Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Forestry

Forestry

Extensive study finds number of North American birds has dropped by 3 billion since 1970

By Bob Weber
The Canadian Press in The Globe and Mail
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

An extensive study of hundreds of bird species across decades worth of data has for the first time estimated how badly numbers of even the most common birds have shrunk. The paper… concludes the total number of North American birds has dropped by three billion since 1970 – about 30 per cent. Some of the most familiar species have been the hardest hit. “The species like pigeons and house sparrows and starlings…are in steep decline,” said Adam Smith, an Environment Canada scientist and the paper’s co-author. The study, conducted through nine universities and government agencies in Canada and the United States, looked at 529 different kinds of birds. …The current study doesn’t address reasons for the drops, but Mr. Smith said previous research points to probable causes. “Habitat loss and degradation… The loss of that ecological space is the primary driver of population decline for almost all of these birds.”

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Sierra Club memoir all about dedication

By Lindsay Kines
The Times-Colonist
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

Elizabeth May says she experienced a “Frank Capra moment” while reading Diane Pinch’s new history of the Sierra Club in B.C. Just as Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life imagined …Canada’s Green Party leader began to wonder what BC might look like today if activists behind the Sierra Club had never existed. …May says she envisions walking through one bad development after another in a “dark place.” …That hasn’t happened, of course, as Pinch documents in her detailed history of the club. Instead, dozens of successful campaigns over the years… have helped preserve vast swaths of B.C.’s wilderness. …The book ends with a… call to action in a time of climate change, and Pinch admits it’s a “scary issue for most people these days, with all the changes going on with forest fires and extreme weather.”.

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“Enough smoke to blot out the starts”: Watching the world burn in British Columbia

By Naomi Klein
Vanity Fair
September 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, United States

The news from the natural world these days is mostly about water, and understandably so. We heard about the record-setting amounts of water that Hurricane Harvey dumped on Houston. …Yet, for large parts of North America, Europe, and Africa, the summer of 2017 was not about water at all. In fact, it was about its absence; about land so dry and heat so oppressive that forested mountains exploded into smoke like volcanoes. …For millions of people from California to Greenland, Oregon to Portugal, British Columbia to Montana, Siberia to South Africa, the summer of 2017 was the summer of fire. And more than anything else, it was the summer of ubiquitous, inescapable smoke. …Over the next week, British Columbia blazed through the record books. By mid-August, the fires had broken the provincial record for the most land burned in one year: 3,453 square miles. 

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Canadian National Railway and Tree Canada Announce Major Investment to Support Winnipeg’s Tree Canopy

By Canadian National Railway
Globe News Wire
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

WINNIPEG — On the occasion of CN’s 100th anniversary, CN is announcing its participation in Mayor Brian Bowman’s Million Tree Challenge. This investment in Winnipeg’s greenspaces is being done with the support, partnership and expertise of Tree Canada, the leading national organization dedicated to improving the lives of Canadians by planting and nurturing trees. CN’s contribution to the Mayor’s Million Tree Challenge is part of CN’S multi-year commitment to Tree Canada to improve and expand urban canopies in major Canadian cities. Winnipeg was selected by CN and Tree Canada as the recipient of the 2020 donation.  The million dollar commitment will enable CN and Tree Canada to plant tens thousands of trees in Winnipeg. CN invites other Winnipeg based companies to join the cause.

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Mayor challenges Winnipeggers to plant 1 million new trees as canopy faces threats from disease, pests

CBC News
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Brian Bowman

As disease and pests threaten the future of Winnipeg’s tree canopy, Mayor Brian Bowman is asking Winnipeggers to get involved in saving one of the city’s defining features. The mayor issued a challenge to the city’s residents: plant one million trees over the next 20 years, or by the time Winnipeg’s population is expected to crack the seven-digit mark. …The mayor said threats like the emerald ash borer beetle and Dutch elm disease pose a serious risk to Winnipeg’s trees — affecting up to two-thirds of the city’s trees. …Bowman said the initiative will challenge individuals, non-profits and private businesses to help by planting trees on their property, volunteering to plant trees in other spaces or donating to Tree Canada who will support efforts to plant more trees in Winnipeg. The charity also received a $1-million donation from the Canadian National Railway to kick start the One Million Tree Challenge. 

