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Category Archives: Forestry

Forestry

Vimy Ridge oak tree honouring Canadian soldiers could soon be planted on Buckingham Palace grounds

By Patty Winsa
The Toronto Star
November 10, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, International

An oak tree with Toronto roots could soon be planted at Buckingham Palace as part of a project to memorialize thousands of Canadian soldiers killed in the First World War battle at Vimy Ridge. The tree was grown from acorns sent to Queen Elizabeth II from the Vimy Ridge woodlot in Scarborough, which was planted by Leslie Miller, a Canadian soldier who returned from that war with a collection of acorns picked up from the ravaged battlefield in France. “I thought it would be appropriate to offer a tree to Her Majesty,” says Patricia Sinclair, a Toronto resident and volunteer with the Vimy Ridge Legacy Corporation, which sent the acorns. “It connects those soldiers who went to fight for King and Country.” About 3,600 Canadians were killed, and a total of 11,000 injured, during four days of fighting before the ridge was in Allied hands.

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Mt. Pine Beetle Invasion on the rise in Calgary Region Forests

By Noel Edey
Cochrane Now
November 11, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The invasive mountain pine beetle population has claimed more than twice as many trees in the Calgary Forest Area than last year. A recent fall survey revealed the wood-boring insect claimed 3,300 trees in 2019 compared to 1,400 in 2018. Mike Undershultz, senior forest entomologist with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, says they will continue to implement an aggressive attack to minimize their impact upon pine stands. …”The population is increasing a little bit. …”What we’re trying to do on a landscape level is to break down the connectivity of the pines to create more of a mosaic of age classes and those types of kinds of things. So, in the event of a worst-case scenario where beetles come steamrolling over a forest, potentially the damage is not going to be as bad in a situation where we’ve implemented the strategy.”

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How to get more forest fibre in British Columbia

By Jim Hilton
The Williams Lake Tribune
November 10, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In the Cariboo and many other parts of the province as our forest inventory improved and we realized how much volume was attributed the smaller diameter trees especially pine, the industry evolved to use the so called inferior parts of the forest fibre basket. …As described in a July 1999 government document limited commercial thinning has been undertaken in British Columbia, the majority in the Sayward Forest on Vancouver Island. …A recent article in the logging and sawmilling journal author Jim Stirling provides some interesting background on commercial thinning potential in this province. …“Although unusual circumstances have combined to create the necessity of interest in commercial thinning techniques, they may well prove to have an accepted role in forest management. …The experience with thinning systems in Scandinavia and other European countries with forest industries can only help Canadian forest companies. 

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New fuel break surrounding Mount Baldy community complete

The Osoyoos Times
November 11, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

With funding from the Forest Enhancement Society of B.C., the Mount Baldy community is now protected by a 350-metre-wide fuel break, surrounding Baldy Mountain Resort, the community, and the resort’s future sub-divisions. The last wildfire moved through the area in the 1930s and since that time, a stand of dense fire-prone trees has grown back. The over $279,000 in funding from FESBC was critical in protecting the community from future wildfires, the resort stated. …The goal was to thin trees in a patchy distribution to form islands of trees and avoid clearcutting the area, a project fully supported by the provincial government’s Mountain Resorts Branch. The harvesting work covered 90 hectares on the southern perimeter of the resort and was completed by Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd., Lusted Logging, and Mike Closs Logging.

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‘You’re sitting on a jewel, Revelstoke’: Wilderness society proposes new park

By Liam Harrap
Pentiction Western News
November 9, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A non-profit society is proposing a new provincial park north of Revelstoke. The 8,408 hectare Rainbow-Jordan Wilderness encompasses significant tracts of ancient inland rain forest. “It’s an unknown wilderness area,” said Amber Peters, biologist with the Valhalla Wilderness Society in New Denver, B.C. Peters gave a talk earlier this month at the Community Centre in Revelstoke about the proposal. …According to Parks Canada, B.C. has the world’s only temperate inland rain forest, all of which is found in the Columbia Mountains. …The society submitted the proposal to the provincial government last spring, along with two others, including the Quesnel Lake Wilderness and the Selkirk Mountain Caribou Park Proposal, which is a 156,461-hectare area on the south end of Glacier National Park.

