Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: April 13, 2015

Business & Politics

Government aid to grow forestry sector highlights COFI 2015

Wood Business
April 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Funding announcements, the future of fibre and an informative discussion on Aboriginal land title highlighted the final day of the Council of Forest Industries’ 2015 annual conference, which took place on April 8 and 9 in Prince George, B.C. Approximately 500 people packed into the auditoriums at the Prince George Civic Centre to listen to sessions on fibre supply, the bio-economy and community recognition, as well as an announcement from Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Steve Thomson… He added that any future policies for the province’s forestry sector would need to revolve around keeping B.C. competitive on a global scale. 

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Great Western Forestry fighting Nalcor claims

The Telegram
April 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Great Western?Forestry disputes Nalcor Energy’s claim its work on the Muskrat Falls project was not up to snuff. The contractor — once tasked with clearing trees from a transmission line right of way between Muskrat?Falls and Churchill Falls — is pressing a lawsuit against the provincial Crown corporation, claiming Nalcor was the one to breach their contract.“At all times material to this proceeding Great Western Forestry was and it continues to remain engaged in the business of harvesting and clearing timber, a business which it has carried on since 2002,” the contractor stated in its February 2014 statement of claim.

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Northern Pulp, two others, file appeals of mill’s industrial approval

Chronicle Herald
April 10, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

The Environment Department has received three appeals to the 2015 industrial approval for the Northern Pulp mill in Pictou County. Thursday marked the deadline to file an appeal. Appeals were submitted by the Pictou Landing First Nation, a community group called Clean the Pictou Air and Northern Pulp. Environment Minister Randy Delorey, who said he hasn’t seen the appeals yet, has until June 9 to make a decision. “It’s too early to make any comment as to any of the three,” the minister said Friday at Province House.

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U.S. firms charge ahead in quest for tariffs against Port Hawkesbury mill

Chronicle Herald
April 11, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Two American pulp and paper mill owners are charging ahead in their quest to have tariffs placed on supercalendered paper entering the U.S. from Port Hawkesbury Paper Corp. In a preliminary injury inquiry on Friday, American trade commission voted to refer the case to the department of commerce for further investigation. Lead by American supercalendered paper manufacturers Madison Paper Industries and Verso Corporation, the Coalition for Fair Paper Imports is alleging that Nova Scotia has unfairly subsidized Port Hawkesbury Paper Corp.

Madison Paper unfair competition claim advances from CentralMaine.com

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For a clean environment, jobs and financial stability, natural gas strikes right balance: Guest viewpoint

Richard Abradi is the Energy Manager at Catalyst Paper in Rumford, Maine. 
Mass Online
April 12, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

As our economy begins to rebound from the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, it is important to understand that one of the primary costs to manufacturing businesses is the cost of energy. Manufacturing in this country began in New England and the Northeast by taking full advantage of our many rivers. If manufacturing is to remain a feature of our economy and provide good jobs for our workers, it is critical that our region has access to cheap energy, just as it was critical 200 years ago. The problem is that New England is one of the most expensive regions of the country and, indeed, the world for energy costs. 

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Softwood Lumber Board Partners with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to Support Market Development for Innovative Wood Building Technologies

from the Softwood Lumber Board
PR Newswire
April 9, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — Today, the Secretary of Agriculture announced a partnership agreement between the Softwood Lumber Board (SLB) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to help coordinate research, demonstration projects, and market development for innovative wood building technologies in the built environment throughout the United States. …The agreement recognizes several goals and objectives including the creation of jobs in rural communities. The softwood lumber industry is an important job creator and supports hundreds of local communities, and building with wood helps create jobs along each stage of the supply chain.

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Maker of toilet tissue, towels using wheat straw as easily renewable fiber source

Star Tribune
April 12, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

WICHITA, Kan. — A company plans to roll out a new line of tissues and paper towels this month that incorporates wheat straw and bamboo, which it hopes will provide a rapidly renewable and environmentally friendly source of fiber for its products while giving farmers a new market for what remains after the grain is harvested. Kimberly-Clark Professional, which manufactures Kleenex and Scott brand products, says its new “GreenHarvest” line will blend in 20 percent wheat straw, which it hopes will ease demand for the tree fiber and recycled paper it already uses. It will help conserve natural resources and address what the Roswell, Georgia-based company expects will be dwindling supplies of recycled paper.

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Forestry

B.C. farmland lost to tree planting for carbon credits is a frightening loss

Opinion by Mark Hume
The Globe and Mail
April 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Thousands of hectares of agricultural land in British Columbia are being planted with trees so that companies can gain credits for carbon sequestration, says NDP agricultural critic Lana Popham. During a tour of the province, the MLA has been hearing about the practice from ranchers and farmers who are worried about the loss of food productivity and who say they are being outbid for good farmland by large, foreign corporations. Given the massive drought in California and the uncertain future of food production everywhere due to climate change, it seems crazy to take valuable farmland out of production to grow trees… There’s room for more trees in the forest land base, but Ms. Popham said companies want flat, open farmland because it is easier and cheaper to replant trees there.

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Clark gov’t under fire for “illegal” grizzly hunt in Tsilhqot’in

April 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Clark government is under fire following remarks from Tsilhqot’in leaders in B.C.’s interior last week that the grizzly hunt licences issued by the province for their neck of the woods are “illegal.” “This is Question Period material,” reacted B.C. NDP MLA Scott Fraser, the Aboriginal Relations critic on Friday. The Official Opposition also responded to a sloo of internal B.C. government memos obtained via the Vancouver Observer that show, among many revelations, a senior wildlife official warning against the hunt in the backcountry of one of the most legally trailblazing tribes in Canada. The Tsilhqot’in are fresh off a Supreme Court land rights victory, and view the grizzly as sacred.