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Northern Sask. residents want boreal forest off the chopping block

CBC News
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sylvia McAdam

Sylvia McAdam remembers the medicine she once picked from the land near Big River, Sask. She can’t find it now — and says it never returned after the forested area was chopped. She described how the area has changed post-clearcut. More wind passes through the exposed land, but there is an absence of wildlife. The waterways have changed and the trees on the fringes of the cut are falling. There will be more tree-harvesting in the north, as Sakâw Askiy Management Inc. moves forward on its 20-year plan for the 3.3 million hectares of boreal forest north of Prince Albert. About 19,900 hectares per year are scheduled for harvest in the first decade, and 18,800 hectares in the second. Forestry follows mining as one of the biggest industries in the province.  “​I’m not going to see it come back in my lifetime, maybe my grandchildren, and it’s not going to come back the same way,” McAdam said. 

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Forestry celebrated at annual Logger Sports Show

By Dara Hill
The Merritt Herald
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Logger Sports Show put forestry into focus last weekend in Merritt. Featuring talented carvers, laughing loggers and truckers eager to show off their stuff, the fourth annual event kicked off National Forestry Week in Merritt and gave locals the chance to celebrate and learn about the industry. “It was a huge success, especially looking at participation and community involvement,” said organizer Jerry Canuel. …“Despite the really difficult times, you get people like Frank Etchart coming down from Nadina Logging, who have not worked all summer,” said Canuel. “But yet he’s out there and his guys are showing up and they’re volunteering their time and effort and trying to and make it right for everybody. More than 50 logging companies had their trucks on display.

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Telkwa mayor wants Province to tackle spruce beetle outbreak

By Marisca Bakker
Terrace Standard
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

“It’s an epidemic,” Mayor Brad Layton said …describing the spruce beetle outbreak. He wants more to be done to stop the infestation and said those in charge of it are doing a ‘piss-poor’ job. The total estimated spruce beetle attack in the Omineca Region is approximately 341,000 hectares, most of which is in the Prince George Natural Resource District. This is up from approximately 210,000 hectares of spruce beetle-infested forest detected in 2016. …The effect of spruce beetles differs from the pine beetle in that it is harder to identify trees that have been affected. It can take over a year for trees to display signs of stress after being attacked…. However, Layton said this beetle can be stopped easily. …“This is our future, it is our community’s future,” added Layton. “If we want to keep a timber industry, they need to start funding it appropriately.”

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Declines in the southern caribou population will continue to happen if the Ministry doesn’t put the Kootenays on the map as a priority: Wildsight

BC Local News
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C.’s Forests Minister Doug Donaldson recently announced that the province will be expanding additional protection areas in the Peace region, but not in the majority of B.C. that lies west of the Rocky Mountains. As Tom Fletcher reported, protection strategies have been expanded in recent years, including snowmobile restrictions and extensive forest protection zones. …Donaldson says that analysts are looking around at the herds needing protection outside of the peace region, and that enough protection is already in place. …Local environmental group Wildsight disagrees. Eddie Petryshen, Wildsight’s Conservation Coordinator, says that Caribou habitat protection is absolutely necessary in the B.C. Interior. …Petryshen says that it’s not just about protecting caribou, but other species of animals that depend on old growth forests, which is where caribou thrive. …“Caribou are one of the oldest mammals on the planet… Now, they are just barely hanging on in these remote areas and those areas need to be protected.”

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B.C. Interior caribou protection area big enough, minister says

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Additional caribou protection areas are needed in the Peace region, but not in the majority of B.C. that lies west of the Rocky Mountains, Forests Minister Doug Donaldson says. Residents of the Kootenays and Cariboo regions packed public meetings this spring to demand details of a proposed caribou protection strategy. They were concerned about federal demands to expand industrial and recreational no-go zones in an effort to protect dwindling herds. …The province accepted Lekstrom’s recommendation to put a moratorium on “new high-impact forestry and mining activities” in the Peace region for two years, while consultation continues on restrictions that could shut down some forest operations. …The federal government was preparing an emergency order under the Species at Risk Act to impose new restrictions, citing climate change and habitat disturbance as key factors in the population decline. 

