Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Special Feature

Special Feature

“Sawdust Fusiliers” — The Canadian Forestry Corps in WW1

By Judith Elson
Royal Commonwealth Society of Canada
November 8, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada

During the First World War huge quantities of wood were needed on the Western Front: to shore up trench walls and line muddy trench floors; to make stakes for barbed wire fences; to construct corduroy roads over muddy terrain; to build shelters, hangars, military buildings. …Britain had plenty of suitable trees but lacked experienced men to cut and trim them. On February 16, 1916, Andrew Bonar Law, the British Colonial Secretary, formally asked the Duke of Connaught, Governor-General of Canada, if Canada would provide the manpower necessary to cut and process timber in England. By March 1, 1916, the Canadian Government had responded by creating the 224th Battalion, dedicated to harvesting and processing timber resources overseas. Another three battalions were recruited in the next fifteen months. …By the end of the year, 11 companies of Canadian lumbermen were working in Britain, with another 3 companies working in France, a total of 3038 Canadians.

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Canada’s forest sector awards of excellence

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 9, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada

Vancouver, BC – The Forest Products Association of Canada held its annual Awards of Excellence luncheon in Vancouver yesterday. Kicked off by FPAC President and CEO Derek Nighbor and moderated by renowned meteorologist Mark Madryga of Global News, the event honoured the achievements of 16 individuals and community partners who have made special contributions to strengthen Canada’s forest products sector and our forestry communities. “We launched the Awards of Excellence program to honour some of our best and brightest, and to celebrate some special people doing incredible work in our industry,” said Nighbor. “The event is also a chance for us to thank some people who might not work in our sector, but have been champions alongside us in supporting sustainable forest management and the economic benefits that Canadian forestry brings to our communities and the country,” Nighbor added. 

Live links to individual press releases with picture of award reception are below:

Forest Community Champion Awards

FPAC Partnership Awards

Indigenous Business Leadership Award

Skills Award for Indigenous Youth

FPAC Innovation Award

FPAC Lifetime Achievement Awards

FPAC Outstanding Member Award

FPAC Women in Forestry Award of Excellence:

FPAC Rising Star Award:

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Highlights from the 2019 Wood Solutions Conference

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
November 6, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Vancouver Convention Centre was buzzing on Tuesday as 600+ architects, engineers, builders, contractors, building officials, technologists, planners/developers and students came together for the 2019 Wood Solutions Conference. An annual event hosted by Wood WORKS! BC, this is the place for wood producers to showcase their products to end users who are passionate about using wood. …An event that has become a tradition in the province of BC, the Wood Solutions Conference provides delegates with two streams of learning. This year, in the expanded second floor ballroom of the convention centre, 36 booths filled a trade show where wood industry representatives displayed information and spoke with interested visitors. …Concurrent breakout sessions gave delegates a second opportunity to learn about integrating wood into their business. Twenty workshops in four content streams featured speakers from near and far. …Embury-Williams was delighted to introduce Øystein Elgsaas, an architect and partner at the firm Voll Arkitekter—the masterminds behind the world’s tallest wood building—Mjøstårnet.

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Enjoy a slideshow of pictures from the 2019 Wood Solutions Conference

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
November 6, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

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Logging Trucks arrive at Vancouver Convention Centre

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

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Convoy aims to shine light on B.C.’s struggling forestry sector

By Dara Hill
Merritt Herald
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Merritt was rumbling with excitement on the morning of Sept. 25, as an estimated 200 logging trucks took off for Vancouver to demand government action on B.C. struggling forestry sector. “We respectfully demand the B.C. and federal government engage in immediate action to rectify this dire and quickly deteriorating situation that sees the largest employment sector in British Columbia in dire straights,” a news release from the event organizers reads. …The project, dubbed the BC Logging Convoy, came together thanks to the hard work of local forestry professionals. “At over 63 years in business, we are the longest running logging company in Merritt B.C., and this is the worst crisis we have ever,” wrote Frank Etchart, owner of Nadina Logging, in a news release. “I care deeply about my town and my employees, and I feel it is my duty to protect my family and theirs.”
[This story has some great pictures]

