The Blackshear Times
March 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Dotty S. Porter

Thursday is day to recognize how much timberland means to our area. Forests are connected to our day-to-day routine in more ways than we could possibly imagine. Every time you drink a glass of water, breathe in fresh air, write in a notebook or even tap on your cell phone screen, you are directly benefiting from Georgia’s working forests. On March 21, the United Nations International Day of Forests provides us with the opportunity to recognize the benefits of our state’s working forests and what they mean to our survival, comfort and progress. Georgia has been blessed with 22 million acres of privately-owned, working forests that cover roughly two-thirds of the state’s total land area, according to the USDA Forest Service. Those forests are not here by mistake, however. For generations, private forest landowners have invested in managing healthy forests that provide numerous economic, environmental and social benefits to our communities and our state.

Read More

Maine lawmakers looking to get teenagers involved in logging

The Associated Press
March 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BANGOR, Maine — A pair of Maine lawmakers wants to get more of the state’s teenagers interested in logging. Logging has a long history in deeply forested Maine. Independent Sen. Angus King and Democratic Rep. Jared Golden say they’re introducing legislation designed to “level the playing field for the logging trade with other agricultural fields.” The lawmakers say their Future Loggers Careers Act would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to learn logging under parental supervision. They say that would allow the teenagers to contribute to family businesses, as well as help the businesses survive. The group Professional Logging Contractors of Maine supports the legislation, which it says will help ensure a future generation of timber harvesters in the state.

Read More

Study for Maine loggers group cites low pay as barrier to industry growth

By Lori Valigra
Bangor Daily News
March 15, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Donald Burr

Maine faces a shortage of loggers and log truckers that will worsen in the coming years, a study released Thursday found. The Pine Tree State’s labor shortage could stunt the growth of the $8.5 billion forest products industry, the study said. It honed in on the need to increase wages to attract workers so the industry can grow. The study, commissioned by the Professional Logging Contractors of Maine, was prepared by the Maine Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Southern Maine. “The root of Maine’s vital forest products economy — the logging industry — must be able to offer higher wages to compete for existing workers and attract new ones at a time when they are desperately needed to support a resurgent forest products industry,” Dana Doran, executive director of the Professional Logging Contractors of Maine.

Read More

As climate continues to warm, study finds several barriers to northward tree migration

Elyse Catalina, University of Maine
Phys.org
March 15, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Extensive land development, invasive species and too many deer may make it difficult for tree migration to keep pace with climate change in the Northeast, according to newly published research. The study, led by Kathryn Miller, a plant ecologist with the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Division, and Brian McGill, a University of Maine professor of ecological modeling, analyzed U.S. Forest Service data covering 18 states from Tennessee to Maine. The researchers found a large swath of land in the mid-Atlantic states that was severely lacking in forest regeneration. Even where present, species regenerating on the forest floor were different than those making up the forest canopy. Earlier studies have raised concern about regional regeneration, but this is the first to document the sheer extent and severity of the problem.

Read More

The best way to preserve forests? Use trees.

By Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-ARK)
The Hill
March 15, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Regardless of your political ideology …we can agree on one thing: …the more public and private land we can dedicate to sustainable growing trees, the better our environment will be. Conversations surrounding forest management can quickly turn combative, as conservationists advocate for active forest management, but some environmentalists push for a hands-off approach. The solution to this impasse is simple, albeit counterintuitive. If we want more trees, we should all be using more products made from trees. The key to keeping forests healthy and resilient is strong demand for forest products – coupled with a commitment to replant more trees than we harvest. It’s Economics 101. Additional demand for wood building materials, paper and bioenergy raises the value landowners receive from keeping their land as managed forests. If you are a private landowner growing trees, and you are making money when you sell those trees, you’ll keep planting more trees.