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2019 Report Shows Community Forests are Important for Rural BC

BC Community Forest Association
September 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Victoria and the Territories of Xwsepsum (Esquimalt) and Lekwungen (Songhees) First Nations: The BC Community Forest Association (BCCFA) is pleased to share the 2019 Community Forest Indicators Report. The Indicators Report, now in its 5th year, contains analysis of 18 different areas where community forests deliver economic, social, cultural, and environmental benefits to their rural and Indigenous communities and to the province. Along with the quantitative information, the report is filled with stories and photos that further demonstrate the importance of community forests to the sustainable future of these communities and the land that surrounds them. “With mill curtailments and closures occurring across the province, BC has turned its attention to policy reform and transition planning to support resilient forestry communities, reconfigure relationships with Indigenous communities, and take on the challenges of climate change and the risk of wildfire. 

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Building resilience to wildfire in Kimberley’s municipal watersheds

BC Local News
September 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In a presentation to Kimberley City Council, Consultant Robert Gray explained that Kimberley is part of large research project that aims to increase resilience to wildfire, specifically in Kimberley’s Watersheds. …He said that research on the past and future of fire risk in south eastern B.C. is being conducted by him and a team in the Okanagan along with the Ministry of Forests, the Regional Districts and the Ktunaxa Nation. …He adds that they are working with the City to determine the risks, thin out material and “get stuff moving” in the Mark Creek and Matthew Creek watersheds. Part of that is applying to a new grant through the Columbia Basin Trust called the Wildfire Innovation Grant. …Gray says that wildfire risk stems from climate change and rising temperatures. …He adds that in Canada, the spring fire season is expected to grow more than the fall season.

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Timber rights on City of Powell River-owned property might belong to logging company

By Paul Galinski
The Powell River Peak
September 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

POWELL RIVER, BC — Timber rights on a piece of City of Powell River-owned property known as Lot A may still be owned by Island Timberlands. … A letter from resident George Orchiston… making a case for the city to represent the interests of its residents and publicly declare its ownership of timber on Lot A. …The city purchased the 132-acre property in 2017 for the sum of $800,000. …Island Timberlands held an open house in 2015 and presented draft harvest plans to the public. They did draft plans but stepped back, added Brewer. …“Right now, it doesn’t look like the alleged owner of the trees has a plan to harvest them and if they do, that is the time for the city to get involved and work on an agreed harvest plan,” said Doubt. 

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The conflicting ideas of economy and ecology examined in Ellingsen’s work

By Mike Davis
BC Local News
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cortes Island photographer David Ellingsen has a fair bit of internal conflict as a proud, self-described environmentalist whose family history is in logging old growth trees. In fact, Ellingsen’s family name is attached to one of the historic leaps forward in west coast logging, the Ellingsen jack, which largely replaced the Gilchrist jack as the go-to tool for taking huge felled logs out of the soggy coastal woods more efficiently. “But while my father was taking down and milling trees, he was also working towards getting a sustainable, eco-forestry program going on Cortes Island, putting the local community in charge of the rate of harvest on any public lands on the island,” Ellingsen says. …One of his current exhibitions, entitled The Last Stand, is on display at the Museum at Campbell River right now. It’s a collection of works depicting, in some ways, his family history. 

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You Can Visit An Enchanted Forest In BC This Fall & It’s Straight Out Of A Fairy Tale

By Stephanie Hilash
Narcity
September 17, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

B.C. is one of the best places to explore fall as the entire province has tons of little hidden gems. One of the most magical spots in B.C. is the Enchanted Forest. This off the grid location looks like something out of a fairy tale and going to see it in the fall makes it even more surreal.The Enchanted Forest in Revelstoke is possibly the cutest tourist attraction ever. …Open until mid-October, you can romp around the paved path looking at some of the most magical sculptures and treehouses. It will honestly feel like you fell straight into a fairy tale. …If the sculptures and architecture weren’t enough, the trees that surround the forest are pure magic. These skyscraper-like trees create a large canopy of green over your head as you walk. You may even find yourself looking up quite a bit marvelling at the sheer height of them. 