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Amphibians spring into action as temperatures rise

The Herald
April 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Nova Scotia — Every spring during the first few warm, damp nights in March or April — usually about 5 C or warmer, and coupled with precipitation — thousands of amphibians roam from forests to wetlands, sometimes in concentrated bunches or sometimes more scattered across several nights. The most common are yellow-spotted salamanders and wood frogs, although several other species like the blue-spotted salamander can be seen as well… The starting point for salamanders and wood frogs is in upland forest, where they spend most of the year hunkered down under logs, rocks, leaves and mosses, feeding on an assortment of insects. Their destination, which can be up to a few hundred metres away, is in forest pools and wetlands and sometimes even a wet spot in your backyard where they breed.

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Crapo defends vote as just budget measure

Idaho State Journal
April 9, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo says his recent vote on a potential future transfer of public lands from federal to state management is nothing to get excited about. He says the amendment only provides the Senate with the ability to hold future deliberations on land transfers. Lewiston Tribune writer Eric Barker quotes Crapo saying the amendment does not undercut the collaborative processes. “It was a budget amendment with no substance in terms of details and left working out of any details to future legislation that would necessarily, if it comes together, be as a result coming to consensus,” Crapo said.

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Southeast state forest plan out for public comment

KFSK.org
April 10, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The state of Alaska this month is taking public comment on a draft plan for managing the newly created 48-thousand acre Southeast state forest. It’s the third state forest in Alaska and much smaller than the other two state forests in the Tanana Valley and near Haines. The Southeast forest lands were set aside by the state legislature in 2010nd acreage was added the following year. Overall the lands total over 48-thousand acres in 33 units on 12 different islands and the mainland near Petersburg, Wrangell, Ketchikan and Prince of Wales Island. The lands are primarily designated for timber sales.

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City focuses on planting as more trees lost to emerald ash borer

Sun Times
April 12, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Chicago — The arrival of spring marks the start of forestry officials’ yearly battle against the destructive emerald ash borer, an invasive species of beetle that could eventually claim all ash trees. In the years since the beetle was found in Illinois, the city has spent considerable resources treating trees for the infestation — while the county forest preserves and the Chicago Botanic Garden have focused more on tree removal… The department will focus on planting this year to replace some of the 10,000 parkway trees removed each year, Poppe said. Resources dedicated to fighting the beetle will be used to plant 7,800 trees this year.

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After Months of Tussle With Activists, India Suspends Greenpeace

April 13, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Pillai’s story made the international news as a case of state intimidation of green activism, but many other local activists in Mahan, where she works, have been targeted. Mahan is one of the last forests of sal trees in the country, and mining there affects more than 14,000 indigenous people… In Singhrauli district, which is near Mahan, members of the MSS say they are subject to regular raids by the Intelligence Bureau, midnight arrests by local police and constant intimidation. On May 7, 2014, some MSS members, who would only speak on condition of anonymity, tried to stop Essar staff from cutting trees before forest clearances were given. They were arrested at midnight without the required warrants.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Monique Keiran: Climate change threatens Garry oaks

TimesColonist
April 12, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

… How changing climate and its attendant baggage will affect Garry oaks and their attendant plants, microbes, insects and other critters remain unknown. Whether this Garry oak meadow will survive also remains uncertain. Elsewhere in B.C., scientists, policy-makers and forestry professionals delve into similar questions. However, they spend their efforts determining changing climate’s effects on the province’s economically important tree species — lodgepole pine, Sitka spruce, and Douglas fir, for example — not geographically unique, timber-valueless species such as Garry oak. We have, after all, seen how changing climate enabled a burgeoning epidemic of mountain pine beetles to kill mature pine forests across more than 14 million hectares of B.C. and economically devastate many Interior communities.

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Indonesia has a new tool against climate change

Cifor.org
April 12, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

Indonesia—It has one of the world’s largest forest estates …. and one of the highest rates of deforestation and degradation. The government of Indonesia has a serious target: reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 26 percent by 2020, and – if international assistance is forthcoming – by 41 percent during that same period… “We all realize that deforestation, degradation, and forest fires contributed to greenhouse gas emissions. With this INCAS method, we can actually move forward, at least figure out emissions figures and not just all talk,” said Minister Nurbaya at the INCAS seminar. INCAS is designed to bring together best available spatial, biophysical and land management data from across the nation, to quantify changes in carbon stocks and greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture, forestry and other land use sectors in Indonesia.

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General

Timber activist: Damage already done by spotted owl’s listing

Peninsula Daily News
April 10, 2015
Category: Uncategorized

PORT ANGELES — An advocate for the North Olympic Peninsula timber industry isn’t sure what to make of a new study to determine whether the northern spotted owl should be relisted as endangered. “They did so much damage in the beginning, it’s hard to image they could do much more,” said Carol Johnson, executive director of the North Olympic Timber Action Committee. Logging was curtailed when the owl was listed as threatened in 1990, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said a loss of old-growth habitat was the primary threat to the species. Biologists have since determined that the invasive barred owl, a larger and more aggressive cousin of the northern spotted owl, is the main reason the spotted owl was driven from its native forests in Washington, Oregon and Northern California.

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