Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

More lumber curtailments in BC, this time it’s Tolko

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Citing high logs costs and weak markets, Tolko announced downtime at its Williams Lake and Armstrong divisions. In related news: a BC Interior report predicts more lumber closures; a non-seasonally adjusted view on US housing starts; and the US-China trade war’s impact on hardwood producers.

In Climate news: managing for disturbance can stabilize forest carbon; the long-term potential of forest carbon credits; and the impact of invasive earthworms on carbon stored in the forest floor. In other news: BC clarifies logging regs on private land; the Northeast Territories delays its new Forest Act; high fire danger forecast in the US South; and breeders of rare frogs seek to undermine animal traffickers.

Finally, Smokey Bear gets a Smithsonian exhibit and ‘The Lumber Baron‘ hits the big screen.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canada invests in artificial intelligence and recycled hamburger paper

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 23, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Government of Canada announced support for Quebec based Group PG and Kruger for their innovative software and recycled paper investments [respectively]. In other Business news: the making of Skeena Bioenergy; a Florida legislator asks Trump to end his trade war with China; and Tree Canada has a new CEO.

In other news: Ontario’s Invasive Species Centre gets new funding; three BC Interior Universities collaborate on natural disaster research; Canada Games Pool replacement to feature a wood roof; BC’s clean energy sector surpasses forestry in GDP and job creation; the US Dept of Interior has backed off plans to shrink an Oregon monument; and wind remains on Alberta’s side in wildfire fight.

Finally, with the help of some wood chips, you can now compost your clan in Washington state.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC may lose another 12 sawmills over next decade

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 22, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

In a worst-case scenario, another 12 BC sawmills will close over the next decade, says industry analyst Jim Girvan. In other Business news: Home Depot blames the slump in lumber prices for its slow growth; Trump’s move on steel has the NAHB asking for tariff relief; and BC Central Interior Steelworkers prepare to vote on industry’s wage offer.

In Forest Fire news: BC deploys firefighters to Alberta; as the High Level evacuation is described as post-apocalyptic; Fort McMurray lessons loom large; and conditions are expected to get worse. In other news: Trump wants to slash wildfire payments to California; AF&PA’s Donna Harman leads way on gender diversity; plastic is the fifth-highest emitter of greenhouse gases; and how cardboard fares as an alternative.

Finally, an Ontario firefighter filed a Human Rights complaint because he wasn’t fed vegan food in BC.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Bill 22 pits the big tenure holders against the smaller ones

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 21, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Bill 22 is a catch-22 for BC forest companies, according to Business in Vancouver’s Nelson Bennett. Also from his pen: stock shock amongst BC’s publicly traded companies; and no timber shortage in Fort Nelson. In related news: Vaughn Palmer says industry feels blindsided by Forests Act changes; and BC maintains its focus on China despite Huawei conflict. Elsewhere: the US framing market took a step back last week; and Chinese tariffs are taking a toll on Alaska log exports and the Appalachian hardwood industry.

In Forestry/Climate news: the Federal environment minister warns BC over caribou recovery; eastern forests shaped by Native American burning more than climate change; U of Toronto Faculty of Forestry on life support; and how green is mass timber anyway?

Finally, given forecasts and evacuation alerts in BC and Alberta, the fire season has truly begun. In light of the above, we’ve once again opened up a separate news section for Forest Fires under Safety.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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West faces another record-breaking fire season, status quo in the East

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Weekend precautions are out as Western Canada is facing another potential record-breaking fire year, while status quo is forecast for the Atlantic provinces. In other Forestry news: the Mayor of Chetwynd speaks out on caribou coverage; industry pushes back on Maine’s proposal to prohibit aerial spraying of herbicides; the world’s first global map of tree symbioses; and how to make money off rainforests without cutting them down. 

In Business news: the first round of China tariffs already stifled US wood exports; West Fraser announces two-week curtailments in BC; a wood pellet processing plant is being considered at Neucel mill in Port Alice, BC; and the Black Press board isn’t impressed with Trudeau’s offer of lumber to rebuild Notre Dame. 