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Pacific Western Brewing planting more than 70,000 seedlings between Prince George and Quesnel

Quesnel Cariboo Observer
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George’s Pacific Western Brewing (PWB) continues to contribute to reforestation efforts in our region. PWB’s “Cariboo Cares” reforestation program continued this summer with the planting of more than 70,000 spruce and lodgepole pine seedlings about 50 kilometres northwest of Quesnel. …The planting area is between Quesnel and Prince George. “This year’s planting comes at a critical time for the forestry-dependent Interior,” said brewery general manager Scott Rattee. “The downturn in the forest sector has taken a heavy toll, with several hundred direct and indirect jobs lost in Prince George and neighbouring Interior communities.” Last year, PWB and its customers funded the planting of thousands of seedlings at the site of the devastating Elephant Hill fire east of 70 Mile House.

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The conflicting ideas of economy and ecology examined in Ellingsen’s work

By Mike Davies
The Campbell River Mirror
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cortes Island photographer David Ellingsen has a fair bit of internal conflict as a proud, self-described environmentalist whose family history is in logging old growth trees. In fact, Ellingsen’s family name is attached to one of the historic leaps forward in west coast logging, the Ellingsen jack. …“But while my father was taking down and milling trees, he was also working towards getting a sustainable, eco-forestry program going on Cortes Island, putting the local community in charge of the rate of harvest on any public lands on the island,” Ellingsen says. “He was thinking not only about the present… but also looking towards the future and realizing that current system of forestry in B.C. and reflected all around the world, for the most part, is not sustainable for the long term.

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Report into massive B.C. wildfire forwarded for consideration of charges

Canadian Press in Victoria Times Colonist
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

KAMLOOPS, B.C. — The RCMP investigation into the cause of a massive wildfire that destroyed homes and charred nearly 2,000 square kilometres of land in British Columbia has now been passed to the BC Prosecution Service for consideration of charges. RCMP Sgt. Janelle Shoihet says the probe into the Elephant Hill blaze in 2017 was complex and lengthy. She says the prosecution service will make a determination about which, if any, charges may be appropriate. Details of the report examining the cause and origin of the blaze will not be released while charges are under consideration. The Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development told CFJC Today news that no charge approval decision had been made and no timeline had been set.

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Do log exports take away jobs in BC?

By Jim Hilton
The Quesnel Cariboo Observer
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

During a radio talk show about the forest industry problems, the topic of log exports came up again. The industry representative was adamant that log exports did not reduce jobs in B.C. …When it comes to exporting logs anywhere, the devil is in the details, and that is made apparent in an article entitled Waste Not, Want Not? Post-Harvest Residual Fibre by Jim Girvan in the Winter 2018 Truck Logger BC magazine. The author describes how more low-quality fibre needs to flow from the primary harvest. …Without a solution, mill closures and job loss may be on the horizon.” Girvan includes information on work done in the interior that may help. FPInnovations Fibre Supply group has developed a new guide to support those wanting to address the issue of how to best use residual material.

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West Chilcotin Fibre Utilization Project a Success Environmental Benefits & Increased Employment

West Chilcotin Forest Products & Forest Enhancement Society of B.C.
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

ANAHIM LAKE, BC: A Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. (FESBC) funded fibre recovery project in the Chilcotin is increasing utilization of forest fibre by 20 per cent and the number of full-time jobs by 20. The FESBC funding is enabling Ulkatcho First Nation-owned West Chilcotin Forest Products (WCFP) to bring forest fibre to market that would normally be left behind or burned as waste in cut blocks. Over the winter and through early spring, WCFP was unable to haul the pulp logs into Bella Coola due to the  severity of seasonal storms that hit the Bella Coola Valley which prevents the safe log hauling, storage and barge loading. A provincial shortage of haul trucks presented an added challenge even if there had have been a good weather window to load the log barges.  “The West Chilcotin plateau lacks the infrastructure many other areas of our province take for granted,” said Stephen James, Executive Director of WCFP. 