Read More

New Jersey Forest Service member named Forester of the Year

By Nicholas Polanin
My Central Jersey
March 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Bill and Pam Zipse

A New Jersey Forest Service member whose forestry management and planning skills are helping to protect 775,000 acres of state land is the Allegheny Society of American Foresters Forester of the Year. Bill Zipse, a supervising forester with the New Jersey Forest Service, received the honor during the organization’s recent winter conference in West Virginia. The Allegheny Society of American Foresters is a non-profit professional organization for foresters in a five-state region of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and West Virginia.

Read More

What the logging story left out

By Jennie Floyd, Munroe Timber Company
The Monroe County Reporter
March 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Jennie Floyd

After reading a recent front-page article titled “Busted”, I felt compelled to clear the record with accurate facts about the logging sector in Monroe County. …Georgia is recognized as a national and global leader in working forests and forest product manufacturing. Georgia leads the nation for commercially available timberland; annual timber harvest volume; exports of pulp, paper, and paperboard products; and exports of wood pellets. …The recent article about loggers being “Busted” was prompted in part because citations were written for “muddying the roads” – a law that had not been enforced for years. What readers were led to believe however, is that logging in the rain causes “destruction and tearing up” of county roads, which is far from the truth.

Read More

Georgia is Leading the Way to Stand4Forests

By Vicki Weeks
Dogwood Alliance
March 11, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Last year the Stand4Forests movement was launched, laying out a bold vision for forest protection in the US endorsed by organizations, elected officials, and scientists from around the country. The Stand4Forests movement calls for a new vision of forest protection. In Georgia, residents and lawmakers are leading the nation in taking the first powerful steps towards making the Stand4Forests vision a reality. In early 2019, GA State Senator Lester Jackson introduced the Stand4Forests resolution, SR108. It’s been co-sponsored by at least 6 other State Senators and when the 2019-2020 legislative session begins again, we could see SR 108 going to a vote! That means that now – this year – is the time to call on all of our GA Senators to become forest champions. 2020 could be the year that Georgia becomes the first state to officially Stand4Forests.

Read More

Wayne National Forest plans fires for tree, wildlife health

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
March 10, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Nearly 2,000 acres of Wayne National Forest in Ohio will be intentionally burned over the next three months as part of the area’s fire management efforts. Forest officials say scientists who study native plants, birds and other wildlife believe prescribed fire helps maintain healthy oak forests. They say controlled blazes help increase nutrient availability in the forest and remove some leaf litter and smaller trees and brush. That, in turn, allows more sunlight to reach the forest floor to regenerate oak and hickory trees and sun-loving plants.

Read More

Is Hemp A Solution For Downed Timber Industry?

By Blaise Gainey
WJCT NEWS
March 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

North Florida’s timber industry suffered a more than one-billion-dollar loss in result of Hurricane Michael. To replace the loss many have proposed hemp farming. Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried has been an advocate of hemp but understands getting North Florida ready to accept it is a process. “We certainly will have an opportunity to get hemp in that area if they so choose to,” said Fried. “But reforestation in that area and the ecosystem in there and that quality of life can’t be replaced. So our first goal is to get the timber of the ground and to give these individuals an opportunity to reforest, and to have an opportunity to have an opportunity to have prosperity again in that area.”

Read More

Georgia Forestry Had Economic Impact of $21.3 billion in 2017

All On Georgia
March 5, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Georgia’s forest industry continues to fuel the state’s economic engine. According to a new report, in 2017, increases were recorded in the number of jobs, net state revenue, and output – the total revenue generated by the industry. Statistics documented in “2017 Economic Benefits of the Forest Industry in Georgia, 2017,” from the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Enterprise Innovation Institution, detail advances made in categories across the board. “Georgia’s forest industry is making steady gains that impact everyone in the state,” said Georgia Forestry Commission Director Chuck Williams. “The number of jobs and compensation are up, dollars brought into the state are up, and tax revenue generated for the state was $970 million. Simultaneously, our forests are providing critical environmental services. It’s a healthy report to kick off the new year,” Williams said.