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Protest convoy of up to 200 logging trucks rolls into downtown Vancouver

By Simon Little and Sean Boynton
Global News
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

As many as 200 logging trucks came rumbling through downtown Vancouver Wednesday, bringing the plight of B.C.’s embattled forestry sector to provincial leaders. Government MLAs and the province’s mayors are gathered at the Vancouver Convention Centre for the annual Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) convention. Convoy co-organizer Frank Etchart, who owns Nadina Logging Ltd., told Global News action to address mill closures and curtailments in the province is needed immediately. …The convoy was met by hundreds of onlookers, some of them cheering and applauding the truckers. Others held signs voicing support for the forestry industry, reading “forestry feeds my family.” …“The mills can’t afford to bring the wood out of the bush because the stumpage is too high. So it’s going to sit there until the stumpage rate comes down and they can afford to bring it in,” Williams Lake Mayor Walt Cobb said. 
[This story has excellent video coverage]

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70 trucks and counting: B.C. loggers en route to Vancouver to protest job losses

By Ashley Wadhwani
Terrace Standard
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

It was an early-morning start for dozens of B.C. Interior loggers heading from Prince George to Vancouver to make noise over job losses in the province’s once-booming forest industry. The initial convoy left Prince George at 2 a.m. Wednesday, stopping through Williams Lake at 5 a.m. As the group heads to the Vancouver Convention Centre, up to 200 logging trucks are expected to join along the route. About 100 trucks from the north, including Prince George, Quesnel, Williams Lake and 100 Mile House, were seen on the roads in 100 Mile, receiving honks of support and more trucks as they travel through rural communities impacted by mill curtailments and closures. …It’s no doubt that the recent hits to the forest sector will be top of mind for mayors [attending the UBCM convention] in the Interior who have seen first-hand the job losses felt by their community members. READ MORE

Additional coverage:

100 Mile Free Press: Northern loggers help drive home forest industry job loss with Rally to Vancouver

The Northern View‘It’s hurting everybody’: B.C. family shows support for logging truck convoy

BC Local News: Aldergrove residents show their support for B.C. loggers convoy

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Logging truck convoy protests job losses

By David Zura
News 1130
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Honking horns and demanding action — logging truck drivers have gathered outside the Vancouver Convention Centre to demand help for B.C.’s forest industry. David Zura reports.

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Logging-truck protest convoy driven by plea for help in B.C. small towns

Bt Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
September 25, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

When log-haul contractor Levi Brownscombe left his home in Hixon, 60 kilometres south of Prince George, at 2:30 a.m. on Wednesday, there were already logging trucks on the road driving south to join the protest convoy headed to Downtown Vancouver. …supporters showing up at the side of the road holding ‘We Love Loggers’ signs cheered them on. From the rallying point in Merritt, the convoy culminated in a boisterous procession of logging trucks rumbling in a circuit past the Vancouver Convention Centre… “We’re not here for a handout,” McKinnon said. “I want to make that perfectly clear, we’re here to secure jobs in the forest industry.” Loggers are looking for changes to B.C.’s stumpage system that he believes the province can make. …Stumpage rates are calculated quarterly, using a formula that reflects market prices for lumber, which is important because of the Canada-U.S. softwood lumber dispute.

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Value-added Wood Products is BC’s Fastest Growing Forest Products Sector

By Kelly McCloskey
Tree Frog Forestry News
September 13, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson, BC’s Minister of Forests… opened the 16th annual Global Buyers Mission (GBM) in Whistler, BC to a standing room crowd of more than 700 delegates. …Prior to introducing the Minister, [BC Wood Chairman] Greg Stewart thanked the government and industry sponsors…and noted the good works of the association in helping grow the value added sector. “BC Wood is the voice of value-added wood sector and given that it’s the fastest growing sector in the forest products industry—it’s a great time to be that voice”. Mr. Donaldson in turn, welcomed the 400 international buyers from 20 countries emphasizing the importance of the event, their attendance and the millions in business being done. Anticipating potential concern over BC’s continuity of supply—due to the current market situation, US tariffs, tight fibre supply, etc.—Donaldson emphasized his government’s efforts to support supply, diversify markets and encourage more value-added wood manufacturing (and thus jobs) from each log harvested.

