Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

US housing starts rebound, Steelworkers reject Western’s offer

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 19, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US housing starts rebound despite a slight drop in homebuilder confidence, pointing to housing market strength. In other headlines: the Steelworkers Union rejected Western Forest Products’ offer and their request for binding arbitration. Meanwhile: a Marshall Plan to rescue the BC Interior; Canfor shareholders to vote on going private; and Irving Tissue invests in Georgia, big time.

In other news: Mosaic employs cameras to deter backcountry vandals; opposition rises to US Roadless Rule changes; and Scientist uncover resistance genes for the deadly ash tree disease.

Finally, Sierra Pacific’s Red Emmerson; Vancouver Sun’s Gordon Hoekstra and BC conservation officer Blake Parker are recognized for their good works.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC’s forestry slowdown means job cuts at CN Rail

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Lower freight volumes in BC’s forest sector result in job cuts at CN Rail. In related news: a Quebec hardwood flooring company lays off 165; the US-China trade war’s impact on Kentucky hardwood producers; Roseburg adds to its layoff total in Oregon; and BC’s market-diversification trade mission to China and Japan is a wrap.

In Forest History news: looking back at an 1800s New Brunswick lumberjack; and the generosity of messers McMillan, Bloedel and VanDusen as the Bloedel Conservatory turns 50. Meanwhile, stories on: the last American caribou; BC’s old growth review; Oregon’s wildfire reduction investments; Montana’s grizzly recovery plans; and California’s new carbon offset standard for the tropics.

Finally, tree farmer (and Rolling Stone) Chuck Leavell is awarded Superhero for the Earth.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Tolko’s BC operations to take extended holiday downtime

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tolko will be shutting down operations across BC for two weeks over the holiday season, adding to the BC Interior’s economic woes. In related news: BC’s Liberal leader says the NDP has no plan to help the forest sector; coastal mayors beg parties to resolve BC forestry strike; poor newsprint markets have Resolute closing its Augusta Georgia plant; and Conifex reports Q3 improvement despite losses.

In other news: BC seeks public input on old growth forest management; UN seeks to streamline science on boreal forests; and large scale automated forest tree breeding comes to Sweden. Meanwhile, mass timber makes news in Ontario; Quebec; Mississippi; and with Freddie Mac economists.

Finally, the world’s first floating timber tower is unveiled in–you guessed it—Amsterdam.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Dept. of Commerce must rethink its ruling on shakes and shingles

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 14, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US Court of International Trade says the Dept. of Commerce must rethink its conclusion on Canadian cedar shakes and shingles, says determination must consider previous rulings. In related news: BC’s Asia mission seeks market diversification while steering clear of diplomatic concerns. Meanwhile: what’s up with Tolko’s laid-off Kelowna workers; Sappi’s pulp business hurt by US-China war; and JD Irving opens tissue plant in Macon, Georgia.

In other news: BC seeks to increase the use of wood slash; an Ontario firm chips trees for green energy; a Quesnel First Nation secures more woodland tenure; a biomass alternative to plastic receives US funding; and researchers say bamboo’s elegant structure offers energy and fire-safe benefits.

Finally, what’s the impact of the Alaska Roadless Rule proposal on logging, not much both sides say. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Trouble in Timberland – an intense bust cycle: Friedman

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 13, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Like oil and gas in Alberta, forestry is experiencing an intense bust cycle that is quietly killing small town BC, says the Financial Post’s Gabriel Friedman. In related news: BC’s latest trade mission to Asia; and logging convoy leaders target every affected BC community. Elsewhere: the US puts WTO dispute settlement system in peril; New Zealand is happy with China trade deal; and US hardwood producers keep pleading for relief.

In Forestry/Climate news: the choice before us by a climate crisis realist; Oregon puts a high price on fighting future wildfires; the uncertain future of Michigan’s wood-fired power plants; the negative impact of wildfires on Arizona’s streams; and a rare deer-like forest species is photographed for the first time in Vietnam.

Finally, a Tree Frog congrats to AF&PA’s sustainability award winners.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Tolko closing Kelowna mill forever, mediation resumes at Western

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 12, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

After nearly 90 years, Tolko’s Kelowna mill is closing forever, local MLA blames NDP government. In related news: why isn’t the province doing more to help the forest sector; BC looks to expand markets to Asia; and Western Forest Products and Steelworkers resume mediation. Meanwhile: both US and China wood furniture exporters see double-digit drop; and Canadian women break the forest products glass ceiling.