Finally, the Frogs will be celebrating Queen Victoria’s B-day in London, back in Canada on Tuesday after the long weekend.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Here comes the smoke: Health officials tell BC to prepare

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Here comes the smoke: Health officials tell BC to prepare for new ‘5th season’. In related news: Fires have become a fact of life in Alberta, Federal fire officials update forecast for this year’s wildfire season; and wildfire prompts evacuation alerts near Osoyoos, BC.

In other news: optimism and criticism amid BC’s timber review; the pros and cons of logging in Alaska’s national forests; and UBC energy centre wins green building award.

Finally, case solved: it wasn’t Trudeau’s wood-pledge to France the Tree Frog Editors reported seeing yesterday at Notre Dame Cathedral, but rather, the construction of a huge wooden framework to secure the stone structure.

Kelly McCloskey, a Tree Frog in Paris

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Trudeau offers lumber to rebuild Notre-Dame Cathedral

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

After visiting the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral, Prime Minister Trudeau offered Canadian lumber to help with the rebuild; and the Tree Frog news may have seen it arrive in person [!!]

In Business news: capacity reductions and curtailments help softwood lumber prices recover–albeit slowly–from recent lows; China’s tariffs a wake up call for US hardwood industry; Conifex quarterly results improve but stay in red; Atlantic Power acquires two biomass plants; two former provincial politicians were re-elected to Canfor’s board; and a Liberal MLA says NDP forestry bill based on ideology, not common sense.

Finally, Western red cedars die off as extended dry spells continue; and the canary in Canada’s Boreal forest is a woodpecker.

Kelly McCloskey, a Tree Frog in Paris

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Lumber prices may foretell next downturn

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 14, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Looking at lumber prices, time is running out to prepare for the next downturn, says Seeking Alpha. In other Business news: Kruger begins construction of its tissue plant in Sherbrooke, Quebec; Southern Pine, OSB and softwood plywood to be included in new China tariff; and wood buildings could be the solution to BC’s housing crisis.
 
In Forestry/Climate news: BC Green MLAs Sonia Furstenau and Adam Olsen call for logging moratorium, say Vancouver Island’s old growth is under attack; logging bill would allow Maine loggers to bargain for fair compensation; and the level of carbon dioxide on Earth is highest it’s ever been since the existence of mankind.

Finally, Yellowstone’s Grizzlies are wandering farther from home, while Ontario uses sardines to assess the health of its bear population.

Kelly McCloskey, a Tree Frog in Paris

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Tolko to close Quesnel mill, drop shift at Kelowna

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 13, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tolko announces it will permanently close its Quest Wood sawmill in Quesnel, BC and drop a shift in Kelowna; the Forest Minister is saddened by the loss of jobs. In other Business news: Thessalon Lumber lays off 20 in Ontario; EACOM Timbers reaches agreement with Unifor; and New Zealand and China sign forestry cooperation arrangement.

Elsewhere: wildfire prompts evacuation order, state of emergency in central BC; ENGOs threaten legal action if BC spotted owls’ habitat not protected; a tale of two wildfire bills in Oregon, and Oregon becomes 1st state to restrict herbicide linked to tree deaths;

Finally, it’s time to celebrate the elaborate courtship of Maine’s American woodcock.

Kelly McCloskey, a  Tree Frog in Paris

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Canada’s Forest Sector Honours its Best and Brightest

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Forest Products Association of Canada held its annual Awards of Excellence ceremony in Vancouver yesterday, while—a stone’s throw away—Russ Taylor’s Global Softwood Conference pointed to better days (and markets) ahead. In other Business news: trade woes cloud BC’s economic outlook; Nova Scotia truckers call for Northern Pulp extension; Steelworkers say WorkSafeBC fines are inadequate; pulp prices are up in Q1, and the 131-year-old Luke paper mill in Maryland is closing. 

In Forestry/Climate news: soaring temperatures and a lack of rain adds to BC’s wildfire risk; floods beget a state of emergency in Ontario’s North Bay area; Oregon needs more wildfire prevention tools; Russian wildfires force evacuations; Scotland’s forests face a deadly tree disease; and fighting climate change with…er… Bamboo.

