Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

BC Restrictions on log exports don’t make sense: Peter Pearse

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 21, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Speaking at the Truck Loggers convention, BC Forest Minister Doug Donaldson detailed changes to the contractor/licensee rate dispute mechanism, while renowned forest economist Peter Pearse says the BC gov’t’s plan to further restrict log exports doesn’t make sense. In other Business news: a lawsuit involving a logging contractor, a major forestry company, a former forests minister and the Hells Angels gets underway in Nanaimo.

In Forestry/Climate news: the misunderstood role of broadleaf trees as a firebreak, how forest fires and climate change contributed to California’s utility bankruptcy; and one man’s view on how the supply chain movement can help end deforestation.

Finally, tall timber towers are taking root in Canada, while a timber temple to sports rises at the 2020 Olympics.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC plans to curtail log exports, increase domestic wood production

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Premier John Horgan, speaking at the Truck Loggers convention, revealed plans to reform the forest industry by curtailing log exports (amongst other policy changes), with the goal of increasing domestic manufacturing and sector reinvestments. Below are a few of the interlocutors:

  • Reforms will reverse systemic decline over the last two decades (BC Gov’t)
  • Horgan pledges forestry revitalization, but it’s easier said than done (Vaughn Palmer)
  • Log exports make it economically feasible to harvest second growth wood (David Elstone)
  • Change to fair market rate test a fundamental shift in support of logging contractors (TLA)
  • BC extends log export orders for northern regions due to lack of mill capacity (Tom Fletcher)

In other news: forestry stocks are on the rebound; the BC Forest Practices Board has good news for Skeena Sawmills and the Sunshine Coast Community Forest; and the US shutdown impacts wildfire preparations in Colorado and Oregon.

Finally, the Oregon Dept of Forestry has a new Deputy State Forester and the Canadian Wood Council is looking for a new President and CEO.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Illegally harvested timber ‘greenwashed’ in China with FSC labels

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

An independent investigation into the Chinese timber trade says the FSC logo has become less a symbol of sustainability and more a tool for “greenwashing”. In other Business news: Mercer’s stock jumps 19% due to an S&P index change; the US shutdown is impacting rural housing grants; Repap is optimistic re: their bid for Resolute’s Fort Frances mill; and a small fire at Catalyst’s Crofton pulp mill.

In other news: a new database helps builders find FSC certified lumber; wood is replacing rubber in the artificial turf market; a Drexel U prof on the trend to wood construction; and a [wonkish] study on climate change’s impact on global tree growth.

Finally, the 2018 Wood Design & Building Award winners; live tweets from the TLA Convention; a primer for the COFI Convention, and a wood and wellness event in the UK.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

Read More

Climate scientists, investment analysts see value in forests and forest products

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

When it comes to fighting global warming, climate scientists are assessing and applauding the push for expanding forests, while (elsewhere) investment analysts look for forest companies that could benefit from an increased demand in their products. In other Business news, more on: the global slowing of lumber trade; the positive EU wood products market; the federal investigation of supply chain failures in BC; and West Fraser’s production curtailments.

In Forestry and Climate news: the Great Bear Rainforest means more logging for this First Nation group; Colorado’s beetle infestation is exacerbated by drought; the US gov’t shutdown keeps Montana’s firefighters idle; Finland has developed a new way to turn forest waste into transport fuels; and wood pellet production in North Carolina and their use in the UK are under the gun.

Finally, a frog believed to be the last of his kind has been granted a reprieve from solitude.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Transportation agency to hold public hearings on rail delays in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada’s transportation regulator has launched an investigation into delays at BC’s railways that—according to FPAC’s Derek Nighbor—cost lumber producers more than $500 million over two years. In other Business news: West Fraser announced more temporary curtailments in three BC Interior mills; the TLA’s Making it Work conference kicks-off tomorrow, where (per Tom Fletcher) log exports are high on the agenda.  

In Wood Product news: the US Code Council’s recent embrace of tall timber buildings is driving CLT production growth and inspiring architects to design skyscrapers out of wood. Elsewhere, a floating timber bridge is proposed to connect Brooklyn and Queens in New York.