In other news: a Vimy Ridge oak tree honours Canadian soldiers; Oregon among the world’s fastest tree growers; Alaska’s fight to save the Tongass; California’s use of AI to fight wildfires; and Australia declares wildfire emergency while their countrymen opine on the native forestry debate.

Finally, an insightful guest column on the import of being wary of the linguistic sleight of hand.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Mass timber suppliers see surging sales in Canada, US

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As commodity lumber producers struggle, the value-added sector serving mass timber construction is surging. In related news: a tutorial on how to build taller with wood; wood’s contribution to the bottom line; and the upside of waste wood

In other news: BC moves forward with leaders’ table on caribou recovery; Nova Scotia’s bat population is slowly recovering; and the US is proposing endangered species protection for the Pacific Fisher. On the human Safety front, the BC Wildfire Service is studying firefighter’s health; while a US report says wildfire smoke is worse than controlled burns.

Finally, this Monday, Canadians and Americans pay homage to the sacrifice of those who gave their lives to keep us safe, while thanking our aging and remaining veterans. One way to do this is by revisiting the role of the Canadian Forestry Corps in WW1.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Victoria’s (Australia) old-growth logging ban panned by workers, feds

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

ENGOs praise Victoria’s (the southeastern state of Australia) decision to end old-growth logging in native forests, as workers and the federal government express dismay. In other Forestry news: BC employs thinning and logging to reduce fire risk; and Alberta launches its caribou task force, ends firefighter rappelling program. 

In Business news: Kelowna’s Tolko mill will remain closed for the foreseeable future; striking forestry workers rally in Nanaimo; and Q3 results are reported by Western Forest Products, Stella-Jones and Boise Cascade. Meanwhile, Nova Scotia’s forest fire numbers are the lowest in 80 years; and Kalesnikoff’s CLT plant is a step closer to completion.

Finally, photos and highlights from BC’s 2019 Wood Solutions Conference.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry carbon offsets may be worse than nothing: Bennett

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 6, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Business in Vancouver’s Nelson Bennett revisits the history and image problem of forest carbon offsets and why some experts say they’re worse than nothing. In other news: BC’s mill layoffs are not being replicated in Ontario; Canfor’s mill closure results in a logging asset sale; IKEA reports strong sales growth in Canada; and the China-NZ trade agreement is lauded by NZ timber exporters.

In Wood Product news: Canadian’s are willing to pay for sustainable packaging; Domtar adds manmade fibres to its paper mix; an Oregon paper mill creates paper from straw; KFC tests bamboo packaging for its poutine; and a Dutch timber design seeks to demonstrate the concrete of the future.

Finally, Heavens to Betsy — the environmental toll of cremating the dead.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Carbon emissions from deforestation smaller than thought

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 5, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A new study says human-made net carbon emissions from deforestation are about a fifth of what was previously estimated. In related news: ENGO’s pan BC’s ‘log and talk‘ consultations;  Alberta appoints caribou task force members; a Tongass alternative—shift to second growth logging; Northern Wisconsin secures clean SFI/FSC audits; and the UK plans to tackle climate change by planting trees.

In other news: a new wood-based cellulose can capture hormones from wastewater; California lifts wildfire evacuations; Ontario reports lower 2019 forest fire losses; Canada’s lumber production is up slightly; Rayonier announces Q3 losses; and Sappi concludes purchase of Quebec’s Mantane pulp mill.

Finally, the Frogs are on location at CWC’s Wood Solutions Conference in Vancouver today. Hope to see you there!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Trump and California at odds on forestry and wildfires

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

California’s governor hits back at Trump over wildfire criticism, saying, “You don’t believe in climate change. You are excused from this conversation.” In related news: commentary on the wildfire similarities in Arizona; and the fate of America’s Amazon apropos the Alaska roadless rule.

In Business news: Steelworkers reject Western Forest Products’ call for binding arbitration; BC Minister Donaldson says Liberal’s stumpage proposal would backfire; and retirement monies available for laid-off BC mill workers. Meanwhile, down-under in New Zealand: wood exporters get preferential access to Chinese markets;  foreigners are buying up NZ forestry land and a farm-to-forestry conversion ban makes no sense to forest owners.