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Alberta firefighters call for reversal of cut to helicopter rappel program

By Travis McEwan
CBC News
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Firefighters who rappel from helicopters to fight forest fires called on the Alberta government Thursday to reverse its decision to end the program. The end of the Wildland Firefighter Rappel Program [RAP] was revealed Wednesday by Forestry Minister Devin Dreeshen who called it a budget decision and said the government is putting priority on two other groups of firefighters who are used more often.  Close to 63 firefighters have been employed and trained by the program. The UCP government will work to place them in other crews, he said. …Mike Dempsey, a vice-president of the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees who represents … firefighters in the RAP program said, “I’m a bit shocked and saddened, of course. It seems like they’re wanting to save a bit of money, but it’s going to cost them a whole lot more in suppression costs.”

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Log truck driving course offered for free at college

The Kelowna Daily Courier
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Job seekers looking to step into the cab and start up careers as professional log truck drivers can tap into a tuition-free training program coming to Okanagan College. The professional log truck driver program will be offered by the college in Oliver, starting Nov. 18. …It’s being offered tuition-free for eligible students who meet the definition of an employment insurance client, are eligible for WorkBC case management, have been referred by a WorkBC case manager and who possess a valid driver’s licence. …“This program was designed by the B.C. Forest Safety Council in consultation with log truck and truck harvesting advisory group,” said Dennis Silverstone, the college’s director of continuing studies and corporate training.

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Syncrude marks three billion barrel milestone with $3 million community investments

By Laura Beamish
Fort McMurrary Today
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Syncrude is donating $3 million to programs and initiatives in the region to commemorate hitting a three billion barrel milestone at their Mildred Lake project last week. …A number of new investments will be funded, including the University of Alberta Faculty of Engineering for student engagement in northern communities, Inside Education’s Wood Buffalo Environment Education Project, a machining program with the Fort McMurray Catholic School District, a non-destructive apprenticeship program with CAREERS: The Next Generation, an e-learning program with the Fort McKay First Nation and an education training program with the Mikisew Cree First Nation. Tree Canada Operation Releaf program will also be included. The program is committed to helping people in the community replant forested areas affected by the 2016 wildfires.

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Province moves forward with leaders’ table on caribou recovery in the Peace

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Premier John Horgan met with Chief Ken Cameron of the Saulteau First Nations and Chief Roland Willson of the West Moberly First Nations on Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019, to discuss moving forward with a leaders’ table to support the recovery of the endangered central group of the southern mountain caribou, while maintaining the social and economic well-being of communities in the northeast region of British Columbia. The leaders’ table will build on the work initiated by Minister Doug Donaldson and staff with the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. The leaders’ table will discuss next steps in moving forward to implement the Intergovernmental Partnership Agreement that was negotiated in response to the threat to the caribou identified under the federal Species at Risk Act. The leaders’ table will also review potential approaches to mitigating natural resource and land use impacts of the agreement, while advancing caribou protection.

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Greater Victoria mayors reach urban deer standstill with province

By Nicole Crescenzi
Victoria News
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mayors of Greater Victoria are back to square one in exploring additional options for urban deer management. In September, mayors from eight municipalities…penned a letter the the Ministry of Forests in hopes of arranging a meeting with Minister Doug Donaldson. Leading up to the letter, the mayors discussed how a regional effort needed to be taken for deer management…Any form of wildlife management must go through the province. …“As a group of eight mayors we were very disappointed that we could not get a meeting, neither here nor at the UBCM,” Esquimalt Mayor Barbara Desjardins said. …Black Press reached out to the Ministry of Forests on why a meeting couldn’t be arranged. “We welcome an invitation for staff to meet with the mayors regarding options on urban deer control. If options are not identified through discussions with staff, the Minister is pleased to discuss real or perceived barriers”, said a ministry spokesperson.