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Take a photo tour of the Global Buyers Mission with us!

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
September 13, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

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WoodTalks Speaks to the Benefits of Wood and Mass Timber

By Kelly McCloskey
The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 12, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

WHISTLER, BC — This week, 800 buyers, sellers and specifiers of value-added wood products have gathered in Whistler for the Global Buyers Mission (GBM), Canada’s largest show of its kind. And on day one, WoodTALKS—a wood design and construction education event held in conjunction with the GBM—was front and centre. Ken Hori, BC Wood’s Program Manager opened the event, welcoming a record 130 architects and other building sector professions. 

First to the podium was Robert Cesnik of HDR Architecture Associates, speaking on the Evolution of Mass Timber Design in BC’s Okanagan. …Emily Dawson of Kaiser + Path kicked off her presentation on Quantifying the Appeal of Mass Timber with a warning on the “tyranny of the quantifiable”. Her message put simply: numbers matter but so does incorporating the full range of product reasons and benefits. …Renowned architect Peter Busby spoke of his love of wood and its positive contribution to society’s social and environmental needs. …Bryn Davidson, of Lanefab Design/Build spoke of his company’s journey from laneway homes to… net positive developments. …Wrapping up day-one was Alfred Waugh of Formline Architecture who presented on Indigenuity in Architecture.

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WoodTALKS at the 2019 Global Buyers Mission

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
September 12, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

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Time to redefine forest priorities

By Christine Gelowitz, RPF, CEO, Association of BC Forest Professionals
The Prince George Citizen
July 26, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Christine Gelowitz

Are we facing a turning point in how we think about and value B.C.’s forests? In recent years, B.C. forests have been ravaged by pine and spruce beetle, two years of significant wildfires… It’s against this backdrop that the B.C. government… conducted public consultations on the Forest and Range Practices Act. …The act has been criticized by a variety of groups. …Put simply, forest professionals are trying to balance legal (government-required) and non-legal (locally-desired) priorities that often conflict with each other. Finding “win-win” solutions for objectives that are completely at odds is almost impossible and leaves everyone unhappy. Clearly, it is time to review and update the Forest and Range Practices Act to clarify how regional communities, Aboriginal peoples, and other special interests want to use and manage the forest today. …Forest professionals are passionate about B.C.’s forests. …In order to properly care for our forests, we need clarity on what British Columbians expect from their forests and where priorities lie.

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Forest sector delegates gather to witness The Embalming of the Snark

Vancouver Hoo-Hoo Club 48
July 26, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Join us in the beautiful village of Whistler in British Columbia, Canada, ​for the 127th HHI Convention. The west coast of Canada is renowned for its verdant rain forests—a bucket-list must see for anyone in the wood products/forest sector. We encourage you to stay a while, either before, or after the convention, and explore this unique part of the world. …Rameses Jim Spiers will be on hand at the Conference to present ‘Hoo Hoo 101 – The history and traditions of Hoo Hoo’. And, Club 48 President, Stirling Angus will host group activities that include a tour of a log sort yard in Squamish and dinner under the stars at the North Arm Farm in Pemberton. On behalf of our President, Stirling Angus, we once again invite you to Whistler, where Hoo-Hoo International will bear witness to the Embalming of the Snark, and Club 48 will usher in Matthew Burke as our new president! 
 

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What’s a Hoo-Hoo?

