Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

New NAFTA shows limits of America First; and the reactions keep coming in

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 3, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway
Region: Canada, United States

The world’s trading system survived the most protectionist US administration in memory, as the new NAFTA shows limits of America First. The reason—according to the Wall Street Journal—the resistance Mr. Trump encountered from Congress, business, his advisers and Canada and Mexico. A summary look at the range of reactions to the new US-Mexico-Canada Agreement.

In other news: Resolute is selling its South Carolina paper mill; Palmer Renewable Energy plans its biomass launch in Oregon; Miller Western wins a safety award in Alberta; and the US Senate narrowly passed Daines’ bill to “end fringe litigation and the endless barrage of timber lawsuits“.

Finally, Canadian Women in Timber pays homage to BC’s forest sector on its Forest Awareness Day.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Devastating but not surprising, log shortages driving mill curtailments in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 19, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

News of mill curtailments in central BC are devastating but not surprising given log shortages due to the Mountain Pine Beetle and forest fires. In other Business news: strike action looms in BC; beetle-killed timber an opportunity for Colorado; Northern Pulp seeks public support for effluent pipe; and Boise Cascade to close its North Carolina LVL plant.

In Forestry news: Trump repeats disputed claim that forest management is to blame for California’s wildfires; but according to the San Francisco Chronicle, it rings true—to a degree. Elsewhere, stories of concern about: Canada’s endangered species; BC’s elusive wolverine; Cape Breton’s moose cull; Alaska’s roadless rule; and Australia’s koala colonies.

Finally; the silent killer in our homes… wood burning stoves!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog News

 

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Canfor committed to BC, Swedish acquisition reflects customer needs: Kayne

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 16, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor’s Don Kayne says the company remains committed to BC despite recent curtailments, and their Swedish acquisition reflects customer needs. In other Business news: Northern Pulp may not meet its waste treatment deadline; GP’s new Alabama mill is up and running; Resolute has a new CFO; and construction prices are up despite lumber’s fall.

In Forestry news: drone video of California’s devastation is resulting in calls to treat wildfires like fires; more acceptance of pyrosilviculture; and fire buffers. Elsewhere: America celebrates Recycling Day; NJ Senator Sweeney joins call for code changes that restrict light-frame construction; and BC loggers help rescue a log truck driver in the Cariboo.

Finally, martini drinkers may want to stock up as a tree disease is causing an olive crisis in Italy.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Major forest companies cut BC production while expanding to US and offshore

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 15, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

All the major forest companies are cutting production in BC—due mostly to log supply concerns—while expanding operations in the US South. In other Business news: politicians Bob Simpson, John Rustad and Todd Doherty weigh in on BC’s curtailments; Canfor goes global with Swedish acquisition; the China/US trade war is hurting Rayonier; and a collective of timber import and distribution companies merge in the UK.

In climate and wildfire news: lots more on California’s crisis and who’s to blame; as well as how climate change is impacting forests nationally, and in Washington, Oregon and the UK.

Finally: the world’s only inland temperate rainforest is protected in BC; ENGO groups call for more caribou protection and Nova Scotia’s moose are facing imminent extinction

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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As beetles slow Western wood production, the pendulum swings East

Tree Frog Forestry News
November 14, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Timber supply shortages driven by the Mountain Pine Beetle infestation in British Columbia have triggered West Fraser Timber to cut production at two BC mills; a study by ForestEdge and Wood Resources International predicts that Eastern Canadian wood production will support Canadian lumber exports to the US in the next decade; and Unifor’s Stephen Boon says the Canadian government needs to press Trump to remove lumber tariffs.

As California copes with the most recent wildfires, the BBC debunks five common wildfire myths; Tree Canada assists in replanting Ontario trees destroyed by recent tornadoes; and Georgia governor Nathan Deal has proposed tax credits to encourage landowners to replant post-hurricane.

And, a new green building code has been released in the US. 

Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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As the death toll rises and California scrambles to contain wildfires, the blame game intensifies

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 13, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

As the death toll rises and California scrambles to contain wildfires at both ends of the state—with some help from Oregon and Montana—the blame game intensifies. Key headlines include:

  • Wind, drought worsen fires, not bad management
  • California fires: what is happening and is climate change to blame?
  • Don’t debate forestry management in the middle of disastrous wildfires
  • Megafires more frequent because of climate change and forest management
  • California fire destroys Neil Young’s home

In other news: BC’s never-ending struggle over ancient trees; Ontario’s beech trees face slow demise; the EU calls for tough action on deforestation; and Pat Bell’s view of Proportional Representation.

Finally, its going to be a green Christmas after all, as Millennials opt for pine over plastic.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Trump says forest mismanagement responsible for deadly California fires

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 12, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

President Trump is blaming forest mismanagement for deadly Northern California fires—29 fatalities to date—threatening to pull federal funding. California Gov. Brown calls that “inane and uninformed.” In related news: one OSU professor says there are hundreds of Oregon towns facing similar risks; while another says planting after fire isn’t always necessary. 

In Business news: October saw double digit price drops for softwood lumber and OSB; Interfor shares fall nine percent; Conifex curtails its Fort St. James mill; Canfor acquires another South Carolina sawmill; and Kalesnikoff finally receives the go-ahead for a new office building.

Lastly; BC moves to preserve moose feed by cutting herbicides; and despite climate change, there are still too many polar bears in parts of Nunavut.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Sustainable forestry and increasing wood use can help tackle climate change: UN and Canada

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 9, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The UN Economic Commission for Europe and Canada say wood products and sustainable forest management can help tackle climate change. Here are the headlines and related stories:

  • How much wood should a wood-cutter cut? (Business in Vancouver)
  • The potential for carbon storage and greening the economy (UNECE)
  • Canada’s new funding for climate change research (Gov’t of Canada)
  • Can this carbon capture technology save us from climate change? (CNN)
  • Long-lived wood products are significant carbon capturers (U of Eastern Finland)

In other news: Canadian housing starts moderate; Interfor posts strong results; Nova Scotia seeks to end blockade of Northern Pulp; and Irving is in the spotlight again. 

Finally, this Sunday, Canadians and Americans pay homage to the sacrifice of those who gave their lives to keep us safe, while thanking our aging and remaining veterans. One way to do this is by supporting Eric Brunt’s [noble] effort to capture their stories before its too late in “Last Ones Standing”. Watch the trailer here!  

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Midterm election results suggest US muscular approach to trade will continue

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 8, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Although trade wasn’t a wedge issue in the US midterm elections, Barrie McKenna says Trump will view the results as a licence to continue his muscular approach, particularly [says CBC] if the Democrats  focus on domestic issues. Elsewhere; KPMG says its too early to estimate the impact on Canada; Washington State rejects ballot question on carbon tax; and green building expert Jerry Judelson sees little change on the climate front.

In other Business news: Export Development Canada predicts China will surpass US as BC’s top timber market; Russia threatens China over illegal logging; labour negotiations in BC are headed for mediation; Western Forest Products reports strong Q3 results; and 84 Lumber moves up on Forbes’ list of private companies.

Finally, a new NASA laser set to launch to the International Space Station will create the world’s first 3D forest carbon map.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Getting taller is about getting more attention for everyone!

Tree Frog Forestry News
November 7, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

It’s not about who gets tallest first, but about bringing attention to tall wood buildings that matters, said Dutch architect Do Janne Vermeulen, speaking at the Wood Solutions Conference in Vancouver; a new formaldehyde-free particleboard has been developed by EcoSynthetix in Ontario; and Japan’s wood culture is alive and thriving in a nearly completed Olympic venue. 

In forestry, part-two of the Wood Business contractor survey looks at BC’s Interior; First Nations are benefiting from engagement in resource management, according to a study by the Montreal Economic Institute; and 160 conservation officers are protecting BC’s natural resources says environment minister. 

Himalayan forests at risk from an abundance of dry pine needles may soon find relief as dry needles are converted into low-cost, eco-friendly briquettes.

Finally, as we approach Remembrance Day in Canada, Derek Nighbor shares the history of the Canadian Forestry Corps – nobody was more experienced or qualified to harvest the timber required on the Western Front than Canadians.

–Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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Need a distraction until 6:00 pm Eastern when the US midterm results start trickling in – Read on…

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 6, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The 2018 US midterm election results will start trickling in at six pm eastern when the first polls close. Until then, here are the headlines: Ontario has a new forest minister; Northern Pulp’s effluent challenge continues; Irving contravenes the Fisheries Act; Woodgrain finalizes its purchase of three Boise Cascade mills; Boise Cascade curtails its North Carolina LVL production; and what’s next for Weyerhaeuser’s shuttered Federal Way campus.

In Wood Product news: U of Toronto’s Mass Timber Institute is officially launched; automated nail laminated timber leverages the new NLT guide; prefabricated CLT makes headway in Finland; and used clothing is recycled into construction panels. Elsewhere, updates on EXPO 2019 (Atlanta); DEMO 2020 (Ottawa); and the 2019 Wood Protection AGM (Quebec).

Finally, BC introduces new legislation to put public interests first; and ISO updates their standards for agriculture and forestry machinery.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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UN Committee in Vancouver to focus on the role of forests and forest products in a sustainable society

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 5, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The 76th session of the UN Committee on Forests and the Forest Industry is in Vancouver this week, focusing on the role of forests and forest products in a sustainable society. In related news: SFI speaks out on forestry practices in BC; ENGO’s on why certification won’t stop tropical deforestation; the Audubon Society on birds and climate change; an MIT expert on the [non] carbon neutrality of biomass; and how switching from coal to biomass is creating jobs in Austria.

In other news: a US judge strikes down a law giving California control over the sale of national forests; the UK government pledges support for the timber industry post-Brexit; and the Southern Pine Beetle continues its march north.

Finally; NRCan scientists say the woodland caribou is threatened but not doomed; and the US abandons its caribou reintroduction program in Idaho and Washington.

–Kelly McCloskey

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On the go: Domtar to close Waco plant, Canfor to curtail BC production, Tolko invests in Mississippi mill

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 2, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

On the go: Domtar announces plan to close its Waco diaper plant next year; Canfor says it will curtail BC’s lumber production in Q4; and Tolko plans to partner with Mississippi’s Southeastern Timber. In other Business news: Resolute says the lumber market crash is close to the bottom; while the US Dept of Commerce says construction spending in September remained flat.

In Forestry news: the US Administration promises to encourage biomass for energy; BC’s use of prescribed burning is criticized after a hazy Halloween; where there’s fire there’s Bruce Blackwell; old-growth logging is proposed in the Tongass; the USDA’s plan to relocate its research office is under review; and Starbucks debuts a tree-inspired Juniper latte.

Finally, Pat Bell (BC’s Forest Minister 2008-2011) says proportional representation–one of the options in BC’s electoral reform vote—is bad for resource development.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Halloween-infused news competes with tall timber in today’s headlines

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 1, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

With the fire performance of mass timber on demonstration in BC; and the US Code Council set to vote on mass timber; it’s no surprise that tall timber developments are already making headway in Toronto. Equally unsurprising is the Halloween-infused news on building code changes proposed by the Standing Committee on Paranormal Phenomena and the US National Fish and Wildlife Foundation grants to The Bats to the Future Fund.

In Forestry news: new research says deforestation is still occurring but has slowed worldwide; Canada and the US are said to be key to the remaining wilderness; the damage reports to timber from hurricane Michael are in; and Brazil’s new president creates concern about the future of the Amazon.

Finally; Ontario’s wildfire season was one of the busiest ever; while BC and California look to prescribed burns to reduce future risks.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Spider’s propensity for human blood and Weyerhaeuser’s haunted house. Must be Halloween.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 31, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Spider’s propensity for human blood (there isn’t any) and Weyerhaeuser’s haunted mansion top the news on Halloween. A few headlines for those not searching for the paranormal include:

Finally, more on the historic code changes proposed for tall wood (and reinforced steel) in the US, and those that oppose them.

Have a happy and safe Halloween!