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Public engagement session focuses on forest sector renewal

By Trevor Hewitt
BC Local News
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

SMITHERS, BC — With a dark cloud of uncertainty looming over the Province’s forestry industry… the Province’s Ministry of Forest… held a number of Interior Forest Sector Renewal public engagement sessions. That included a Smithers session, which was held in late July. The notes… highlighted five specific categories as most important. The first, Forest Tenure and Fibre Supply, saw many make suggestions about utilizing ground fibre and hauling all wood to the roadside to decrease the amount that must be burnt. …The second topic, Climate Change and Forest Carbon, focused on the environmental impact of the industry. …The third topic, Manufacturing Capacity and Fibre Utilization, focused on ensuring the long-term economic viability of the industry through finding more uses for wood and by increasing market diversification. …Similarly, the fourth topic of Wood Products Innovation focused on utilizing innovation to foster economic stability in the industry. …The last topic was Reconciliation with Indigenous Communities.

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Sicamous executing million dollar project for wildfire reduction

By John Lawless
Castanet
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire risk reduction project valued at close to a million dollars will be rolled out to help protect the Sicamous area. This includes protection for important infrastructure such as the water reservoir and essential transportation corridors. The District of Sicamous will see improvements from removing forest fuels in the development of a mountain bike park to give citizens better and safe access. “Our community welcomes a large number of tourists each year,” says Joe McCulloch, the Operations Manager for the DOS. “The work we’re doing now will not only help protect our local community and important infrastructure from the threat of wildfire but will also create additional opportunities for people to safely access the land for their recreational pursuits.”

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Wildfire Risk Reduction Project in the Shuswap Ready to Go!

Forest Enhancement Society of BC
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A wildfire risk reduction project, valued at almost $1,000,000, is ready to roll out to provide greater protection from wildfires around the perimeter of Sicamous. The Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. project will protect important infrastructure owned by the District of Sicamous (DOS) like its water reservoir and vital transportation corridors. The DOS will also realize another benefit from the work removing forest fuels in the development of a mountain bike park in the treatment area to allow for greater and safer access for citizens. The project will enhance the utilization of forest fibre by chipping the debris and utilizing that biomass for heat and eventually power.

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‘You’re losing a significant fighting force’: United Conservative Party scraps wildfire rappel program

By Sammy Hudes
Calgary Herald
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A program employing more than 60 firefighters trained to rappel into areas where new wildfires have begun is being scrapped by the UCP government as it looks to “modernize” the province’s wildfire response strategy. Former firefighters of the unit are criticizing the move, saying it will make it more difficult for crews to efficiently tackle new wildfires across the province. …The UCP is also cutting staffing for close to 30 wildfire lookout towers and one air tanker unit. Minister of Agriculture and Forestry Devin Dreeshen said the UCP government is “making changes to align with best practices in other provinces.” …But Jamie Parker, who spent four years in the rappel program, said losing it will make it far more difficult to deal with Alberta’s growing trend of wildfires. …NDP Leader Rachel Notley said the rappel unit has played a key role in preventing further wildfires that match the scope of the 2016 event in Fort McMurray.

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Alberta ends program for firefighters rappelling from helicopters

By Lauren Krugel
Canadian Press in CBC News
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Alberta government is ending a program for firefighters who rappel from helicopters to fight forest fires. Forestry Minister Devin Dreeshen says in a statement that crews have been rappelling into locations in less than two per cent of Alberta wildfires. Dreeshen says the province will work with the firefighters to place them on other crews if they want next summer. He says the United Conservative government is putting a priority on two other groups of firefighters who are used more often. Helitack crews land as close as they can to a fire and hike into it, and Firetack crews are made up of contract workers. NDP Opposition Leader Rachel Notley says the decision to get rid of the rappel unit puts public safety and people’s homes at risk.

