Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

BC seeks public input as Canfor announces additional capacity reductions

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 19, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC invites public feedback on how to revive the interior forest sector amid job losses and new curtailments at Canfor. In related news: Vaughn Palmer is surprised at the finance minister’s lack of concern for the sector; a BC town declares a financial crisis; and Dawson Creek’s MLA says more needs to be done. Also, 2nd quarter results for: West Fraser and Södra; expansion plans by Stora Enso; and post-fire thoughts at Muskoka Timber Mill in Ontario.

In Forestry news: ENGOs say BC’s iconic tree protection is ‘mostly symbolic’; ENGOs are not the ‘real problem’ in Montana; and a new study says deforestation in war torn counties is worse ‘post-conflict’.

Finally, tiny molecules that add life to pulp and paper products.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Home builders and lumber stocks get reality check

Tree Frog Forestry News
July 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US home builder stocks follow lumber producers down as sagging housing news takes its toll. In related news: US lumber is up while Canadian production is down; Fort St. James declares financial crisis due to mill closures; Canfor looks to repurpose its shuttered Vavenby sawmill; and a labour ruling has some Western Forest Products contractors heading back to work. 

In Forestry/Climate news: BC takes action on threatened old-growth, protects 54 groves with iconic trees—including the Big Lonely Doug; Canada invests in First Nations conservation and in forest-based solutions to plastic waste; researchers take stock of Canada’s urban forests; and BC builds the case for more mass timber construction.

Finally, gaps in wildfire science leave Canadian researchers fighting blind.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Resolute sells Fort Frances mill. New owner mum on its future.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The sale of Resolute’s mothballed Fort Frances mill is viewed as suspect as new owner stays mum on its future. In other Business news: the lumber futures market declines as rumours circulate of more down-time; sawmill closures hurt BC communities; Canfor receives positive certification report; and North Carolina weighs expansion of Enviva wood pellet mill.

In Forestry/Climate news: Fort Nelson BC mayor is ecstatic over community forest award and an increase in the region’s AAC; Rainforest Alliance/FSC launch small landowners program; David Suzuki on why climate protection is not a partisan issue and a new study says climate change is exacerbating California’s wildfires.

Finally, updates on SFPA’s Wood Expo, BC’s net zero energy-ready competition; the battle to save Notre-Dame.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

US lumber coalition blocks duty relief for five Canadian companies

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A US Trade Court temporarily blocked the US Dept of Commerce from revoking duties on five Canadian lumber companies. In other Business news: Western Forest Product’s strike enters 3rd week; Stella-Jones’ CEO-change causes market unease; support and opposition for the Canfor/Interfor tenure sale; how the Weyerhaeuser dusky gopher frog decision complicates the US Endangered Species Act; and the BC Liberals outline their plan to support the forest sector.

In Forestry/Climate news: researchers say wolfs are not to blame for BC’s declining deer population; whole-tree harvesting could boost Michigan’s biomass production; and wood smuggling in Afghanistan turns a profit for the Islamic State.

Finally, stay tuned for a series of reader-driven enhancements to the Tree Frog News. First up, a company finance and market pricing section, separate from Business & Politics news.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Sierra Club report calls for increase of old-growth forests

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 15, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A Sierra Club report calls for BC’s old-growth forests to be returned to 30% of their original level. In related BC news: ENGO’s call for more old-growth protection; second growth forests are not as fire resistant as old growth; and today is the deadline for input on BC’s forest policy review. Elsewhere: a fresh approach to the spruce budworm is working in New Brunswick; Saskatchewan foresters join Quebec to fight the budworm; and private investors team up with the Nature Conservancy to protect Appalachian forests.

In other news: lumber and plywood lead price decline in residential construction; Western Forest Products strike enters third week without agreement on a mediator; a Montana perspective on BC’s mill closures; national efforts taken to stop US firefighter suicides; and China’s GHG emissions are up more than 50% in the last ten years.