Finally, as noted in today’s ad, the Frogs are on a ‘work-cation’ next week so don’t be surprised if your Tree Frog News is simpled-down a bit and Peppered with Paris Pics 😉

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US – China trade dispute creates palpable frustration

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US business is frustrated with Trump’s aggressive stance on China, fears trade negations may collapse. In related news: US hardwood producers remain optimistic despite negative turn; the International Trade Commission says US cabinetmakers are harmed by Chinese imports; and China’s construction sector continues to grow as economy slows, softwood inventories rise.

In other news: BC Liberals and NDP spar over forest policy; federal carbon tax panned in Ontario; inside California’s Megafire on PBS; US Forest Chief on the ‘crisis in the woods‘; AF&PA’s Donna Harman on charging for paper bags; the Narwhal on saving spotted owls; and the emergence of markets for Brazil’s eucalyptus.

Finally, genetically engineered trees could save our forests, but it won’t be easy.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Lumber prices bounce on US construction spending, employment

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

North American softwood lumber prices bounced moderately on news of US construction spending and especially construction employment. In other Business news: an explainer on US-China trade talks; the NAFTA tribunal arguments focus on which time period to consider; Nova Scotia truckers demonstrate their support for Northern Pulp; and grant announcements abound by the US Forest Service and the US Endowment for Forestry and Communities.

In Forestry/Climate news: Canada’s forests are no longer the CO2 vacuums they used to be; Alaska’s massive old-growth timber sale faces a lawsuit; California’s forest carbon offsets fall short of cap-and-trade goals; the debate over BC’s wolf kill program is fraught; and more on the UN biodiversity report and habitat loss.

Finally, substance abuse in the sawmill and [??] suspected substance abuse on the highway.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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BC’s new vision for a troubled industry is questioned

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s new vision for a troubled industry and particularly Bill 22 is ‘ill-advised‘ according to the BC Liberals, but Premier Horgan could ‘put it on hold and consult’, writes Vaughn Palmer. In other Business news: Western’s Don Demens is in DC to make the case for duty-exemptions for cedar; Canfor’s sawmills are back up and running; and Universal Forest Products grows through acquisitions.

In Forestry/Climate news: a partial climbdown on cuts to Ontario’s tree-planting program; and Patrick Moore—the sensible environmentalist—to lead a US based CO2 Coalition. Also, more details on the tragic plane crash of BC Wildfire Service contractors and condolences from Doug Donaldson, BC’s Minister of Forests.

Finally, while a climate advocate says Notre Dame should not be rebuilt, a Paris architect envisions its rebirth with CLT. Here is a gallery of images. [stay tuned for on-site updates as  the Tree Frog news team heads to Paris this Friday to investigate further. Seriously!]

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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UN biodiversity report says nature is in worst shape in human history

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 6, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A UN biodiversity report says nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, the first to say so under agreement by 50 participating governments. In other Forestry/Climate news: Canada’s position as a climate do-gooder is undercut by wildfire emissions; Alberta’s wildfire season is here; while BC is cautious and the US warns of another busy wildfire season. 

In Business news: NAFTA panel to hear appeal of US ruling that American producers are injured by Canadian softwood shipments; BC’s forestry revitalization has industry concerned, looks a lot like the opposite; BC tops-up its compensation fund for forestry providers; Pinnacle restarts its Williams Lake plant after a fire; and Quebec’s Les Products Gilbert mill to be upgraded.

Finally, last week’s Hoo-Hoo event story sent you to the wrong image gallery. Here’s who was at the Hoo-Hoo in Vancouver.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Amid discouraging earnings, BC Gov’t proposals top industry concerns

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Amid discouraging earnings, West Fraser’s Ted Seraphim puts BC’s proposed forest policy changes at the top of his concern list. In related news: first quarter earnings are down for Interfor, Norbord and Rayonier, but up for Mercer. Meanwhile: a decision on Northern Pulp’s effluent plant may be deferred until after the federal election; and a new bill seeks to exempt Maine loggers from federal antitrust laws.

In Forestry news: BC delays timber auction to assess legacy trees; and Nature Ontario’s top ten concerns on the province’s Endangered Species Act amendments. In US Wildfire news: forest fires are accelerating snowmelt; western forests have a fire debt problem; not all fire is bad fire; and how to fireproof your home.