By Sandy McKellar
Vancouver Hoo-Hoo Club 48
July 12, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

The International Order of Hoo-Hoo: The Fraternal Order of the Forest Products Industry, is one of the longest standing industry service clubs in the world. …If you work in the forest and lumber sector, you’ve likely heard of this enigmatic club. Perhaps you’re a member. But do you know the history of the club and the origin of its name? Hoo-Hoo got its start in 1892 in the small town of Gurdon, Arkansas. …Founding member William Barnes wanted club directors to have “eerie and peculiar” names. For inspiration, he turned to a contemporary at the time – author Lewis Carroll –and his nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark”. …Finally – let’s get back to the curious Hoo-Hoo. What is it exactly? The name Hoo-Hoo came from a nickname given to a lumberman back in the late 1800’s due to an unruly tuft of his hair! …Join us in the beautiful village of Whistler in British Columbia, Canada, for the 127th HHI Convention

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Global Buyers Mission 2019

BC Wood Specialties Group
September 9, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West
The 16th Annual Global Buyers Mission™ (GBM) will take place this week in Whistler, BC (September 11 – 13). If you are attending, you will be joining over 800 delegates including pre-qualified international Buyers and Specifiers. Not attending the GBM ? The Tree Frog News will provide daily updates starting this Wednesday.
 
Last year, it was estimated that over $35 million in new business was developed from this event. Pre-qualified Buyers are expected from Australia, Belgium, Chile, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, the UK, United States, and Vietnam. 

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The Who’s Who of Hoo-Hoo in Vancouver

By Sandy McKellar
Vancouver Hoo-Hoo Club
May 2, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Vancouver Hoo-Hoo Club hosted their annual Members’ Night Reverse Draw and Dinner last night at the Terminal City Club in Vancouver. “This event is growing in popularity,” said organizer Jay Puder of Transpac Group about the sold-out event. This forest industry fraternity dates back to 1892, when it was founded in Gurdon, Arkansas! Special guests at the Vancouver event included Hoo-Hoo International, Snark of the Universe, Jack Miller and his wife Rita, who travelled from Boston to join fellow lumbermen (and women). Miller was presented with a Yellow Cedar talking stick by Vancouver Club President Stirling Angus. The highlight of the event was the Reverse Draw, this year Mike Wilson took home the pot! Learn more about the Vancouver Hoo-Hoo Club and their upcoming International Convention (Whistler, BC) here.

 

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Western Forest Products Announces Latest Plans and Progress in Ongoing Commitment to Identify and Protect Big Trees

By Babita Khunkhun
Western Forest Products
April 23, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver, BC – Big trees on the coast of British Columbia are revered for their biological and cultural value. As part of its sustainable forestry practices, identifying and protecting these awe-inspiring trees has been an ongoing focus at Western Forest Products. “Our team members share a great sense of responsibility toward safeguarding the forests under our care. We are proud to have formalized a big tree policy in 2016 that strengthened guidelines used by our forest professionals in the retention of big trees and we look forward to continuing to build on our big tree conservation efforts,” said Shannon Janzen, Vice President and Chief Forester, Western Forest Products. “We are protecting B.C.’s biggest trees using new science and technology and through consultation and collaboration with First Nations and academics to build on our forest stewardship at Western.” Through the use of LiDAR, Western has identified approximately 2,000 big trees that could meet the standards of the company’s big tree retention policy.

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FPAC Champions Women and Gender Diversity in the Workplace

By Kelly McCloskey and Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 17, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Gender equality and diversity for women in Canada’s forest sector was the theme of a breakfast panel at the Vancouver Club yesterday. Set in the subtle glitz of the ballroom, guests filled their plates, joining colleagues and friends for a unique event sponsored by the Forest Products Association of Canada’s (FPAC). The panel presentation—part of FPAC’s recently launched #TakeYourPlace Campaign—was part of a Canada-wide effort by the federal government and the Canadian Institute of Forestry to promote opportunities for women in Forestry. Moderated by Michelle Ward, Director of Corporate Communications at Canfor, the panel included MP Dr. Hedy Fry, Vancouver City Councillor Lisa Dominato, and Sustainable Forestry Initiative President and CEO Kathy Abusow. These accomplished professionals spoke of their experiences as a woman in the workplace, and—given what they know now—shared what they would recommend if they could give some advice to their “younger-selves”. 