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Bat population in Nova Scotia seems to be slowly recovering after being decimated by fungus

By Ian Fairclough
The Chronicle Journal
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The bat population seems to be starting to make a slow recovery after it was decimated by white nose syndrome, which started to rip through the province’s bat colonies – and others throughout North America – in 2011. Last week, a New Brunswick researcher reported the discovery of several maternity colonies with healthy bats and pups, leading to a glimmer of optimism for the future of bats in that province.  Donald Sam, a species at risk biologist with Nova Scotia’s Department of Lands and Forestry, said the population here also seems to be starting the long road to recovery. “We’re a little ahead of New Brunswick, not to compare,” Sam said. “We identified maternity sites four years ago, mostly on Crown land because that’s what we have easy access to.” He said department staff have gone back to those sites several times, and the numbers are growing over the four years.

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Paper gluttons killing forests

Letter by Gary Saunders, retired forester
The Chronicle Herald
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Re: “Forestry out of control,” Bob Bancroft’s Oct. 28 letter against industrial clearcutting. He ignores or forgets the real reason for this practice: our insatiable appetite for cheap paper. In this, we Canadians outdo every other nation on Earth but one: America. Even a decade ago, we averaged a quarter tonne a year per person. Now, despite the internet’s urge to “go paperless,” it’s likely even higher thanks to the overpackaging of internet-shopped goods. …Really, anyone who uses toilet paper is complicit in clearcutting somewhere. So let’s quit this holier-than-thou, juvenile name-calling, take our share of the blame and get on with curbing our throwaway lifestyle. Europeans, no longer blessed with ample woodlands, can teach us how.

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Forest fire numbers in Nova Scotia this year were the lowest since the 1940s

By Ian Fairclough
The Chronicle Herald
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

The summer of 2019 was hot. And dry. But despite that, the province saw its lowest number of wildfires in more than 70 years. There were 143 fires across the province this year, the fewest since there were 110 in 1948, statistics from the province’s Department of Lands and Forestry show. The low number was due in large part to the wet spring, and then the humid summer, says Kara McCurdy, the department’s fire prevention officer. “It doesn’t really matter how cool it is, it can be really cool outside and dry, and fires will spread,” she said. Low humidity and high wind will mean a better chance of fire spread, but high humidity and low wind means it’s not really going to go anywhere.” And that was what much of the summer was like.

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Staffed lookout towers are an effective tool for firefighters

By Michael Guerin, public safety and emergency management specialist
Wildfire Today
November 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

Even in our technologically advanced age, most reports of fires are called in by observant folks, often using cellphones. The ubiquity of these devices means an increased ability to detect wildfire more quickly. But a fair portion of California still has poor or no cellular coverage. Utilities that shut down power as a wildfire-prevention measure in fire-danger zones also render cellphones in many areas unusable as cell towers lose power. And as crowded as California can seem, large areas of the state are relatively unpopulated, not dense with residents or hikers who might quickly report a fire. Yet a key firefighting tool that existed in the pre-cellphone era is missing — watchers who were paid to scan the horizon for fires. At one point, there were more than 9,000 lookout towers in the United States, placed atop hills and mountains where individuals — also referred to as lookouts — worked alone each summer to watch for and report fires. 

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Gianforte, forestry officials confront forest management in Missoula

By Madison Doner
NBC Montana
November 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Greg Gianforte & Jim Hubbard

Montana business leaders and forestry officials discussed management of federal forest lands in western Montana at the Missoula Smokejumper Center. U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte, along with USDA Undersecretary Jim Hubbard, heard from officials on Thursday.  A smokejumper showed Hubbard and Gianforte things like how their gear is made to how they prepare to fight wildfires. They also talked about what can be done to keep our forests alive. “We have a forest health crisis which is affecting wildlife, it’s affecting conservation, it’s affecting our communities,” said Gianforte. Loggers, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and timber community leaders told Gianforte that Montana’s forests need to be more actively managed to protect what forest we have left. …Hubbard says the forest is overgrown and is at the age where it needs to regenerate, but that’s not the only concern.