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Tall timber code proposals pass public comment hurdle, final ICC vote in Dec.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 30, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The American Wood Council’s tall timber code proposals were approved by more than 2:1 at the International Code Council’s public comment hearings. While architects celebrate the potential (in Treehugger) and states move forward regardless (i.e. Oregon), the December vote isn’t a shoe-in.

In other news: tensions escalate around Northern Pulp’s future in Nova Scotia; tariffs on China are causing new home prices to rise in Idaho; Oakland’s suspicious fires have developers bracing for higher insurance costs and considering switching to more expensive steel framing.

Finally, the WWF says 60% of the world’s wildlife has been wiped out since 1970 and Eastern Australia is deemed a deforestation front — the only location in the developed world to make the list. 

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Disappointment permeated lumber markets, structural panels continued to lose ground: Random Lengths

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 29, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

According to Random Lengths – disappointment permeated framing lumber markets last week and structural panel sales continued to lose ground. In other Business news: Steelworkers in BC’s southern interior returned a 98% strike vote; forestry experts say Montana’s forest industry is rebounding; and BC forests face a worker shortage for reforestation. 

In Forestry news: Ottawa and BC are still talking on endangered southern caribou; a gov’t scientist is sounding the alarm on drunken trees in Canada’s North; an Irish botanist worries about ancient trees worldwide; and an Oregon senator says the West has an epidemic of trees

Finally, McDonald’s rebrand includes CLT; and Washington could be the first state to charge for carbon emissions.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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When it comes to respiratory effects of wood smoke, sex matters (apparently)

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 26, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Exposure to wood smoke can have different effects on the respiratory immune systems of men and women (aka – sex matters). In related news: BC wildfires could be as deadly as California’s within 20 years; fighting fire with fire in the US West means breathing smoke year-round, but according to Bloomberg – we don’t have a choice.

In Business news: Canfor copes with its natural gas shortage in Prince George as well as strike action by the Steelworker’s union; Resolute’s investment in Thunder Bay is Premier Ford-approved; Quebec is hosting a cabinet and furniture industry show; and NY State is seeking funds to boost its forestry and wood industry.

Finally; another call to action to save BC’s old-growth rainforests and move over pumpkin, the witch-hazel tree is a better symbol for Halloween!

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Serial arsonist suspected in Oakland construction blazes: concrete industry claims combustible materials are the problem

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 25, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

After six under-construction residential complex fires in Oakland over two years, evidence points to a serial arsonist; unless of course you’re the concrete industry and the problem is the combustible materials. In related news: the USDA announces a grant program to expand wood product use and wood energy markets.

In Business news: Northern Pulp’s stand-off at sea makes the Washington Post, but the company is committed to staying, and the forest industry watches and worries. Other company news includes: Canfor’s solid third quarter; West Fraser’s beaten up stock; White River’s resurgence; Resolute’s Thunder Bay investment; the cause of Western Forest Products’ train derailment in Woss; and Weyerhaeuser’s truck driver shortage.

Finally, a US study says burning more biomass for energy is required to suck CO2 out of the air; but the Dogwood Alliance and others say it’s a dangerous delusion.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wood is good for everything, even clean water

Tree Frog Forestry News
October 24, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

A famous Canadian wildlife painter is calling on government to stop issuing logging permits in BC mountain caribou habitat; a fisherman in Nova Scotia used his boat to stop Northern Pulp from mapping a new effluent outfall; and a California research team has invented a process to turn wood into drinkable water!

The good news stories today include an announced Phase 2 in the San Group sawmill development in Port Alberni BC; a successful new forestry venture for a Northern Ontario First Nation; and the University of Winnipeg launches a new section of their Climate Atlas of Canada with a focus on forests.

Lastly, I can’t help but brag just a little about the 2018 summer Festival of Forestry Teachers’ Tour. After 51 years, this group of volunteers continues to successfully introduce BC teachers the wonderful world of forestry!

–Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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BC tightens oversight of resource projects with new superintendent of professional governance

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 23, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The BC government introduced legislation to tighten oversight of resource projects, create whistleblower protection and oversee the professional associations. Is it a means to restore public trust (BC Gov’t) or a lost opportunity (ABCFP)? In other Business news, more on: the San Group expansion, Irving’s plea deal; and Random Lengths lumber and panel report.

