Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Opinion / Editorial

Opinion / Editorial

Linking Talent with Employers in Canada’s Forest Sector

Forest Products Association of Canada
July 8, 2016
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

One of the biggest labour challenges in our industry today is ensuring that we have the right people trained to do the jobs that are going to be in demand not only today, but tomorrow. The Forest Products Association of Canada’s launch in June of our new job-matching tool with the Hon. MaryAnn Mihychuk, Federal Minister of Employment, Workforce and Labour, will be a critical tool to support matching job hunters with job opportunities, thereby supporting economic growth in communities across Canada. This new tool (thegreenestworkforce.ca), which is free for both employment seekers and employers will not only support those looking for work in the forest sector, but it will also provide advanced labour market information that can be used to help forestry companies with their recruitment efforts, allow governments to develop public policies to better address employment needs, and support our high schools, colleges and universities by informing students about the career opportunities that exist in Canada’s forest sector.

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Forest sector trade mission to India highlights opportunities for Canadian wood

Forestry Innovation Investment
March 24, 2016
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

From February 21–29, 2016 Forestry Innovation Investment (FII) led a Canadian delegation of 22 senior industry and government representatives across India to explore the possibilities of expanding trade with India, a country with a deep cultural appreciation for wood products. The delegation included representatives from Canada’s largest lumber producing companies, representatives from industry trade associations including Coast Forest Products Association, and representatives from provincial and federal governments including Natural Resources Canada. …Mission participants took part in targeted market visits and outreach covering sites in Bengaluru and Mysore where participants engaged directly with manufacturers and toured local processing facilities.

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Growing the market for softwood lumber

By Duncan Davies, President & CEO, Interfor 
Interfor / Building Products Digest
May 12, 2015
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

NEARLY A DECADE ago, after years of conflict, the North American softwood lumber industry came together in a collaborative effort to protect and grow the market for our products. We’ve made tremendous progress since then and are on the cusp of some major achievements. Our goal now is to make sure we stay the course and build on the momentum that’s been established. As a member of the industry groups that have guided these efforts, I have had the privilege of working with a number of talented and forward-thinking individuals from both sides of the border on these initiatives. The steps we’ve taken have not been easy. We’ve had to abandon traditional self-interest and old-style rhetoric to focus on the benefits of the “greater good.” 

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Largest Forest Sector Mission to India Puts Spotlight on Canadian Wood

Forestry Innovation Investment
February 26, 2015
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

Representatives from the Canadian forest industry recently returned from India having seen firsthand the strength and potential of India’s economy, including opportunities to sell more Canadian wood to a country that may soon overtake China with the largest population in the world. The nine-day market exploration was organized by Forestry Innovation Investment’s office in Mumbai, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, the Canada Wood Group, and the High Commission for Canada in India. A total of 26 participants from 17 companies and three trade associations joined the trade mission making this the largest-ever Canadian forest delegation to visit India.

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The forest industry’s vision for the future

National Newswatch
December 8, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

The next federal election will feature a useful debate about the role of natural resources in Canada’s economic future. Canada’s forest products industry offers a story of the innate potential of Canadians to make better products, create good jobs and improve our environment too. An international survey earlier this year reported that Canada’s forest products industry has the best environmental reputation in the world, testament to almost two decades of hard work to adapt and improve. Canada now exports forest products to more than 180 countries including China to which our exports increased 275% in the last decade. At the same time, Canada has been building a formidable story of environmental stewardship.

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An Interview with FPInnovations’ new Executive VP

The Tree Frog News caught up with Dr. Trevor Stuthridge at his new office in Vancouver. 
Tree Frog News
November 21, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

Tree Frog Daily Forestry News (Tree Frog): You’ve been on the job now for several months; what do you see at the key challenges facing the forest sector?

Dr. Trevor Stuthridge: I wouldn’t presume to know them all yet but the key challenge I see is also an opportunity. Typically, what happens after an economic downturn is that we panic and don’t spend any money, and when markets return we become complacent. In this regard, the major challenge for our sector is to avoid complacency and instead focus on how we can integrate our capabilities and take advantage of and embrace new, more innovative outcomes.

Tree Frog: What do you mean by “innovative outcomes”?