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Forest health is a delicate dance of life and death, experts say

By Lex Talamo
Yakima Herald Republic
November 10, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On state-owned land in the Elk View timber sale, an area about 12 miles northwest of Naches, a cluster of pines stands together on the edge of a dirt road.  …To elk hunters or hikers who frequent the serpentine, gravel roads leading through the forest off State Route 410 and Nile Road, the densely packed trees might offer cover or a beautiful contrast to the swaths of meadow interspersed with the trees.But to Chris Brandon and Brendan Cockrum, foresters with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, the close-knit trees portend disaster. Limited nutrients in the soil dispersed to the dense trees yield weaker adult trees that are more susceptible to insect infestation, disease and, ultimately, death. Trees also become more susceptible to “ladder” fires — wildfires that start on the ground, travel up a tree, then spread to that tree’s neighbors.

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Oregon among world’s fastest tree growing areas

By Oregon Employment Department
Oregon Natural Resources Report
November 11, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Oregon is one of the world’s great tree-growing areas. The state’s soils and climate provide ideal conditions to grow such commercially viable species as Douglas fir and ponderosa pine. Forests cover more than 30 million of Oregon’s 62 million acres – almost half of the state’s landmass.  Firms in the forestry and logging sector grow and harvest timber on a long production cycle, generally of 10 years or more. Timber production requires natural forests or suitably large areas of land that are available long term. Oregon’s often mountainous and remote terrain, in both public and private ownership, provides that land base. … According to the Oregon Employment Department’s covered employment statistics, the subsector’s 755 firms employed 9,009 people statewide and added $546 million in payroll to Oregon’s economy in 2018. Employment was in slow decline between 2005 and 2009 and has since leveled off. It is currently varying seasonally in a band between 8,000 and 10,000 jobs. 

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‘We depend on the Tongass’: Alaskans fight to save US’s largest national forest

By Nina Lakhani
The Guardian
November 12, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Tribal leaders, fishermen and environmentalists from Alaska will testify before Congress on Wednesday in a bid to save America’s biggest national forest – the latest battle against the Trump administration’s assault on environmental protections.  The Tongass national forest, one of the world’s last intact temperate rainforests which plays a crucial role in fighting the climate crisis, is under threat of logging as Alaska seeks exemption from the Roadless Rule, which protects millions of acres of pristine forests across the US. …The Roadless Rule prevents mass clearcutting of trees in undeveloped forested areas and is seen as one of the most broadly supported environmental protections in the US. …Wednesday’s hearing by the Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Land (NPFPL) will hear evidence on the potentially devastating consequences for the Tongass and its people.

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California has 33 million acres of forest. This company is training artificial intelligence to scour it all for wildfire

By Peter Holley
The Washington Post
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Multiple factors often align to make California wildfires unusually hard to contain: hurricane-force winds that sweep toward the coastline, steep and often rough terrain, drought conditions exacerbated by climate change and finite resources spread thin by a vast landscape covered in wilderness. …California has 33 million acres of forest, far too much land for state agencies to monitor simultaneously. By the time reports of fires reach authorities and resources are mobilized, many hours, and sometimes days, can pass. …A San Francisco-based technology company called Chooch AI is trying to narrow that gap with the help of artificial intelligence, reducing the time between a fire’s eruption and the moment it’s spotted by people. The company, which is working with state agencies, researchers and technologists, is working to develop an AI tool that would scour hyper-detailed imagery from satellites for evidence of wildfires largely invisible to the naked eye. 

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Voters could be asked to decide future of Oregon’s forestry practices

By Sam Stites
Capital Press
November 10, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

SALEM — A political fight over how Oregon manages its forests and timber activity could resolved by voters next fall. Two separate sets of ballot initiatives with contrary views of forestry in Oregon have been filed with the state Elections Division. One side seeks to insulate current practices from change and the other aims to create new regulations that prohibit certain techniques they feel are harmful to the environment and Oregonians. This week, Jim James and his fellow chief petitioners filed initiatives they’re calling the “Health Forests and Wildfire Reduction Plan.” They would keep the regulation of forest and timber practices on all state and privately owned lands in the hands of professional foresters, scientists and the Oregon Board of Forestry. The plan would require the state Forestry Department to report new forestry regulations to the state board for review.