Finally, chick here to check out the Who’s Who of Hoo-Hoo in Vancouver. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Lumber woes linger, paper & other wood products fare better

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Lumber-price’s unseasonable slump continues while pulp & paper and other forest products fare better. The headlines include: sawmill profits fall as pine prices decline; temporary curtailments at Canfor, Interfor and Conifex; Tolko’s Williams Lake mill returns to operation; Q1 earnings are down at Western Forest Products, but up at Stella-Jones, Clearwater Paper and Domtar; and a deeper dive on the WTO’s softwood ruling on the use of “zeroing” in anti-dumping methodology.

In other news: Larry Pynn on the need for training for BC’s natural resource officers; Tree rings show the human effect on climate worldwide; EU forest cover increases but climate concerns persist; and industry says Australia’s billion tree planting program ‘can’t be done‘.

Finally, our sincere condolences to the family and friends of Dylan Montjoy, who died in a logging accident near Holberg BC over the weekend.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Deforestation in Canada and Other Fake News: Two Sides

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 1, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Two Sides is promoting a new book that claims to debunk common forestry and paper myths: Deforestation in Canada and Other Fake News. In other Forestry news: a preview of the IMAX film on BC’s threatened ancient rainforests; an update on BC’s Abbott/Chapman report; and more pushback on Ontario’s tree planting program cut.

In Business news: Wood Resources on sawmill margins in 2018, construction trends in 2019, Canfor Corp’s losses and Canfor Pulp’s income in Q1; and Södra’s CLT expansion plans. In Safety news; Worksafe BC investigates logger death on northern Vancouver Island and Tolko adds sobriety checks following boom boat drivers death. 

Finally, the five second rule does count as does the type surface you drop it on. Who knew?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry asset funds are on the rise due to climate change

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 30, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Asset managers are raising more funds to invest in the forestry sector due to worries over climate change. In other Business news: Canadian lumber exports to Japan are down 25% in Q1; Resolute’s sales are also down in Q1; global wood pellets shipments are up 21% in 2018; a private forest landowners study shows Wisconsin industry on the upswing; and layoffs at Domtar’s Espanola plant are good news for some. 

In Forestry news: the downside of cutting Ontario’s Tree Program, and Forests Ontario’s response; and more on the public’s response to BC caribou recovery plans in Vanderhoof and Revelstoke. Elsewhere: the brick exterior industry is leveraging past wildfires to say brick is better; and paper towels vs hand dryers makes for a long read in the Guardian. 

Finally, how mill workers could become pot growers in Burns Lake.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC Gov’t opens new inquiry into 2012 mill explosions

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 29, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The BC Gov’t’s new inquiry into the 2012 mill explosions is focused on WorkSafeBC’s recommendations and its accountability. In other Business news: the US Commerce Dep’t is set to rule on whether New Brunswick’s property taxes are a softwood subsidy; and the Motley Fool says Canfor and West Fraser are recession-proof investments.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC’s forestry watchdog cites weaknesses in enforcement of logging laws; Ontario’s species at risk reforms is panned for its pay-to-slay provision; and a group of BC profs say time is short for species at risk. Offshore: Iran losses 12,000 ha forests annually; Brazil lost 1.3 million ha of forests in 2018; and Europe’s forests are being ravaged by bark beetles.

Finally, a fire broke out near AA Milne’s famed Hundred Acre Wood; BC’s Forest Discovery Centre is officially unveiled; and a BC breeder is about to hatch its first spotted owl.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

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Weyerhaeuser, West Fraser report Q1 losses, Interfor ups downtime

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 26, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Weyerhaeuser and West Fraser report first quarter 2019 losses as earnings plunge, while Interfor announces downtime plans at each of its three BC interior mills. In other Business news: Ontario consults the forest sector on electricity prices; and however diminished, forestry remains an economic bedrock in Thunder Bay.

