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Today's Takeaway

Market endorses Tembec takeover

Categories: Today's Takeaway
May 26, 2017
Tree Frog Forestry News

Stock prices for Tembec and Rayonier Advanced Materials rose 40% and 10%, respectively, on news that Rayonier offered to buy Tembec in a friendly takeover. (The suitor was formed in 2014 through a spin-off from Rayonier Inc.) Rayonier CEO Paul Boynton said "they would keep Tembec’s headquarters in Montreal and maintain its existing facilities. They’re all profitable; we plan to run them all and invest in them all”

 
Tembec union president Roger Gauthier says he was shocked to hear it was Rayonier, but not that "Tembec was being sold”. Guathier observed “they were trying to make it mean and lean and attractive to get bought out. We were definitely seeing something coming because it didn't make sense.”

Paul Boynton also weighed in on the softwood dispute saying Rayonier "will come to bat for Tembec". Although the takeover itself won't affect the countervailing duty, Tembec's Jim Lopez said the merger “will help them cover the costs of paying it” [and add another US-based voice in support of Canada’s position].

BC researchers say “better forest management and a focus on long-lasting wood products could contribute 35 per cent of our 2050 carbon-emissions reduction target”. According to Dr. Werner Kurz, examples include “the 18-storey Brock Commons building that continues to store the carbon that was stored in the forest and avoids emissions that would have occurred to produce the concrete and steel”, had wood not been used.

Lots of forest fire news today and a decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruling “in favor of the US Forest Service and allowing logging in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest”.

-- Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry

Resources expo hitting CN Centre

By Frank Peebles

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Prince George Citizen

Four acres of industry will be on display this weekend. Starting today, CN Centre is home to the indoor-outdoor extravaganza that revs the heaviest engines in our local economy. The Canada North Resources Expo only comes every two years and it is only on for two days, though, so the rush is on. The forest industry is naturally the focus of the event (it began as the Forest Expo back at its genesis), but mining, agriculture, construction, transportation, energy, safety, environmental protection and more will all get some of the limelight, plus all the crossover points. Tools - large and small - will be one of the visual draws, but the expo is also about problem-solving for people involved in industry, upgrading your company with the best in capital investments, and getting close to the cutting edge of goods and services linked to the work we do on the local landscape.

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Crews containing Tete Jaune Cache wildfire

By Mark Nielsen

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Prince George Citizen

Crews have battled to a standstill a forest fire burning near Tete Jaune Cache while also learning it's three times as large as originally thought. First estimated at 200 hectares when it was discovered on Tuesday, it was since determined to be 574 ha following helicopter fly-over on Thursday morning. "Since Tuesday there really hasn't been any growth but with all the cloud cover we just couldn't see it," B.C. Wildfire Service spokesperson Amanda Reynolds said. "But the clouds had cleared this morning so a flight went up." In all, 54 fire fighters were on the scene building by hand fire guards on the north side and on the east and west flanks. "The fire now, we are calling it 'being held,' it's not out of control anymore," Reynolds said. "There's been sufficient suppression action taken on the fire and it's not likely to spread beyond existing or pre-determined boundaries under the current and forecasted conditions."

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B.C. Wildfire Service introduces new firefighting terms

By Ash Kelly

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
CBC News

Right now, a 574-hectare wildfire burning five kilometres east of Tete Jaune Cache, B.C., is zero per cent contained, human caused and not an interface fire. But what does that mean? With fire season about to begin, CBC reporter Wil Fundal spoke with B.C. Wildfire Service fire information officer Claire Allen. She pulled back the curtain on some of the technical jargon, including some new terms for 2017. Types of fires: A wildfire is an unplanned fire that occurs in a wilderness area, away from people or structures. A prescribed burn that escapes its intended perimeter can also be considered a wildfire. An interface fire is more of a concern for people. It means a fire could potentially affect man-made structures, while at the same time burning natural fuels such as trees and shrubs. In this situation, a house fire could jump to the forest or visa versa.