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Building Tall with Wood – A Renaissance

By Erol Karacabeyli and Conroy Lum
FPInnovations
August 21, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

With the resurgence of modern mass timber products and systems, a renaissance in construction of tall wood buildings is becoming a reality. The desire for construction using sustainable materials triggered an initiative to support demonstration projects showcasing tall wood buildings both in Canada and the US. As part of this initiative, FPInnovations released the first edition of the Technical Guide for the Design and Construction of Tall Wood Buildings in Canada. This Guide is intended to be used by design and construction teams, providing them with the concepts and background to respond to questions that would arise when designing beyond the height and area limits prescribed by the acceptable solutions in the National Building Code of Canada.

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Wood not at war with concrete

Opinion: Attack ads mislead; products from sustainably managed forests support thousands of B.C. jobs
Vancouver Sun
December 12, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada

By James Gorman, Rick Jeffrey, Dwight Yochim, Brian Hawrysh, Michael Giroux, Jack Draper and Mary-Anne Arcand, Special to The Vancouver Sun

The Canadian Concrete Masonry Producers Association has taken the rather desperate measure of placing full-page newspaper ads attacking the one environmentally responsible and sustainable building material — wood. Their ads suggest forestry in Canada is not sustainable when in fact Canadian forest practices are world leading. The real concern of concrete producers is that new wood products are beginning to displace concrete products in applications like six-storey buildings and bridge spans. They feel threatened by the work being done by government to update Canada’s National Building Code to reflect the safe and appropriate application of wood building systems. 
To see the full newspaper advertisement from Tuesday’s Vancouver Sun click here.
Check out Wood section below for more on this topic.

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Forest Industry and government Help Japan Rebuild after 2011 Tsunami

October 25, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, United States

For well over a century, Japan has been an important trading partner of the British Columbia forest sector… Given this close and long-standing relationship, when an earthquake and tsunami devastated large parts of east Japan in March 2011, it was no surprise that the B.C. industry reacted quickly and decisively. Pledging financial and technical support to the rebuilding effort, the industry championed a joint industry-government response involving the Governments of B.C., Canada and Alberta. The result was the $4.6 million Canada Tohuku Reconstruction project, announced in November 2011.  

**This content has been updated – click ‘read more’ for details** 

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Writer known for articles about Canadian forestry makes home run with new book

By Dave Willis
Delta Optimist
October 26, 2016
Category: Opinion / Editorial, Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver disc jockey Red Robinson and author Robin Brunet will be in Ladner Saturday for a book signing. Red Robinson: The Last Deejay is a newly released biography on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member. “It’s like looking in the mirror, ‘Is that really me?'” Robinson, 79, says with a laugh, describing what it’s like to hold the book knowing his life story is inside. “It is.” He said he didn’t want the book to be “fluff” and that he wanted to tell the truth about his journey as a legacy for his family. The biography, published by Harbour Publishing, “details the life and career of Robinson, one of Canada’s most celebrated pioneers of rock and roll,” according to a press release.

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Renew the SLA 2006? … No thank you

By Russ Cameron
Independent Wood Processors Association of BC
November 2, 2015
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Independent Wood Processors Association (IWPA) keeps hearing that BC’s forest industry wants to extend, or roll-over as is, the now expired Softwood Lumber Agreement. But that’s not quite true. We do understand why the members of the influential BC Lumber Trade Council (BCLTC) want a roll over. They have exclusive and renewable access to the BC Public’s non-competitive timber resource. But the fact is that the majority of BC’s wood processors buy their wood competitively and don’t want a roll over. We may be small and we may only have the opportunity to make value added products from about 5% of the logs and lumber produced in BC, but there are a lot of us. Or should I say, there used to be a lot of us. BC has lost over half of its small family owned and operated wood processors in the last dozen years primarily due to the SLA 2006 and SLA inspired Forest Policy changes which allowed control of the non-competitive harvest to be consolidated into a very few hands. (Read More takes you to the IWPA homepage, follow link at the bottom of that page).

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Forsite Expands Across Western Canada

Forsite Consultants Ltd.
December 8, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forsite Consultants Ltd., a specialist in forest management, is pleased to announce the opening of their new office in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Centrally located in the Forest Centre – Innovation Place, the office is strategically positioned alongside other forest professionals in the community. …“We are excited about the evolution of our company. This expansion represents a commitment to build on the success our team has had to date and increase our demonstrated focus on service”, says Forsite’s Cam Brown. “We have a strong team of experienced staff at our new Prince Albert office, with decades of experience in forest management, certification and GIS.”