In Wood Product news: the role and future of concrete (Engineering.com); a flame-retardant for wood, made from wood (Finland); a first look at the renderings of the proposed up-to-40-storey timber tower (Vancouver); and two years after his death, architect Bing Thom’s last project opens at Simon Fraser University. Other stories of note: a summit on Canada’s biodiversity crisis; Ontario’s axed tree planting program; and police raids on illegal logging in Brazil.

Finally, good news—our readership is growing exponentially. Bad news—our server isn’t happy about the surge of readers when we publish! Apologies if you’re experiencing some delays but your patience is appreciated while we upgrade.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

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Canfor to curtail operations, US housing sales up but starts down

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 25, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Lumber market woes and high fibre costs are leading to more curtailments at Canfor’s BC operations. In related news: US housing sales are up in March despite the unexpected drop in starts reported last week. Elsewhere: Resolute renews labour agreement for three US mills; and Nova Scotia has a new Minister on the Northern Pulp mill file.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC’s isolated First Nation communities need more wildfire support; balance is key to Ontario’s Endangered Species Act; Meares Island celebrates historic Clayoquot Sound blockade; Ontario cancels tree planting program; Nelson, BC wants to control private forest lands; and tropical tree losses persist at high levels.

Finally, Canada invests in net-zero buildings, while wood products are touted in the UK, Japan and Dubai.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Notre Dame rebuild plans raises questions, begets offers

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Although the cause of the Notre Dame fire is still unknown, France launched a redesign completion, amid questions about safety at historic sites around the world, and offers of sunken, salvaged timber from Ghana. In other Wood Product news: office buildings go beyond green with WiredScore, a 3rd party certification for digital infrastructure.

In Business news: the latest from Madison’s on lumber is not good; FEA Wood Markets 2018 billion board club includes these 15 producers; new bargaining dates are set for northern BC; Northern Pulp gets new info demands; the San Group updates its sawmill plans; and West Fraser to appear on Emmy-Nominated TV show.

Finally, Western Forest Products identifies and protects its big trees; while California researchers have sequenced the entire genomes of two giant redwoods.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Vancouver architect unveils plan for world’s largest wood tower

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 23, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Architect Peter Busby proposes to build the world’s largest and greenest wood tower—a 35- or 40-storey mass timber structure—in Vancouver. In related news: FPInnovations announces world-renowned speakers for Woodrise 2019; and Project Learning Tree launches its Green Ride (all 8750 km of it) for Green Jobs. 

In Forestry/Climate news: Vicky Husband calls for citizen action on plans to log near BC’s Juan de Fuca park; Ontario proposes changes to its Endangered Species Act; 80% of US parents want climate change taught in the class room; a Perdue Univ. prof says large-scale carbon sequestration would send food prices soaring; and the Arbor Day Foundation announces its forest stewardship winners.

Finally, just in case you were busy looking for Easter eggs, you can check out yesterday, last week or last year’s headlines, as we archive them all. Here’s our coverage on FPAC’s Women and Gender Diversity in the forest sector panel.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Happy Easter and Happy Earth Day 2019

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 22, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

After nearly a half century, Earth Day—the world’s largest secular holiday—is celebrated in 193 countries, including Canada and the USA. In Earth Day news: Horgan and Trump issue customary statements, while: Canada celebrates its environmental record notwithstanding its wilderness gaps; Brazil’s unique deforestation challenge is highlighted; and eight stories of sustainable architecture.

In Forestry/Climate news: pro and anti-logging sentiment at the Caribou hearings; ENGO outcry over logging plans near Juan de Fuca park; the Canadian gov’t to help tackle climate change in BC; U of Nevada researchers seek to improve conifer resilience; and fire season starts slow in Ontario.

Finally, wood versus weed, Boise Cascade sues to protect its tree-shaped logo.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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Notre Dame wake-up call: fire risk mitigation in heritage buildings

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Notre Dame fire is a “wake-up call” for the guardians of heritage buildings throughout the world; while drone footage shows the devastation up close; and a recent 3D laser scan may facilitate the rebuild. In related news: U of Toronto’s timber tower plan is updated.