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Guest View: Community forest proposal may work — we need to know more

By Keith Moore, RPF

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Haida Gwaii Observer

I write to support Alexandra Hepburn’s call for more community forums and more information about the proposal for a community forest on Haida Gwaii. In my opinion, it is very early days and much too early for anyone to state firm and final opinions for or against it. There is a lot of misunderstanding and a serious lack of real information. At this point, I suggest we mandate MIEDS, with the support of the CHN, to find out much more detail from the province about the possible benefits and limitations. Only then will we be able to make an informed decision. At this point, we know our situation on Haida Gwaii is highly unusual. We know a community forest tenure gives a community a defined area of land (like a Tree Farm Licence, TFL) with a responsibility and a right to manage that land according to community objectives. This creates some real opportunities we do not have at present.

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Forest fire prompts evacuations in Red Sucker Lake First Nation

By Laura Glowacki

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
CBC News

A nearby forest fire is forcing people with health concerns to flee Red Sucker Lake First Nation. Manitoba Sustainable Development currently lists the fire, which is approximately seven kilometres north of the community, as out of control. The blaze appears to be moving north for the time being, the province said, and was started by a human. Fire crews, including water bombers, attacking the blaze Thursday were briefly diverted to a second fire in Gods Lake Narrows, Man. — approximately 60 kilometres to the northwest — but have since returned to the Red Sucker Lake fire.

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Tree-planting program effective

Letter by Rob Keen, CEO, Forests Ontario

Categories: Forestry
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 26, 2017
The Kingston Whig-Standard

Re: "Political bumbling gives green energy a bad name," May 23. I read with great interest Jim Merriam's article in the Whig-Standard in which he outlines his vision for addressing climate change and where he correctly outlines the effectiveness of reforestation to sequester carbon. We also appreciate his vote of support in the final paragraph. Wise use of our forest resources plays a central role in addressing climate change. In many ways, Ontario is already doing our part. The Ontario government works closely with Forests Ontario and our province's forestry sector to implement tree-planting programs. Since 2008, through the Ontario government's 50 Million Tree Program (50MTP), administered by Forests Ontario, landowners with 2.5 acres or more of open land may qualify to have trees planted on their property.

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State Foresters Respond to President’s FY18 Budget Recommendations

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States
May 23, 2017
National Association of State Foresters

WASHINGTON —The National Association of State Foresters (NASF) reacted with disappointment today to President Donald Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2018 budget recommendations. The proposed budget includes significant cuts in forestry programs, including a recommended 50 percent reduction of USDA Forest Service State and Private Forestry program funding. Bill Crapser, Wyoming State Forester and president of the National Association of State Foresters, said today: “America’s trees and forests are facing real challenges from threats such as catastrophic wildfire, invasive pests, disease and development pressures which know no boundaries. State Foresters are disappointed by the disastrous cuts included in President Trump’s budget recommendations. Strong investments in state and private forests help protect public benefits such as rural jobs, clean air and water, wood products and wildlife habitat."

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Kilmer pushes Ag secretary Perdue on proposed cuts to timber jobs program

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States
May 25, 2017
The Daily World

Washington, D.C. – During a House Appropriations Committee hearing Thursday, Congressman Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., pushed Trump Administration officials to explain proposed cuts to rural jobs programs in the Trump budget. Kilmer asked the Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Perdue, why an initiative to promote forest collaboratives to help timber communities and another to repair roads and trails to expand outdoor access were cut in the president’s budget proposal. ...Kilmer told Perdue and Tidwell that a forest collaborative he has help form of timber interests, environmentalists and community members is “really making progress in trying to increase harvest levels in a responsible way. 

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Get the facts about healthy forests

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 26, 2017
Healthy Forest Facts

Great series of videos on this website - in their words: Caring for the things we love... it is our calling. Our forest, sustainable and renewable, are part of solutions that future generations thrive on. By reducing the fuel in our forests, attacking fires with early suppression and allowing science to drive practices for enhancing fire prevention and post-fire recovery efforts, we can have healthy and fire-resilient forests. We can do better for the forests we all care about.


