Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Forestry

Forestry

Trees & Turkeys: a bountiful partnership

By Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Treehugger
November 20, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

This Thanksgiving, the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) express gratitude for another productive year working together toward common goals. …More than 300 million acres of forestland throughout the U.S. and Canada are currently certified to the SFI Forest Management Standard, which includes strict criteria for water and air quality, biodiversity, and efficient use of fiber resources. …NWTF is dedicated to the restoration of the wild turkey and the preservation of the U.S. hunting heritage. Since it was founded in 1973, NWTF has helped increase the number of wild turkeys in North America from 1.5 million to a historic high of almost seven million. The organization’s 10-year initiative, “Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt,” promotes active forest management and conservation of upland habitat specifically.

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Canadian folk anthem Log Driver’s Waltz finds new life in children’s book

By Dan Taekema
CBC News
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Canadian folk legend Wade Hemsworth used to write songs and send them out to the world “like little boats.” “He didn’t know where they would go or how far they would go, but he really liked to see how they would come back — how other people interpreted them,” explained his great-nephew who shares the same name. Recently, one of his best-known works came ‘birling’ back as though riding on white water — the Log Driver’s Waltz. Written in the 50s, but popularized by a National Film Board video in 1979, the tune about a young woman’s delight in dancing with a light-footed log driver has been turned into a children’s book published by Simon & Schuster. …”Parents will be reading this book to their kids and so a new set of people will think of the song in a different way than their parents did.” Hemsworth knows that’s something that would have made his great-uncle very happy.

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New SFI Board Members Will Enhance SFI’s Leadership Work

By Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Global Newswire
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

OTTAWA and WASHINGTON — The Sustainable Forestry Initiative is pleased to announce the election of four new members to its board of directors: Lillian “Ebonie” Alexander, Executive Director, Black Family Land Trust; Kevin Edgson, President and CEO, EACOM Timber Corporation; Brent Keefer, President, Hancock Timber Resource Group; and Dan Lambe, President, Arbor Day Foundation. …“These four board members join us at a critical juncture given SFI’s current work to set our strategic direction for the next five years. I’m… confident that their diverse experience and leadership skills will bring fresh perspective to SFI’s future plans,” said Mark Rodgers, President and CEO, Habitat for Humanity Canada and Chair of the SFI Board of Directors.

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Project Learning Tree Curriculum Wins Teachers’ Choice Award Special 25% Discount To Be Offered for the Holidays

By Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc.
Globe Newswire
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

WASHINGTON and OTTAWA — Project Learning Tree’s (PLT) Energy in Ecosystems curriculum for grades 3-5 has been selected a Learning Magazine 2019 Teachers’ Choice Award (TCA) for the Classroom winner. Winners… were selected by a nationwide panel of teacher-judges… PLT is an initiative of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative. “The Energy in Ecosystems by Project Learning Tree is a fantastic online resource for students in grades 3-5,” said one teacher…. “…my favorite parts: it’s all online, it is super engaging, targets the NGSS standards which are how my school’s science standards are aligned, and it also integrates the Common Core standards for English and Math.” PLT’s Energy in Ecosystems e-unit https://www.plt.org/energy-ecosystems-unit consists of six activities for elementary students… Students focus on forests—one of the largest and most complex types of ecosystems—and come to understand ways that plants and animals are connected to each other.

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The Government of Canada is protecting nature through investments in Canada’s natural heritage

By Environment and Climate Change Canada
Cision Newswire
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – The Government of Canada has committed to doubling the amount of nature protected, on land and in our oceans, from coast to coast to coast. Today, Environment and Climate Change Canada is launching a call for proposals for the Natural Heritage Conservation Program. Proposals will be sought from organizations that can develop, coordinate, and deliver a national program aimed at assisting local, provincial, territorial, and national conservation organizations in securing ecologically sensitive private lands across Canada. As part of the Budget 2018 Nature Legacy initiative, the Government of Canada has made a $500 million investment in the new Canada Nature Fund to support the protection and conservation of Canada’s ecosystems, landscapes, and biodiversity, including species at risk. Canada Nature Fund contributions will be matched by partners, raising a total of $1 billion for conservation action…

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Action needed to reverse Canada’s wildlife decline, conservationists say

By Morgan Lowrie
Canadian Press in Coast Reporter
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

MONTREAL — Canada may be known for its wide-open spaces and wildlife, but the federal and provincial governments need to dramatically increase their efforts if they’re to save the country’s endangered species, conservationists say.  A World Wildlife Fund report last month created alarm with its finding that global wildlife populations dropped 60 per cent over the last 40 years, and recent data shows the situation in Canada is not a lot better. A WWF report last year found that Canadian mammal populations dropped by 43 per cent, amphibian and reptile populations by 34 per cent and fish populations by 20 per cent over a similar time period. Some types of birds have lost between 43 and 69 per cent of their populations….Margot Venton, a lawyer with the environmental law group Ecojustice, says part of the reason for the declines is that the regulatory framework is full of holes and is often ignored by governments.