In Wood Product news: the US Forest Service celebrates CLT; DeckExpo promotes Southern Pine and Western Red Cedar; but the concrete, cement and steel industries say the US Code Council’s advocacy guidelines are suppressing information on the devastating consequences of allowing wooden high-rise buildings.

Finally, Prince Harry’s environmental message; a survey of US family forest owners; and an online map of the impact of climate change on Canada’s boreal forest.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US wood importers say Chinese tariff dodgers exist but WSJ article one-sided

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 22, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

US wood importers say Chinese tariff dodgers exist but the recent Wall Street Journal article is one-sided and overstates the significance. In other Business news: southern BC mill workers may join their northern neighbours in strike vote; the Tolko and Soda Creek mills are back up and running after BC’s pipeline explosion; and Northern Pulp faces an effluent leak in Nova Scotia.

In other news: Alberta wolves restore the natural balance in Yellowstone National Park; a botanist’s view on how forests and wildfires are linked; how wildfires may reverse Montana’s declining timber sales; and the tallest mass-timber building in the Western Hemisphere will soon reside in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Finally, a presidential proclamation on National Forest Products Week.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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San Group, Georgia-Pacific, Mercer and Kenora FP announce expansion plans

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 19, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The San Group announced plans to build a new sawmill in BC; GP will expand its OSB plant in South Carolina; Mercer buys a sandalwood company in Australia and Kenora FP will increase production in previously shuttered plant. In other Business news: US housing starts fall, Canada helps two BC First Nations participate in the forest sector; and  Canada’s Ambassador to the US talks pot and [softwood] trade.

In other news: a Canadian fisheries expert says climate change is on a disaster path for fish; a US ecologist urges 3-step solution to mega wildfires; the USDA and Domtar develop carbon foam from lignin; and UC San Diego to receives upgrade for earthquake simulation and first up is a 10-story CLT building.

Finally, Quebec’s forests appear to breath in a video; and award announcements for: US custom woodworkers; SFI leaders; and Scottish structural timber designers.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Marijuana legalization spurs awareness campaign on workplace impairment

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 18, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Is your workplace ready for legalized marijuana? WorkSafeBC launches campaign to raise awareness about impairment in the workplace.

Elsewhere: strike action ends at Tolko; the San Group adds a shift in Port Alberni; Burns Lake looks to mill poplar; two sawmills expand in Ontario; Weyerhaeuser opens mill in Arkansas; Irving’s plea deal is questioned; and Resolute wins award for reducing its carbon emissions.

Meanwhile: BC seeks better buildings; NJ considers wood safety reforms; controlled burns are promoted in BC; Utah’s trembling aspen giant is collapsing; Michigan’s history of forest clearing is panned; and the future of the Amazon lies in Brazil’s election.

Finally, US builder confidence rises and SFI awards go to Brian Kernohan (Conservation Leadership) and Bettina Ring (President’s Award).

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Unions and rare frogs put the brakes on forest sector activities

Tree Frog Forestry News
October 17, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

British Columbia’s interior forest sector has yet another hurdle to contend with. After summer fires and political face-offs, interior workers are on strike. Vice president of the Steelworkers union, Paul French said they are sending a “message to negotiators that employees are serious about their demands”. At Tolko’s Lakeview mill the strike affects about 50 employees. 

In the eastern US – forest workers are facing a very different challenge. A rare frog is the force behind a court case involving Weyerhaeuser and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

But the news isn’t all doom and gloom, in Ontario an outdoor education teacher is responsible for planting 8,000 trees, as part of the Ontario government’s 50 Million Tree program; and Canfor is pleased to share their recent company and employee awards – congratulations!

–Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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Climate change implicated in loss of insect abundance in some tropical forests

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 16, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Climate change is implicated in the loss of insect abundance in some tropical forests, and is hyperalarming—given its impact on the broader ecosystem. In related news: climate change may also threaten the availability and economic accessibility of beer; Canadian MPs debate the recent UN report; and more investment is sought for Ontario’s Biomass Innovation Cluster.  