Finally, there’s never been a better time to get into tree planting.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou: Tom Fletcher

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 1, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou, writes Tom Fletcher… a relief to many BC communities. In other Forestry news: Alberta’s pine beetle battle gets more bucks; BC ups TFL 61’s allowable cut, Oregon cuts deal to protect fishers; California’s new wildfire normal; and Tobi Lutke and Elon Musk make ‘tree planting for the climate’ news.

In Business news: Western Forest Products calls for binding arbitration, as BC Truck Loggers call for an end to the strike. Meanwhile: Simpcw First Nation urges BC to come to the table with Bill 22; Acadian Timber and Mercer announce Q3 results; and Resolute’s stock falls to a new low. 

Finally, is nothing sacred. NHL goalies switch to composite sticks.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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Resolute, Norbord and Enviva Q3 results are down as expected

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 31, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Resolute, Norbord and Enviva Partners reported third quarter results yesterday and as expected, earnings were down or non-existent. In other Business news: the Conifex-Hampton deal is okayed; Resolute extends Ignace, Ontario mill shutdown; and it will take more than lower mortgage rates to lift the US housing market.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC adds teeth to its Climate Change Accountability Act; Sudbury’s acid-damaged lakes are recovering well; and a new study says GHG emissions caused by damage to tropical forests are underestimated by a factor of six. Meanwhile: high winds are fueling wildfires in Oregon and California; but in an era of megafires is Canada learning from the US experience.

Finally, Fort St. John’s 8-meter-high lumberjack is felled by flames.

Have a happy and safe Halloween!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wildfires batter California, exploding in size

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 30, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Wildfires batter California and although scary, the images are look-worthy. In related news: what it’s like to live in a high risk fire zone; the US Forest Service has fire-suppression money left over; and BC looks at how firefighting affects the health of fire crews.

In Business/Finance news: although consumers continue to spend, the US GDP fell to 1.9% and the Fed is expected to cut interest rates. Meanwhile: Canfor’s privatization move faces some opposition; Resolute expands its liquidity; Roseburg opens an LVL plant in South Carolina; and panel prices soared last week while lumber rose slightly.

Finally, two rare white moose; an Arctic stump, and a wood showcase for the Tokyo Olympics.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canfor agrees to go private, Conifex tenure transfer approved

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 29, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor has entered into an agreement with Jim Pattison’s Great Pacific Capital Corp. to take the company private; as BC approves its first Bill 22 case, allowing Conifex to transfer its forest tenure to Hampton Lumber. In other Business news: Potlatch reports Q3 profits; mislabeling of wood products in the US is alarmingly common; and modified wood products put pressure on treated lumber.

In other news: the US Forest Service says the new Tongass rule doesn’t mean more logging; an Alberta field trial converts forest residues into natural gas; spark detection systems help with combustible dust, and California wildfires have echoes of 2017

Finally, the wood company and the weed company have settled their dispute.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry crisis pushes lumber prices up, BC trade down

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 28, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s forestry crisis is showing up in worsening trade figures, as logging shifts to the US Southeast and lumber prices rise. In related news: Mackenzie, BC is hanging by a thread; BC log home builders’ fibre challenge; and strikers and families speak out on impact of Western Forest Products’ labour dispute. Elsewhere: time is running out to find a buyer for Ontario’s Fort Frances mill; and the US-China trade war is bad news for Pennsylvania’s hardwood industry.

In Forestry/Climate news: Jim Pattison’s pragmatic view on climate change; the US pellet industry touts wood energy; and a Stanford researcher casts doubt on the viability of carbon capture. Meanwhile: California declares statewide wildfire emergency; Alberta’s wildfires consume the second most amount of land in history; and Inca trees offer hope to Brazil’s devastated forests.

Finally, have you ever thought of being a poop fairy?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC’s reconciliation legislation: increased certainty or a veto on development

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 25, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s reconciliation legislation aims to create economic certainty while respecting Indigenous rights, but it sounds like a resource veto to some. In other Business news: diversification has helped Vancouver Island, but the forest crisis is downgrading growth; and the Truck Loggers express fears as Western Forest Products’ strike nears four-month mark. Meanwhile: US new-home sales fall and the home-improvement boom is forecast to fizzle.

In other news: Vancouver is pushing for zero emissions buildings; Canada needs provincial support on endangered-species; plans announced to update the SFI standard; who regulates Oregon’s logging industry?; and California wildfires worsen, residents fleeing.