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We have to treat wildfires like actual fires

By Glenn McGillivray, managing director of the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction
The Globe and Mail
November 13, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Glenn McGillivray

For the second time in about a year, multi-billion-dollar wildfires are turning California communities to ash as fast moving flames race through tinder-dry forests and grasslands and ultimately feast on unnatural fuels. The wildfires in California last year caused about US$14-billion in insured losses. Unless we want more of the same in the years ahead, we need to better understand the issue of wildfire getting into communities. We can gain at least some improved understanding by looking at what was learned from the major urban conflagrations in history. In the distant past, several major cities have experienced large conflagrations caused by one thing or another, such as cows and earthquakes. Fires in London, New York, Toronto, Chicago and San Francisco led to many changes in how cities are designed, how buildings are constructed, and in fire education and safety.

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Concerned citizens aim to protect N. Cowichan municipal forest reserve from logging

By Sarah Simpson
The Cowichan Valley Citizen
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Icel Dobell’s aim is to preserve all 5,000 hectares of North Cowichan’s Municipal Forest Reserve. …“Many people don’t realize that the municipal forests are owned by the public. Most people think they were owned by private companies and that they have no say,” Dobell said. …Members of Where Do We Stand met with senior staff at the municipality this week to talk about the future of the forests and whether the less than $600,000 annual profit made from them was worth the active logging. …“We’re not protesting, we’re requesting a pause in logging in all of our municipal forests while there’s still time,” Dobell explained.

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Overhaul of B.C. environmental assessment will fail: scientists

By Justine Hunter
The Globe and Mail
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

George Heyman

The B.C. government’s overhaul of its environmental assessment regime is in danger of failing to accomplish what it promises – to restore public confidence in the way government manages natural resources, and to protect the environment. That conclusion comes from a group of independent academic environmental scientists who have torn apart the proposed new Environmental Assessment Act that was tabled earlier this month. …Environment Minister George Heyman tabled the new act to replace a set of rules written by the B.C. Liberal government in 2002. …What the bill fails to do is fix fundamental flaws that exist in B.C.’s environmental-assessment process today, say the more than 180 university academics and science professionals. …The proposed B.C. Environmental Assessment Act will be called for debate on Tuesday.

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Threatened frog re-discovered in Delta Nature Reserve

By Grace Kennedy
North Delta Reporter
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

This October, students on a field trip with the Burns Bog Conservation Society saw an unusual type of frog and took a photo. Now, after having the photo analyzed by the biologists in the provincial government, the conservation society has found out it’s a red-legged frog — an endangered species that was believed to have disappeared from Delta by the late 1990s. “For me, this was an amazing example of how you can sometimes have something really rare and special right under your nose. You just have to be looking for it,” said Mark Robertson, education and research coordinator for the conservation society. Northern red-legged frogs range from the California to Haida Gwaii, making their home in cool, forested regions.

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Report card for professional reliance experiment

By Jim Hilton
Quesnel Cariboo Observer
November 18, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…This fourth report by the Environmental Law Centre on professional reliance at the University of Victoria was requested in the fall of 2017 by the new NDP/Green party came out in July of this year. …Battle lines are forming with Council of Forest Industries (COFI), calling for the report to be scrapped, while environmental organizations like the BC Coalition For Forestry Reform (BCCFR) is calling for all of the recommendations to be implement immediately. In order to reduce the political posturing, I suggest a review of the ELC report that came out in 2015 after more than a decade of implementing “reduced civil service and red tape” forestry experiment and before the election of a new minority government. …The focus was to shift from reliance on government bureaucrats to professionals in the private sector. …This was the “new era of professional reliance” or sometimes called “results-based forestry” when discussing the forest industry.

