Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 5, 2015

Business & Politics

Catalyst Paper Re-Launches Coated Paper Line-up

Canada Newswire press release
May 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

RICHMOND, BC – Catalyst is pleased to launch our new coated product line-up. Since purchasing mills in Biron, Wisconsin and Rumford, Maine, Catalyst has leveraged the best of our manufacturing platform to create the most comprehensive web product line in North America. Effective May 4, 2015, Catalyst Paper will become the sole manufacturer of the Orion®, Vision®, Escanaba®, Dependoweb®, Capri® and Consoweb® brands. This suite of well-known coated products, recognized for their excellent quality and pressroom performance, is available for purchase now, with full production capability across all three Catalyst coated mills in Port Alberni, BC; Rumford, ME; and Biron, WI mills in June.

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Conifex Announces First Quarter 2015 Results

Marketwired
May 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA— Conifex Timber Inc. (“Conifex” or the “Company”)  today reported net income of $1.6 million or $0.08 per diluted share the quarter ended March 31, 2015, which was equal to the net income for the first quarter ended March 31, 2014, on sales of $85.3 million and $67.2 million respectively. …Lumber segment operating income was comparable to the previous quarter as declines in shipments of Conifex produced lumber and wholesale lumber were offset by the benefits of improvements in unit mill net realizations and unit cash conversion costs.

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Northern Pulp to shut down to install air pollution equipment

During the shut down, Northern Pulp’s 300 unionized workforce will remain on the job
CBC News
May 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Northern Pulp will shutdown its Pictou County paper mill on May 30 in order to install equipment to meet air pollution reductions demanded by the Nova Scotia government. The shutdown is an admission the company will not meet an end of May air pollution reduction required in its industrial approval. “Its a big job.There’s a lot to do,” says Bruce Chapman, general manager of the mill. The mill is a beehive of activity as crews work to assemble the precipitator which can be described as a large eloctrostatically charged plate that will capture fine particulate emerging from smoke stacks.

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Alaskan timber industry may jeopardize Alaska

Juneau Empire
May 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

For decades, distant markets, high labor costs and market forces combined to make Alaska timber less competitive than timber from Washington and Oregon. Despite this, the Forest Service still prioritizes a financially unsustainable timber industry at the expense of other regional industries. This timber-first approach jeopardizes the real money-makers in Southeast, and it contradicts the Forest Service’s own goal of managing the Tongass for the long-term social, economic, and ecological health of our region.

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Business bright on future of proposed mill site development

ABC News, Australia
May 4, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Tasmanian businesses are hopeful a new industrial development will go ahead on the former Gunns pulp mill site in the state’s north. Several potential buyers had expressed interest in Gunns’ remaining assets including the Tamar Valley pulp mill land and permits by the close of a sale deadline. Gunns receivers KordaMentha said the best offer may come from a buyer with no interest in building the controversial mill. Tasmanian Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s Michael Bailey said its location near the Bell Bay port and a large power source made it an attractive development opportunity.

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RusForest reports decreased sales volume

Pulp and Paper News
May 5, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

RusForest AB, a Swedish forestry company with operations in Russia, announces preliminary Q1 2015 production and sales results for its Magistralny and Ust-Ilimsk units. Anton Bogdanov, CEO of RusForest Management Company, commented, “Harvesting and sawmilling levels in Magistralny during Q1 2015 were consistent with last year while subcontracted harvesting in Ust-Ilimsk increased significantly. We are making progress in consolidating our forestry assets in Ust-Ilimsk in order to simplify and increase the value of any further development or sale. The pellet mill project in Magistralny is still at an early stage, but it is so far progressing according to plan.”

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Henry Yorke Mann: An early proponent of ‘extreme wood’ design

Globe and Mail
May 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Henry Yorke Mann figured among British Columbia’s pioneer organic architects, but of a markedly different strand from his more famous peers such as Fred Hollingsworth. Not content to merely avoid crass commercial work, Mr. Mann embraced what might be called “extreme wood” in his architecture and was an active proponent of a back-to-the-land architectural counterculture. Mr. Mann was was one of the earliest and most ardent proponents of the kind of heavy-timber hand-crafted architecture that would visually symbolize 1960s West Coast bohemianism.