Read More

Department of Environmental Conservation to host meetings on forest tax law

By Justin A. Levine
The Adirondack Daily Enterprise
March 2, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The state Department of Environmental Conservation will host a series of public meetings around the state in March on how a forest tax law can be improved.  The 480-a Forest Tax Law provides tax incentives for owners of 50 or more acres of forest lands, provided the owners develop a forest management plan and produce forest products. “An owner must first decide if he or she is willing to commit land to the production of forest crops and to follow a management plan, prepared by a forester and approved DEC, for the next succeeding ten years beginning each year that they receive a tax exemption,” the DEC explains. “If this analysis shows that a tax reduction can be obtained, a forester should be consulted for professional advice about the approximate costs of preparing a management plan and making investments in the forest which may be required by the plan.

Read More

Jackson County timber officials talk the current timber situation

By Ashton Williams
My Panhandle.com
March 1, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MARIANNA, Fla – Senator Rick Scott is still pushing for extra funding and assistance for those affected by hurricane Michael. His most recent focus has been that of the timber industry. Wanting to get more funding to help timber landowners restore their forests.  Jackson County timber farmers are working diligently to get as much timber off the ground as quickly as possible. But because of the amount of destruction senior forester, Barry Stafford, feels a lot will be left behind, causing landowners to suffer even more. “There’s going to be so much of it that’s not going to be picked up,” said Stafford. “It’s bad enough that they can’t get any money for their salvaged because prices are like a dollar or two a ton for it, so they’re getting very little than what they would have before the hurricane.” 

Read More

Department of Natural Resources warns of invasive tree found in 12 Wisconsin counties

By Matthew Clark
Channel 3000
February 27, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

MADISON, Wis. – Officials with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources are asking people to be on the lookout for an invasive species of tree.  According to the DNR, the Amur cork tree has been found in at least 12 counties, with populations ranging from a few to several thousand. The trees have a unique, corky outer bark and have a yellow tissue under the bark. The species of tree is damaging to the diversity of Wisconsin’s forests, and planting them is prohibited under the state’s invasive species rule.  The trees are typically found in parks, yards and cities, but they can quickly spread to forests after their fruit is eaten by birds.  Officials said people who believe they have spotted one of the trees should use a knife to peel away the bark to confirm the color.  The DNR asks people to email them locations of the trees at invasive.species@wisconsin.gov with the subject line “Amur cork tree location.” 

Read More

Ash loggers race against time before beetles get them all

By Micheal Hill
Associated Press in Bangor Daily News
February 27, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WALTON, New York — Loggers in snowy forests are cutting down ash like there’s no tomorrow, seeking to stay one step ahead of a fast-spreading beetle killing the tree in dozens of states. The emerald ash borer has been chewing its way through trees from Maine to Colorado for about two decades, devastating a species prized for yielding a light-grained hardwood attractive enough for furniture and resilient enough for baseball bats. Many hard-hit areas are east of the Mississippi River and north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Some fear areas in the invasion zone like upstate New York might have only five to seven years of ash logging left. “Emerald ash borer is probably the most thorough killing machine that we’ve come across in my career over the last 35 years,” said Tom Gerow, general manager for The Wagner Companies, which specializes in furniture-grade lumber.

Read More

Beetle scourge forces ash loggers to race against time

By Michael Hill
Associated Press in St. Louis Post-Dispatch
February 27, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

WALTON, N.Y. — Loggers in snowy forests are cutting down ash like there’s no tomorrow, seeking to stay one step ahead of a fast-spreading beetle killing the tree in dozens of states.The emerald ash borer has been chewing its way through trees from Maine to Colorado for about two decades, devastating a species prized for yielding a light-grained hardwood attractive enough for furniture and resilient enough for baseball bats. Many hard-hit areas are east of the Mississippi River and north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Some fear areas in the invasion zone like upstate New York might have only five to seven years of ash logging left.”Emerald ash borer is probably the most thorough killing machine that we’ve come across in my career over the last 35 years,” said Tom Gerow, general manager for The Wagner Companies, which specializes in furniture-grade lumber.