Finally, the latest viral online craze involves… stapling bread to trees. Sorry!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

FPAC praises Premiers’ commitment to trade and skills development

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 12, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada’s Premiers receive praise from FPAC’s Derek Nighbor for discussions on trade, immigration and skills development. In other Business news: the US Trade Court upheld its injury determination on Chinese plywood; fiber costs for softwood pulp are up in 16 countries; more on the BC Federation of Labour’s hot edict on Western Forest Products; and Liberal frustration with the NDP on BC’s struggling forest sector.

In other news: mass timber helps reform construction’s carbon footprint; the potential upside of BC’s old tree mutations; U of Toronto is officially disestablished; and long time rock musician is also a steward of the forest.

Finally, the Hoo-Hoo—Tree Frog’s favourite forestry fraternity—is coming to BC. What’s a Hoo-Hoo you ask?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC moves to reduce log exports by increasing fees

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC will punitively increase the surcharge on logs for export—initially for BC Timber Sales only—in an attempt to increase fibre availability to local mills. In other Business news: Canada’s premiers want feds to redouble efforts on softwood trade; the NY Times speaks to how US lumber companies are faring post-duties; and unions up the pressure on Western Forest Products.

On BC mill curtailments: Fort St. John, North Thompson and Prince George leaders look to minimize the impacts; Interfor seeks support for Canfor timber transfer; and add Powell River paper mill to the downtime list. Elsewhere: the BC Forest Practices Board on proposed amendments to forest practices; and an Ontario group that helps you track forest fire smoke

Finally, despite help from Saskatchewan and Thunder Bay, Ontario’s evacuation plans put on hold. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Mission accomplished. Lumber curtailments achieve supply-demand balance

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Lumber curtailments achieve their intended consequence as Madison’s reports supply-demand balance. In related news: the impact of softwood duties on housing affordability are overstated (US Lumber Coalition); lack of funding for BC forest crisis is panned (MLA Davies). Meanwhile: global sawlog prices fall (WRI); cheap logs from Europe create log export crisis in New Zealand; and pallet production shifts from hardwood to softwood.

In Forestry news: a BC expert calls for thinning subsidies to reduce wildfire risk; spruce beetles add to BC’s risk despite slow start to the fire season; Ontario fires create air-quality problems for Quebec. Elsewhere: Alberta’s pine beetle fungi discovery; New Brunswick’s resistance to carbon pricing; and Europe’s toxic caterpillar plague

Companies making news include: Canfor, West Fraser, Port Hawkesbury Paper, Resolute, and Pleasant River Pine.

Finally, some first-hand advice on what to do if you run into a bear in the woods

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC’s 2019 fire season a fraction of 2018—so far!

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

To date the forest area consumed by wildfires in BC is just one percent of 2018’s total. In related news: evacuations in Ontario prove challenging; Saskatchewan and Quebec firefighters head to Manitoba; and Alaska’s Hess Creek fire is currently the US’s biggest.

In Forestry/Climate news: Trump touts forest management in speech on environmentalism; Massachusetts bill suggests not-logging to reduce CO2; Arizona wants to promote biomass from forest thinnings; fewer trees many mean fewer fires in Alberta; and Robert Bateman says BC’s caribou moratorium is not long enough. 

In Business news: China’s recyclables ban plays havoc on Maine’s recycling programs; and US and New Zealand log exports to China fall. Also: Tolko and Pinnacle’s new plant, Port Melon’s stink and Northern Pulp’s effluent.

Finally, who plants trees at 93—the Queen of England of course.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Future of Northern Pulp’s Pictou mill looking up

Tree Frog Forestry News
July 8, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The future of Northern Pulp’s Pictou mill is looking up as an extension to its treatment plant closure a possibility. In other Business news: the fight to survive BC’s mill closures; options for the OSB plant in 100 Mile House; killing BC industries won’t save the caribou; and BC’s caribou plan on hold as NDP mends fences

In Forestry/Wildfire news: Oregon’s loggers on cap-and-trade; the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society on species at risk; the World Wildlife Fund on Europe’s super fires; the US Forest Service on reducing log rates to encourage thinning; and fire evacuations in Manitoba and Ontario.

Finally; MP Richard Cannings on why his wood-first bill died in the Senate.