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Forest Practices Board releases 2018-19 Annual Report

BC Forest Practices Board
September 12, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The Forest Practices Board has released its annual report for the fiscal year 2018-19, providing an overview of the board’s performance and work from April 2018 to March 2019. Each year, the board randomly selects forestry operations for audit. In 2018, it published the results of 15 audits. “Our auditors evaluate whether forest licensees are in compliance with the Forest and Range Practices Act and the Wildfire Act,” said Kevin Kriese, chair, Forest Practices Board. “This year, four audits found no problems at all, while 11 found issues ranging from failing to comply with requirements for roads and bridges, to not carrying out fire hazard assessments following logging.” The board also responds to public concerns and complaints about forest and range practices. In 2018-19, the board received 61 concerns and eight formal complaints on topics including water quality, biodiversity and old growth forests, visual quality and wildfire. 

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B.C. set a new record for lightning strikes as quiet fire season winds down

By Randy Shore
The Times-Colonist
September 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — B.C. set a record for lightning strikes, but enjoyed the quietest fire season in years thanks to timely rainfall. Environment and Climate Change Canada has recorded 422,000 lightning strikes this year in the province, far above the 18-year average of 266,000. July alone saw 264,344 lightning strikes, said meteorologist Matt MacDonald. …In June, July and August — the meteorological summer — total rainfall was actually below normal in many parts of B.C. and it could have gone terribly wrong for our parched forests. But instead of long, warm spells punctuated by dry lightning storms, electrical activity was accompanied by rain. …The province has spent $125 million fighting fires this season. More than $600 million was spent in each of the past two summers, according to the B.C. Wildfire Service. There are currently no fires of note burning in the province.

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What will it take to save B.C.’s old-growth forests?

By Ken Wu, Endangered Ecosystem Alliance
The Vancouver Sun
September 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The recent fires raging in the Amazon have begun to focus the world’s attention on the destruction of forests in general — including the logging of B.C.’s magnificent, old-growth, temperate rainforests — the grandest forests on earth next to the U.S. redwoods. …The unique features of old-growth forests take centuries to develop — in a province where the forests are re-logged every 60 years on the Coast. As a result, old-growth forests are not a renewable resource under B.C.’s system of forestry and are not replicated by tree-planting. …Indeed, the rest of the western world is focused on logging 50- to 100-year-old second- or third-growth trees. B.C. is one of the very last jurisdictions on earth that still supports the large-scale logging of 500-year-old trees. …The transition to an exclusively second-growth forest industry in B.C. is inevitable. …Conservationists are just advocating that this transition happen now, rather than after the last endangered old-growth stands are gone.

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B.C. predator cull would target 80 per cent of wolves in caribou recovery areas

By Randy Shore
The Times-Colonist
September 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — The provincial government is proposing a predator cull that would kill more than 80 per cent of the wolf population in parts of central British Columbia that are home to threatened caribou herds, according to correspondence from the Ministry of Forests. …“The objective of this wolf reduction program is to reverse caribou population decline in the Tweedsmuir-Entiako, Hart Ranges, and Itcha-Ilgachuz herds,” says a memo signed by Darcy Peel, director of the B.C. Caribou Recovery Program. “To reverse caribou population declines, high rates of wolf removal (>80 per cent) must be achieved.” …A parallel cull is also proposed for the Itcha-Ilgachuz herd area to “remove cougars that have likely begun to focus on caribou as a prey source.” …A 30-day consultation with Indigenous communities and “targeted stakeholders” is underway.

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Mr. Horgan, rein in BCTS

Letter by Norm and Loni Funnell, Roberts Creek
Sunshine Coast Reporter
September 12, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

This letter was sent to B.C. Premier John Horgan. BC Timber Sales (BCTS) is out of control. There have been concerns about BCTS for years and we had hoped that with the NDP forming government, more oversight and control would be put on BCTS. Clearly this has not occurred. We are disappointed and disgusted with your “business as usual” approach to BCTS. Given the climate emergency we are in, now is not the time to be clear-cutting old growth forests as fast as possible. …We are demanding that your government put an immediate moratorium on all old growth logging on public lands controlled by BCTS and that you completely overhaul BCTS. You must change the mindset of the organization so that conservation of our old growth heritage is uppermost in the organization’s mandate.