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Report yields new details in 2014 Yosemite air tanker crash

By By John Antczak

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
The Washington Post

LOS ANGELES — The 2014 fatal crash of an air tanker fighting a forest fire in Yosemite National Park came just after the pilot was warned to avoid a tree to the right but then struck trees to the left, according to a National Transportation Safety Board report. Soon after the plane went down investigators came to believe its left wing probably struck a tree. The report released Wednesday provides new details on what led up to the crash, which killed pilot Geoffrey “Craig” Hunt, 62, but does not conclude what caused it. The board is expected to determine the probable cause within about 45 days, said Janet Upton, spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, which was operating the aircraft under control of the National Park Service when the crash occurred on Oct. 7, 2014.

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Salvage logging

Letter by Larry Woodard, Professional Forester

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
Idaho Statesman

As a professional forester, I was pleased to see that the Forest Service is actively pursuing salvage logging and rehabilitation of the Pioneer Fire area. To recover 70 million feet of dead timber and replant some of the acreage is just common sense. Prompt recovery and repair of burned areas reduces the chance of a major beetle outbreak. Those environmentalists that would argue against rehabilitation of a fire area, simply lack basic knowledge of the forest ecosystem. I am sure there will be plenty of bugs for the woodpeckers.

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4FRI contractor hit with another lawsuit

By Emery Cowan

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
Arizona Daily Sun

At the beginning of this month, a new company took operational control of Good Earth Power AZ, holder of the largest contract on the Four Forest Restoration Initiative. Officials with the new company, NewLife Forest Products, have pledged to get Good Earth’s troubled forest thinning track record back on track. But along with Good Earth's habitual underperformance and lingering debt that NewLife will have to address, the 4FRI contract holder just got hit with another lawsuit filed by two former employees claiming nonpayment and breach of contract. That makes at least three lawsuits that have been filed against Good Earth by former employees or contractors. ...Since June of last year, the Forest Service reported it has been contacted 10 times with complaints about nonpayment or late payment by Good Earth. 

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Loggers association suggests federal reforms to improve forest economy

By Sean Hart

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
Blue Mountain Eagle

For the first time since 2013, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Associated Oregon Loggers hosted an operators dinner in John Day May 17, where attendees heard updates on the industry, legislation and insect problems. Associated Oregon Loggers Fores Policy Manager Rex Storm said, although there have been changes since 2013, the forest economy remains “very slack,” with only one local mill and lean timber supply. The problem is not a shortage in demand, he said, but a lack of a “sufficient and reliable volume of timber” preventing investment in mills, making it difficult to find buyers for private logs. While ODF primarily works with private landowners, Storm said the timber supply from the larger national forests has more impact on the logging infrastructure. He said, while the association looks forward to the completion of the forest plan revision that has been in progress for many years, he is “not optimistic” it will have the legal sufficiency for a sustainable timber supply.

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Carbon dioxide emissions could be greatly reduced via proposals such as Wild Olympics

Letter by Jerry Estberg, professor emeritus in physics at the University of San Diego

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 26, 2017
Peninsula Daily News

The need to reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is receiving increased attention as a strategy to combat global warming. ...I believe the only method that is effective and known to result in significant negative emissions is by photosynthesis that occurs — especially in forest ecosystems like those on the Olympic Peninsula. This process occurs over many years as the forest grows. Contrary to the claim of the April 21 letter writer [“Tree proposal”], this process is not only stopped when the forest is clearcut, it is reversed (aerobic decomposition). The net result of current clearcutting forest-management practices is that there is no significant change in the carbon concentration in the atmosphere because the amount sequestered during tree growth is released after the trees are harvested. What will work is protecting forest land from clearcutting with forest proposals like Wild Olympics.

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Timber Industry Win A ‘Big Thorne’ To Environmentalists

By Tim Pearce

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
The Daily Caller

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the United States Forest Service (USFS), allowing operations to log Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. The 2-1 court decision, released Tuesday, went against a Greenpeace and various other interest groups, clearing the way for the largest logging operation on the Tongass Forest in 20 years. “We are disappointed that the court’s decision tipped to a setback in our effort to save the ecological integrity of Prince of Wales Island,” Larry Edwards of Greenpeace told Alaska’s SitNews. The Ninth Circuit determined that the USFS did not violate the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) or the “standards and guidelines” of the Big Thorne Project when the agency launched the Tongass Forest Plan in 2008.