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When David Meets Goliath: Help Us Support Your Community

December 5, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

The coastal forest industry needs to attract and train 4,700 men and women from BC’s coastal communities by 2022 in order to meet anticipated demand. But there’s something standing in our way. These jobs are steady, well-paying jobs that allow people in rural coastal communities to work where they live and be a part of their hometown. However, BC forest contractors are struggling to sustain themselves and as a result are struggling to support recruitment for these jobs. This isn’t the sustainability story you usually hear about—environmental sustainability. This is business sustainability which is just as important but much less talked about… A global economic recession in 2008 led to contractors accepting lower rates in order to survive. Six year later, rates have not rebounded with markets. Everyone took a hit, but some say the hardest hit were BC’s logging contractors.

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Logging and Tourism Create Win-Win on Maurelle Island

Truck Loggers Association
September 19, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Although not the usual headline, the successful cohabitation between logging and tourism on Maurelle Island (near Quadra Island) this summer is worth celebrating. Both industries are important to BC’s economic and social well-being and balancing the industries’ combined interests results in far more benefits than choosing one over the other. And, like many forestry/tourism news stories, it didn’t start out that way. …Not every tourism/logging issue can be reconciled in this manner. But recognition that the sum of both industries is greater than either individually is a good place to start. …In the Maurelle Island example, this led to both harvesting and kayaking in the waterways surrounding the island—a clear win-win for the communities and industries involved.

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Gambier Island Woodlots Need Your Support

I ask you email Craig Sutherland, Assistant Deputy Minister, to share your support for the Gambier Island woodlots.
Truck Loggers Association
July 10, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada West

Concerns have been raised by a group generally opposed to logging about two new woodlots tendered for sale on Gambier Island. This is understandable given it means change in the form of some logging. However, there’s a lot of misinformation about the planning processes and the degree to which harvesting will take place. I commend government for hosting a meeting to clarify the process and alleviate community fears. Despite local apprehension, the woodlot program is precisely the right kind of tenure for our coastal islands. Woodlots are naturally tailored to address local issues, are often locally owned, and operate with local contractors living in the surrounding community.

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Some thoughts on Jack Munro

Tom Tevlin
November 18, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada West

It’s indisputable that Jack Munro, a giant of BC politics, improved the lives of a great many Canadians. It’s even fair to say he saved some lives as well; Munro’s commitment to logger safety is as important an achievement as any other of his collective bargaining accomplishments. But what’s less discussed is the key role he played at the Forest Alliance of BC where he was its high-profile and influential Chair through the 1990s, as valley-by-valley land-use disputes spread across the province like wildfire, making headlines here and in BC’s international markets.

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BC Loggers Need a Real Market on the Coast

by Monty Hussey
July 17, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Having been involved in contract logging for all of my life, I can say one thing on behalf of all the coastal contractors who work on BC’s coast. We just want the opportunity to work. We want to provide stable jobs for our crews, to make sure our employees are safe, to pay the bills we incur and to ensure the communities we live in are supported. It is not complicated. What is complicated, however, is operating a successful contracting business in an industry where a very few companies control most of the contract logging opportunities.

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One Forester’s take on the 2013 Budget for the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

By Anthony Britneff
Anthony Britneff, RPF (ret)
July 16, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West, International

Anthony Britneff

In this year’s budget debate for the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources Operations (MFLNRO), the loyal Opposition posed some really interesting questions on topics that really matter to British Columbians; topics such as wildfire protection surrounding communities; TFL tenure; industrial water usage and fees (e.g., for fracking) and sustainability of forest management especially with respect to forests, animals and habitat. As a registered professional forester (retired), I find many of the Minister’s answers to questions from the loyal Opposition to be weak failing to inspire confidence in how the government is managing our publicly owned natural resources.

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Election Reflections: Implications for Forestry and BC’s Coastal Communities

Truck Loggers Association
May 28, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Raise your hand if you predicted the Liberals would win the election?  I thought as much.  So why did the pollsters get it so wrong and what does the result mean for forestry and BC’s coastal communities? With respect to the election results, there’s been a lot of ink spilled on the misread by the pollsters. Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer reminded us in a column last week that for 43 years (up to 1982) opinion polling during an election was illegal, so as not to “influence the order of finish among the candidates.” Given how wrong the pollsters were in 2013, perhaps the crime being avoided should be more along the lines of “careless misrepresentation.” Here are some the top explanations for the misread.