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How a new tree movement is taking root across Canada

By Mark and Ben Cullen
The Toronto Star
September 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

…Fortunately for all of us, the value of trees is coming into focus, and sharper than ever. Science has proven the many benefits of planting trees and maintaining mature trees. According to a report on the Toronto’s Parks, Forestry and Recreation website, there are 10.2 million trees in the city, which provide 18,000 hectares of canopy cover. …The city is investing in community-led tree planting and stewardship on private land to help reach the 40 per cent target. …To achieve the canopy-cover goal, the Toronto city budget included planting costs for 120,307 trees planted in 2017, with 120,000 more in 2018 and another 120,000 this year and next. …Six years ago, a new not-for-profit organization was born from this column in the Toronto Star. …The coalition is called Trees For Life.

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Port Blandford mayor objects to province’s plans to use access road for forestry harvesting

By Jonathan Parsons
Cape Breton Post
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

PORT BLANDFORD, N.L. — Port Blandford Mayor Chad Holloway said the province’s most recent attempt to access nearby forest for harvesting is both against zoning regulations and dangerous on the highway through town. In an interview Holloway said he found out last month the department of fisheries and land resources wanted to approve harvesting activity in the area surrounding Port Blandford. The clearcutting debate has a storied history for the town. In the beginning of 2018, many residents of the area protested clearcutting and advocated the prevention of planned harvesting both inside and around Port Blandford boundaries. After many public consultations … the town of Port Blandford opted to rezone the areas within the town marked for cutting, and to prevent harvesters from using a resource road in the town to access the cabin country area near the outside of the town. It cited the road’s designated use did not allow for commercial forestry activity.

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TEK Elders, First Nations to take feds to court over forest spraying

By Tom Sasvari
Manitoulin Expositor
September 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

SAGAMOK – About 21 First Nations along the North Shore of Lake Huron (including those on Manitoulin Island) are set to take the federal government to court over aerial spraying on their lands, actions that they say negatively affect the environment and human health. The Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Elders of Robinson Huron Treaty say that spraying is part of a bigger issue, in that First Nations are not consulted about activities taking place on their land. The elders say that violates the Robinson-Huron Treaty of 1850. “They are violating the treaties with spraying,” Ray Owl, spokesperson for the TEK Elders of Robinson-Huron Treaty territory told the Recorder. “We’ve been at this for five years, raising our concerns and have run out of avenues to be gentlemen on this issue. What we know is that what is going on is a treaty violation.” 

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Think the spotted owl is to blame for job losses? Think again.

By Eric Loomis
The Washington Post
September 13, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

The Trump administration recently weakened the Endangered Species Act by allowing policymakers to consider the economic impact of protecting these plants and animals. Industries will have more power to maneuver, even if it means imperiling fragile species. While corporations stand to benefit most from the eased regulations, the administration has touted the positive effects for workers. Many timber workers and lumber interests in the rural Pacific Northwest, still angry over the closing of old-growth logging due to northern spotted owl protection in the early 1990s, cheered the announcement, reflecting a media-fueled perception that environmentalists and workers are natural enemies in the battle to protect our fragile planet. The only problem? This simplistic narrative erases the history of working-class support of environmentalism while covering up the more complicated story of the timber industry’s decline due to the policies of a shortsighted, rapacious industry — not environmental regulation.