Click the Read More below for a full story of the presentations…

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Scribbles from the 2019 COFI Convention

By Paul Harder
Harder Blog
April 8, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Paul Harder

41 speaker quotes from the 2019 COFI Convention:

1. Convention buzzwords: innovation, inclusion, sharing, partnerships, relationship, certainty, predictability, capacity (ability), conservation, caribou
2. “A new model of forest management.” – Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations & Rural Development
3. “China-U.S. negotiations are only a small subset of the larger tensions.” – Robert Johnston, Managing Director, Global Energy & Natural Resources, Eurasia Group
4. “India and Southeast Asia will become more important for Canada’s forest sector than China.” – Robert Johnston

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COFI 2019 Convention Tree Frog Photo Gallery

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 9, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Please enjoy our gallery of images captured at the COFI 2019 convention. It’s our pleasure to bring friends and colleagues together—and capture smiling faces, conversations and presentations at industry events. This is a small (237!) sampling of the many pictures Sandy took over three days of the convention. Once we’ve deleted the closed eyes and other obvious bloopers, it’s hard to delete images, every one captures different nuances of the speakers’ personalities! Over the next week, we will endeavour to email pictures to those we photographed – however, please contact us if there’s an image you would like. 

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COFI 2019 Convention Wrap-up

By Susan Yurkovich
Council of Forest Industries
April 5, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Susan Yurkovich

I’d like to wrap up the 2019 COFI Convention by summarizing what we’ve heard over the last couple of days. …I hope you will agree that we’ve been given a lot of food for thought and I hope that will you will leave here like me, optimistic. There’s no question that we have challenges, but working collectively and doing the right thing—we can continue to be a proud foundational industry, that’s going to benefit generations for decades to come. In closing, I want to again express my thanks to our exhibitors for being here this week. Thanks also to our convention presenting sponsor, Finning Canada, and today’s platinum sponsor Farris, and to all the sponsors of this year’s convention. And finally thank you, our delegates, for your participation. That concludes this year’s convention. I invite you all to join us again at next year’s convention, when we return to the Prince George Civic Centre, April 1-3, 2020.

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Premier John Horgan Supports a Strong and Sustainable Future for BC’s Forest Industry

Canadian Wood Council
April 5, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rick Jeffery

The Canadian Wood Council applauds Premier John Horgan’sannouncement… to choose wood construction wherever possible for public sector buildings. Two landmark projects mentioned as examples where wood will be showcased prominently are the new Royal BC Museum in Victoria and the new St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver. “Premier Horgan’s announcement in support of increased wood opportunities in BC is welcome news for an industry that supports jobs, market development, and CleanBC’s plan to reduce climate pollution for the province,” explained Rick Jeffery, Interim President of the Canadian Wood Council. …“This is the beginning of the change our forest industry needs,” Premier Horgan said. “We have committed $20 billion in public infrastructure over the next three years. I have directed that all these projects consider the use of engineered wood as a primary building material, whenever and wherever possible.”

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Susan Yurkovich, Doug Donaldson kick of COFI conference

By Kelly McCloskey
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

This week, almost 700 business, government, First Nations and community leaders have gathered in Vancouver for the B.C. Council of Forest Industries (COFI) annual convention. …On the coattails of yesterday’s PwC report revealing industry’s profound role as a driver of the economy… CEO Susan Yurkovich was quick to speak to some of the unique highlights. In addition to generating 140,000 jobs—one out of every 17 in the province—was that fact that the jobs were well distributed to every corner of the province. And fully 40% of them were in the lower mainland while 9% are First Nations. …Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests,  provided an update on the key initiatives he’s been working on and two funding announcements. …Other updates were provided on the Coast Revitalization Initiative, pending and future changes to FRPA—which included a teaser on a “new model of forest management” in Premier Horgan’s closing speech on Friday.