Finally, the Washington Post on Trump’s executive order that promotes logging as a means to help curb wildfires.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

John Brink, BC Rail settle decades-old dispute prior to court date

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 14, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Prince George lumber manufacturer John Brink and BC Rail settled their decades-old dispute over the land Brink built his sawmill on. In other Business news: Wood Resources on the declining trade of softwood lumber in 2018; Nova Scotia’s Premier speaks to the Northern Pulp dispute; Georgia Pacific’s mill closure will ripple across Louisiana; 10 years after expropriation the Abitibi Consolidated’s mill site has yet to be cleared up; and Western Forest Products commits to noise reduction at its Duke Point mill.

In Forestry news, more on: BC efforts to preserve a newly-found old growth forest; the US gov’t shutdown impact on wildfire preparations; and the 2018 Farm Bill. Elsewhere, Health Canada says concern over glyphosate use in forest management is not scientifically supportable.

Finally, to be healthy, black bears need more than an all-you-can-eat salmon buffet.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

As prices migrate lower, the softwood tariff takes its toll on Canadian production

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As prices migrate lower, the US softwood lumber tariff is causing curtailments in Canadian lumber production. Meanwhile, Trudeau continues to raise the issue with Trump without “weighing in on” everything he says. In other Business news: lower paper sales has Georgia Pacific laying off 700 in Louisiana; BC Forest Minister’s dilemma given his relationship with First Nations; Thunder Bay unveils its latest strategic plan; and more on the effort to redevelop Maine’s Millinocket paper mill. 

In Forestry news: Adam’s Lake Indian Band passes forestry audit; biotech’s potential to address forest pests; how the US gov’t shutdown is impacting wildfire preparations; and the illegal logging trend in Mexico’s cartel territory.

Finally, a US builder’s strategy to address wood frame’s mid-rise fire construction vulnerability.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Trump, California spar over wildfire monies, while shutdown delays thinning projects

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As President Trump withholds FEMA monies for wildfires—unless California improves its forest management—his government shutdown is stalling forest thinning projects. In other Forestry news: the Canadian Institute of Forestry speaks out on gender equity; the Ancient Forest Alliance has a new [BC old growth] forest to protect; and road density, mining and forestry threaten key species in BC’s Elk Valley.

In Business news: lumber’s price-fall helps the case for wood use; BC’s Premier supports Minister Donaldson’s visit to pipeline blockade; LP announces plan to build a pellet mill in Mississippi; a woodlot owner speaks out in support of Northern Pulp; moduler wood housing is helping BC’s homeless; and Canfor’s 2018 year in review.

Finally, Wood WORKS! is working as evidenced by BC mayor’s lobby effort for more wood use.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC pipeline blockade creates problems for industry, gov’t and First Nations

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s natural gas pipeline blockade is creating problems for industry (even if they do everything right), the NDP government (despite their commitment to consultations) and for other First Nations (who desire the development). In other Business news: Western US sawmill production is up 4.8% in 2018; Frank Dotorri’s retirement plans include pursuit of a CLT plant; and Port Hawkesbury Paper’s contribution to Nova Scotia is still strong despite tariffs.

In Forestry news: Ottawa sets new rules for drone use; California’s governor wants social factors considered and more cameras used in fire safety efforts; the economic implications of caribou recovery are a concern for Northern BC communities; and according to a U of Victoria consortium, climate change was the driving force for BC’s record-breaking 2017 wildfire season.

Finally, LBM Journal names its Dealers of the Year Award and Suwannee Lumber makes a big donation to Florida youth.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Tall Timber, Trade and Trump… and a Tracking Technicality

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tall Timber is in the news with more on: Toronto’s massive Quayside waterfront plan; Oregon State U’s earthquake-friendly forestry building; and Georgia’s debate over wood’s use above three-storeys. In Business news: the China trade war is taking its toll on hardwood producers; and a PR effort for Northern Pulp is questioned.

In other news: support and ridicule for Trump’s recent thinning initiatives; support and distain for BC’s Forest Minister’s apparent blockade support; friction over Alberta’s plan for a new park; and the value of agricultural woodlots in Southern Ontario.