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Forest Service to revise strategic plan

By Jessica Kutz

Categories: Forestry
Region: United States; US West
May 25, 2017
Telluride Daily Planet

The U.S. Forest service responsible for managing the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, and Gunnison public lands has announced a decision to revise the Forest Service Strategic Plan, a document drafted in 1983.  The planned revision was discussed at Wednesday’s regular San Miguel County Commission meeting. The last effort to revise the strategic document was completed in 2006. U.S. Forest Supervisor Scott Armentrout said the first phase of the revision will involve making assessments. “(These are) really to learn what went well, what is not going so well and what are some new things we need to think about,” Armentrout said. Topics to be covered include examining which U.S. Forest areas are suitable as wilderness and which are considered recreation areas, as well as looking at the “spectrum of resources” available for forest vegetation management, Armentrout said. 

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Siberia’s forest fires quadruple to engulf 30,000 hectares

Categories: Forestry
Region: International
May 26, 2017
TASS Russian News Agency

ULAN-UDE - Siberian forest fires have swelled four times, from 7,000 to 30,000 hectares in the past 24 hours, the federal aerial forest protection service Avialesokhrana said in a statement on Friday. "As of the morning of May 26, in the Krasnoyarsk region, fires have engulfed 15,000 hectares, while 13,800 hectares in the Irkutsk region and 1,000 hectares in the Republic of Tuva have been affected by fires," the statement reads. Over the past 24 hours, 18 forest fires covering 542 hectares have been extinguished, the regional firefighting center said adding that 33 wildfires were being fought. "Most of the fires occur in hard-to-reach areas, they pose no threat to populated areas," the center added. More than 600 personnel and 120 units of equipment are involved in combating the blazes.

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Company & Business News

Rayonier Advanced Materials vows to 'come to bat' for Tembec in softwood battle

By Ross Marowits

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; United States
May 25, 2017
The Canadian Press in Montreal Gazette

MONTREAL -- Rayonier Advanced Materials will "come to bat" to protect the interests of Tembec in the cross-border battle over softwood lumber, the head of the Florida-based company said Thursday after announcing a friendly takeover of the Quebec forestry firm. ..."We'll be supportive of whatever works best for Quebec, Ontario and our position here," Paul Boynton, chairman and CEO of Rayonier Advanced Materials, told a news conference in Montreal after the transaction was announced. ...The takeover won't affect that countervailing duty. But Tembec CEO James Lopez said the size and liquidity of Rayonier Advanced Materials will help cover the costs of paying it while also forging ahead with planned capital investments, including $136 million over four years in Quebec. Tembec is less exposed to the U.S. softwood battle than it was a decade ago the last time the dispute erupted after selling its two mills in B.C. and three in Quebec.

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Tough times across region

By Trevor Nichols

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 24, 2017
Castanet

Thousands of jobs disappeared, more people were unemployed, there was less capital investment and dozens of businesses went bankrupt in the Thompson-Okanagan in 2016. ...Somewhat puzzling was the fact that half of the 11,500 jobs lost in those industries were in wood product manufacturing. Considering the region’s softwood lumber production increased in 2016, a possible explanation could be that the manufacturing activity occurred in neighbouring regions like the Kootenays or Cariboo. According to Karen Christiansen, a partner at Kelowna’s MNP LLP, dwindling transportation jobs, particularly in the trucking industry, could be due to the ripple effects from the wildfires and economic struggles in Alberta.