Your Tree Frog editors are heading out early today to kick-off this summer’s Festival of Forestry teachers’ tour to Port Hardy! 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Pinnacle, Tolko to build pellet plant in northern Alberta

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 5, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Pinnacle is partnering with Tolko to build a new wood pellet plant in High Level, Alberta. Other companies in the news include: Canfor Pulp (summer shutdown); Northern Pulp (Unifor encouraged); Resolute (a lesson for the energy sector); and Seaspan (new marine simulator). Meanwhile: northern and central BC community leaders meet to discuss mill closures; and updates on Chinese hardwood and log imports.

In Forestry/Climate news: Ex-forestry CEO Rick Doman’s view on forest management and fires in Canada (podcast); Brazil’s president pushes back on EU criticisms; an LCA expert on embodied carbon in the building industry; and Swiss researcher says planting trees is the best way to fight climate change.

Finally, wood product sustainability stories about BC, Lakehead U, toilet paper and BBQ briquettes.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Global trade in lumber up, value of Canadian exports to US down

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Global trade in lumber increased marginally in 2019; while the value of Canadian lumber exports to the US declined significantly—according to Haken Ekstrom. In other Business news: Interfor seeks First Nations engagement on Canfor’s tenure; the BC Liberals want forest relief not partisan antics; the US Commerce Dep’t says low property taxes in New Brunswick are not a subsidy; and Nova Scotia’s Premier is hopeful about Northern Pulp’s fate.

In Forestry news: the Forest Practices Board says BC needs a new planning process; Alberta’s pine beetle mortality is as high as 98 percent; and the USDA says old-growth forests are more resistant to wildfire than young forests.

Finally, happy Independence Day to our US readers who are celebrating their separation from British rule in 1776.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Steelworkers take stand despite lumber market challenges

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The United Steelworkers voted 99 percent in favour of striking at Western Forest Products despite challenging markets and labour agreements in BC’s interior regions. Elsewhere: Canfor Pulp is implementing summer curtailments at two BC mills and Quebec and Ontario call for harmonized trade regulations.

In Forestry/Climate news: Oregon’s Governor isn’t backing down despite cap-and-trade failure; Florida timber growers are encouraged to plant – hemp; Dallas stays cool with an urban forestry plan; New Zealand allows longer log trains; and Finland studies logging’s impact on climate change.

Finally, Air New Zealand abandons newsprint; Nestle chooses paper over plastic; and Hardie mimics cedar siding.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Steelworkers commence strike action at Western Forest Products

The Tree Frog Forestry News
July 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

In company news: Western Forest Products faces strike action by the Steelworkers Local 1-1937; West Fraser is temporarily curtailing Northern Alberta Plywood; and Interfor gets the Village of Chase’s support for the purchase of Canfor’s tenure. Meanwhile: Madison’s reports a calmer tone for lumber trading; and Chinese imports of US wood products are down due to the US-China trade war.

In Forestry news: BC’s caribou rescue plan lacks a socio-economic analysis (Vaughn Palmer); First Nations push for greater share of forest tenures (Ian Bickis), BC’s forest crisis could have been planned for (Bob Simpson); glyphosate concerns are raised in Northern Ontario and BC’s Kootenay region; and the potential of wood products to mitigate carbon emissions globally.

Finally, the Canadian gov’t gives Canada Wood a boost; while Australia and the UK promote wood’s potential.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Sawmill curtailments beget pulpmill curtailments in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 28, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Sawmill curtailments beget pulpmill curtailments in BC as Canfor Pulp announces summer downtime. Meanwhile—opining on the root causes: John Bergenske says it’s poorly managed forests; while Vaughn Palmer speaks of the “unavoidable aspects” but also why the lack of urgency by the NDP government.

In Forestry/Climate news: killing aspen increases Alberta’s wildfire risks; salal dye-off a sign of BC’s climate change; cap-and-trade protests continue in Oregon; BC health experts add to their vulnerable people list; and Spain battles blazes as heatwave grips Europe.

Finally, the promoters promote: plastic pollution, wheat-straw pulp; eco-friendly housing; a natural 24-hour fuel; and climate-smart wood. 

An early Happy Canada Day greeting from the Frogs. Back on Tuesday.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Google’s ambitious plan for Toronto includes lots of wood

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 27, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Mass timber and high-tech companies meet in Sidewalk Labs’ vision for a wireless, timber-filled Toronto. In related news: how Toronto’s project can help tackle climate change; and create jobs for Northern Ontario.