Finally, many of you were unable to click through to our website from the link in our email because of a security warning. The issue wasn’t with www.treefrogcreative.ca but rather the tracking technology employed by iContact (our messaging service). We have assurances that the issue has been resolved, but if you are still concerned, you can always type our URL (www.treefrogcreative.ca/news) directly into your search bar. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

The battle lines are drawn as Northern Pulp fights for its future

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

In todays news: Northern Pulp readies its plan for a new effluent system; Western Forest Products pursues reconciliation in BC’s Alberni Valley; Vancouver’s old growth lumber gets a new lease on life; Trump’s executive order may see logging in National Parks; and silvopasture (cows and trees) can mitigate climate change.

For those who extended their Christmas break, a few of the headlines from last week include: the NY Times on the decision to allow 18 storey wood buildings; the Wall Street Journal on lumber’s price collapse; the Canadian Press on Canada’s changing forests; Macleans on Canada’s species [most] at risk in 2019; and the Economist on the importance of building with wood. Also: FEA Wood Markets outlook for 2019; Frank Dottori’s retirement; and the passing of BC’s John Russell PhD, RPF. 

Finally, the Tree Frog News supporter roll-over date is February 1, 2019. As our longtime readers know, we exist solely because of the generosity of our sponsors and our “frog-friends”. Bottom line, if you like the service—you can ensure we continue via our Friend of the Frog donations page. Your small contribution truly makes a difference!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Most Prices Stalling, But Demand is Still Growing: FEA Wood Markets outlook

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

FEA Wood Markets released its market outlook for lumber in 2019. In sum, demand is expected to grow 2.1%, prices will remain strong, US production will rise 5% and Canadian production will fall 1%. In other Business news: the New York Times story on mass timber begets stories in Treehugger and the Commercial Cafe, more press for Frank Dotorri on his retirement; and a plan B for Nova Scotia if Northern Pulp is forced to close.

In Forestry news: the Sierra Club calls for more old-growth protection in BC to offset Amazon deforestation; the US Trade Official criticizes illegal logging in Brazil; Green groups warn of forestry pitfalls in COP24; and Google Street View helps urban foresters count the trees.

Finally, the Economist says efforts to make buildings greener are not working; but also that more buildings should be made of wood.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Frank Dottori exits the business, names his replacement—Tony Wyszkowski

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Industry icon Frank Dottori is exiting the lumber business after naming his successor at WRC Timber (Tony Wyszkowski); and sadly, BC’s John Russell PhD, RPF—the world’s leading expert on western red and yellow cedars—has died. Other names making news include:

  • John Ackerly (Green Heat) on the conspiracy against wood stoves
  • Fan Williams (Architects’ Journal) on concrete’s unfortunate CO2 footprint
  • Lesli Allison (Western Landowners Alliance) on active management of US lands

Elsewhere: Nova Scotia improves trucking efficiency by allowing more B-trains; and home insurance is harder to find in Colorado due to wildfires.

Finally, the Tree Frog News supporter roll-over date is February 1, 2019. As our longtime readers know, we exist solely because of the generosity of our sponsors and our “frog-friends”. Bottom line, if you like the service—you can ensure we continue via our Friend of the Frog donations page. Your small contribution truly makes a difference!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Looking back on 2018 or forward to 2019, here are the headlines you missed

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Looking back on 2018 or forward to 2019, the holiday headline that garnered the most attention was the International Code Council’s decision to allow wood buildings as high as 18 storeys in the US. Notable stories include: New York Times (knotty is making a comeback); Fire Engineering (more planning and education will be required); and Treehugger (the year wood construction took some steps forward, some back). 

Other headlines you might have missed include: the Wall Street Journal on lumber’s collapse; the Canadian Press on Canada’s changing forests due to fires, bugs and climate; Macleans on Canada’s species [most] at risk in 2019; and FPAC’s wish list for Canadian Forestry in 2019.

Finally, Trump’s executive order opening the door for more thinning and biomass use is celebrated as good for the forest and human health.

Best wishes for healthy and prosperous 2019.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Our BIGGEST thanks on the SHORTEST day of the year

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 21, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Our BIGGEST thanks to all our readers and sponsors on the SHORTEST day of the year – the winter solstice. But why the lag between the shortest day of the year and the lowest average daily temperature of the year? According to the Farmer’s Almanac, it’s because the Earth’s thermal mass still retains heat from the summer and cools gradually. The coldest day of winter doesn’t occur for another month and a half.