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Networking with friends and colleagues at #COFI2019

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

With a crowd of close to 700 people, the 2019 COFI convention was a remarkable gathering of the “who’s who” of the forest sector. Here are some of the pictures we captured — friends and colleagues enjoying each other’s company. We’ll have more pictures on Monday.

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Risk & opportunity and the economic outlook for the forest sector

By Kelly McCloskey, Editor
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Early up on COFI’s conference agenda were two keynote speakers addressing risk & opportunity and the economic outlook for the forest sector. Robert Johnston of the Eurasia Group, spoke of the risks and opportunities from a globalization and geopolitics perspective. According to Johnston, the top risks lie in the US-China relationship, European populism (e.g., their version of America First) and the increase in non-democratic leaders around the world—particularly given the decline in US support for the institutions the West has relied on for economic order. …Jock Finlayson followed with a snapshot of the US Canada and BC’s economic outlook, which he described as “slowing”. The downside drivers being: the US housing market—which remains well below past highs; Canada’s competitiveness vis-à-vis the US—particularly in the area of regulation; and the lack of investment in machinery and equipment.

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MacNaughton says Canada may not fare better with Democrat as U.S. president

By Ian Bailey
The Globe and Mail
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Duncan Davies and David MacNaughton

US says he is often exasperated by the tweets of U.S. President Donald Trump, but that it’s not a given Canada would be more successful if a Democrat were elected president next year. …at the annual convention of COFI, David MacNaughton said many grievances expressed by Mr. Trump are also shared by some Democrats. “Therefore, we shouldn’t be thinking about, ‘Oh my gosh. At least if there is a change, everything is going to be OK,’ ” Mr. MacNaughton said on Thursday, adding, the President’s re-election hinges on whether the U.S. economy remains strong. …“It is always easy to get a deal if you’re prepared to do a bad deal, and we have not been prepared to do a bad deal,” said Mr. MacNaughton, who also denounced steel tariffs imposed on Canada by the Trump administration

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Pressing U.S. on softwood deal would be sign of weakness, ambassador says

By Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

David MacNaughton

Canada faces little prospects of getting a deal now to settle the Canada/U.S. softwood lumber dispute, so it’s a bad idea to even try, said David MacNaughton, Canada’s ambassador to the U.S. in a speech Thursday to industry executives. “If we were to plead with the U.S. lumber coalition to come back to the table to negotiate right now, I think they would see it as a sign of weakness,” MacNaughton said during a discussion with the media after his presentation to the Council of Forest Industries convention. “While we’re open to sit down and have negotiations, we think the best way to get a fair deal for Canada is to let the dispute resolution process continue and work with U.S. interests being damaged by the tariffs.”

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B.C. invests $7.9 million to continue advancing wood use and growing global market

Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of BC
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson

To create and support good jobs in British Columbia’s forest sector, government is investing $7.9 million to promote and grow markets for B.C. wood products at home and abroad. Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, made the announcement in his opening remarks at the annual Council of Forest Industries conference. “Advancing new products and markets for B.C.’s world-class wood products supports good jobs in over 140 communities throughout British Columbia,” said Donaldson. “Advancing innovation in wood products and wood technology supports our strategy to maintain B.C. jobs in B.C.’s forest sector.” …A total of $7.9 million will be made available, with $5.8 million committed to activities that work to expand markets for B.C.’s wood products in Asia and North America. The remaining $2.1 million will be… dedicated to the innovative use of wood and wood building systems in B.C.