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Court halts timber activity in Southwest over threatened owl

By Felicia Fonseca
Associated Press in Helena Independent Record
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Kathleen Ramsay

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — A U.S. judge has halted tree-cutting activities across 18,750 square miles of the Southwest until federal agencies can get a better handle on how to monitor the population of a threatened owl. The order issued by the U.S. District Court in Tucson, Arizona, covers all five New Mexico national forests and one in Arizona. It’s unclear exactly what activities will be sidelined. Forests across the Southwest are using a mix of logging, mechanical thinning and prescribed burns to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires that threaten the Mexican spotted owl and its habitat. …The Fish and Wildlife Service said …on a pilot project to evaluate trends in the owl population based on occupancy monitoring, but it doesn’t have a strategy or funding to do the work across the owl’s entire range. WildEarth Guardians had asked for an injunction on all 11 national forests in Arizona and New Mexico…

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Cal Fire and The Nature Conservancy partner to improve forest management and reduce risk of megafires

Lake Country News
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and The Nature Conservancy announced a historic partnership to improve forest management and reduce the risk of high-severity wildfires through the expanded use of prescribed fire. The memorandum of understanding, or MOU, guiding this partnership includes prescribed fire training with experts and trainees from both organizations, forest management projects including thinning and prescribed fire in cooperation with a diversity of partners, and joint communications to improve the public’s understanding of prescribed fire. This partnership, in recognition of a worsening wildfire crisis and the need to involve new stakeholders, is a first-of-its-kind collaboration between a state firefighting agency and an environmental nonprofit organization in California.

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World’s largest privately owned giant sequoia forest sold for $15 million

By Paul Rogers
The Mercury News
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A Bay Area conservation group has signed a deal to purchase the world’s largest privately owned giant sequoia forest, a primeval landscape in California’s Southern Sierra Nevada with massive trees that soar 250 feet tall, span up to 80 feet around at their trunks and live for more than 2,000 years. The 530-acre property, known as the Alder Creek, is roughly the same size as Muir Woods National Monument in Marin County. Located in Tulare County 10 miles south of Sequoia National Park, it is home to 483 massive trees that are larger than six feet in diameter — four more trees than the famed Mariposa Grove at Yosemite National Park. “This is probably the most-coveted sequoia conservation opportunity in a generation,” said Sam Hodder, president of Save the Redwoods League, a non-profit group based in San Francisco that has agreed to pay $15.6 million to purchase the property.

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Forestry commission issues advisory. Drought conditions, high temperatures cause state to see wildfires

The Times-Journal
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

The Alabama Forestry Commission has issued a Fire Danger Advisory for all 67 Alabama counties effective immediately until rainfall is received. Current drought conditions and persistent high temperatures have combined to create a high probability of fuel ignition and an atmosphere favorable for wildfires. In the last 30 days, AFC wildland firefighters have battled 192 wildfires burning approximately 2,221 acres of land across the state. …Although the state is not under any type of burn restriction, the Commission urges everyone to delay outdoor burning until conditions improve if possible. While under the fire danger advisory, all necessary safety precautions should be exercised when doing any type burning.

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Report says extreme weather making invasive insects worse

By CBS News
WHNT News 19
September 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…invasive insects are killing large swaths of our nation’s forests. According to a new report, extreme weather events linked to climate change – like droughts and flooding – are making the problem even worse. …The hemlock woolly adelgid is hard to see with the naked eye, but the tiny invasive species of insect is having a gigantic impact from Georgia to Maine and is threatening delicate eco-systems that rely on the hemlock tree. According to Forester Jason Denham, the hemlock woolly adelgid is present in about half of New York State. He says trees stressed by climate change are more likely to succumb and die from an infestation… A recent study from Purdue University shows invasive pests kill so many trees each year that it’s equal to 5 million car emissions. The study also estimates that if unchecked, invasive insects could eventually kill off 41% of trees in the continental U.S.

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Clemson program prepares women to manage the family forest land

By Jonathan Veit, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences
The Newsstand – Clemson University
September 16, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CLEMSON – Clemson University Cooperative Extension is sponsoring a new statewide educational program designed to prepare family forest matriarchs for the reality that they could someday be left to make management decisions about their forestland. More than half of South Carolina’s 13 million acres of forestland is in private, non-industrial hands and owned and managed by 207,000 family forest owners. More than 80 percent of South Carolina forestland owners are 55 years old or older and the vast majority of them are men. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 80 percent of wives outlive their husbands. “It is all demographics. 