In today’s news: Trump signs 2018 Farm Bill; why construction costs are up; Canada’s smorgasbord of bad weather; why California needs to start more fires; and the ridiculously large number of trees New Zealand needs to plan to be carbon neutral.

Finally, on our last News day of the year: a Danish TREEdition and the Tree Frog’s favourite Yule Tide Fly Stew. Your faithful Frogs will be back with all the headlines on January 2nd, 2019!

Best wishes for a successful, healthy, and joyful new year!

Kelly, Sandy and Heidi

Read More

Christmas comes early as US vote on Tall Wood is set to pass code council

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 20, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Christmas comes early as the International Code Council vote on Tall Wood is set to pass, clearing the way for 18-storey buildings in 2021. In other Business news: Western Forest Products’ Don Demens corrects inaccuracies in ENGO op-ed; Northern Pulp’s discharge pipe has the community divided; EACOM says duties are hard to swallow with sagging lumber prices; and US sawmill production is up 4.3% in the first nine months of 2018.

In other news: Oregon’s Elliott State Forest may become a research forest; BC/WA/Oregon join forces on forests and climate change; and new research suggests forests, like humans, require a balanced diet.

Two TREEditions today: a 40 ft. Christmas tree order in the UK (thanks Sam Coggins) and reflections of the real Santa Clause (aka Bill Dumont).

Finally, an early Christmas greeting to all our readers and please note – tomorrow’s Tree Frog News is the last of 2018, barring any breaking news over the holiday.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Anthony Thistleton says loud and clear: the more mass timber, the merrier!

Tree Frog Forestry News
December 19, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Business news in Eastern Canada – will wood supply thwart the restart of the Fort Frances mill? And will fishermen stop Northern Pulp from finding a new effluent pipeline route?

In Wood news, a UBC student wants to plant gardens on bus shelters, and Anthony Thistleton’s new book Thinkwood says YES to using mass timber – the more the merrier! 

Canada is the chief steward of the world’s Boreal forests – it’s a big responsibility; NRCan is investing in two Indigenous forest sector projects in New Brunswick; and researchers at the University of Arizona say Southwest forests’ productivity will decline over 21st century due to climate change. 

Finally – with six days until Christmas, Tree Frog is reaching out again for your TREEdition Stories. Please tell us about your Christmas traditions and send us a picture – we’d love to share. 

Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Timber Innovation Act to support wood use in large scale buildings

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 18, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Legislation supporting the expansion of wood for use in large scale buildings (in the form of the Timber Innovation Act) is heading to the president’s desk for approval. In related news: Canada Wood signs an MOU with Korean Architects; the U of Toronto plans to merge its faculties of Forestry and Architecture; the Softwood Lumber Board completes its leadership transition; and innovative wood-based fabrics aim to replace microplastics.

In Forestry/Climate news: did Jerry Brown do enough on climate change (LA Times); California’s catastrophic wildfire season is not the new norma(Wall Street Journal); ENGO’s bemoan the non-closing of biomass loophole at COP24 (Mongabay); and how much is a tree worth (the Australian edition).

Finally, need a break from the Christmas hullabaoo? Airbnb just listed this pinecone-shaped treehouse in California.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

COP24 ends with agreement on rules for transparency but not much else

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 17, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

COP24 wrapped up with agreement on how countries should track their emissions but not much else. In related news: Canada encouraged the establishment of a global market with carbon pricing; while the role of forests and carbon credits was debated but put off until next year.

In Company news: Despite tensions with China, Don Kayne calls BC trade mission business as usual; Canfor extends temporary curtailments in BC; Western Forest Products sells 7% of its Alberni Operation to First Nations group; Tolko targets February for rebuild of Williams Lake mill; and Port Hawkesbury Paper is doing well six-years after shutdown.

In Forestry news: the US Farm Bill does the right thing; Secretary Zinke steps down due to federal investigations; a winter wildfire threatens two Alberta communities; and California takes some heat on wildfire spending.