Finally, International Bat Week ends October 31st (Halloween)… a coincidence?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

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Canfor’s operating losses rise as Q3 revenues plunge

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor’s Q3 losses rise on weaker lumber markets—especially in BC— and due to lower pulp and paper earnings. In related news: Premier Horgan wants Western Forest Product’s labour dispute resolved soon, while Vancouver Island logging contractors fear for their future. Meanwhile: BC’s first 12-storey wood building breaks ground in Langford; climate change bodes well for Ontario’s mass timber future; and embodied energy experts say “wood is good, steel and concrete are bad.”

In Forestry/Climate news: Canadian scientists complete the family tree for the tree of life; BC appoints feedback-panel on old-growth protection; Alaska Tribes opine on the Tongass question; logging gets a new lease on life in Arizona; and the White House sides with the EPA on the future of biofuels.

Finally, a fast-moving wildfire prompts evacuations in California wine country.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US Celebrates National Forest Products Week and Timber Innovation Day

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 23, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

President Trump proclaimed this week as National Forest Products Week… and yesterday as Timber Innovation Day—to recognize and highlight new and innovative uses for wood. In related news: green advocates emphasize embodied carbon, such as this example of mass timber in the Toronto Conservation Authority’s new home.

In Business news: softwood lumber prices moderate down, while the US housing continues to prop-up the US economy. Meanwhile, CN Rail cuts its profit forecast; Georgia Pacific idles two South Carolina mills; and the BC gov’t’s Interior Renewal feedback process ends, as worker transition monies are set to flow, and log home builders celebrate good news for a change.

Finally, the Arctic tundra is becoming a source of greenhouse gas emissions.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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West Fraser shares up slightly despite $45M Q3 loss

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 22, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

West Fraser Timber shares are expected to fare well, despite reporting $45M Q3 loss on lower lumber production. In other Business news: the Steelworkers say Western Forest Products is refusing to budge; a Longlac Ontario mill is running out of wood; Norbord curtails OSB production at Cordele, Georgia; and an update on the EU’s softwood challenges.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC’s search and destroy approach to pine beetles; California’s forest thinning effort in Lake Tahoe; Oregon’s wildfire cash flow challenge; Indonesia’s 2019 wildfires losses; and an Arizona study says high precipitation years won’t save trees from climate change.

Finally, UK scientists develop an artificial leaf inspired by photosynthesis.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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It’s Election Day in Canada as one BC logger struggles to vote

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 21, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Don’t Frog-et to vote! 

It’s Election Day in Canada as one BC logger struggles to vote due to the forestry downturn.

In Forestry/Climate news: support for laid-off BC forestry workers is now available; Nova Scotia established a committee to advise on forest management; Sweden’s climate phenom was in Fort McMurray, Alberta; the pros and cons of a modest change to Alaska’s roadless rule; and Oregon struggles to find common ground with forestry revenue sharing and the Endangered Species Act.

Finally, the driver of this car survived his crash with a loaded logging truck!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Pinnacle pellet deal with Japan good news but is it sustainable?

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC applauds Pinnacle’s pellet deal with Japan for its value-added and clean energy aspects, while others wonder if there’s enough wood waste to go around given sawmill closures. In other Business news: builders remain upbeat despite drop in US housing starts; Western Forest Products and the USW are back in mediation; and Weyerhaeuser’s ex-finance manager is charged with theft

In Wood Product news: prefabricated wood-frame construction boosts mid-rise affordability in BC, the US Congress and EU eye wood buildings as a carbon sink; and watchmaker Swatch’s Swiss headquarters is a head-turner. Meanwhile: critics speak out on BC’s wolf kill; Trump’s plan to log the Tongass; and Indonesia’s palm forest recovery program; and scientists point to downside of tree planting as a solution to climate change.

Finally, microscopic mites as a biological weapon against the bark beetle.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US housing market firming amid low mortgage rates and steady demand

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US home construction data for September suggests the US housing market is firming amid low mortgage rates and steady demand. In related news: 93% of new homes built in 2018 were wood framed; and the potential US-China trade deal may be too late for hardwood producers. Meanwhile, Hazelton BC wants more information on the Gitxsan pellet plant proposal; and Smartlam reverses direction on CLT plans for Maine.

In Forestry news: BC calls for caribou habitat restoration projects; Montreal battles the emerald ash borer; BC’s approach to the spruce beetle panned; California’s blackouts called outrageous; Oregon’s forestry petition rejections puzzle; and critics speak in favour of Alaska’s roadless rule, as the USDA seeks comment on the propose changes.