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Forest improvement projects receive almost $3.4 million

Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of British Columbia
April 4, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Doug Donaldson

The Forest Enhancement Society of B.C. is providing nearly $3.4 million to support a range of projects to improve unproductive forests or forests that have been damaged by wildfires or pests. Doug Donaldson, Minister of Forests, announced the new funding at COFI’s convention in Vancouver. …“Projects funded by the society have generated over $230 million in economic activity and supported 1,400 jobs in B.C.” …Additional funding applications related to other aspects of forest enhancement are currently being evaluated by the society. Projects funded by the society are helping minimize wildfire risks, enhance wildlife habitat, improve low-value and damaged forests, re-plant damaged forests and make fibre for green energy production.

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COFI kicks off their Vancouver Conference with a sold out Ice Breaker

Kelly McCloskey, Editor
Tree Frog Forestry News
April 3, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Susan Yurkovich

The BC Council of Forest Industries (COFI) kicked off their annual forestry conference—one of Canada’s largest— with a sold-out Ice Breaker in Vancouver. The two-day conference promises to be an outstanding event given the expected attendance of  650 delegates and high profile speakers such as David MacNaughton, Canada’s Ambassador to the US, BC Premier John Horgan and BC Minister of Forests Doug Donaldson. Susan Yurkovich, President and CEO of COFI opened the conference and welcomed the delegates. The event sponsor, John Desjardins, National Sector Leader, Forest Products at KPMG shared the stage, emphasizing the importance of the event and the forest sector to KPMG. Contrasting the current economic climate with last year, Desjardin noted the cyclic nature of the sector and how quickly its fortunes can change. To follow our pictorial record of the event, follow the link in the Read More below – we’ll be adding more pictures each day.

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COFI 2019 Ice Breaker in Pictures

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 3, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

The 2019 Council of Forest Industries kicked-off their annual convention Wednesday night with well attended Ice Breaker Reception. Held at the elegant Parq Hotel in Vancouver—the backdrop for the event featured over 50 trade show booths interspersed with gourmet food stations and plenty of room to network.

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The Plague Killing Frogs Everywhere Is Far Worse Than Scientists Thought

By Carl Zimmer
The New York Times
March 28, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: United States

On Thursday, 41 scientists published the first worldwide analysis of a fungal outbreak that’s been wiping out frogs for decades. …The researchers conclude that populations of more than 500 species of amphibians have declined significantly because of the outbreak — including at least 90 species presumed to have gone extinct. …The losses were puzzling, because the frogs were living in pristine habitats, unharmed by pollution or deforestation. In the late 1990s, researchers discovered Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis — Bd. …The fungus turned up in other countries — probably via the international trade in pet amphibians. …Certain factors once thought to account for the decimation of frog populations — like climate change and deforestation — are not the greatest threats, the scientists found.  …Today, 39 percent of the species that suffered population declines are still declining. Twelve percent are showing signs of recovery.

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A Few Species of Frogs That Vanished May Be on the Rebound

By Carl Zimmer
The New York Times
March 29, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: United States

In 2013, two biologists named Jamie Voyles and Corinne L. Richards-Zawacki spent weeks slogging up and down mountainsides in Panama. …In front of them sat the object of their quest: a single gold-and-black frog. …“They used to be so abundant …But in recent years… they couldn’t find any. …As had frogs around the world. Dr. Voyles and other frog researchers found that many of the dead frogs were covered with the same aggressive skin fungus, known as Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or Bd. …Now scientists are trying to figure out what accounts for these rebounds. Dr. Voyles published evidence suggesting that the frogs have gained potent defenses in their skin against the fungus. …Even climate change may be temporarily helping some frogs withstand the fungus.

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The Fire of Notre-Dame de Paris

By Caroline Harrap
France Today
May 16, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: International

…One of the nation’s most beloved landmarks, this masterpiece of medieval architecture dates back more than 850 years. …Since that time, the building has been the scene of… the crowning of King Henry VI of England in 1431, Napoleon’s coronation took place there in 1804. …Today, the cathedral is the most visited monument in France, even ahead of the Eiffel Tower, attracting some 12 million people a year. …Though the cathedral is still standing… it has been estimated that it will take at least four months to fully secure the site. …As well as creating a temporary roof, a huge wooden framework will be erected in order to support the main structure, while most of the stained-glass windows will need to be removed and put into storage.