Finally, Ontario proposes hunting season for cormorants to reduce their impact on fish and forest habitats.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

Read More

Forest for Climate Declaration at COP24 welcomed by some, derided by others

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 14, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Poland’s ‘Forest for Climate Declaration‘ at COP24 is welcomed by FPAC; but derided as a climate bomb by Wake University’s Justin Catanoso; and called hypocritical by ENGOs given Poland’s dependence on coal. In related news: BC’s climate plan fails to promote biomass upside; bamboo producers hype their fast growing mitigation potential; and the UN Forest Products Annual Market Review is out.

In Business news: Repap Resources plans to buy and reopen Resolute’s Fort Francis papermill; Cascades purchases three US packaging companies; Northern Pulp lacks a Plan B; and Western Forest Products TFL 39 audit gets high praise.

Finally, a BC Forest Service retirees’ TREEdition, a global competition on forest education; and the Lorax helps stop development in a US federal appeals court.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

China arrests a second Canadian; drama sparks concern over Canada’s exports

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 13, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Huawei drama is heightening concern over Canada’s exports while China just arrested a second Canadian. According to one expert, despite the risk, Canadian officials need to stay put to maintain their private-sector links. In other Business news: Madison’s says lumber price volatility is settling down to norm; US construction material prices fell 2% in November; the Transportation Safety Board released its report on Western Forest Product’s rail crash; and the United Steelworkers target Canfor’s Vavenby mill.

In other headlines: more on the US Farm Bill, forestry in the aftermath of California’s wildfires; and the UK’s ban on CLT. Elsewhere: ENGO’s target old-growth logging in BC; and local forest happenings in Fredricton, Halifax, HelenaSquamish and Calling lake, Alberta. 

Finally, a heads up on the upcoming Montreal Wood Convention and Savannah Biomass Conference.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Compromise in Farm Bill drops contentious changes but retains forest benefits

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 12, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The House and Senate compromise on the US Farm Bill drops the contentious GOP-desired changes in the name of fire prevention but retains funding for thinning, forest landscape restoration and the Timber Innovation Act (i.e., support for mass timber). In other Business news: an update from Tom Fletcher on the BC/China trade mission; and the American Wood Council elects Roseburg CEO as chair.

In Forestry/Climate news: Alberta researchers want to help tree migration outpace climate change; California’s top firefighter wants to ban home construction in fire-prone areas; the FAO releases two papers on forest vulnerability pre-COP24; and an Australian architect has high hopes for timber innovation in design and construction. 

Finally, scientists at the Deep Carbon Observatory say carbon-based life lurking below the Earth’s surface dwarfs the amount of life roaming on top. Allegedly.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Christmas tree farmers launch “got milk” campaign to combat fake trees

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 11, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Christmas tree farmers launched a “got milk” like campaign to combat the growing fake tree market. The campaign is called “It’s Christmas. Keep It Real!” Meanwhile Finland’s prime minister says, “Climate Change is real” and “Trump wasn’t wrong but it’s not raking, it’s thinning“. 

In Business news: Hakan Ekstrom says world sawlog prices fell in Q3; the Washington Post says China is subverting US tariffs on plywood by shipping through Vietnam; Susan Yurkovich says China is too important a market to pass on; Finning International appoints West Fraser’s Ted Seraphim to its Board; and the Canadian Steel Producers hire former FPAC executive Catherine Cobden.  

In Wood Product news: CLT is touted as the “need of the hour” while char is challenged as a fire insulator

Finally, new research says urban frogs are sexier than forest frogs. Allegedly.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC suspends China leg of forestry trade mission to Asia, companies carry on

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 10, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC suspended the China leg of its Asian trade mission due to Chinese fury over the Huawei arrest, but Canadian companies carried on [carefully]. In related news: the BC trade delegation was in earthquake-prone South Korea promoting the benefits of wood construction; Japan plans to process trees felled by their recent earthquake; and builders tout mid-rise wood construction in London, Ontario.

In Forestry news: saving BC’s caribou won’t come without sacrifice (UBC prof); more logging is not the solution to Oregon wildfires (ENGO); and don’t believe those touting a single solution to Oregon’s wildfires (Industry CEO). Elsewhere, BC’s carbon neutral program to receive UN award; Nova Scotia breeds the perfect Christmas tree; and Milan is increasing its tree cover by 30%.