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Forestry leaders share positive view of economic outlook in face of shifting market

By Jacob Sandler

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Wood Business

Despite uncertainty surrounding the short-term future of the Canadian market, most speakers at two softwood lumber conferences held in Vancouver in early May presented optimistic views about long-term prospects. For many, the inevitability of short-term instability provides an opportunity for innovation, diversification, and expansion into new markets. ...[FPAC's CEO], Derek Nighbor, gave a political perspective of the forestry sector, stating that as a major sustainable contributor to the national economy, and one that provides employment in remote and northern communities, there is a huge amount of support from government for ongoing forestry innovation. ...President of International Wood Markets Group Inc. Russ Taylor opened his conference with a global overview of the softwood market. He predicts continued growth in global consumption. Global production will also continue to trend upward at ~two per cent growth/year, as will global exports.  

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Comment: Next government must take lead on clean growth

By Pembina Institute's Josha MacNab and Karen Tam Wu

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Victoria Times Colonist

As British Columbians, we all want our province’s future to include a prosperous economy, safe communities and healthy families. However, years of government inaction at the provincial level mean B.C. is at risk of being left behind as the world tackles the climate crisis and transitions to a low-carbon economy. That’s why the Pembina Institute has released Vision for Clean Growth in B.C., an action plan that lays out 20 recommendations for building a strong and inclusive clean economy. We are calling on the next B.C. government to endorse the following five key priorities, which we believe will make life better for all British Columbians. ...5. Grow sustainable resource-sector jobs: Strong climate policies would result in an estimated 32,000 jobs in 2025 in B.C. — and another 30,000 by 2050 — in mining, forestry and agriculture. Under these policies, these industries continue to grow, but would do so more efficiently, using less energy and producing less carbon pollution as new technologies and processes are used in each sector.

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Canfor supports Clearwater Secondary grads

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Clearwater Times

Canadian Forest Products is encouraging Clearwater high school students interested in a career in forestry to apply for and take advantage of the company’s scholarship and bursary program. Canfor is offering two different scholarships (combined value of $5,500) available for students interested in studying forestry and is also sponsoring dry grad celebrations for all graduating students from Clearwater Secondary School. ...Canfor is providing a scholarship in the amount of $500 to students entering degree or trades foundation programs related to forestry.

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U.S. lumber tariff scuttles N.S. budget’s growth forecast, says experts

By James Rison

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 25, 2017
The Chronicle Herald

Countervailing duties on Canadian softwood lumber exports to the United States were not factored into Nova Scotia’s already sluggish economic forecast for this year. According to the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council, the provincial economy is expected to grow by only 1.2 per cent this year, less than the national average of 1.9 per cent. ...Marla MacInnis, a spokeswoman for the Finance Department, confirmed the economic forecast used in the provincial budget did not factor in softwood lumber duties. ...Although Bergman would not estimate how long the current softwood lumber trade dispute might last and what its final impact could be on the Nova Scotia economy, he did say it’s not good.

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Tembec union president cautiously optimistic about takeover

By Jeff Turl

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 25, 2017
Bay Today

Tembec's biggest competitor will buy out the company in a friendly takeover, and Unifor Local 233 President Roger Gauthier says he was shocked to hear it was Rayonier, but not that Tembec was being sold. "We had a reduction in our workforce by 50 or 60 employees since the strike," Gauthier told BayToday. "They were trying to make it mean and lean and attractive to get bought out. We were definitely seeing something coming because it didn't make sense. We had mediation meetings where we resolved 90 per cent of our grievances, and we're not used to that so we were saying there's got to be something coming up, something big coming, and voila!" ...But Gauthier is hoping the new owners will want to upgrade the local product. "They're going to want to make our pulp just as good as their standard pulps. I think for the town that's going to be positive. 

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Florida's Rayonier offers $807M US in friendly offer for Tembec

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 25, 2017
CBC News

Montreal-based lumber, paper and pulp producer Tembec has received an $807 million US offer to take over the company from Florida-based conglomerate Rayonier Advanced Materials. Jacksonville-based Rayonier is offering Tembec shareholders $4.05 Cdn per share, or 0.2302 shares in the new combined company for every share that they own. The deal, which would see Rayonier assume $487 million US of Tembec's debt, would keep Tembec's headquarters in Montreal and maintain its existing facilities. "They're all profitable," Rayonier CEO Paul Boynton said on a conference call, referring to Tembec's various operations in Ontario, Quebec and France. "We plan to run them all [and] invest in them all." The proposed deal comes in the middle of another flare-up in the longstanding softwood lumber dispute between the U.S. and Canada.