In Forestry/Climate news: Vancouver Island old-growth films premier in Toronto; the ‘racist tone’ in the caribou talks; the future of bats on Bat Appreciation Day; and Canada’s forests absorb more than six times what the country emits in CO2. Elsewhere: Paper Excellence curtails its Powell River mill for two weeks; and Ethan Allen lays off 300 at furniture plant in North Carolina.

Finally, FPAC’s gender diversity panel comes with passion and good advice!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Suzuki ups the stakes as Caribou recovery plans concern thousands

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A societal crisis? David Suzuki calls for robust conservation for species at-risk; as the last caribou transplants return from the US; BC’s caribou talks draw record crowds of ‘concerned‘ Revelstoke residents; and Canada’s environment minister warns of a hot future unless action is taken.

In other news: More on the Notre Dame fire and timber beam replacement challenge; Alberta’s election adds opposition to the fed’s carbon tax plan; while companies in the news include Tolko (taxes), Domtar (odours), Roseburg (management) and J.D. Irving (recruits).

Finally, the news is early as the Frogs join FPAC’s celebration of gender equity in the workforce. We’ll have an overview of the event in tomorrow’s news.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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Notre Dame Cathedral’s iconic timber roof has been lost

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Notre Dame’s 850 year-old timber roof—crafted from 350 year-old oaks—has been lost in a construction fire; with the cathedral’s age, design and lack of sprinklers contributing to firefighter’s challenge. In related news, New Zealand research highlights wood’s earthquake and fire performance going back to 1848.

In other news: US and Canadian perspectives and actions on the WTO’s softwood ruling and an explainer that calls it ‘gibberish math’; CN challenges breach determination; an Oregon bill would ‘shut down the timber industry‘; the BC gov’t taps ex-Liberal minister Blair Lekstrom to ‘rescue the caribou rescue’ plan, ‘dial down the acrimony‘, and extend consultations a month; and a report card on cumulative effects in BC’s Howe Sound.

Finally, it’s time again to celebrate soil health by soiling your undies.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canada to appeal WTO anti-dumping ruling

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada will appeal the WTO panel decision allowing the US to use “zeroing” to calculate anti-dumping tariffs, while a ruling on the more significant countervailing duties is still to come. In other Business news: the federal and Ontario governments go to court over the validity of the fed’s carbon tax; NRCan invests in UNB’s climate adaptation technology; and Maine invests in wood insulation and in wood fuel from biomass.

In caribou news: FPAC’s Derek Nighbor responds to an NRDC letter in the Washington Post; while industry concerns are aired in the local Vanderhoof and Revelstoke newspapers.

Finally, the cement and concrete industry are at it again – ‘whack a mole‘ style.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC moves to prevent concentration of harvesting rights

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 12, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The BC government seeks to help smaller businesses, introduces Forest Act amendments to prevent concentration of harvesting rights by major licensees. Meanwhile, on the caribou front: BC Liberals call consultation sessions call a sham; BC’s caribou director says otherwise; and Chapman’s Ice Cream seeks to profit from the controversy.

In other news: Ontario’s budget to create conditions for forest innovation; US construction inputs rise despite lumber woes; and Georgia Pacific will close its Oregon Coos Bay mill.

Finally, 10 of the top 20 US landowners are forest companies and tree-based rubber can help fight the world’s plastic pollution problem.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Caribou forums standing room only, NDP quick to blame feds

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

It’s standing room only at the government forums on caribou recovery: hundreds attend in Prince George; it’s standing room only in Williams Lake; the NDP is quick to blame the feds (Vaughn Palmer); the herds have disappeared in National Parks where no development occurs (Tom Fletcher); and a wrong decision may wreck havoc (retired mayor of Chetwynd).

In other news: BC must consider coastal forestry’s unique challenges (Don Demens, WFP); market prospects good despite US protectionism (Business in Vancouver); BC falling short on biodiversity (CPAWS); WTO softwood ruling applauded (Oregon lawmakers); and FSC takes heat over Roseburg complaint.

Finally, the tallest tropical tree in the world—at 100 meters—is a Malaysian yellow meranti.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US gets the better of Canada in lumber ruling at WTO

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The World Trade Organization delivered a mixed ruling in the US-Canada lumber dispute, finding the US did not follow the rules in calculating the anti-dumping duties but more significantly, they can use the long-outlawed ‘zeroing policy‘, which overstates the calculation. In response, the US Lumber Coalition cheered the ruling, while the Canadian industry is disappointed but plans to continue as more rulings lie ahead. 