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Study aims to shed light on the elusive wolverine in B.C.’s south coast region

The Canadian Press in the Province
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — A new project aims to find out more about the life and lifestyle of the ghost of the deep forests of British Columbia, the wolverine. The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation along with the Forest Enhancement Society of BC will undertake a project to study the range, movements, and habitat of wolverines in the south coast region, including Squamish. Brian Springinotic of the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation says it is important to study these creatures because human activity and climate change may be having a significant impact on them. It is also important to understand what and how far ranging those impacts are, he says.

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‘It blows my mind’: How B.C. destroys a key natural wildfire defence every year

By Bethany Lindsay
CBC News
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Last year, 12,812 hectares of B.C. forest was sprayed with the herbicide glyphosate. It’s an annual event — a mass extermination of broadleaf trees mandated by the province. The eradication of trees like aspen and birch on regenerating forest stands is meant to make room for more commercially valuable conifer species like pine and Douglas fir. But experts say it also removes one of the best natural defences we have against wildfire, at a time when our warming climate is helping make large, destructive fires more and more common. “It blows my mind that nobody is talking about this,” said James Steidle, a member of the anti-glyphosate group Stop the Spray B.C. “The experts know this stuff. They’ve known about this stuff for decades, but it’s just not being translated into reality.”

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MLA Dan Ashton backs Penticton group trying to stop logging near recreation area

By Jordyn Thomson
Pentiction Western News
November 16, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Support is continuing to flood in for the Carmi Trails Recreation Group’s initiative to stop the logging slated for near the Pine Loop, Squirrel Loop and Fir Loop trails located 10 minutes outside of Penticton.  Neda Joss, one of the organizers with the group, said that there was a full house at their meeting on Nov. 12 that outlined B.C. Timber Sales (BCTS) plans regarding the cut blocks in the area, and what she and others had learned on a guided field trip with BCTS on Oct. 12. The clear cut would see the widening of these recreational trails for logging trucks to access the area, something Joss and others are against because it would threaten the natural landscape of the trails. “We went through a PowerPoint presentation and filled people in on what BCTS had proposed to us on Oct. 12.,” said Joss.

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Province not doing enough for forestry sector, say Liberals

By Melanie Law
BC Local News
November 15, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Liberals have called out the provincial government for not doing enough in the wake of the Interior’s declining timber supply and log prices. In a news release issued November 15, Cariboo and Nechako Lakes MLAs said the local forestry industry has been “ignored.” “There are already hundreds of forestry workers out of work in the Cariboo, and I know those who are still working are very worried about their future,” said Cariboo-Chilcotin MLA Donna Barnett. “The last two wildfire seasons have been devastating and we are in desperate need of an economic recovery program for the whole of rural and northern B.C.” Forestry workers across the region have seen layoffs due to both decreased timber supply and market conditions. Most recently, West Fraser announced that it would be permanently reducing production in both its Quesnel and Fraser Lake sawmills as of Jan. 14, 2019, to better align its output with available fibre.

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Residents concerned about forest harvest in Annapolis County

By Ian Fairclough
The Chronicle Herald
November 18, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotia — Residents near a proposed 20-hectare forestry operation in Annapolis County say the province should pause and take another look at the project. …Fredericks says the harvest will encompass much of the 30 to 40 hectares of Hardwood Hill, and local residents are concerned about impacts to biodiversity and the local ecosystem. He said residents have several concerns, including that the proposed harvest area includes a mixture of mature and old-growth Eastern Hemlock, and immature beech trees that are not ready for harvest. …He also said beechnuts and cavity trees support species including barred owls, flying squirrels, porcupines and black bears, and said selective cutting should be the preferred method.

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Questions raised over Cape Breton cull that has cost Ottawa $7,900 per moose

By Michael Tutton
The Canadian Press in the National Post
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

When a Mi’kmaq hunter shoots a moose in Cape Breton Highlands National Park, the meat feeds children, hides are used in clothing, and there’s one fewer ungulate damaging the park’s vulnerable forest. However, some citizens question whether an average taxpayer price tag of slightly over $7,900 per animal has been justified. More than 120 moose have been killed since the program was introduced three years ago. …Park conservation manager Rob Howey argues the harvest of 122 animals from an estimated herd of 1,800 since the fall of 2015 has been a worthwhile expenditure. …“We’re going to take back all the results analyze and determine what the best approach might be to restore the boreal forest.