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Salvage logging approved near Seeley Lake

By Eve Byron
The Missoulian
November 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Seeley Lake Ranger District plans to move forward with a second salvage sale for trees on lands burned during the 2017 Liberty fire.Initial salvage harvests took place on 186 acres shortly after the fire was contained. The new project, called Liberty II Fire Salvage, targets insect-infested trees, but also will remove dead, dying and diseased trees on 484 additional acres about 13 miles southwest of Seeley Lake. Existing roads will be used to access the timber, with the work taking place in winter when the ground is frozen. District Ranger Quinn Carver said he expects the work will begin in December and wrap up within a year. …“This decision reflects an important step forward on the Seeley Lake Ranger District as we continue to address and respond to the impacts of the 2017 fire season,” Carver said.

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Timber interests propose three pro-logging ballot measures

By Ted Sickinger
The Oregonian
November 8, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A group of retired foresters backed by the timber industry filed three initiative petitions this week looking to counter what they say are “radical anti-forestry ballot initiatives being pursued by environmental extremists.” The measures would give Oregon counties and the wood products industry more control over how members of the state Board of Forestry are selected. They would amend the state constitution, requiring the state to fully compensate woodland owners for any new regulations that eliminate their ability to log, such as expanded no-touch stream buffers. And they would require that the forestry board use “non-biased” and “peer reviewed science” to come up with consensus-based policies.  Jim James, a forestry consultant and executive director of the Oregon Small Woodlands Association, is one of the chief petitioners. He said he was not acting on behalf of the association, though it is mentioned in the initiative petitions. 

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Trump Administration Won’t List Spotted Owl as Endangered

By Matthew Renda
The Courthouse News
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Thursday it will not list the California spotted owl as an endangered species. “The Service determined that California spotted owls continue to inhabit their historic range, and the species is not in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range, nor is it likely to become so in the foreseeable future,” the agency said in a release issued Thursday. The announcement drew the ire of conservation organizations that continue to insist the bird of prey’s population is dwindling due to habitat destruction in the forests of Northern California and the Pacific Northwest. …The spotted owl is currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

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Federal Officials To Propose ‘Threatened’ Status For The Pacific Fisher

By Monica Samayoa
Oregon Public Broadcasting
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing Endangered Species Act protections for the Pacific fisher, a relative of the weasel that persists in small numbers in forests of southwest Oregon and Northern California. The agency’s proposal, set to be published Thursday in the Federal Register, come days after the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service entered into agreements with five timber companies and the state of Oregon to protect the Pacific fisher on nearly 2 million acres of forestland in Oregon. The proposal to extend “threatened” status to Pacific fishers prohibits activities that bring harm, injury or death to the carnivorous mammals. It provides exceptions — essentially allowing the inadvertent killing of these protected animals — if it happens during activities like habitat management or “forestry management activities for the purposes of reducing the risk or severity of wildfires.”

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Tamástslikt’s “Timber Culture” exhibit reveals multi-cultural logging industry

The Union Bulletin
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Gwen Trice

PENDLETON — In 1923, a Missouri lumber company built a town in Northeastern Oregon named Maxville. Hundreds of loggers left Arkansas and Mississippi to live and work there. Many brought their families, and many were African Americans. While the town has since disappeared, the Maxville story is still unfolding. “Timber Culture,” created by the Maxville Heritage Interpretive Center, is an inclusive look at Oregon’s multicultural logging industry. The exhibit opens Friday, Nov. 8, and runs through Dec. 31 at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, 47106 Wildhorse Boulevard. …Gwen Trice, whose father was one of the Maxville loggers, spearheaded the exhibition project.