In Business news: Stimson Lumber calls for a boycott of Oregon businesses; Steelworkers anticipate a strike vote at Western Forest Products; how Hampton Lumber avoids curtailments; U of Maine to help the forest economy; and Wood Resources on global trade in softwood lumber.

Finally, new studies suggest: Alberta’s seismic lines up methane emissions; pine forest restoration is good for birds; intact forests are on the decline; higher temps means lower seedling survival in the Sierras; and health risks rise with wildfire smoke.

Finally, despite the bug bites, the [planting] job is worth it.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Softwood lumber prices continue dizzying reversals

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 26, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Softwood lumber prices continue their dizzying reversals; while the strengthening Canadian dollar threatens to squeeze forest industry profits. In other Business news: Conifex’s decision to sell its Fort St. James mill was “extremely difficult” (CEO Ken Sheilds); Liberal’s don’t understand the “real issues” (Mayor Bob Simpson); “more shutdowns are coming” (CEO John Brink) and “we will get through this difficult transition” (CEO Susan Yurkovich).

In Forestry news: Canada’s first faculty of forestry is set to close; Nova Scotia announces shift to biomass heat; David Suzuki says “caribou and industry can coexist”; Patrick Moore says “trees are the answer”; and Bill Moomwa says Massachusetts forestry “isn’t sustainable for the climate”.

Finally, mass timber makes headlines in Montreal, Toronto; Colorado, Washington DC and Wales.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Hampton Lumber to buy idle Fort St. James mill from Conifex

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 25, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Hampton Lumber plans to buy Conifex’s idle Fort St. James BC operation—and build a new sawmill; while Boreal Bioenergy is also looking at Fort St. James (and Nelson) to expand their torrefied wood pellet business. Elsewhere: Norbord is cleared to restart its Alberta OSB plant after wildfire scare, the caribou recovery moratorium has MP Bob Zimmer concerned; MLA John Rustad says BC’s July 1 stumpage increase is flawed; and Home Depot’s CEO on lumber and Lowes.

In other news: Toronto’s waterfront community will be built with Ontario forest products/mass timber; a BC Forest Safety Council update on faller training; BC is encouraged to follow the fed’s lead and declare a climate emergency; and Dovetail Partners has a new Executive Director.

Finally, wearing wood-based lingerie has never felt so good.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Forest industry crisis needs action by BC government

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s Forest industry crisis needs gov’t action, according to the Vancouver Sun. In related news: premier Horgan is set straight on botched caribou plan; BC’s Northwest economy is on the rise despite forestry cuts; Gorman Bros feeling the lumber slowdown; strike action looms at Western Forest Products; its a rollercoaster ride for Canada’s sawmills; and lumber exports are up in US and Russia.

In Forestry/Climate news: BC’s drought condition raises concerns about root stability and the health of urban parks; more fires means more smoke in Alberta; warmer weather increases spruce beetle outbreaks in western US; and the slow growing ponderosa is less vulnerable to climate change than faster growing trees.

Finally, BC’s secret biochar plant; and the UK’s switch to clean energy.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Caribou rescue plan needs a rescue of its own: Palmer

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 21, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The BC government imposed an interim moratorium on resource development to give itself more time to come up with a plan to protect caribou populations—or as Vaughn Palmer calls it—a rescue plan for the rescue plan. Here’s what industry and some ENGOs have to say. Elsewhere: BC’s Forest Practice Board finds non-compliance in a Peace River woodlot and a stream near Kelowna.

In Business news: Ontario’s cabinet shuffle called good news for forestry; more on the closure of Canfor’s Vavenby mill from the employees, the District of Clearwater and mainstream media; how Canal Flats, BC is turning an old sawmill into a high-tech centre; and an early peak at the 2019 Global Buyers Mission.