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Northern Ontario First Nation, conservationists seek logging ban on Farabout Peninsula

By Matt Prokopchuk
CBC News
November 16, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A First Nation in northwestern Ontario and a local conservation group want a piece of land that extends into Eagle Lake near Dryden removed from future forestry management planning and set aside so it becomes permanently off-limits to logging. That comes as the company that holds the sustainable forest licence for the area that includes Farabout Peninsula says it hasn’t yet determined how much, if any, harvesting it intends to apply to do on the peninsula within the timeframe covered by the next planning period. Work is underway to develop the next forest management plan for the years 2021 to 2031. Forest management plans effectively dictate how woodland areas in Ontario are managed, including guidelines around logging, development of infrastructure, like roads, as well as sustainability and renewal.

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Forest Fires

By Gene Wengert, President, The Wood Doctor’s Rx, LLC
Submitted Editorial
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

We have all heard about the terrible forest fires in the West in the past few years, and especially the “Camp” fire in November 2018.  Let’s look at forest fires from a forestry point of view. But before beginning, we do want to voice our cares and concerns for those who lost family and friends and to those that lost homes, belongings and a lifetime of irreplaceable items in the Camp Fire and all wildfires. A forest fire needs a source of ignition. needs fuel and needs oxygen.  The ignition source is often cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, but human activities do causes many fires.  The fuel source is wood, leaves, needles and understory grow including brush and grass. The speed of burning and the speed of expansion of a forest fire into new fuels depends to a large extent on the presence of oxygen.  In turn, this means the wind speed is a huge factor in the life of a fire, as the wind brings in oxygen, as well as carries burning embers into new fuel sources.

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Continued Occupation Shuts Down SPI Clearcut Logging Operation

North Coast News
November 20, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

At least a dozen Humboldt County forest defenders hiked in to a Sierra Pacific Industries logging operation in the Mattole area, occupying the site, sending the log trucks coming in back out of the forest, effectively shutting it down. The activists were at the same area where a treesitter has been up since last week. After putting up a tree-sit 100’ high in an active Sierra Pacific Industries‘ (SPI) logging plan last Thursday, about a dozen forest defenders were on the ground in the plan this morning, resulting in the shutting down of the logging activity. The timber harvest plan (THP) is in the Rainbow Ridge area in the Mattole River watershed in Humboldt County, site of a long-running, multi-pronged campaign to preserve the legacy forests there under Humboldt Redwood Co. (HRC) ownership.

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Jerry Brown quietly admits Trump was right

Preston Business Review
November 20, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jerry Brown

After brushing off President Trump’s charge that poor forest management is partly to blame for California’s recent devastating wildfires, Gov. Jerry Brown is urging state lawmakers to ease restrictions on logging that were enacted under pressure from environmental groups. Brown is proposing one of the most significant changes to the state’s logging rules in nearly half a century, , as . In an effort to thin more forests, the proposal would allow private landowners with 300 acres or less to cut larger trees and build temporary roads without obtaining a permit. Environmentalists, however, want to make California’s logging rules even more restrictive, the Daily Wire said. But the recent deadly fires in both Northern and Southern California have prompted lawmakers to act. 

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Why Finland is so good at handling forest fires. Hint: It’s not because of raking.

By Rick Noack
The Washington Post
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Months before devastating wildfires caused havoc in California, firefighters from across Europe headed to Sweden as authorities there struggled to extinguish several massive blazes. Sweden… ordered an air force jet to drop a bomb in the middle of the wildfire’s center to deprive the blaze of oxygen. The strategy failed, and Sweden’s fires continued to rage for weeks. But just a few hundred miles away, in neighboring Finland, officials worried about a far different problem: not enough wildfires. “From nature’s point of view, the diversity of species and habitats suffers from too few fires,” the Finnish Forest Association recently concluded in a report. …The forest service in Finland does carry out controlled burns of the forest floor mostly to clear away underbrush and also promote new saplings. …No, the key factor in California’s vulnerability to fires (and Finland’s resistance) appears to have to do with weather.

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How climate change is fueling California’s wildfires

By Mario Picazo, Meteorologist
The Weather Network
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

California has been burning more than ever since the turn of the century. Thirteen of the state’s twenty hottest fires have occurred since 2000 as increasing temperatures push up the frequency and severity of wildfires. …Adding up the acreage affected by the flames from 2013 through this time in 2018, we get an overwhelming figure somewhere close to 5.4 million acres. So considering California is roughly 100 million acres in size, that means 5.4 per cent of the state’s surface has seen some form of fire over the past 5 years. …A recent U.S. Government report prepared by leading climate and forest experts explores the interactions between climate change and forests. The main concluding remarks emphasize how climate change is increasing the vulnerability of many U.S. forests through fire, insect infestations, drought and disease outbreaks.