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Quebec's Tembec to be bought by Florida-based Rayonier

By Nicholas Van Praet

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 25, 2017
The Globe and Mail

Tembec Inc. has agreed to a takeover offer from Rayonier Advanced Materials in an $807-million (U.S.) friendly deal that further thins out the ranks of Canada’s publicly-traded forest products companies. Nearly a decade after emerging from a crisis in North American lumber markets that resulted in its recapitalization, Montreal-based Tembec is selling to Jacksonville, Fla.-based Rayonier for $4.05 a share in cash or the equivalent in Rayonier shares. ...Consolidation has ripped through the forest products and paper space over the past 15 years as companies grappled with weakened earnings in the face of the 2006 housing crisis and newsprint’s decline, among other challenges. That has left few publicly-traded names for Canadian investors beyond giants West Fraser Timber Co. and Canfor Corp. The Rayonier-Tembec deal further reduces the list. It also marks another purchase of a significant Quebec-based company with no anti-takeover protection by a suitor out of province.

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Rayonier Advanced Materials to buy Tembec in forest products push

By Yashaswini Swamynathan

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 25, 2017
Reuters Canada

Rayonier Advanced Materials said it would buy Canada's Tembec Inc for $807 million including debt to expand its business into packaging and forest products, sending Tembec's shares to a five-year high on Thursday. The deal comes at a time when Canada is resisting a move by the United States to impose tariffs on Canadian lumber imports. "I call it (tariffs) an annoyance but not something fundamental," Tembec CEO James Lopez told Reuters. Tembec shareholders will get C$4.05 ($3.02) in cash, or 0.2302 of a Rayonier share, for every Tembec share they own, the companies said. The offer price is at a premium of 37.3 percent to Tembec's Wednesday close. The deal includes $487 million in debt.

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Oregon’s Starker Forests names new president and CEO

By Eric Mortenson

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: United States; US West
May 24, 2017
Capital Press

Jake Gibbs, a forester with more than 20 years of experience, has been chosen as the next president and CEO of Starker Forests, the venerable family timber company based in Corvallis, Ore. Gibbs began work May 22 and will take over as president and CEO on July 15, when the company’s board of directors meets. Gibbs comes to Starker from another family business, Lone Rock Timber Management in Roseburg, Ore., which was involved in a controversial proposal to purchase the Elliott State Forest. Gibbs began as a tree planter, gained silviculture and logging experience and in 2016 was listed as Lone Rock’s external affairs director. In a message to Starker employees, Gibbs said he is “excited and humbled” to be selected to lead the company.

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Calhoun pulp mill shifts away from newsprint

By Dave Flessner

Categories: Company & Business News
Region: United States; US East
May 26, 2017
Chattanooga Times Free Press

CLEVELAND, Tenn. — The shift from paper to tissue production at one of America's biggest pulp mills, in Calhoun, Tenn., should help ensure the future of the Resolute Forest Products facility in McMinn County despite the ongoing decline in the demand for the newsprint alos produced at the plant, company CEO Richard Garneau said Thursday. Following the company's annual meeting here Thursday and a board tour of the Calhoun facility on Wednesday, Garneau said he is encouraged by the start of the tissue production lines in Calhoun. Although the initial investment at the pulp and paper mill ended up costing about 10 percent more than originally forecast, Garneau said production and packaging of the new tissue products started about a month ahead of schedule and the new technology should give Resolute an advantage in capturing more of the growing tissue business.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Wood Pellet Association of Canada promotes Canadian wood pellets in Japan

By Gord Murray

Categories: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada
May 25, 2017
Canadian Biomass Magazine