Finally, pining for some profile? Send us your forest-friendly family TREEdition (with a photo if possible) and we’ll make your wish come true.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

TREEditions, tree footprints, tree density and tree flocking. Must be Friday.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 7, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Prefering incentives over strong-arming, BC’s business community signs onto the government’s climate plan. In other Business news: Madison’s says lumber prices are “waffling“; Northern Pulp is taking legal action and forest farmer Chuck Leavell talks policy and the Rolling Stones.

In Forestry news: BC’s wolf kill is protested while the government talks moose protection in the Cariboo; fishers are reintroduced in Washington state; and SFI sums up their successful conference in Colorado.

Finally, tree footprints, tree density and tree flocking, and our first reader-submitted, family-friendly TREEdition (thanks Brian Barber). Must be the weekend for Christmas tree shopping. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

With COP24 approaching, forests are touted as key to tackling climate change

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 6, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

With COP24 approaching, the Rainforest Alliance says forests are the world’s most powerful and cost-efficient carbon-capture technology. In related news: Canada plans to set tougher targets; BC says all new buildings must be “net-zero energy ready”; Oregon’s forest sector is poised to provide solutions; forest management in Michigan is helping; and preventing wildfires by cutting your own Christmas tree in California.

In other news: Washington State approves code changes allowing 18-storey wood buildings; NASA and LiDAR team up to map the Earth’s forests; more on Nova Scotia’s clearcutting response; and peace comes with caveats in Columbia as deforestation rises 44 percent.

Finally, with less that three weeks of shopping until Christmas, we’re on the lookout to profile your forest-friendly family traditions. Got any?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Does Nova Scotia’s clearcut response satisfy the critics?

Tree Frog Forestry News
December 5, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Does Nova Scotia’s clearcut response satisfy the critics? According to the Chronicle Herald, “they made all the right noises” but CBC News says “it wasn’t what some were expecting“.

Elsewhere: a major US homebuilder sounds the alarm on a ‘housing slowdown’; sawlog prices were down everywhere but North America in Q2; the wood components sector forecasts US demand to grow; and BC faces headwinds with its forestry mission to Asia.

Finally, Canada imports one fake Christmas tree (mostly from China) for every two real ones it grows. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Binational panel formed to review softwood lumber dispute

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 4, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

A binational panel with three Canadians and two Americans has been formed to review the softwood lumber dispute (Globe & Mail subscribers only); while a tentative truce between the US and China is seen as good news for US wood molding and furniture manufacturers.

Architects say the UK ban on CLT above 18 meters is an “overreach” as CLT is safer than steel, while the Timber Trades Journal says the “trend towards timber will continue“. In related news, PEI’s building code now allows for wood residential buildings to have a fifth floor.

In Forestry and Climate news: Nova Scotia’s Minister says fewer clearcuts doesn’t mean less wood; a NASA mission will measure the world’s forests in 3D; UN leaders need to persuade workers their industry can have a future with climate action; and a BC Climatologist says when removing forests “it gets warmer in some places and cooler in others.”

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Andrew Waugh to fight UK decision to ban CLT above five storeys

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 3, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Renowned architect Andrew Waugh vows to fight the UK ban on timber materials in buildings taller than 18 meters (or five storeys). The ban stems from the Grenfell Tower tragedy that killed 72, due in large part to the use of flammable foam board cladding. 

In Business news: West Fraser and Catalyst Paper announced temporary curtailments in BC; Northern Pulp’s closure is promoted by some; and Canfor insiders bet on better days ahead. In Forestry and Bioenergy news: Nova Scotia plans to respond to the Lahey report; BC’s forests are releasing more carbon; wood-eating crustaceans provide insights for biofuel, and European bioenergy production could triple by 2050.

Finally, forest fires in California this year released carbon emissions equivalent to the amount produced to power the state’s electricity for one year.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

USMCA signed in Buenos Aires; US Farm Bill to pass without forestry provisions

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 30, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The USMCA (or NAFTA-update) was signed today at the G20 summit in Buenos Aires. Key takeaways: the agreement lifts the risk of economic uncertainty; the Canada-US rift remains; and final ratification remains a big hurdle. Meanwhile: the US Farm Bill is likely to pass as Republicans sidelined their forestry provisions; Alberta’s plan to ship oil by rail will hurt lumber shippers; and pressure mounts as Canadian Senators weigh in on Northern Pulp’s future.