It’s the Summer Solstice. So why the lag between the longest day and the warmest temp?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Amid BC curtailments, Steelworkers ratify fire-year contract

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 20, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Central BC sawmill workers ratified a five-year contract amidst closures and layoffs. In related news: Canoe Forest Products curtails its plywood plant one week; BC’s Finance Minister rules out financial relief for BC mills; Northern BC mayors create an emergency centre; and Trump and Trudeau to talk timber (aka softwood duties) today. Elsewhere, BC Business magazine features West Fraser’s Ted Seraphim and Prince George’s BID Group.

In Wood Product news: McDonalds incorporates CLT in new building design, tests new ‘green concept‘ by adding [wood] fibre to the menu. In other news: Oregon’s prescribed burns meets new smoke rules; California efforts to avoid another fire catastrophe; Oregon loggers protest cap-and-trade bill; and ENGO’s protest US Forest Service policy changes.

Finally, sad news. Dr. Bob Kennedy, UBC alumnus and former Dean of the Faculty of Forestry at UBC, passed away.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Lumber prices climb on cutbacks at Canadian sawmills

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 19, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Softwood lumber—after inexplicably wallowing in the doldrums (Madison’s), cutbacks at Canadian sawmills (WSJ), send lumber prices surging (Seeking Alpha). In related news: the BC Liberals say “keep people working“; but the Prince George Citizen says “no need to take the them seriously“. Meanwhile companies in the news include: TimberWestGarden River Truss, Norbord and Rayonier.

In Wildfire news: surviving another BC smoky summer; is California prepared?; surprising behaviour in beetle-attacked lodgepole forests in the US West; evacuations in Northern Alberta; and a wet spring means a late start for Idaho.

Finally, forest fire updates from BC (100 Mile House and Campbell River), Phoenix and Northern California

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

West Fraser to close Chasm mill, reduce shifts at 100 Mile House

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s lumber industry takes another hit with the announcement that West Fraser will permanently close its Chasm mill and reduce shifts at 100 Mile House. In related news: 

  • ‘Like a kick to the stomach’ (Clinton Mayor Susan Swan)
  • West Fraser’s annual allowable cut reduced by 36 per cent (Diane Nicholls)
  • Trouble in BC’s woods means trouble for the BC economy (Jock Finlayson)
  • Closure of Canfor’s Vavenby sawmill deals blow to Domtar’s chip supply
  • MLAs Clovechok and Davies say province must do something—anything.

In other news: Canadians and Americans say wood is the most environmentally friendly material; Ontario’s first wood fuel facility opens; ENGO’s target biomass energy in the US Southeast; and BC’s logging leftovers benefit wildlife habitat.

Finally, the tree said to inspire Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax has died.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Oregon to adopt cap-and-trade, join California and Quebec

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Oregon is poised to adopt a cap-and-trade program and link its allowance auctions with California and Quebec via the Western Climate Initiative.

In Business news, coverage on BC’s forestry crisis includes: a letter by the BC Liberal leader; CBC on jobs losses over the past 30 years; the Peace River pulp and OSB mill closures; and the BC Forest Minister, a local newspaper editor and a First Nations chief on Canfor’s proposed tenure transfer. Meanwhile: Brexit has the UK timber industry craving certainty; Conifex drops a shift in Arkansas; and a labor update at Clearwater Paper in Lewiston.

Finally, engineered wood is cool but if you like bourbon—restore white oak trees.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Lumber rallies as curtailments spread to OSB and pulp production

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 14, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Good news: lumber futures are on pace for their biggest weekly gain in decades as mill curtailments take hold. Bad news: Western Forest Products is axing a graveyard shift in Chamainus; Louisiana Pacific is closing its Fort St. John OSB mill; Canfor is reducing pulp production in Taylor, BC; Teal Jones is logging less on Vancouver Island; and ATCO says it’s day-to-day in Fruitvale, BC. Speaking up are: BC’s Minister Donaldson; Liberals Clovechok, Rustad and Davies; and columnists Mike Smyth and Rob Shaw.

In Forestry news: pine beetle troubles in BC; ash beetle treatments in New Brunswick; and biotech support for the American Chestnut. Elsewhere: more on the USFS logging rule changes; Oregon’s Forest Practices Act; and efforts to protect Canada’s Wood Buffalo National Park.