In other news: Vaughn Palmer opines on BC’s caribou protection plan; ENGO’s on BC’s wolf kills and caribou zoos; the NY Times on protecting Poland’s primeval forest; and Treehugger on mass timber’s sustainability.

Finally, can Big Oil’s reputation be saved by planting trees?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Transportation watchdog confirms ‘discriminatory’ rail practice

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A preliminary report from Canada’s transportation watchdog appears to confirm shippers’ complaints about discriminatory treatment for commodity lumber. In other Business news: Quebec truckers face growing challenges; Northern Pulp’s uncertainty ripples down to its contractors; Random Lengths says improved weather will trigger higher prices; and AF&PA’s Donna Harman opines on the evolution of the US industry. 

In Forestry/Climate news: California’s wildfires spark preemptive state of emergency; ENGOs call for carbon capture with forests; natural forests are better than plantations at fighting climate change; and northern forests CO2-uptake is on the rise.

Finally, from the COFI conference, Yurkovich’s highlights, Jeffrey’s timber accolade, Harder’s notable quotes, and our photo gallery of the folks in the room.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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COFI highlights surprise with Horgan, CEOs and a youth panel

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Wrapping up the all the highlights of this year’s COFI convention is no easy feat—given the many impressive and informative presentations. But as evidenced in today’s Special Feature, CEO Susan Yurkovich was more than up to the task. Other conference headlines include:

  • BC Premier launches forest policy review for Interior (Mark Nielsen)
  • Horgan not ruling out trade mission to China (Marcella Bernardo)
  • BC to use procurement to help with shrinking timber supply (Tom Fletcher)
  • Horgan pledges to build museum, hospital with mass timber (Nelson Bennett)

In Forestry/Climate news: a northeastern BC town balks at the cost of saving caribou; scientists wrestle with converting biomass to coal in Arizona; Shell is investing in carbon offset projects worldwide; and changes to Brazil’s environmental policy has activists concerned.

Finally, more COFI highlights and our conference image gallery tomorrow.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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COFI keynotes speak of risk and opportunity in the forest sector

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 5, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

On the coattails of yesterday’s report revealing the forest industry’s profound role in the BC economy, 670+ COFI delegates received updates on: the risks inherent in the US-China relationship; the poor prospects of a softwood lumber deal and the slowing economic outlook for BC, Canada and the US. In related news: BC’s Premier has a ‘new vision for forestry ‘ in the Interior; and BC’s Forest Minister announces funding for wood promotion and forest enhancement.

In Forestry/Climate news: reforestation is deemed critical to the Paris climate accord; US senators push for increased forest fire spending; a South Korea forest fire is declared a national emergency; and a BC bioenergy company is feeling ‘burned up‘ over slash piles.

We’ll have updates from the COFI conference, including more on Thursday’s panels, reviews of today’s presentations, and more pictures … tune in Monday!

Finally, here are yesterday’s #COFI2019 photo highlights and Smokey the Bear celebrates his 75th B-day (do you recognize that voice?).

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry accounts for 1/3 of BC’s tangible exports: Finlayson

Tree Frog Forestry News
April 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Jock Finlayson (Business Council of BC) says exports are key to BC’s prosperity and forest products account for 1/3 of all exports. In related BC news: PwC says forestry contributes $13 billion to GDP, and 1 of 5 jobs in Northeast. Elsewhere: Nova Scotia’s premier meets with Northern Pulp’s union; and Anderson Windows opens new Arizona plant.

In other news: a Nordic study ‘cements wood‘ as the future of construction; while a study funded by the cement industry questions wood’s carbon math; and—the cement association applauds. Elsewhere: the Rainforest Alliance says forests are a low-tech, high-impact climate solution; Ontario responds to logging reductions in Dryden; and BC finds its caribou pitch is ‘no easy solution‘. 