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Measures aimed at reducing fire intensity in Southern Oregon’s Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

The Associated Press in the Statesman Journal
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MEDFORD, Oregon — The U.S. Forest Service plans to propose measures for southern Oregon aimed at reducing the size and intensity of wildfires and creating healthier forests better able to withstand the hotter, drier conditions brought by climate change. The Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest plan would include a mix of commercial logging and brush removal on 22,000 acres of Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands, the Mail Tribune reported Sunday. It would include nearly 5,000 acres of prescribed fire and using fire to maintain up to 13,000 acres of previously burned areas. …”The objective is to make the watershed more resilient to disturbances like fire, insects and climate change,” said Don Boucher, the forest’s district ecologist and main architect of the plan. The environmental assessment will be up for public comment for a month.

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Trump, Touring Fire Ruins in California, Repeats Disputed Claim on Forest Management

By Thomas Fuller
The New York Times
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PARADISE, Calif. — President Trump walked through the ashes of the Northern California town of Paradise on Saturday, promising to help the state recover but repeating his disputed view that forest management was to blame for the fire, the most destructive in California’s history. The president, expressing shock at the scale of the devastation and praising the efforts of emergency workers, offered much more conciliatory words than he had used a week earlier when he accused state officials of mismanaging California’s forests and threatened to withhold financial assistance. …Mr. Trump repeated his view on Saturday that forest management — the partial clearing and cleaning of brush from forests — was partly to blame for the string of immense and deadly wildfires in recent years. …The death toll of the Camp Fire, now at 76, has climbed steadily as a team of more than 500 specialists searches for human remains.

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Trump’s claim of poor California forest management rings true — to a degree

By Phillip Matier and Andrew Ross
The San Francisco Chronicle
November 18, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

“A century of mismanaging Sierra Nevada forests has brought an unprecedented environmental catastrophe that impacts all Californians.” That’s not a tweet from President Trump, but the opening line of a February report by California’s Little Hoover Commission investigating fire danger in the state. “The immediate crisis is visible to anyone who has traveled recently in the Sierra Nevada, especially in its southern range,” Commission Chairman Pedro Navawrote in the cover letter for “Fire on the Mountain,” an 82-page report. The report outlines factors that have led to the current forest crisis, including years of poor or nonexistent management policies, and the recent drought and a beetle infestation that killed an estimated 129 million trees across the state — trees that could go up in flames. Still, Nava was a bit taken aback by Trump’s Nov. 10 tweet blaming the state’s “gross mismanagement” for the fires.

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Why we’re trying to lift the ‘Roadless Rule’

By Heidi Hansen, deputy commissioner, Alaska Department of Natural Resources
Anchorage Daily News
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

From the North Slope to the Panhandle, and the Interior to the Peninsula, rural Alaskans are prioritizing their access – to each other, the rest of Alaska and the world.Cost is often the limiting factor. But not always. Many community leaders want to improve access without jeopardizing the unique character and resources of their communities. It’s literally a fight for survival for some small communities. For others, it’s part of a long-term plan to become more sustainable.One of the regions where the state of Alaska is working with local communities and stakeholders to increase rural access and connectivity is Southeast Alaska, where the U.S. Forest Service is taking a fresh look at how it manages roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest.

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Pacific Northwest woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

By Steve Lundeberg
Oregon State University
November 16, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry shows. The findings, published today in Global Change Biology, represent an important tool for scientists and land managers because woodlands throughout the western United States are under increasing stress from accelerated rates of drought-related mortality related to global, human-caused climate change. Also, the Northwest’s hemlock, Douglas-fir and redwood forests have tremendous potential to counteract climate change via their carbon-sequestration abilities, meaning policies that promote stewardship of those forests is critical, the scientists say.

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California fire has claimed 63 as missing list grows to 631

By Paul Elias and Kathleen Ronayne
The Associated Press
November 16, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

MAGALIA, Calif. (AP) — At least 63 are now dead from a Northern California wildfire, and officials say they have a missing persons list with 631 names on it in an ever-evolving accounting of the missing after the nation’s deadliest wildfire in a century. …Authorities were making the list public so people could see if they were on it and let authorities know they were safe, Honea said. …On Thursday, firefighters reported progress in battling the nearly 220-square-mile blaze that displaced 52,000 people and destroyed more than 9,500 homes. It was 40 percent contained, fire officials said. 