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Forest Service sees resistance to Roadless Rule rollback at Ketchikan meeting

By Eric Stone
KRBD Ketchikan Radio
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service kicked off a series of public meetings all over Southeast Alaska this week to discuss why it is seeking a full exemption to the Roadless Rule in the Tongass National Forest. The federal agency explained it didn’t anticipate big changes in the Tongass as a result of the exemption. But some in the crowd weren’t convinced. The Forest Service’s second in command in D.C., Chris French, faced largely skeptical crowds in Ketchikan. He explained that his boss, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue opted for making the Tongass National Forest fully exempt from the Roadless Rule because that’s been the position of the state of Alaska all along. …Southeast Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Chairman Donald Hernandez fired back. He says that ignores consultations with subsistence groups, tribes and public comment that have been clear: keep the Roadless Rule in place.

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Oregon’s forest management a boon for environment and economics

By Jennifer Beathe, professional forester, Starker Forests
The Oregonian
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Jennifer Beathe

I was pleased to read the third installment of The Oregonian Failing Forestry series (“Failing Forestry: The $1 billion lawsuit that could decide the fate of Oregon’s state forests,” Oct. 27) that highlighted the significant value the Oregon timber industry provides to rural Oregonians in terms of high-paying, family-wage jobs. Whether they are mill jobs, trucking jobs, or forestry jobs – the timber industry pays higher than the state average wage and employs more than 60,000 Oregonians, mostly in rural counties. These are critical jobs for those economies. Fortunately, timber provides more than just economics for Oregonians, in spite of the false dichotomy the article seemed to express that Oregonians must somehow choose between monetary value of timber harvest and environmental values of clean water, wildlife habitat and recreation opportunities. That is simply not true – forest management in Oregon can, and does, produce both. That’s what the Oregon Forest Practice Act was designed to do.

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Exporting Georgia’s Market-based Approach for Sustainable Forest Management

By One Dwivedi, University of Georgia’s Warnell School of Forestry
Global Atlanta
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Puneet Dwivedi

Georgia is gifted with abundant and healthy forests that cover about 24 million acres or about 65 percent of total land in the state. …But are economics and sustainability always at odds? …This has led my team of researchers at the University of Georgia to examine whether market-based, non-state forest governance works and whether it can fit with existing and evolving government regulations to encourage sustainable forestry. By way of background, the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI)’s Fiber Sourcing Standard encourages best practices in forest management. …The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is particularly useful in Georgia. …Our study found that the implementation rate of best management practices was higher on those family-owned forestlands which were located within the procurement areas of mills certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing standard. This suggests a voluntary, market-based approach to encouraging good forestry in Georgia is working.

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The Victorian Government’s killing off one of the state’s oldest industries — but was it close to death anyway?

By Richard Willingham
ABC News, Australia
November 9, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Mick McKinnell made a lot of money chopping down trees, but the former Healesville logger saw the writing on the wall two years ago and swung the axe. “There is no economic forest left out there that can have a financial benefit, so we just walked,” he told the ABC. …Warnings have existed for years that native timber logging for hardwood trees is in dire straits, and this week Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews took the bold political step to ban native timber logging by 2030. Andrews is not the first Premier to be pressured to act on forestry, and he was under the pump to move last term. …Under the Premier’s plan, the amount of wood made available for the chop will drop by 25 per cent in 2025, with another 25 per cent over the next four years.

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LIDAR technology leads Brazilian team to 30 story tall Amazon tree

By Jenny Gonzales
Mongabay.com
November 11, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A combination of scientific curiosity and chance has led a research team that was creating a detailed forest biomass map of the Brazilian Amazon to a unique discovery: a tall tree for the record books. An individual red angelim (Dinizia excelsa Ducke), discovered in a remote area on the border of Pará and Amapá states, is 88.5 meters (more than 290 feet) tall — the equivalent of a 30 story building. It is the tallest canopy tree ever found in the region, which averages tree heights of 45 meters (147 feet). The discovery, news of which was first published this August in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, occurred while INPE (the National Institute for Space Research) was working on the map — meant to improve Amazon biomass estimation methods, and to enhance carbon emission estimation models due to land use change.