In other news: Paper Excellence targets Asia with its Catalyst purchase; Tolko curtails production at its Quest Wood mill in BC; prescribed burning takes hold in Washington state, hurricane Michael may have implications for Florida’s forest sector and its building code; and California utilities shut off power amid wildfire concerns.

Finally, the US National Forest Week starts next week and the American Forest and Paper Association has plans to celebrate.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Declining lumber prices, rising construction costs, timber theft and more…

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 15, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Interfor plans to cut production in the BC Interior due to declining lumber prices and rising log costs; Santa Fe construction costs keep rising; timber theft is a growing problem on Vancouver Island; and cross laminated timber use is allowed in the UK despite combustible cladding ban.

In Forestry news: BC Woodlot awards go to the Thompson family, Charles Bloom Secondary School and Saulteau First Nations; a UBC conference touts the climate change credentials of urban forests; an Ontario forest is at risk due to the departure of a single bald eagle; a new Council is formed to help address Canada’s plant health risks; and forestry practices are good for Washington state.

Finally, Pakistan’s 10 billing tree tsunami is already taking root.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Hurricane Michael decimates older houses, insured losses estimated at $8 billion

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 12, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Hurricane Michael’s path of destruction decimated areas with older houses and mobile homes with insured loses estimated at eight billion. Elsewhere, BC’s pipeline explosion takes down a Tolko mill; Western Forest Products suspends its Ladysmith operation due to a log shortage; Boise Cascade purchases Arling Lumber; and Catalyst Paper’s sale to Paper Excellence gets union endorsement.

In Forestry news: a new documentary pans old growth logging in BC; the Sierra Club endorses proportional representation in BC referendum; salvage logging in Quesnel is deemed bad news for the endangered fisher; forest thinning is helping with Oregon’s wildfires; and Southern timber prices are more complicated than just “too many trees“.

Finally, Bill Dumont says Green MLA attacks on BC natural resource professionals are not in the public’s interest.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Michael leaves trail of destruction in Florida, two dead.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 11, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The most powerful hurricane on record to hit Florida’s Panhandle left wide destruction and at least two people dead. In related news: Forbes Magazine asks – what kind of architecture best withstands hurricanes [wood of course], while flooding in North Carolina renews the debate over logging and wood pellets. Elsewhere: BC’s natural gas explosion closes three Canfor mills; Irving pleads guilty to three pollution charges in New Brunswick; and ND Paper plans to reopen the Old Town mill in Maine.

In other news: mass timber is hyped in New York City and Hamilton, while Charlottetown adopts new code to allow taller wood structures; BC and Washington pledge habitat protection; Ireland’s forestry boom is panned; and Europe’s forests may not help fight climate change.

Finally, Vicki Christiansen, the US Forest Service Chief, took the interim off her title; and an acornucopia erupts in Washington DC.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

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Paper Excellence to acquire Catalyst Paper; Steelworkers start job action in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 10, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC leaders welcome Paper Excellence’s purchase of Catalyst Paper’s three remaining mills, notwithstanding its aging workforce. In other Business news: the Steelworkers start job action with an overtime ban in northern BC; softwood lumber exports are up in Europe but down in Canada; and Russia is expanding its role in China’s lumber industry.

In Forestry/Climate news: an Ontario First Nation bans clear-cut logging; roadless advocates dominate Alaska hearings; Oregon loggers say wood products are part of the climate solution; US south plantation forests are causing timber prices to fall; and the loss of forests worldwide is ten-fold less [or more], depending on your data source.

Finally, the largest cross laminated timber building in the world takes the spotlight in London.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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UN report says climate change worse that expected; forest restoration, wood products touted as part of the actions required

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 9, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

UN report says climate change worse than expected; forest restoration and long-lived wood products touted as part of the actions required. The headlines include: 

In Business news: the Woodworking Network on lumber production trends; the low-down on hardwood lumber by Merchant Magazine; and a Wall Street Journal expose on plywood tariff-dodges due to the US/China trade battle. Elsewhere: fire risk labels proposed for wood joists in Ontario; part 2 of a series on wildfires in Oregon; and common ground among fire scientists in the US West.