Read More

Scott Calls on Feds to Help Panhandle Timber Industry

My Panhandle.com
February 25, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Rick Scott

Washington, D.C. – Senator Rick Scott is calling on the U.S. Department of Agriculture to do more to help the timber industry after Hurricane Michael.  “The storm damaged 2.8 million acres with approximately 72 million tons of timber, leaving more than 16,000 forest landowners with few options for recovery,” Scott wrote in a letter to Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue. “It could take more than a decade for Florida’s timber industry to recover from the storm’s devastation, and our Panhandle families need help.” Scott adds that… the department should send  “an incident management team to deploy to the USDA Farm Service Agency field office in Marianna to help process the current applications for affected timber landowners. 

Read More

Forestry museum, lumbering hall of fame near reality in Rice Lake

By Heidi Clausen
The Leader Telegram
February 25, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

RICE LAKE WI — Evidence of northern Wisconsin’s proud lumbering heritage can be found throughout the region. Look no further than the street signs in the city of Rice Lake, many which bear the familiar surnames of prominent lumber barons such as Knapp, Stout, Tainter and Wilson. Indeed, few industries have played as big a role in developing communities here as the forestry and logging industries, yet the area has been sorely lacking a place to publicly and properly display this history. A small but ambitious group in Rice Lake is working to remedy that. For several years, they’ve been raising funds to open the Great Lakes Forestry Museum at the National Lumbering Hall of Fame Park in downtown Rice Lake.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Environmental Groups Want Massachusetts To Stop Subsidies For Biomass Energy

By Paul Tuthill
WAMC – Public Radio
March 21, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Environmentalists are objecting to the Baker administration’s efforts in Massachusetts to promote the use of forest products as fuel for heat and energy. In a letter to Gov. Charlie Baker signed by about 30 representatives of environmental groups and scientists, the activists complain about the recent awarding of state grants, totaling almost $3 million, to companies involved in producing wood chips to burn in boilers and stoves. One of the activists, Laura Haight of the Pelham, Massachusetts-based Partnership for Policy Integrity  said the Baker administration’s policy is at odds with climate science. …Legislation has been filed that would make woody biomass and garbage incineration ineligible for state renewable energy subsidies.

Read More

Tree rings contain secrets from the forest

By Marlene Cimons
Popular Science
March 20, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Neil Pederson’s introduction to tree rings came from a “sweet and kindly” college instructor, who nevertheless was “one of the most boring professors I’d ever experienced,” Pederson said. …Ultimately, “I fell in love with the beauty and wealth of information found in tree rings,” he said. …Today, he and his colleagues are using the data inherent in these ancient sources of nature to better understand the impact of climate change and carbon dynamics on forests. …Pederson, now a senior ecologist with Harvard University’s Harvard Forest …analyzed tree rings to determine if the information they gleaned matched the accuracy of high-tech equipment. They wanted to know whether the rings could serve as a proxy for learning more about carbon storage and climate change in forests over the long-term, and found that they could.

Read More

South Carolina forests are protected for trapping carbon, with a little help from California

By Chloe Johnson
The Post and Courier
March 9, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

South Carolina and California have little in common politically, but the Golden State’s laws are protecting the Palmetto State’s trees. California’s cap and trade program, which took effect in 2013, is the nation’s most expansive regulatory scheme aimed at fighting climate change in part by preserving forests. …Crucial to the program’s success are forests like those found in South Carolina and around the Southeast: forests full of fast-growing, long-living hardwood trees capable of sequestering hundreds of thousands of tons of carbon from the atmosphere. …While all forests sequester carbon to some degree, the Southeast’s hardwood swamps are some of the most capable of sucking greenhouse gasses out of the air, said Patricia Layton, a forest geneticist at Clemson. …To be eligible to sell credits under California’s rules, the forest has to be under threat of cutting and conversion. 

Read More