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Catastrophic wildfires and climate change lead to growing acceptance of ‘pyrosilviculture’

By University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources
YubaNet
November 15, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

For millennia, fires periodically burned through California forests, thinning trees, reducing shrubbery and clearing out downed branches and debris. Without periodic fire, the forests became more dense, with spaces between large trees filling in with a thick carpet of duff, seedlings and shrubs. As a result, today’s forests are prone to more intense and damaging fires… These fires are … threatening large swaths of forest, towns, and even urban areas. …Making peace with fire and turning it into a useful tool, rather than a raging threat, was the objective of an October meeting in Shaver Lake of UC Cooperative Extension forestry and natural resources scientists, Southern California Edison forest managers, CALFIRE officials and U.S. Forest Service representatives. The event also raised awareness of “pyrosilviculture,” a new forest management term coined by UC fire scientist Rob York to emphasize the importance of fire in silviculture, the management of forests for wood.

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As wildfires grow deadlier, officials search for solutions

By Matthew Brown and Ellen Knickmeyer
The Associated Press
November 14, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

BILLINGS, Montana — Creating fire buffers between housing and dry brush, burying spark-prone power lines and lighting more controlled burns to keep vegetation in check could give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, according to experts searching for ways to reduce growing death tolls from increasingly severe blazes in California and across the U.S. West. Western wildfires have grown ever more lethal, a grim reality that’s been driven by more housing developments sprawling into the most fire-prone grasslands and brushy canyons, experts say. Many of the ranchers and farmers who once managed those landscapes are gone, leaving neglected terrain that has grown thick with vegetation that can explode into flames when sparked. …However, most of California’s deadly fires of recent years have been in grasslands and brushy chaparral, Keeley said. “Most destructive fires are not in the forest. Thinning isn’t going to change anything,” he said.

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Old growth trees cut in violation of 4FRI mission

By Scott Buffon
Arizona Daily Sun
November 14, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Four Forest Restoration Initiative has been spent years strengthening and supporting the public’s faith in their mission to cut down trees across northern Arizona, or what they call their “social license.” But the United States Forest Service made a decision out at the West Escudilla Project to cut down over 1,300 trees that were more than 150 years old, fearing an infestation of an invasive dwarf mistletoe. In response to the action, the 4FRI stakeholders released a letter, calling the treatment “inconsistent” with their current practices. “Members of the 4FRI [stakeholders group] have spent nearly two decades building the social license that made landscape-scale restoration a reality on Arizona national forests,” according to the stakeholder letter. “There is broad stakeholder consensus and science support for retraining old-growth trees, including wildlife habitat, increased genetic diversity, and potential increased fire and climate resiliency.”

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Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest Sells Most Timber For Harvest Since Early 1990s

By Danielle Kaeding
Wisconsin Public Radio News
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Timber sales on the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest have increased for the sixth year in a row. The forest sold 128.7 million board feet of timber this past fiscal year. Forest Supervisor Paul Strong said that’s the most timber sold on the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest since the early 1990s. The forest has been able to sell more stands of timber for harvest through an agreement with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources under the Good Neighbor Authority, which allows the state to conduct management of national forest land. “They’ve been a steady partner delivering their share of this program for the last three years,” Strong said. The state sold 30.7 million board feet under the agreement, said Jeffrey Olsen, national forest specialist in the Good Neighbor Authority program with the DNR.

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Timber industry suffering after Hurricane Michael

By Shelly Campbell
WJHG-TV
November 15, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

JACKSON COUNTY, Fla.- You could say Kim Barber comes by the timber industry naturally. “We moved up here from south Florida in ’95,” Kim said. “My family, we own Chipola Timberland.” The family owns roughly 7,000 acres of trees–many of which are now on the ground after Hurricane Michael. “I’m still hoping I’m in a dream and I’m going to wake up in the morning and everything’s going to be back to normal, but it hasn’t happened yet, so I guess this is the new normal,” Kim said. Each year, the Barbers clear cut and replant, but recent heavy rains have also posed challenges. 