Finally; the true story of BC’s Hope-Princeton gallows

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

First Nations Group says Canfor timber transfer a “non starter, unless…”

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 13, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A BC First Nations group says the proposed Canfor/Interfor timber transfer is a “non-starter, unless and until the Simpcw have a meaningful role in forest management”. Other lumber views include: the aim of the layoffs (Tom Fletcher); no quick fix (Gordon Hoekstra); Bill 22’s driver (Keith Baldrey); the need for re-training (Derrick Penner); and the trickle-down community impact (Dylana Milobar).

In other news: Trump and Trudeau to talk NAFTA-2 and softwood next week; the pros, cons and critic’s of Trump’s proposed forest management changes; a forester’s view on BC’s salad die-off; loggers protest Oregon’s cap-and-trade bill; and REDD+’s role in tropical forests.

Finally, Alberta researchers transform pulp waste into oil-patch odour eater.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Lumber curtailments starting to have an impact: Madison’s

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 12, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The latest sawmill curtailments caused lumber futures prices to reverse, suggesting prices are likely to stop falling if not increase. In related news: BC braces for more closures; Norbord to indefinitely curtail its OSB plant in central BC; Steelworkers surprised by Canfor curtailments; Resolute to extend mill shutdown in Ontario; fear of higher lumber prices dent US home builder stocks; and global sawlog prices fall to the lowest level in two years.

In Forestry news: alarm bells are sounding on BC’s drought conditions; a Northern BC First Nations group pushes for a new conservation area; high DDT levels persist in New Brunswick’s lakes; and National Public Radio highlights concern over forest firefighter health in the Pacific Northwest.

Finally, AF&PA has a new CEO and the UK balcony fire draws a rare rebuke by timber groups.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Canfor significantly curtailing production capacity in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor Corp announced that it is curtailing all of its BC sawmills except one for 2-6 weeks. In other Business news: Random Lengths said despite curtailments lumber prices sagged last week; Keith Baldrey opines on BC NDP’s Bill 22; and the federal gov’t’s ban on single-use plastic may be good for Canada’s paper producers.

In Wood Product news: China designates wood frame construction as green, with a little help from the Canada Wood Group. Elsewhere: the pros and cons of timber buildings continues to be debated in the wake of the UK’s Grendfell fire. 

Finally, ’tis the season for fire readiness per: BC’s Forest Enhancement Society; Montana’s Fire Service; and Oregon/Washington’s Fire Coordination Center.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC’s communities wonder whose sawmill will fold next?

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As the amount of trees available for logging plummets, BC’s communities wonder whose sawmill will fold next? In related news: Steelworkers advice for the newly unemployed; Canada’s Whac-a-Mole trade strategy is in crisis; and Vietnam cracks down on relabeled Chinese timber products destined for the USA.

In Forestry news: Tom Fletcher on the Sierra Club’s orchestrated fundraising protest; Ben Parfitt on BC’s lack of protection for whitebark pine; Nova Scotia ENGO’s search for endangered birds to halt loggers; and New Brunswick’s decision to reduce herbicide spraying. Elsewhere: how the forest fire season is changing across Canada; researchers link Alberta wildfires to climate change; and why North America’s older forests are less vulnerable to increases in temperature and precipitation.

Finally, wood carvers turn invasive species into cutlery, eagles and more.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

More sawmill curtailments in BC as ENGOs launch old-growth protests

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 7, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Western Forest Products is the latest to announce temporary production curtailments at three BC mills. In related news: the human and region-wide impacts of Canfor’s Vavenby closure; another take on BC’s timber-rights sale issue; and the politics behind the cancellation of BC’s recent trade mission to China.

In Forestry news: calling for an end to old-growth logging in BC—the Sierra Club protested at the offices of 17 BC politicians, securing media coverage that includes Victoria, Prince George, Nanaimo, Surrey and Campbell River. In response, the TLA’s David Elstone penned an op-ed saying that BC has the most sustainably managed forests in the world. Elsewhere: Ontario’s new Homes Act has species-at-risk implications; and more from FPAC on FSC’s new certification standard.