Japan is a good news story for Canada’s wood pellet producers. As recently as 2014, Canada exported just 62,000 tonnes to Japan, but by 2016, this had increased by a whopping 350 per cent to 272,000 tonnes. Canada presently accounts for 78 per cent of Japanese wood pellet imports and we aim to maintain this position. As impressive as these figures sound, by 2030, Japan’s wood pellet imports are expected to increase from the current total of 347,000 tonnes to more than seven million tonnes per year! On May 15, the Wood Pellet Association of Canada (WPAC) and the Embassy of Canada to Japan jointly hosted a seminar and reception at our embassy in Tokyo. More than 100 Japanese and South Korean customers and prospects attended. Just a few of the notable companies included GS Global, Hanwha, Kansai Electric Power, Mitsubishi Corporation, Mitsui Corporation, ORIX Corporation, Showa Shell, and Sumitomo Corporation.

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Bioeconomy proponents welcome supercluster program details

By A.J. (Sandy) Marshall, Bioindustrial Innovation Canada; Derek Nighbor, FPAC; Pierre Lapointe, FPInnovations; Marc LePage, Genome Canada

Categories: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada
May 25, 2017
Forest Products Association of Canada

Proponents leading the development of a bioeconomy supercluster welcome the federal government’s launch of the Innovation Superclusters Initiative. Such superclusters will help specific high potential Canadian economic strengths to advance technical platforms to enhance their world leadership position. The Canadian bioeconomy covers a wide range of Canadian traditional and non-traditional bio-sourced industrial sectors that employ more than 2 million Canadians and generates sales of $300 billion for our country. Derek Nighbor, CEO, Forest Products Association of Canada congratulates Minister Bains for his commitment to innovation. “We believe that innovation development and deployment (including de-risking processes, products and markets) are key to our respective sectors’ competitiveness and diversification to ensure economic growth and job creation in rural and urban regions of Canada.”

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Rethink everything about forests, wood products, climate studies say

By Randy Shore

Categories: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada; Canada West
May 25, 2017
Vancouver Sun

British Columbians need to rethink everything about the way we manage our forests and the products they provide, according to research by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions. If we do, the payoff can be substantial.  Better forest management, more thorough extraction of wood from harvested areas and a focus on long-lasting wood products could contribute 35 per cent of our 2050 carbon-emissions reduction target, according to the PICS Forest Carbon Management Project. ...“The scenarios that we looked at are all very conservative assumptions, but taken together they make a big impact,” said project leader Werner Kurz of Natural Resources Canada’s Pacific Forestry Centre in Victoria. “One involved harvesting two per cent less wood per year, another one was just taking more of the wood that we currently leave behind in clearcuts and using it for bioenergy or manufacturing.”

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Wood & Paper Products & Green Building

Ontario CLT firm builds housing for Grand Rapids First Nations

By Don Procter

Categories: Wood & Paper Products & Green Building
Region: Canada; Canada East
May 26, 2017
Chatham Daily News

A cross-laminated timber (CLT) manufacturer based in St. Mary’s, Ont., will build 30 houses for the First Nations in Grand Rapids, Man. The project is a first for CLT in First Nations housing but the manufacturer suggests there are good reasons to think it won't be the last. The assembly can save money on building costs and provide a durable product that is mould-resistant, says Nancy Dewar, vice-president, Guardian Structures, the manufacturer awarded the contract to build the houses. ...Dewar says Guardian's CLT product has a number of advantages over stick-built construction for the First Nations project. For starters the 105 mm thick CLT is hygroscopic, meaning it expels "large amounts of humidity naturally."

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Multipurpose building is a flexible wooden wonder

By Lloyd Alter

Categories: Wood & Paper Products & Green Building
Region: International
May 25, 2017
Treehugger

In 2017, Aki Hamada Architects have built a multipurpose building that is an addition to a circuit board factory in Yokahama, not far away from the Cupnoodles Museum. It's interior reminds me of traditional Japanese architecture like the Katsura villa in many ways. It is built of wood with beautiful joinery; it has moving walls and screens; the spaces are really undefined and flexible and can be put to many different uses, including such modern tasks as making circuit boards. ...The wood detailing is extraordinary, with its grid of tracks in the floor and beams above for the sliding screens.

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