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Beetle Killed Pine Lumber In Decline in the West as Sources Wane

WoodWorking Network
May 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The mountain beetle epidemic, while damaging to pine forests, was offset by a small economic boost, from the rise of a number of new businesses creating wood products and furniture from the blue stained waste lumber, reports Kai Risdall, from the NPR Podcast Marketplace. Now, the epidemic is on the decline in the West, due mainly to the fact that many of the best host trees have already been killed, and the remaining are rotting from the inside. As a result, sources of pine beetle killed wood are becoming scarcer. The above audio podcast from Marketplace discusses the impact this decline in pine beetle killed lumber could have on the timber industry.

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Polymer Makes Safer Furniture

Laboratory Equipment
May 4, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Wood is a popular material in interior design, but its water absorbency limits its use in bathrooms, where natural wood easily becomes discolored or moldy. Fraunhofer scientists and partners have developed a wood-polymer composite material for furniture that is resistant to humidity and has low flammability. Resource-saving wood-polymer composites (WPCs) are the latest trend in materials for garden furniture and other outdoor applications, especially for terrace decking and also for weatherboarding and fencing panels. 

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Forestry

Earthworm invasion: Study forecasts rise of worms in northern boreal forest

Edmonton Journal
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Invasive earthworms are attacking the boreal forest, with new research predicting how quickly one species is spreading in northeastern Alberta. Dendrobaena octaedra, one of six species found in forests in northern Alberta, is projected to expand its territory from three per cent of suitable habitat in the boreal forest to 39 per cent by 2056. …Earthworms are not native to most of Canada, having been wiped out in the last ice age. The worms here now were likely brought by European settlers in soil, with plants and on ships, Cameron said. The intruders are a gardener’s ally, but the same actions worms are admired for — shredding organic matter and tilling the soil — are harmful to the boreal forest.

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B.C. First Nation mulling billion-dollar LNG deal has history of savvy moves

Globe and Mail
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Lax Kw’alaams First Nation is now deciding on a billion-dollar LNG deal announced last week, but the aboriginal community on B.C.’s North Coast has already benefited from years of progressive economic development that has flown under the radar, experts say. Art Sterritt, executive director for Coastal First Nations, said the Lax Kw’alaams’s “straight-up business deal” to buy the logging rights to an area outside of nearby Terrace in 2005 eventually gave it the capital to diversify its economic portfolio, which now includes a handful of other businesses such as a helicopter charter company and a ferry corporation. The band-owned Coast Tsimshian Resources bought the 518,000-hectare tree farm licence with a $9.8-million loan. When the recession started hurting Canadian lumber exports to the United States, band leadership targeted the East Asian market for its raw logs.

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B.C. coastal community calls for end to logging in city

Globe and Mail
May 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Powell River was founded by the timber industry, but the small Sunshine Coast community about 145 kilometres northwest of Vancouver is in an uproar now that loggers are cutting trees right in the heart of the city. Since loggers started clearing roads through the urban forest a few weeks ago, there have been packed public meetings and threats of an injunction by an environmental group. More than 1,000 people have signed an online petition calling for an end to the logging of what is known as Lot 450. Island Timberlands, which holds timber rights to several hundred hectares of forest land owned by the community, has announced plans to cut the area over the next several months.

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Ranchers take beefs to RDEK

Cranbrook Daily Townsman
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Invasive weeds and mud bogging out at Lake Koocanusa were two topics brought up by local ranchers who recently met with Kootenay East MLA Bill Bennett. …While the KLA is supportive of the government’s efforts to reduce ‘red tape’, Reay is concerned that large forestry companies are avoiding responsibility for spreading noxious weeds as they are no longer required to inventory weeds before a logging plan is approved. “Logging is an important industry in our province and it is also very important in opening up areas of overgrowth so that grass can grow,” Reay wrote. “We want the logging companies to be successful but we must make sure they do their part in containing and reducing noxious weeds.”