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How Maine plans to study the debated practice of aerial herbicide on forests

By Anthony Brino
The Bangor Daily News
September 14, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ALLAGASH, Maine — Late summer is the time of year when young spruce and fir tree plantations are treated with herbicides sprayed from helicopters to control competing growth of other trees and shrubs. By August, the needles on spruce and fir trees have hardened off, which gives them a natural resistance to herbicides like glyphosate, the main ingredient in Roundup. …Jackson’s effort to ban aerial forestry herbicides rekindled a debate over how Maine’s working forests are managed and the practices of clear cutting and replanting spruce and fir plantations. He said he hopes that the bill to study the issue will continue the conversation and bring in people who work in the industry and live around the forest sites that are sprayed.

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There’s a new craft beer that aims to tackle climate change

By Danielle De Wolfe
Shortlist
September 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

If, however, you’re a beer drinker who enjoys nothing more than kicking back and cracking open a cold one, you can now do so safe in the knowledge that you’re doing your bit for the environment. Yes, one Glasgow-based brewery has created a ‘Reforestation’ craft beer that aims to actively fight climate change. Named Scorched Earth, the beer is the first of its kind in Europe and was born out of a collaboration between the Drygate Brewing Company and social carbon offsetting enterprise Offset.Earth. A limited-edition 11.5% ABV imperial stout, the new brew has been aged in Islay whisky barrels to create its unique taste. And when we say limited edition, we really do mean it. Yup, there are only 200 individually numbered bottles on offer. All proceeds from the sales of the beer will be donated to the Offset.Eath initiative, meaning that for every bottle sold, 50 trees are set to be planted. 

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Fighting fire with fire, Amazon ‘forest guardians’ stalk illegal loggers

By Leonardo Benassatto and Ueslei Marcelino
Reuters in the National Post
September 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

ARARIBOIA INDIGENOUS TERRITORY — Near midnight, a group of six Guajajara tribesmen with their faces painted for battle listen to the rumble of heavy trucks about 19 miles (30 km) from their village in the Amazon rainforest. They suspect a caravan of illegal loggers felling trees on their reservation. The police are not coming, but the natives have a plan to fight back. The “forest guardians,” as they call themselves, hurry to a choke point in the local network of rutted dirt roads and lay in wait, armed with rifles and handguns. As the trucks approach, they ready themselves to spring an ambush, apprehend the loggers and deliver the culprits, along with their equipment, to the nearest federal police station, hundreds of miles away. The men say they are among some 180 guardians patrolling their tribal land against loggers on night missions.

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Malaysia’s forests are sustainably managed

By Datuk Dr Freezailah Che Yeom
The New Straits Times
September 20, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: International

MALAYSIA — …In spite of what has been alleged by certain groups, Malaysia is still a green country with 54 per cent of its land area under forest cover, the bulk of which has been legally constituted as PRFs (permanent reserved forests) and TPAs (totally protected areas) to ensure forest cover. …To give effect to Malaysia’s commitment to sustainably manage its PRFs, a National Committee on Sustainable Forest Management was established in 1994 to operationalise the International Tropical Timber Organisation (ITTO) Criteria for Sustainable Management of Tropical Forest. …Globally, at the end of 2018, 24 per cent of non-tropical forests have been certified compared to a meagre 1.8 per cent of tropical forests. Malaysia can be proud as 35 per cent of our PRFs have been certified and our forest managers are doing their utmost to strengthen forest management so that other areas may also be certified.

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Spruce beetles chomping away at our forests

By Evan Saugstad, former mayor of Chetwynd, BC
The Alaska Highway News
September 19, 2019
Category: Forestry

 …If you have driven through the Pine Pass the past two summers, you will have noticed all the red trees between Mt. Lemoray and Mackenzie Junction. …Today, we have another pest, doing the same type of thing all over again, and it is called the spruce bark beetle. …What you don’t see, and likely won’t, is any government action to stop this invasion. And quite to the contrary, what you do see is government implementing polices that prevent anyone from doing anything about this. …They have a very simple strategy. It is called stall and wait. …Keep the loggers out and in a couple of years government will be able to announce that the forest industry has no real reason to go into these areas, as there are no commercially valuable trees left to harvest. …The problem is we are told these same spruce trees play an important role in caribou survival.

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