Finally; the first woman receives Society of American Foresters award for outstanding forestry education.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor
 

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Scientists champion forests in advance of International Panel on Climate Change report

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 5, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Scientists say forests are the ‘unsung hero’ of climate action in advance of Monday’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report. In related news: NRCan’s chief scientist uses LiDAR to assess forest change; a Georgia professor is measuring the pros and cons of increased CO2 on tree growth; the World Resource Institute has a new report on the value of tropical forests; and a Chinese researcher says mixed forests can absorb twice as much carbon.

In other news: Mercer International is acquiring two Daishowa-Marubeni’s mills; BC signed a reconciliation agreement with the Sechelt First Nation; BC’s movie industry goes green with FSC; the construction revolution goes modular with CLT; and the US is not invited to Canada’s 13-nation meeting on the WTO.

Finally, a death cap mushroom advisory is put out in BC; and can legalization of cannabis save our forests?

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canadian forestry leaders, global business award winners announced

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 4, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canadian Forest Industries top 10 forestry leaders under 40, and the Business Intelligence Group’s 50 global business awards were announced yesterday. In other business news: the Steelworkers issued 72 hour strike notice in BC; and more commentary on the new NAFTA et al:

  • Dissecting the new USMCA deal (Nova Scotia)
  • Canada can claim partial success in USMCA (Canadian Press)
  • New trade agreement would hinge on cooperation (Ohio)
  • Tariffs may lead to costly headaches for home builders and remodelers (Washington Post)
  • The price of The Donald: The president’s tariffs undercut his progress on trade (Dallas)
  • Quarterly lumber prices level but energy costs are going up (Engineering News)

In Forestry news: virtual reality is being use to engender empathy for old growth forests in BC; an off-duty border agent is fined for causing a wildfire in Arizona; forest carbon offsets are opposed in Oregon; and Montana’s forests could adapt to pine beetles if we let them.

Finally, a wooden laptop made from recycled wood and paper will last three times longer and patina with age!

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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The vote is in on NAFTA’s replacement – the good, the bad and the ugly

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 2, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The vote is in on NAFTA’s replacement – the good, the bad and the ugly. Here’s what  the key players are saying:

In other news: China is cutting import tariffs on wood and paper products; US lumber is benefiting from the softwood tariffs; Ontario seeks to advance a pro-forestry agenda; Oregon bans a tree-killing herbicide; California getting some relief from the weather; and song birds prefer old growth forests in Oregon.

Finally, the American Wood Council celebrates World Habitat Day, when we reflect on why our world needs wood.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Last minute deal reached to salvage NAFTA, concessions made on both sides

The Tree Frog Forestry News
October 1, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada and the US reached a last-minute deal to salvage NAFTA, as concessions were made on both sides. Notably, Canada retained its cultural exemptions and Chapter 19—a red line rooted in past lumber disputes—gave on dairy and agreed to modest tweaks on autos and the sunset clause. Campbell Clark [in the Globe and Mail] says it’s “a mediocre deal that avoids damage to the economy”.

In other news: Pinnacle Renewable Energy finds opportunity in Alberta; Freeman Lumber faces silt challenges in Nova Scotia; Sterling Lumber will manufacture CLT mats in Texas; a timber investment company is lauded in Oregon; wildfires create repetitional damage for BC tourism; and mid-rise builders are fuelling prefab wall construction in BC.

Finally, you can win free beer for a year by finding by a hidden medallion in one of six US National Forests; and New Zealand plans to meet its GHG target by planting a lot of trees

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canada’s National Forest Week wraps up with stories from coast to coast

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 28, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada’s National Forest Week wraps up with celebration stories from coast to coast. Examples include:

  • Forest scholarship recipients announced (COFI, Vancouver, BC)
  • Forest Families social media campaign launched (AFPA, Edmonton Alberta)
  • Forestry Advocacy Day at Queen’s Park (OFIA, Toronto Ontario)
  • It Takes a Forest Initiative launch (EACOM, Domtar & Forests Ontario)
  • FPAC signs on to an Aboriginal Procurement Champion (Ottawa, Ontario)

In other news: Pressure is on but no resolution at NAFTA; Ontario to create a forestry growth strategy, Ottawa’s urban forest hit by tornadoes; more fires should be left to burn in Oregon; Alaska Roadless Rule receives push back; a US Senator wants to halt payments to environmental groups; and a bill to thin US forests is introduced.