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Firefighters, water bombers control Stanley blaze as it approaches properties

TB Newswatch
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

THUNDER BAY – A major brush fire near Stanley that was threatening an area cemetery and a number of properties has been knocked down. Nearly 40 firefighters from Oliver Paipoonge, Conmee and the Ministry of Natural Resources, along with two water bombers, spent more than two hours Monday evening working to control the blaze that broke out in the wooded area off Highway 11/17 near Pebblestone Road. Oliver Paipoonge fire chief Mike Horan said the blaze came within 200 feet of the Stanley Hill Cemetery and within 150 metres of some of the nearby homes.

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13 new forest fires in past four days

Bay Today
May 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Since Thursday, 13 new fires have been confirmed in the region says the MNR. Of these, four fires are still burning under control. Three are in the Sault Ste. Marie region, and one is in the Sudbury region. The Northeast Fire Region has confirmed and suppressed 22 fires totaling 71 hectares. The forest fire hazard is high around Algonquin Park, but the remainder of the region is experiencing a low hazard.

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Grazing, timber groups lose national forest rule challenge

The Capital Press
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

A lawsuit filed by grazing and timber interests that challenged national forest regulations was dismissed for lack of legal standing. Grazing and timber groups have lost their challenge against high-level federal regulations that govern activities across all national forests. In 2012, the U.S. Forest Service established a new “planning rule” that lays out national forest management principles, replacing a previous policy established 30 years earlier. The planning rule is used to develop management plans for individual forests, which in turn determine allowable grazing and logging levels.

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BLM, O & C, And Forest Plans

Jefferson Public Radio
May 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Some of the fiercest arguments over proper federal forest management in Oregon focus on the “O & C lands,” forests once granted to the Oregon & California Railroad to finance construction. Back in federal hands, they are supposed to give half their timber revenue over to the counties containing them. But with little timber being cut, county budgets have suffered. BLM is out with a draft of its management plan for Western Oregon forests, and will take comments into July. In this hour, we visit first with EarthFix reporter Jes Burns to get perspective on the lands and plans.

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Stopping fire in its tracks

Thinning efforts expand on private, city and federal lands in Ashland watershed
The Mail Tribune
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ASHLAND — Anne Coyle will never forget that September day in 2009 when a 200-foot wall of flames blocked her view of Ashland from her house in the forest high above town. The Siskiyou fire came charging up the hillside toward her 20-acre homesite, dancing menacingly among the treetops and ready to devour everything in its path “By the time it got to my land, it was in the canopy,” Coyle says. “It got up here so fast it was scary. But just like that, the fire dropped from the treetops to the forest floor, robbed of the small trees, brush and low-lying limbs it needed for energy, thanks to forest thinning done on her property two years earlier. Flames ran out of gas at the corner of Coyle’s vegetable garden 12 feet from her home.

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Lawsuit Launched to Speed Recovery of Oregon Coast Coho Salmon

Center for Biologoical Diversity
May 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore.— The Center for Biological Diversity and Oregon Wild today filed a formal notice of intent to sue the National Marine Fisheries Service over its failure to develop a recovery plan for Oregon coast coho salmon. Despite the fact that the fish has been protected under the Endangered Species Act for nearly seven years, the agency has failed to develop a recovery plan to guide much-needed improvements in logging and other land-management practices identified as a major factor in the decline of wild coho. The groups are represented by Chris Winter with the Crag Law Center and Paul Kampmeier of the Washington Forest Law Center.

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15-year-old legal fight over forest road resumes in Reno

Associated Press
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

RENO, Nev. — One of Elko County’s expert witnesses in a 15-year-old legal battle over control of a road in remote wilderness acknowledged Monday that he has never found a map or other historical document that shows a road or trail existed before the area was designated part of a national forest in 1909. Land surveyor William Price testified as the second week of an evidentiary hearing resumed in U.S. District Court in Reno. The case pits the county against environmentalists suing to re-establish federal authority over the road in their ongoing effort to protect the threatened bull trout in the Jarbidge River near the Idaho border.