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Victorian Government forestry announcement a “kick in guts for timber workers and timber

By the Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union
Mirage News
November 9, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Victorian Government’s plan to end native forestry has been slammed as a kick in the guts to Victorian timber workers and the communities which rely on the industry. The Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union said that while no one denied the industry faced challenges, the Government’s response was deeply flawed, completely inadequate, and far from being a viable or fair transition plan. “This is not the way to respond to an industry facing challenges,” Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union National Secretary Michael O’Connor said. “This announcement isn’t a viable plan for the future, it’s an embarrassing, motley, half-baked, rag-tagged, mishmash of talking points.  “It is a stupid, heartless decision that is out of character for a Government that had built a reputation of supporting blue-collar jobs and regional communities.

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‘It’s my whole life’: Logger reacts to Victorian native forest logging ban

By Neil Mitchell
3AW 693 News Talk
November 6, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Premier Daniel Andrews today announced a statewide ban on the logging of native trees. …Industry sources say the ban could cost taxpayers as much as $500 million, due to the need for compensation and the loss of jobs. Brad Meyer from Meyer Log Cartage, a business which logs native timber, said he’s gutted by the news. “It’s my whole life. …so where to from here, I’m not sure,” he told 3AW’s Neil Mitchell. “My whole business revolves around native forest timber harvesting, so without that I don’t have a business at all.” Mr Meyer said he wasn’t consulted at all prior to today’s announcement, and only found out about it this morning. …The native logger said he’ll fight back against the new legislation, which he says will have a “massive” impact on lives. “They haven’t won. I won’t be giving in that easy,” he said.

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Immediate end to old growth logging a big win for people and wildlife

Australian Conservation Foundation
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The immediate end to old growth logging will protect some of Victoria’s most spectacular and intact native forests. In response to the announcement that the Victorian Government will immediately end old growth logging and phase out all native forest logging over the next decade, Jess Abrahams, Nature Campaigner at the Australian Conservation Foundation and a former member of the Forest Industry Taskforce, said: “Victorians love our native forests and wildlife, so this is a major announcement by the Andrews Government, albeit one that is long overdue. An immediate end to old growth logging will protect some of Victoria’s most spectacular and intact native forests. The protection of a further 96,000 hectares of habitat for the vulnerable Greater glider is very good news. The transition from logging native forests to plantations can’t come soon enough – ten years is just too slow for the critically endangered Leadbeater’s possum, which is on the brink of extinction.”

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Immediate end to old-growth logging, as thousands of jobs set to go

By Noel Towell and Rob Harris
The Sydney Morning Herald
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Premier Daniel Andrews says thousands of workers in the timber industry face a “tough transition” as the state government moved on Thursday to end logging of Victoria’s native forests. …Mr Andrews said the government had no choice but to act, with the industry facing a dwindling supply of native timber, down 50 per cent in the past decade, and that a large bush fire might deal the sector a knock-out blow. …“We have taken the time to make sure that this is a transition that is managed, it is not a matter of flicking a switch, that would be the wrong outcome in terms of preserving jobs. …Federal Agriculture Minister Bridget McKenzie said Victoria’s decision to end native timber harvesting was “casting aside an entire industry and workforce”. …”The lack of support and commitment to this sustainable industry is strongly condemned.” She said native forestry was a “sustainable industry”.

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Timber workers worried for jobs and towns as Victorian Government announces plan to end native logging

By Sarah Maunder, Kristian Silva and Mikaela Ortolan
ABC News, Australia
November 7, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Victorian timber workers say their communities will become ghost towns after the Victorian Government announced it will phase out the logging of native trees over the next decade. The Victorian Government will reduce the current level of native timber available for logging from 2024–25. With dwindling supply already restricting the industry, all native timber logging will cease by 2030 under the policy. The Government also announced an immediate ban on logging in old-growth forest. …Brett Robin, a fifth-generation logger from Gippsland, said the State Government’s plan would result in “tens of thousands” of jobs lost. Mr Robin told ABC Radio Melbourne only four trees in every 10,000 were being harvested and regenerated, which meant the rest were left alone. “I’ve harvested areas my grandfather and great-grandfather have harvested, and they’ve all been regenerated.

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