Finally, a good news rainforest story from Brazil and understanding the science behind wildfire smoke.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forest fires, pests pose threat to forestry sector growth, Canadian report says

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 27, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

A federal report on the state of Canadian forests says the combination of pests and forest fires is a threat to the sector’s growth, even as demand for Canada’s softwood expands. In other Business news: declining lumber stocks are a buying opportunity for some investors; and New Zealand’s log market is hurt by the US/China trade war.

In Wood Product news: the International Building Code debate over mass timber is heating up as Lisa Podesto of Lendlease takes on the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association; and untreated wood shake roofing is outlawed in Ashland, Oregon.

In National Forestry Week news: stories from the BC Tree Seed Centre in Surrey; the Trees Matter Network in Victoria BC; and from Colin Carroll (CIF President) in Corner Brook, Newfoundland. Finally, the Nature Conservancy says 9 of 10 Canadians are happier, healthier and more productive when they spend time in nature. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Celebration, awards, mediation and new faces

Tree Frog Forestry News
September 26, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

It’s National Forest Week in Canada and the sector is celebrating: FPAC’s press release highlights jobs, sustainable forest management and fighting climate change; the CIF awarded Ken Day (recently retired from the UBC Alex Fraser Research Forest) with their Canadian Forestry Achievement Award; BC Timber Sales salutes forests as Canada’s Living Laboratory; the Forest Enhancement Society of BC awarded a grant to aide fire management at Baldy Mountain Resort, and FPInnovations is working with New Zealand to expand steep slope harvesting.

The good news from Northern BC is that Skeena Sawmills is adding value to the area’s forests by opening a pellet plant fed by waste from their other sawmills. The bad news is that talks between 13 northern sawmills and the union have gone to mediation

There’s a new face at the helm of the World Forestry Center in Portland – warm welcome to Joseph Furia; increased pressure on the clothing sector is driving more research into fibres made from sustainably managed forests; and lastly, zooming in on wildfire pollution – a close up look at what’s going into your lungs.

—Sandy McKellar, Tree Frog Editor

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Wildfire season not over yet but post-wildfire stories abound

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 25, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

The wildfire season isn’t over yet with big fires still burning in Ontario, and fire-related evacuations in Wyoming and Colorado. In post-wildfire news: West Fraser is harvesting timber burned in 2017; artificial intelligence is helping US insurance companies assess wildfire risk; charred forests in New Jersey are already bursting with new life; and Colorado residents are trying to make their scorched community a home again.

In other headlines: Canfor Pulp extends downtime at Northwood Pulp; the Softwood Lumber Board hires Maureen Pello as VP Operations; and FPAC seeks federal investment to accelerate innovation.

Finally; a UK report says the fear of accusations of greenwashing is causing some companies to downplay their environmental credentials.

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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With NAFTA’s dispute mechanism in doubt, the US is crippling the WTO

The Tree Frog Forestry News
September 24, 2018
Category: Today's Takeaway

With NAFTA’s dispute mechanism in doubt, the US is crippling the World Trade Organization (WTO), which sets the rules for global trade and resolving disputes. In related news: tariffs on China and Canada are shifting supply and demand channels; and the softwood dispute drags on. Elsewhere, the United Steelworkers seek improved pay; while timber industry jobs are being created in Mississippi and BC’s South Okanagan.

In Forestry / Fire news: BC’s wildfire efforts—impacted by past beetle epidemics—are not enough, according to the Forest Practices Board; California’s wildfire recovery bill is Governor approved; and the Mail Tribune says wildfire smoke threatens Oregon’s economy and livability.

Finally; mass timber is touted as the smart future for Toronto; wood-frame modular housing eases BC’s student housing crunch; and Cambridge University creates the longest, continuous tree ring-based diary

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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