Finally, trees that survived California drought may help with climate resilience.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Softwood production stable in US, drops sharply in Canada

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

In the first seven months of 2019, softwood lumber production was stable in the US but down 10% in Canada (19% in BC). In related news: lumber prices lost ground last week, US building material costs were down in September, and Trump/China deal doesn’t do much for US hardwood producers.

In other Business news: Tolko’s Kelowna mill workers still in limbo; Structurlam a bright spot for BC forestry jobs; Vancouver Island forestry strike not as crippling as it used to be, EACOM makes railway contingency plans in Ontario, and Port Hawkesbury paper gets interim power rate from Nova Scotia’s regulator.

Finally, Trump expands logging in Alaska’s Tongass, and Canadian politicos voice their climate positions.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Federal Conservatives release plan for BC’s forest sector

Tree Frog Forestry News
October 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As part of an election campaign, the federal Conservatives released a plan to support BC’s ailing forest sector. In related news: lacklustre 3rd quarter results expected this week; Minister Donaldson takes issue with Liberal call for action; and the Wilderness Committee’s perspective on forestry downturn. Elsewhere: JD Irving closes New Brunswick Baker Brook sawmill; and the Wood Component Manufacturer’s Association elects a new board.

In Forestry news: despite Trump pledge, Oregon logging not increasing; BC scrambles to recruit tree planters; Alaska hit by the hemlock sawfly; and LA wildfire out of control after change in the weather.

Finally, building industry materials become runway fashion – all for charity.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Climate change threatens extinction for most birds: Audubon Society

October 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Audubon Society says climate change threatens two-thirds of North America’s bird species, especially in Canada. In related news: Oregon’s moral dilemma with killing Barred Owls to save Spotted Owls, a BC court rules in favour of logging in Haida Gwaii; and voices weigh in on how much BC old growth should be left.

In BC Business news: forest company goodwill, generosity hailed; Liberals call for forest minister’s ouster; Tolko workers face uncertain future; and Part 2 of BC’s Independent Wood Processors plan to replace lost sawmill jobs. Elsewhere: Fort Frances, Ontario has 90 days to find a mill buyer; Oregon State unveils wood products lab; and a contrast in fire seasons: Oregon and Indonesia.

Finally, happy Thanksgiving to our Canadian readers and happy Columbus Day to our US readers. The frogs will be back on Tuesday with full bellies and the weekend headlines.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Environmentalists have a new target: Charmin toilet paper

Tree Frog Forestry News
October 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada’s boreal forests are in the news as environmental groups pressure toilet paper manufacturer Procter & Gamble to use more recycled materials in their tissue. In Haida Gwaii, local artists are seeking to halt logging of old growth trees outside Masset and in Prince George, conservation group Enough is Enough is speaking out against old growth logging in the North.

In Business news: margins are down for BC sawmills; the Independent Wood Processors Association speaks out in support of the BC Premier’s value-added plan; a Miramichi lumber mill is closed indefinitely because of fire; and a paper mill in Maine is investing in significant upgrades to increase pulp capacity and paper quality. 

Finally, Tree Frog editors got a lesson in spelling from a reader yesterday. Grizzly bears in BC may be emancipated, but what biologists are concerned about are those who are emaciated. Thanks Diana!

Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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Wolf cull could be solution to caribou recovery: study

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A report on caribou recovery in BC’s South Peace region—up 49% after four-year wolf cull—recommends program continuance until the herds are self-sustaining. In related news: a poor salmon run may be cause of emancipated grizzly in Knight Inlet; logging helps a threatened songbird in Michigan; wildfires cause massive fish loss in Colorado; and the Tussock moth heads north in BC.

In Business news: Vaughan Palmer pans Premier’s comment on Teal Jones; Quebec helps Thurso pulp mill restart; Huron Central Railway shutdown impacts EACOM; and Ontario invests in First Nation pellet plant study. Meanwhile, a campaign to combat biomass misinformation; and the Adamson, Freer and Griessel families receive BC Minister’s Awards for woodlot management.

Finally, the fall wildfire season challenges Colorado, set to start in South Carolina.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC Timber Sales not complying with old growth logging rules: Ancient Forest Alliance

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC Timber Sales is not complying with old growth logging rules, system is “truly corrupt“, says the Ancient Forest Alliance. Elsewhere in BC: rethinking forestry in Terrace; Pinnacle’s expansion in Williams Lake; and Burnaby sues Domtar over decades-old contaminated land. Meanwhile: Fortress cellulose to take downtime in Quebec and Oregon logging industry hurt by log price drop. 