Several leading restoration experts have expressed their desire to see the cathedral recreated as it was previously and the integrity of the building preserved. They have also pointed out that this would be the quickest and easiest way to restore the cathedral – an important consideration if it is to be rebuilt… in time for the 2024 Olympics. …Others have suggested that perhaps a compromise could be reached – where the integrity of the existing structure is respected but new materials are incorporated. For example, the roof could be constructed with steel, concrete or laminated beams – removing the difficulty and expense of finding enough large oak trees. “If laminated wood was used, it could also have the added benefit of making the building more eco-friendly,” adds Michael Heurtevant.

There’s a new sense of optimism that whatever form the renovation takes, France’s beloved cathedral will be back. There was perhaps no better symbol of this than the moment when the statue that once topped the fallen spire, a copper sculpture of a cockerel, was recovered from the rubble “battered but apparently restorable”. A phoenix from the ashes indeed.

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The entire wooden interior of Notre Dame Cathedral has been lost

By Ryan Prior
CNN
April 15, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: International

A “forest” of wooden latticework inside Notre Dame Cathedral fueled the fire that consumed the iconic church. The medieval roof structure “has been lost,” according to Monsignor Patrick Chauvet, the rector of the cathedral. The cathedral’s wooden frame, which primarily consisted of oak, contains beams that date as far back as the first frame built for the cathedral. That frame featured trees cut down between 1160 and 1170, forming one of the oldest parts of the structure. Most of the current frame dates from the year 1220, according to the church’s website. The modern frame is the second frame, and reflects adjustments made early in the cathedral’s construction process. The prevailing Gothic style called for high vaulted ceilings. To accommodate this, the cathedral’s plans required tall, sturdy oaks from a nearby forest. To kick off the project, workers cleared 21 hectares of oak. Each beam of the intricate wooden cross-work was drawn from a different tree: estimated at 13,000 trees in total. To reach the heights the carpenters needed to build the structure, those trees would likely have been 300 or 400 years old, meaning they would have sprouted out of the ground in the eighth or ninth centuries

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Notre Dame’s age, design fueled fire and foiled firefighters

By Michael R. Sisak
Associated Press in ABC News
April 15, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: International

NEW YORK — Is there anything firefighters could have done to control the blaze that tore through Paris’ historic Notre Dame Cathedral sooner? Experts say the combination of a structure that’s more than 850 years old, built with heavy timber construction and soaring open spaces, and lacking sophisticated fire-protection systems led to the quick rise of flames Monday, which jeopardized the entire cathedral before firefighters brought the blaze under control. …With a building like that, it’s nearly impossible for firefighters to attack a fire from within. Instead, they have to be more defensive “and try to control the fire from the exterior,” said Bryant, a former fire chief in Oklahoma and past president of the International Association of Fire Chiefs. “When a fire gets that well-involved it’s very difficult to put enough water on it to cool it to bring it under control,” Bryant said. …Other landmark houses of worship have taken steps in recent years to reduce the risk of a fire.

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Women With Axes: Looking Back at World War II ‘Lumberjills’

By Emily Ludolph
The New York Times
March 20, 2019
Category: Special Feature
Region: International

At 7 a.m. on any given day in 1942, as R.A.F. pilots sped back from skirmishes over the English Channel …a truck would swing down a British country lane to pick up a crew of women and ferry them deep into the forest. The women piling into the truck …were an elite part of England’s civilian defense efforts: the Women’s Timber Corps, playfully called “lumberjills.” …The lumberjills were part of the Women’s Land Army, which numbered some 80,000 at the height of World War II. …The organization was called back into action in the summer of 1939, roughly three months before Britain declared war against Germany. …Over the course of the war, the number of women working in British industry shot up by roughly a third, from 5.5 million to 7.35 million.

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