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Big change for forests, animals east of Snoqualmie

Crosscut
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

… This isn’t old growth. No massive trunks, no cathedral groves meet the eye. The land in this part of the Cascades has been logged and logged again. Much of it lies in areas of relatively little rain. The trees will take generations to grow big. Aesthetically, it is far preferable to housing developments or widely scattered mcmansions, but beyond that, it has a long, long way to go. The people who will see cathedral forests on the land are not people alive today. When The Nature Conservancy bought this land as part of a scattered 75 square miles east of Snoqualmie Pass, it was making an investment for the long term. “I think [the purchase is] an historic thing,” says Mike Stevens, The Nature Conservancy’s regional director, “and it represents the culmination of 20 years of work, conducted by a lot of different parties.”

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Massive tree-thinning project in northern Arizona is largest of its kind in US Forest Service

Associated Press
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. – Northern Arizona forests are being reshaped as part of a complex wildfire-prevention effort. Some areas are being thinned mechanically while others are blackened intentionally by fire as part of the 2.4 million-acre Four Forest Restoration Initiative. The project made a major leap forward recently when nearly 600,000 acres were cleared for restoration. The project is the largest of its kind within the U.S. Forest Service. It aims not only to lessen the chance of catastrophic wildfires but return the forest to conditions ideal for wildlife, streams and cultural resources. 

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Feds expand efforts to fight wildfires by reshaping forests

Associated Press
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — The towering ponderosa pine trees are cut down and bundled in quick succession as heavy equipment winds its way through a national forest as part of the largest federal effort to reshape the forests to prevent wildfires. The felled trees then are shredded of their limbs and eventually will be taken from the forest in northern Arizona to Phoenix, where they’ll be turned into pallets. Other areas of the Coconino National Forest are blackened intentionally by fire, giving native plants a boost and any wildfire less of a chance to explode into something catastrophic.

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Spring burns around Missoula a taste of potentially tough wildfire season

The Missoulian
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

With a few weeks of spring moisture left, Missoula Ranger District firefighters are busy lighting as many fires as they can before they have to start putting them out. They’re hoping the smoke seen billowing from a Blue Mountain Recreation Area drainage Monday won’t be a constant presence in what fire forecasters warn could be a tough summer for western Montana. “The fuel moistures we’ve been testing have been coming in a little on the low end,” district Fire Management Officer Jesse Kurpius said. “But now that we’re starting to hit green-up, we have to work a little harder. If it wasn’t for this pine litter, this place wouldn’t burn at all.”

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Bullock vetoes federal land task force bill

Helena Independent Record
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Gov. Steve Bullock on Monday vetoed a bill intended to create a task force that would have studied federal land management in Montana, citing among his concerns that the study would focus on selling or transferring federal lands. “A careful reading of the bill … reveals that the transfer of public lands is still very much in the sights of the task force,” Bullock’s veto letter says. “My position on this issue is crystal clear: I do not support any effort that jeopardizes or calls into question the future of our public lands heritage.”

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Editorial: First up for Forest Service: Showing sincerity

Albany Democrat-Herald
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Forest Service has started its “listening sessions” throughout the region on the update to the Northwest Forest Plan: The Willamette National Forest held one of these sessions Monday night in Pleasant Hill, south of Eugene, and has another session scheduled for Wednesday night in Stayton. These follow on the heels of a similar session held last week in Corvallis, the home base for the Siuslaw National Forest. In fact, the Forest Service plans to hold these meetings in every national forest that has been affected by the National Forest Plan, which is to say, pretty much every national forest in the Northwest.

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Aerial arsenal key to saving towns

Calaveras Enterprise
May 5, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Air tankers and helicopters are a key part of the arsenal that the U.S. Forest Service can deploy if wildfires this summer threaten towns in the region. In fact, forest personnel have had recent experience in using aircraft to defend towns, including during last year’s Boles Fire. One of them was Dave Phillips, who normally works at the Bald Mountain Helibase in the Stanislaus National Forest. Last year, he supervised slurry drops that enabled about 200 trapped residents to safely flee the burning village of Weed. “We had lost 157 homes,” Phillips said. “That’s when we got the order for the slurry drop.” The drops came as stunned residents fled the approaching flames with what few belongings they could gather quickly.