Finally,  the US Forest Service applauds the first mass timber sports arena in the country.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Canada’s beaten-up forestry stocks set to rebound: Analysts

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 6, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Some investors are betting that Canada’s beaten-up forestry stocks will see double-digit gains over the next 12 months. In other Business news: Kalesnikoff’s mass timber gamble; Tolko extends downtime at two BC mills; Stimson’s layoffs called a ‘rebuke to Oregon’; and Vaughn Palmer on the high-stakes test of BC’s new Forest Ministry powers.

In Wildfire news: Premier Hogan on BC’s preparations; the Globe and Mail on how to break the cycle; the US Forest Service on the risk of catastrophic wildfires; the Seattle Times on investing to avoid the haze; and the role of the ‘working forest‘ in New York state. Elsewhere; why wood is good; and what’s behind the rise of ‘ghost forests‘ in the US southeast.

Finally, Peter Bentley retires from Canfor. Here’s his ‘75-year Journey‘ (in 8 min).

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

BC gets first test for new tenure transfer rule

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 5, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

With Canfor’s mill closure, forest companies will see the first test of BC’s requirement to approve tenure transfers (Tom Fletcher). Related stories include:

In other Business news: add stumpage increase to BC’s mill worries; Alberta’s mills are back on the job post-fire; Weyerhaeuser & Kimberly Clark to pay for Washington state restoration work; Georgia Pacific to layoff 555 in Arkansas; GP gets out of the particleboard business; and Canada appeals WTO’s ‘zeroing ruling‘ on softwood tariffs.

Finally, Ottawa provides a lifeline for Ontario’s tree-planting program; and a new US study say wildfires release less carbon that thought.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Canfor closes Vavenby sawmill, agrees to sell forest tenure to Interfor

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor is closing its Vavenby sawmill in BC and, assuming the gov’t approves, will sell its related forest tenure to Interfor. In related news: West Fraser is curtailing five BC mills for one week; Random Lengths says the expectation of idled mills generated stronger sales last week; Norbord resumes operations in Alberta post-fire; and Resolute has a fire-scare at its mill in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

In other news: the Atlantic has a feature story on opioids and timber poaching in BC, the deadline for BC’s caribou plan looms, as two mayors say more consultation is needed; FPAC responds to FSC’s new forestry standard; old growth protection is sought in BC’s interior; and Alberta gets a wake-up call on climate change, as a new wildfire quickly grows out of control.

Finally, the NY Times on why the US doesn’t build to withstand earthquakes.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Forest companies brace for a crash as lumber industry struggles

The Tree Frog Forestry News
June 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

After record-breaking profits, forest companies are bracing for a crash as Canada’s lumber industry faces down trade disputes and climate change. In related news: Teal Jones halves its logging on Vancouver Island; and Stimson Lumber cuts jobs in Oregon. Elsewhere: John Brink to be named to the Order of BC; Frank Dottori to be honoured by Canadian Ecology Center; Forsite purchases Object Raku Technology; and EACOM and Ontario celebrate 100 years at the Timmins sawmill.

In Forestry/Climate news: FSC launches new forestry standard; how logging impacts BC’s watersheds; the Caribou deal is offensive to First Nations group; the Forest Practices Board says BC stewardship plans need work; Quebec battles a spruce budworm outbreak; and wildfires displace thousands in Alberta and the premier says ‘its complicated‘.

Finally, mass timber benefits and growth in Canada and Montana.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Lumber curtailments not enough to fix ‘ugly market’: BMO

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 31, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Bank of Montreal’s Mark Wilde says curtailments are not enough to fix weak lumber pricing. In related news: Bloomberg’s Amanda Lang interviews Eric Miller on US trade action and how Canada’s forest industry can fight back; Pence tells Trudeau that US will approve USMCA; and Aspen Planers is down to one shift in Merritt, BC.

In other news: Nova Scotia promises reduction in clear cutting; a tentative labour agreement ends the longshoremen lockout in Vancouver; Tolko suspends operations in Alberta due to Slave Lake evacuation alert; Columbia Forest Products modernizes in Hearst, Ontario; and IP sells its India paper business. 

Finally, the ‘apocalypse is back‘ in Alberta (i.e., wildfire smoke), while 10,000 are forced from their homes

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Canada invests in Toronto’s Tall Wood future

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 30, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tall Wood is on the Up-and-Up in Toronto as evidenced by Canada’s investment in a planned 10-storey timber building. In related news: Northern Ontario needs a wood pipeline strategy; Australian-made CLT is put to the test; and US fire testing goes high-tech with 360-degree video.