In Forestry news: A&A Trading and Terminal Forest Products pass their forestry audit; Manitoba is privatizing their forest firefighting services; and the US is encouraged to prevent fires by letting the forest burn.

Finally, the UK cladding ban may outlaw CLT; and plans are unveiled for the world’s greatest concentration of mass timber buildings in Toronto—with suitable fanfare!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

No end in sight to debate over the role of forest management in climate change

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 29, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

There appears to be no end in sight to the debate over the role of forests and forest management in climate change. Here are the headlines that make the point:

  • Forestry provisions are the latest snag in US farm bill negotiations
  • House Caucus says Democrats obstructing active management of forests
  • Fast-tracking logging on federal lands may not lessen wildfire risk
  • Three years after Paris talks, the world braces for Poland
  • Brazil withdraws offer to host UN climate change conference
  • In Lebanon, climate change devours ancient cedar trees

In Business news: US home sales dropped 9% in October; BC looks to Asia as US market cools; China loses tariff appeal on wood flooring; and how those same tariffs are hurting US companies. Companies in the news include: Mercer’s investment offering; Westervelt’s new mill; Timberwest’s scholarships for indigenous students; and Weyerhaeuser’s triumph over the Dusky Gopher Frog.

Finally, why South Park’s zero-sum view of the world doesn’t work with climate change.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC announces largest ever forestry trade mission to Asia

Tree Frog Forestry News
November 28, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

In British Columbia, the Ministry of Forests will lead the largest ever forestry trade mission to Asia; Liberal MLAs call on Premier to stand up for rural forestry workers threatened by shrinking timber supply; province launches new land guardian program that supports priorities of Haida Nation; and NRCan announces funding for two First Nation projects in BC supporting milling and forest management. 

In the US, more on the farm bill and forestry thinning to prevent wildfires; frogs in the Supreme Court; and the fate of the Alaska cedar.

Finally, a UK-based company has plans to install a biofuel plant in Newfoundland, revitalizing the local forestry industry.

Sandy McKellar – Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Is the US housing boom coming to an end?

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 27, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

As housing prices force builders to move out in search of cheaper land, some say the boom is coming to an end. In related news: Dr. Wood says Canadian purchases of US sawmills could drive prices higher; a Montana builder blames tariffs for driving up prices; while Seeking Alpha says interest rate increases are toxic to the price of lumber and lumber stocks.

Companies in the news include: strike action at Interfor; Western’s purchase of Columbia Vista; Pinnacle’s pellet production; Freres’ mass plywood panels; and Northern Pulp’s pros and cons.

Finally: the California fires have Democrats and Republicans debating forestry’s role in the US Farm Bill.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

US report lays out devastating effects of climate change on health and forests

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 26, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Surprising in its bluntness, the US Fourth National Climate Assessment lays out the devastating effects of climate change on the US economy, health, environment and forests. Related headlines include:

  • Drier climate predicted for Northwest (Peninsula Daily News)
  • Catastrophic northern California fire now fully contained (AP)
  • California, Trump eye logging to fight wildfires (San Diego Union Tribune)
  • Wildfire prevention goes hand in hand with creating jobs (Zinke)
  • Buy certified green, ethical palm oil or forests will suffer (Globe and Mail)

Elsewhere: US Customs is investigating whether importers are evading duties on Chinese hardwood plywood; the BC Forest Safety Council says BC’s harvesting injury rate is the second lowest on record; West Fraser addresses a sawdust safety scare; and BC’s caribou herds are stabilizing where wolves are culled.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Everything you need (and don’t need) to know about Black Friday

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 23, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Although the term was coined in the early 1960s to describe traffic jams in Philadelphia the day after US Thanksgiving, and has become associated with hordes of unruly mall-customers, Black Friday has a more fateful and historic connotation in Australia. This due to their Black Friday fires in 1939, where on January 13th [a Friday no less], a total of 69 sawmills were burned and 71 lives lost.

Sticking with the Aussi theme: Brisbane is now home to Australia’s tallest engineered office building; and a research paper by Planet Ark (Wellness + Wood = Productivity) speaks to wood’s impact on workplace satisfaction and productivity.