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Forestry work at Sparta Mountain to begin after Thanksgiving

By Bruce Scruton
The New Jersey Herald
November 15, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

HARDYSTON — Forestry work is scheduled to begin on a section of the Sparta Mountain Wildlife Management Area in the area between Lake Gerard and Tamarak Lake. …The area to be worked will be about 17 acres in what is designated as Stand 33 in the forestry management plan approved for the wildlife management area in March 2017 after more than two years of controversy. …About a quarter of the existing trees in the 17 acres of work will be cut or girdled and left as standing dead wood. …According to the DEP, no heavy machinery or chemicals will be used, and none of the cut trees will be removed or sold. There have been signs of beech bark disease, and the forestry work may include treatments to slow the spread of the condition. …The New Jersey Sierra Club accused the DEP of a sort of “bait-and-switch.”

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Victoria’s forestry fight: how the election is raising the environmental stakes

By Calla Wahlquist
The Guardian
November 19, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Major parties want ‘sustainable logging’ in native forests, but experts warn of ‘endgame’ for endangered species and drinking water. To understand the campaign to save Victoria’s old growth forests, ecologist David Lindenmayer says, you just need to turn on a tap in Melbourne. Forget about the critically endangered Leadbeater’s possum… Forget, too, about the carbon value of the mountain ash forests of the Victorian central highlands, which are among the most carbon-dense forests in the world. “…if you’re interested in drinking water, then you actually need to have intact forests, intact catchments to produce that water,” Lindenmayer says. These forests are at the heart of one of the key environmental issues that voters in Victoria will have to decide when they head to the polls on Saturday.

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‘Vandalism’: environment groups slam move to increase native forestry

By Peter Hannam
Sydney Morning Herald
November 18, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Environmental groups have slammed the decision by the Berejiklian government to open up more areas of the state’s coastal forests to logging, a move they say will ravage wildlife habitat including precious koala colonies. The government has announced new logging areas on public lands as part of its overhaul of Integrated Forestry Operations Approvals, saying it would provide job security for the state’s $2.4 billion forestry sector while delivering “improved protections for environmental sustainability, biodiversity and key threatened species”. …A remapping of high-conservation old-growth forests would also allow cutting trees to within five metres of headwater streams, instead of 10, while loggers would no longer have to identify and exclude high-use areas for koalas, they say.

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‘A disaster’: Forest deals reignite tension between loggers and conservationists

By Nicole Hasham
Sydney Morning Herald
November 17, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Dejan Stojanovic was aghast. The biologist had pulled to the side of a remote dirt road in southern Tasmania, expecting to find the stately blue gum forest he’d frequented for years. He had come in search of the rare swift parrot, known to nest in the nooks of old local trees. But the bulldozers had got there first. Only disfigured brown earth remained. “I was enraged,” Stojanovic says, recalling the day in November last year. “This giant patch was taken out of the landscape. It was flattened. There were just stacks of logs and mounds of woody residue with heavy machinery parked in the middle of it. It was pretty shocking.” Scientists had been monitoring the site for a decade, gathering valuable data on the critically endangered swift parrot. Just 2000 remain in the wild.

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Italy’s olive crisis intensifies as deadly tree disease spreads

By Alison Abbott
Nature
November 13, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A vicious bacterium that is devastating southern Italy’s valuable olive groves is still spreading years after it was identified, because of opposition to measures meant to contain the pathogen. After months of inaction, authorities in the Puglia region have now resumed efforts to track the spread of the bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, which causes a disease called olive quick decline syndrome (OQDS) that cannot be cured or eradicated. But scientists say that the delays in implementing disease-containment measures have added to the growing risk that the infection will spread out of the Puglian peninsula, the region contained within the heel of Italy’s ‘boot’, and towards olive groves in Italy’s main landmass.

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Logging must stop in Melbourne’s biggest water supply catchment

By David lindenmayer and Chris Taylor
The Conversation Canada
November 15, 2018
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Continued logging in Melbourne’s water catchments could reduce the city’s water supply by the equivalent of 600,000 people’s annual water use every year by 2050, according to our analysis. We calculated water lost due to logging in the Thomson Catchment, which is the city’s largest and most important water supply catchment. Around 60% of Melbourne’s water is stored here. Since the 1940s, 45% of the catchment’s ash forests (including mountain and alpine ash forest) have been logged. There are plans to log up to a further 17% of these forests under the VicForest’s existing logging plan. …The Thomson Catchment is the only one of Melbourne’s large water supply catchments open to logging. Given the critical importance of the Thomson Catchment, our work clearly indicates the Victorian government needs to cease logging and prioritise the supply of water to the people of Melbourne.
 

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