In other news: the USDA speaks out on the wood-carbon connection; FPAC on Canada’s bioeconomy potential; industry exec on Nova Scotia’s plastic bag ban; and Pasadena, California bans wood roofing and permanent wood foundations.

Finally, a dressing from tree bark could transform the treatment of wounds.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Political Amnesia, Trade Wars and a Call for Climate Action

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s forest crisis is expected to dominate the fall legislative session amidst claims of tunnel vision on funding and political amnesia over blame. In related news: the ripple-down effect of Western Forest Product’s strike; finding solutions for Northern BC; and the San Group’s growth begets Entrepreneur of the Year.

In other news: a call for Climate action by Canadian forest industry execs; the Green party looks to plant trees; FPAC counters misleading plastics commentary; and the China-US trade war strains both economies, hits the Australian wood chip industry, and causes hardwood layoffs.

Finally, a BC First Nation to devise caribou plan while the US protects an already extinct herd. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Trees and wood buildings an important climate ally: NY Times

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Forest ecosystems and wood buildings can be our most important climate ally: New York Times. In related news: an Ontario study affirms the carbon value of long-lived wood products; new guidelines coming for BC’s tall timber; and Woodrise wraps in Quebec, moves to Kyoto in 2021.

In Business news: Jock Finlayson on the bad-news BC forest crisis; Northern Pulp says its effluent plan will have minimal impact; US ups duties on Chinese cabinets; and Vietnam to curb trade fraud linked to US-China trade war. Meanwhile, a look at Nova Scotia’s newest protected areas; and toilet paper substitutes fail to catch on.

Finally, Resolute’s Yves Laflame, and BC politicians Heyman and Weaver receive honours. Congrats!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US set to raise tariffs as Chinese counter-measures take their toll

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

On Oct. 15, the US administration will raise tariffs on Chinese wood and paper products to 30% from 25%, as Chinese counter-measures take their toll on US hardwood producers. In related news: Domtar reduces paper capacity at two mills; Teal Jones invests in North Carolina; Texas CLT expands to Alabama; and an update on Northern Pulp’s future in Nova Scotia.

In other news: mass timber’s biophillic response; BC’s watchdog chides Interfor and government oversight; Kodak photo paper goes FSC; US Fish & Wildlife announces caribou protections; and more on BC’s forest-crisis monies from Merritt, Invermere and Minister Donaldson.

Finally, this old tree is eating an iron bench.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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A song for all the mill workers, loggers & logging truck drivers

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

When country and western singer Bobby Garcia heard that 200 logging trucks were Vancouver bound, he said “this song is for everyone in the BC forestry industry.” In related news: Donaldson touts value over volume, the truck loggers send gov’t a message; Conifex’s liquidity challenge; and Northern Ontario is primed for growth. Meanwhile, the latest on lumber and pellet prices, pellet feedstock and the US economy.

In Forestry news: the spruce beetle threat to northern BC; Canadian Women in Timber celebrate 30 years; AFPA launches Love Alberta Forest campaign; an eco-friendly gel could help prevent forest fires; Amazon fires fall sharply; and Russia protects a swath of boreal forest. 

Finally, its Energy Efficiency Day in Canada and the US… a nod to wood buildings!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US economy, housing market forecasts remain strong

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 1, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Freddie Mac—a US owned mortgage corporation—forecasts GDP and housing sales to remain strong in the fall. In other Business news: Interfor mills its last log at Hammond Cedar, Teal-Jones looks to Virgina because it can’t make money in BC; and former Kamloops mayor says Premier Horgan needs to listen to the truck loggers.

In Forestry/Climate news: restoring tropical forests one tree at a time; and Ireland joins the rush to tackle climate change by planting trees. Finally, mid-rise and tall wood buildings are the focus of two major conferences this week—Woodrise in Quebec City and Timber! in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Premier Horgan, journalists pontificate on BC’s forest crisis

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 30, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

At the Union of BC Municipalities conference in Vancouver, Premier John Horgan said it’s time to reduce log exports and add value to BC’s forest products. Other viewpoints include:

In Climate Change news: Ontario, the UN and Trudeau look to plant more trees, while architects consider switching from concrete to timber. Elsewhere: the threatened mountain caribou; and why BC’s forestry crisis looms over Alberta.