Elsewhere, BC Forest Safety Council news, the Steelworkers on Tolko’s Merritt mill shutdown; FPAC and FPInnovations on the fed’s Fall Economic Statement; and forestry tidbits from Saskatchewan, Poland and Papau New Guinea.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Wood fibre costs trend up for pulp, lumber prices appear to have found a floor

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 22, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Happy US Thanksgiving!

North American wood fiber costs have trended upward for the pulp industry; while US lumber prices appear to have “found a floor” and are forecast to rise in January. In other Business news: US log exports are on hold due to the trade war with China; a BC forestry trade delegation seeks to expand markets in Asia; and a Mississippi sawmill plans to increase production by 50%.

In other news: satellite imagery is being used to estimate the availability of logging residue in Canada; three species of bears are sharing the same piece of land in northern Manitoba; mobile biomass plants are producing biofuel in Europe; NRCan is encouraging the use of wood in engineered wood bridges, and wood design is celebrated via awards by Wood WORKS! (Ontario) and TRADA (UK). 

Finally, early registration is now open for three important conferences: COFI 2019; ABCFP 2019; and HarvestTECHX

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

More Canadian ownership south of the 49th and Wild Turkey talk

Tree Frog Forestry News
November 21, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Western Forest Products has joined ranks with many other Canadian lumber companies, making their first major purchase of a US mill. Acquiring Washington based Columbia Vista means they can offer more Douglas-fir products to their Japanese customers. But Western Canadian mills continue to struggle with both log supply and high fibre costs. And while western mills are still in strike mode, Unifor members in eastern Canada have signed a four-year deal. 

In Forestry news, protesters have shut down a Sierra Pacific logging operation in California; Gov. Jerry Brown is proposing changes to that state’s logging rules; and the Real News on how the Finnish manage their forests. 

To all our US readers, we wish you a Happy Thanksgiving, and send you off with a story about preserving the US wild turkey hunt, “Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt”.

Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC Industry says high costs and log supply causing curtailments. Politicians point at Ottawa.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 20, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Forestry’s bull-market ride could soon be over in BC due to high costs and a scarcity of logs. Local politicians and national Conservative leader Andrew Scheer suggest Liberal policies are also to blame. Elsewhere: a mass timber tower rises in Portland; the demise of Strongbuild is a set back for Australian tall wood; and mid-rise wood restrictions are on again in Sandy Springs, Georgia.

California’s wildfires and commentary on their cause and effect include:

Finally, the Log Driver’s Waltz finds new life in a children’s book, and Montreal’s ugly Christmas tree is replace by a… ticklish one.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Devastating but not surprising, log shortages driving mill curtailments in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 19, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

News of mill curtailments in central BC are devastating but not surprising given log shortages due to the Mountain Pine Beetle and forest fires. In other Business news: strike action looms in BC; beetle-killed timber an opportunity for Colorado; Northern Pulp seeks public support for effluent pipe; and Boise Cascade to close its North Carolina LVL plant.

In Forestry news: Trump repeats disputed claim that forest management is to blame for California’s wildfires; but according to the San Francisco Chronicle, it rings true—to a degree. Elsewhere, stories of concern about: Canada’s endangered species; BC’s elusive wolverine; Cape Breton’s moose cull; Alaska’s roadless rule; and Australia’s koala colonies.

Finally; the silent killer in our homes… wood burning stoves!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

 

Read More

Canfor committed to BC, Swedish acquisition reflects customer needs: Kayne

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 16, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor’s Don Kayne says the company remains committed to BC despite recent curtailments, and their Swedish acquisition reflects customer needs. In other Business news: Northern Pulp may not meet its waste treatment deadline; GP’s new Alabama mill is up and running; Resolute has a new CFO; and construction prices are up despite lumber’s fall.

In Forestry news: drone video of California’s devastation is resulting in calls to treat wildfires like fires; more acceptance of pyrosilviculture; and fire buffers. Elsewhere: America celebrates Recycling Day; NJ Senator Sweeney joins call for code changes that restrict light-frame construction; and BC loggers help rescue a log truck driver in the Cariboo.

Finally, martini drinkers may want to stock up as a tree disease is causing an olive crisis in Italy.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More