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Disconnect Between Perceived Jobs and Future of the Industry a Major Coastal Challenge

Truck Loggers Association
April 16, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Truck Loggers Association (TLA) recently commissioned a public opinion poll to better understand public sentiment towards the forest industry – and some of the findings are concerning. Most notable is the “disconnect” between the perceived future of the industry (most are optimistic) and the perceived existence of forestry jobs (most believe there is a shortage of jobs). Our concern lies in the fact that at a time when our members and other forest sector employers are growing and looking to fill thousands of positions, prospective workers in our coastal communities are looking elsewhere.

So what’s going on and why do we care? 

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Change is Inevitable (except perhaps from a vending machine)

by Kelly McCloskey RPF, MBA
Wood N Frog Communications
March 26, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

When the Tree Frog News was re-launched as a free on-line service with opinion editorials, I agreed to cover some of the major change-stories of the year. So when thinking of where to start, the end of the longest and toughest recession in recent history came to mind. Lumber and panel prices are up 50% from a year ago and 100% from when the US housing market crashed in 2009. Another key story is that after six years of paying export charges of 10% to 15%, Canadian producers are shipping tax free to the US and will likely continue to so for the balance of the year. Further, we have peace at the border until at least 2015, thanks to a two year extension of the SLA agreement. However, the change-story I chose to call attention to is more of a personal story; the resignation of John Allan as COFI President and …

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The More Things Change…..

By Dwight Yochim, RPF, Executive Director, TLA
Truck Loggers Association
March 4, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: Canada, Canada West

Although you don’t have to take a history lesson to know BC’s economy is reliant on a healthy forest sector and BC’s next government can set policies that will either encourage or discourage growth – it might not hurt to take one. Consider some of the recent headlines in the Tree Frog News: “Area versus land base tenures”, “Log export policies to change”, “New contractor protection legislation”. Sound familiar? Well it should if you’re long on the tooth, or if you’ve been reading some of the back issues of Truck LoggerBC magazine, as I have.

Click here to watch the video from the TLA

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The forest industry loses an innovative thinker and a good friend in George Weyerhaeuser Jr.

by Tom Tevlin, President and CEO of Greenspirit Strategies Ltd
April 22, 2013
Category: Opinion / Editorial
Region: United States, US West

Many in the BC forest sector were shocked last week at the sudden passing of George Weyerhaeuser Jr. in Tacoma at age 59. George was widely known as a thinker with a strong interest in science and technology, a consistent innovator with an eye on the industry’s future, and a good friend to so many in the US, Canada and around the world. His role as President and CEO of Weyerhaeuser Canada from 1995 through 1998 coincided with his chairmanship of the Board of Trustees of the Forest Alliance of BC where, as the senior staffer, I was so fortunate to work with him on a regular basis.

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US Housing Starts—In The Tank for Seven Years and Counting…

ERA Forest Products Research
July 25, 2014
Category: Opinion / Editorial

David Elstone, RPF, Analyst—U.S. housing starts for June were disappointing, with the seasonally adjusted total down 9.3% m/m to 893,000 starts, and 6.3% below the average year-to-date pace. Unadjusted starts in June tend to be the second-highest for the year, and there was optimism that this June’s data point would be above both April and May, given the slow beginning to the construction season. Instead, it appears that April was this year’s peak. Typically, the trend for housing starts is downhill for the remainder of the year (upper chart), dashing hopes for acceleration in the housing recovery this year, and adding doubt to next year.

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Forestry

Writer known for articles about Canadian forestry makes home run with new book

By Dave Willis
Delta Optimist
October 26, 2016
Category: Opinion / Editorial, Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver disc jockey Red Robinson and author Robin Brunet will be in Ladner Saturday for a book signing. Red Robinson: The Last Deejay is a newly released biography on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member. “It’s like looking in the mirror, ‘Is that really me?'” Robinson, 79, says with a laugh, describing what it’s like to hold the book knowing his life story is inside. “It is.” He said he didn’t want the book to be “fluff” and that he wanted to tell the truth about his journey as a legacy for his family. The biography, published by Harbour Publishing, “details the life and career of Robinson, one of Canada’s most celebrated pioneers of rock and roll,” according to a press release.

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