In Business news: lumber shippers are feeling the pain of a possible lockout at Vancouver’s port; the US-China trade war cut Astoria’s log exports; Tolko’s Louisiana mill is now open for business; and a timber Ponzi scheme snags United Parcel Service workers in Mississippi. In Forestry/Climate news: Alberta declares disaster, public emergency due to wildfires; the Boreal forest experiences two district wildfire seasons; and a California study says thinning and prescribed fire reduced tree loss across the Sierra Nevada.

Finally, Bigfoot replaces Smokey Bear, and why banning paper receipts is nonsense legislation

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Interfor to cut production as lumber demand remains elusive

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 29, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Interfor plans to curtail production in its Southern Interior BC operations as Madison’s says lumber demand remains elusive. In other Business news: more on Tolko’s cuts; a dryer fire sets back Skeena’s pellet plant in Terrace; Stora Enso invests in CLT; and forestry employment is up in Idaho.

In Wood Product news: mass timber makes progress in BC’s mid-rise and high-rise market; as well as in Oregon and Australia; while researchers at the U of Maryland develop ‘air conditioning‘ wood. Meanwhile, a coalition of non-wood associations call US support for CLT unfair; while the concrete industry questions the safety of stick-built construction in Philadelphia.

In Wildfire news: Alberta’s wildfire smoke dominates the weather; as other reports say wildfires are here to stay, and continuing to grow. Meanwhile, Canada is seeking ‘space-based capability‘ to monitor them. 

Finally, BC looks for input on the management of its private land forests.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Innovative wood-based biochemical products green-lighted by Resolute

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 28, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Innovative wood-based biochemical products will be produced at Resolute’s Thunder Bay pulp and paper mill, thanks in part to FPInnovations and Natural Resources Canada. In other Business news: US log exports to China and Canada post heavy decline.

In Forestry news: Canada’s longterm weather forecast is bad news for wildfires; BC seeks feedback on its Forest and Range Practices Act; a study say Caribou recovery will hurt BC’s Peace River economy; the BC Forest Practices Board is reviewing the impact of old-growth logging on bear dens; BC Timber Sales says the Elphinstone petition ‘lacks merit‘; forest-rich Finland will need to import biomass as it phases out coal; and Amazon deforestation is up 20% in past year.

Finally, Forest Talk Radio comes to North Bay, Ontario and BC tree planters get sex assault prevention training.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Demand to end old-growth logging ‘outrageous’: David Elstone

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 27, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

“It’s outrageous to demand an end to old-growth logging without acknowledging the impact to people and communities”, says the TLA’s David Elstone. In related news: Eco-Business asks—which is better for the climate, tall and old trees or dense and young trees; the Tyee promotes the cataloguing of BC’s forest giants; and a National Geographic explainer on rainforests.

In Business news: Resolute’s Tennessee mill focuses on tissue and pulp; EACOM celebrates its centenary in Timmins Ontario; more fall-out from the US-China trade war; Trump kills a unique fire fighting program; and Russia plans to increase exports to North America.

Finally, to reduce wildfire risk, BC ups its budget and enlists the cattle industry; and Ontario sends help to Alberta as heavy smoke blankets the province.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

More lumber curtailments in BC, this time it’s Tolko

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Citing high logs costs and weak markets, Tolko announced downtime at its Williams Lake and Armstrong divisions. In related news: a BC Interior report predicts more lumber closures; a non-seasonally adjusted view on US housing starts; and the US-China trade war’s impact on hardwood producers.

In Climate news: managing for disturbance can stabilize forest carbon; the long-term potential of forest carbon credits; and the impact of invasive earthworms on carbon stored in the forest floor. In other news: BC clarifies logging regs on private land; the Northeast Territories delays its new Forest Act; high fire danger forecast in the US South; and breeders of rare frogs seek to undermine animal traffickers.

Finally, Smokey Bear gets a Smithsonian exhibit and ‘The Lumber Baron‘ hits the big screen.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More