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Forest service to improve wildlife habitat

The Independent Online
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

PEDRO The Wayne National Forest is launching a long-term management project in the Ironton Ranger District it says will create diverse wildlife habitats while supporting local economies. The proposed action includes timber harvest treatments to regenerate forests, create grassy and shrubby openings within forests, or thin forests; and non-harvest treatments to foster conditions favorable for oaks, hickories and native pines. Prescribed fire, herbicides and road construction would be included. The project would be implemented over 10 to 20 years.

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Low pay for forestry contractors questioned

The owner of a M?ori forestry company says some contractors are not receiving proper rates of pay and contracts.
Radio New Zealand
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Many t?ngata whenua work as contractors and the general manager of Kajavala Forestry said the low pay rates were causing many of them to leave the industry. Forestry workers had been hit hard recently, with the redundancy of 200 workers at one of the country’s largest forest contractors, Harvestpro, and a log transport business, Waimea Contract Carriers, being placed in voluntary administration last month. The situation has been exacerbated by what the Forest Industry Contractors Association said was a continuing log jam in the Chinese market, leading to a sharp decline in the number of logs being harvested in New Zealand. Jacob Kajavala of T?hoe and Ng?ti Kahungunu said the introduction of more rigourous safety measures had led to increased mechanisation. 

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UN deputy chief calls for ‘meaningful decision’ on strengthened international arrangement on forests

UN News Centre
May 4, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Opening the eleventh session of the United Nations Forum on Forests today, the Deputy Secretary-General, Jan Eliasson, today called on delegates to work on agreeing a strengthened International Arrangement on Forests, which balanced ambition and practicality. “A meaningful decision on strengthening the International Arrangement on Forests will put us on a path towards a greener economy and a more equitable and sustainable future for all,” said Mr. Eliasson said in remarks to the Forum, which is holding its current session in New York through 15 May. “Realizing the full potential of the future arrangement will require all of us to play a role. We must all work to mobilize tangible and coordinated support, across sectors, and at all levels.”

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Capturing the Full and Unrealized Value of Biofuels — Market Mechanisms are Needed

Forbes
May 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

During the past decade, production of biofuels has gained momentum largely due to policies and mandates aimed at addressing energy security and climate change. A number of concerns, however, remain the subject of an on-going debate. These include: (1) the effectiveness of first generation biofuels (such as corn ethanol) in addressing climate change, (2) the effect of delays in the announcement of annual biofuel mandates, and (3) whether biofuels continue to provide an attractive option for energy security. A key point here is that the value of certain biofuels goes beyond their use as transportation fuels… For example, many biofuel facilities often burn the remains of the biomass to co-produce electricity… Today, even more resistant parts of the biomass, such as lignin, can be converted to chemicals essential to various segments of industry, reducing the consumption of petroleum-based products.

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Study Finds Symbiotic Relationship Between Voluntary, Compliance Markets

Ecosystem Marketplace
May 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

When the US state of California developed its high-profile cap-and-trade program, it drew on (and supported) voluntary markets across North America. Many thought that when the state’s compliance market kicked in, the voluntary markets would quietly fade away. Instead, an Ecosystem Marketplace analysis of 2014 offset transactions across North America shows there is more than enough room for both – with voluntary volume even higher than compliance volume… On the voluntary side, projects with attractive co-benefits or local community benefits often garnered a higher premium compared to their less marketable counterparts. Forest carbon offsets in the voluntary market in North America, for example, garnered an average price of $8.7/tCO2e although only about 585,000 forestry offsets were transacted for a 6.6% market share.

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What the heck is a carbon right?

CIFOR Blog
May 4, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

It’s tough to wrap your head around the concept of owning something like carbon, or having “carbon rights.” Unlike resources such as water, it’s not clear what direct value carbon has. You can’t drink it or eat it. You wouldn’t sell it directly on a market as a physical commodity. Instead, carbon sequestered from the atmosphere by plants and stored in biomass has value because it provides humanity with at least one key service: mitigation of damaging climate change. In other words, humanity should be willing to pay for the service of climate change mitigation provided by carbon stored in trees and other biomass. If the international community decides that it is indeed willing to pay for this service – through carbon taxes, mandatory cap-and-trade carbon markets, or some other mechanism – to whom would that money be owed and under what circumstances?

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