Finally, the News will arrive early again tomorrow as we’re croaking live from the COFI conference in Vancouver. Here are last night’s photo highlights.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forest industry drives one out of every 17 jobs in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A new study says one out of every 17 jobs in BC is generated by the forest industry; while challenges faced by the sector are the focus of this year’s COFI’s conference in Vancouver.

In other news: the Canadian government is investing in forest innovation; WoodWorks US celebrates design innovation; the cement association pans BC’s tall wood allowance; FSC says mass timber is climate friendly ‘if it’s FSC certified‘; and US insurers seek to reduce home flammability.

In Forestry/Climate news: Canada’s environmental watchdog says the country’s climate inaction is ‘disturbing’; Ontario farmers want to use biomass energy byproducts as fertilizer; BC’s caribou consultations are underway; early feedback on the plan points to an urban/rural divide; and BC’s Liberal leader calls the caribou consultations “a sham“.

Finally, Romeo—the endangered Bolivian frog—weds his Juliet.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canada is warming at twice the rate of rest of world

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Federal scientists are warning that Canada’s climate is warming at twice the rate of the rest of the world and that Northern Canada is warming even more. In related news: BC’s wildfire season starts early; the toll of California’s wildfires explained; and hotter/drier weather is bad for Montana’s seedling survival. 

In other news: RISI’s recap speaks of sluggish markets; a fire at Tolko’s Lumby plant is extinguished without incident; UPM is closing one of its German paper machines; housing starts are up in Japan; Michigan State will use mass timber in new facility; and firefighters contain the forest fire in China that killed 30.

Finally, the BC Council of Forest Industries forestry conference kicks off tomorrow evening with an ice breaker. Notable speakers include David MacNaughton, Canada’s Ambassador to the US and BC Premier John Horgan. The Frogs will be in tow—so stay tuned for live updates from the floor. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Nova Scotia pulp mill decision puts thousands of jobs at risk

The Tree Frog Forestry News
April 1, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Nova Scotia government says it needs more details on Northern Pulp’s effluent plan, but time is running out and thousands of jobs are at risk. In other Business news: Chinese log imports reached another high in 2018; and the NAHB will provide testimony on lumber suitability to a NAFTA dispute panel.

In Forestry News: BC’s Forest Minister offers a ‘stay of execution‘ in Elphinstone forest; BC First Nations reach logging deal on Saturna Island; Oregon’s proposed legislation gets pushback from industry; Hurricane Michael has changed Florida’s forests; China’s mountain fire proves deadly for firefighters; BC reports seven forest fires; and a 10,000 acre blaze runs amok in South Jersey.

Finally, the World Resources Institute embraces mass timber, and bike builders display their ‘bike porn‘.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Plague-like fungus, not deforestation, greatest threat to frogs

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 29, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Researches say a plague-like fungus—transported via trade in pet amphibians—is responsible for most frog extinctions, but some species are on the rebound due to adaptations and possibly climate change. In related news: BC’s caribou recovery plan is panned for ignoring community viability and its short consultation process; as is New Zealand’s reliance on trees to meet its CO2 reduction obligations.

In other news: a decision is expected today on the future of Northern Pulp’s Pictou mill; wildfire headlines and actions in Washington, Oregon and California; and awards and recognitions for John Brink (Brink Forest Products), Amy Johnson (Canfor) and North Carolina Senator Deanna Ballard.

Finally, climbing the world’s tallest tree via a human dash-cam.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US launches trade investigation against China over cabinetry

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 28, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US launched yet another trade investigation claiming China is subsidizing their wooden cabinetry exports. In related news: Roseburg denies knowledge of illegal timber imports via a China-based company. In other Business news: BC wood shipments are mixed in January; Ontario may free up wood for Fort Frances mill; Tolko upgrades its mill in Armstrong; and timber industry contributions in Oregon spur a call for campaign finance reform.

In Wood Product news: Timber towers are trending in Toronto, Maine seeks a mass timber demonstration building; California Redwood’s LCA is updated; AWC applauds Utah’s support of mass timber; and Chicago’s new airport terminal will include extensive use of wood.

Finally, Douglas fir beetles in Oregon, Gypsy moths in Vancouver and caribou plans near Revelstoke, BC.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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