Finally, the Canadian Wood Council has as new President and CEO—Kevin McKinley.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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No shortage of opinions on BC’s forestry woes

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 27, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

No shortage of opinions on BC’s forestry woes in today’s news:

Meanwhile: Catalyst lays-off 70 at Crofton mill; another option for Northern Pulp and Boat Harbour; Pinnacle Pellet scrambles to secure fibre amid closures; LignaTerra announces CLT mill for Maine; Jimmy Pattison hordes cash as global trade tensions mount, and slower US economic growth will persist.

Finally, lots on the Climate Strikes, including how forests, and wood products can help; some firm push back on Tom Fletcher’s earlier column; and… sustainable coal?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Two Frogs in the midst of a logging truck convoy!

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
September 26, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Yesterday, the Tree Frog Forestry News team was in Vancouver to meet with forest sector exhibitors at the Union of BC Municipalities convention trade show. But, we weren’t the only ones heading to the Vancouver Convention Centre—within an hour of our arrival, more than 200 logging trucks converged on the downtown core.

Kelly and I were two of hundreds of people who flocked to the foot of Burrard Street to catch a glimpse of the convoy. Surrounded by a waving and cheering crowd, where voices competed with a symphony of truck horns, I couldn’t help but be emotionally moved by the experience. I was in the concrete jungle of Vancouver and all around me, people were eagerly showing their support for these rural contractors and their plight.

After reporting stories of the growing controversy for weeks, to see first hand the passion that drove these truckers from BC’s interior was powerful and impressive. You can see from the headlines in today’s news that the convoy was greeted with cheers and support through every town along their route. It’s easy sometimes to loose sight of the human factor in this world of digital news—yesterday was a bittersweet reminder that behind every story are real people. We were proud to stand in support of this important sector. 

Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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BC logging truck convoy en route to Vancouver, protests job losses

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 25, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Starting in Prince George this morning, a logging truck convoy will descend on Vancouver to protest forestry job losses. In related news: BC’s aid package has mayors, forest contractors and the Liberal opposition crying foul (to the Steelworkers’ dismay) given the associated loss of other rural funding. Meanwhile in the US: hardwood producers struggle with Trump’s trade war; log prices are up in the Northeast; and the latest on mortgage and lumber price trends.

In other news: Alberta researchers say leave more deadwood in the forest; the Pew foundation pans California’s forest plans; Oregon celebrates mild wildfire season; Brazil strikes defiant note on Amazon forest; climate activists rally for old-growth protection; and Tom Fletcher bemoans the fact-free climate crusade.

Finally, 13 BC early adopter communities to permit 12-storey mass timber buildings.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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The UN’s embrace of forest products sparks debate at Climate Week

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The UN’s embrace of forest products sparked debate at Climate Week in New York. In related news: UN plans vast urban forests to improve air quality; carbon removal needed to fight climate pollution; and a blood-red haze engulfs Indonesia.

In Business news: BC’s worker-support funding called sneaky, robbing Peter to pay Paul.  As jobs evaporate and more worries arise in BC communities, including Terrace, Merritt, Quesnel, a 200 logging truck protest is planned for Vancouver and COFI answers questions on its 60-point plan. Other topics making headlines include: trends in global trade of forest products; an industry wetland partnership with Ducks Unlimited Canada; SFI’s Green Ride for Jobs; and the plight of BC’s iconic Mountain Caribou.

Finally; Dovetail’s latest LCA assessment on home cladding products a win for wood.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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It’s National Forest Week in Canada, Climate Week in NYC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 23, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

National Forest Week is celebrated in Canada this week; while Climate Week NYC is raising climate awareness south of the 49th. Related stories include: Climate and the boreal (Canada); new solutions via biomass utilization, (BC and US South); 800 years of tree ring evidence (UK); time to substitute wood for concrete (Australia); and paying to avoid GHG emissions (Norway).

In other news: US housing data roars back, as BC starts drop; tall wood is endorsed by Seattle; the Sierra Club on BC old-growth; and who should be in charge of US forests. Companies making headlines include: Hammond Cedar (meet the people and retraining funds); Kruger (diversity award), EACOM (college partnership); and Katerra (CLT plant opening).

Finally, this week is also the UBCM (Union of BC Municipalities) conference in Vancouver. Sandy and I are attending, so hope to see you there!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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