Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 26, 2015

Business & Politics

Canadian forest product companies hit again by U.S. anti-dumping duties –

Fraser Institute
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Last week, the U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) issued its decision to impose countervailing duties on Canadian exports of supercalendered paper, which is mainly used for magazines, catalogues, corporate brochures and advertising inserts. The contentious issue in the resulting USITC investigation is usually what actions constitute a direct or indirect subsidy, and foreign companies can expect the USITC to cast a wide net in its search for government subsidies. For example, in the case of Port Hawkesbury Paper, the USITC argues that the company did not pay Nova Scotia Power the full applicable fixed-costs incurred by the utility to provide electricity, although Port Hawkesbury paid somewhat more than the incremental costs associated with its electricity usage.

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Worker killed at Hinton area job site

Edmonton Journal
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A 23-year-old worker is dead after he became entangled in a piece of equipment while installing a handrail on a tower near Hinton on Monday evening. The man was employed by Winfield Industrial Sales and Services Ltd. and was working at a site called West Fraser Mills. The incident occurred at 5 p.m. Occupational Health and Safety was investigating Wednesday and a stop work order was in effect at the facility.

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City of Fort St. John including Canfor mill in boundary expansion

Alaska Highway News
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The city is moving ahead with Canfor mill’s request to be included within the municipal boundaries. Council agreed to amend the city’s proposed boundary extension area to include the industrial facility just outside of Fort St. John’s eastern borders at its Monday meeting. City spokeswoman Julie Rogers said the process is a long one, and that the decision is only a preliminary step. “We’ve asked people if they want to have a conversation about being included, so Canfor has expressed interest about being included, and so now we will begin the process,” she said. …Canfor, currently in the Peace River Regional District, responded favourably. Having Canfor within city boundaries will likely affect the Peace River Agreement (Fair Share) funds the city receives from the provinces, Rogers said.

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‘Have a safe day’: Father recalls last words to son before he died at Alberta mill

Global News
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – A worker was installing a handrail on a tower at the West Fraser Pulp and Paper Mills in Hinton when he became tangled in a piece of equipment and died. Occupational Health and Safety said the fatality happened on Nov. 23 at around 5 p.m. It said the worker was an employee of Winfield Industrial Sales and Service Ltd. There is a stop work order where the death happened but the mill is still operational. Family has identified the worker as 23-year-old Dean Smith. Young worker killed by snapped lifting shackle at Alberta jobsite “My son was 23, he’s a bright, fun-loving, hard working, loved his family, lots of friends. It’s all gone,” said Dean’s dad Kelly, his voice breaking.

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EDC: Quebec exports expected to surge this year and next

Canadian Press in Canadian Business
November 26, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – A new forecast by the Canadian government’s lending agency says Quebec’s highly diversified economy is on track for a 10 per cent increase in exports this year and eight per cent growth in 2016. Export Development Canada says the continued growth is being led by strong international demand for aircraft and parts, which accounts for nearly 14 per cent of the total value of Quebec exports. …The EDC also says strong U.S. housing starts are creating demand for lumber and this is helping to drive six per cent growth in exports by Quebec’s forestry sector in 2015 and four per cent growth in 2016. The increase in lumber exports also helps to offset a decline in newsprint and pulp exports caused by non-tariff trade barriers in several countries and the closure of several Quebec mills.

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Resolute Forest Products says it won’t seek new FSC certifications

by Ross Marowits
Canadian Press in Canadian Business
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – Resolute Forest Products is threatening not to seek new Forest Stewardship Council certifications for its Canadian forests over fears that possible changes to the designation process could constrain its supply of wood. Chief among the Montreal-based company’s concerns is a proposal by Greenpeace that would see “the vast majority” of intact forests — those that have been undisturbed by roads or settlements — protected. “Until significant progress is made in addressing these matters, Resolute will work to maintain its existing FSC forest management certificates where possible, but will not pursue new certification,” the company said Wednesday as it announced the reinstatement of an FSC certificate for the Black Spruce/Dog River-Matawin forest covering 2.4 million hectares in northwestern Ontario.

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Economic impact could be huge as paper mill closes its doors

Report by employment department estimates $223 million negative impact to economy
Portland Tribune
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Friday was the final workday for a majority of workers at the Newberg WestRock paper mill, which has now entered into its “idled” state for an indefinite period of time. In the morning and throughout the day supporters from the community gathered outside the facility to show support and say goodbye as workers came and went on their last day of employment. “We sent them off and it was just really strange not hearing that mill going,” said Sharon Moore, organizer of the Friends of Newberg Mill (FNM) group. “It was quiet and eerie.” The FNM group has been involved in helping the workers as the mill shuts down, organizing almost immediately after the closure was announced, attending union meetings and planning Christmas events for children and families affected by the shutdown.

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Domtar recognized by AF&PA for sustainability

Canadian papermaker honored for landfill diversion program in North Carolina.
Recycling Today
November 25, 2015
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) , Washington, has recognized Montreal-based papermaker Domtar with two 2015 AF&PA Sustainability Awards. It marks the third consecutive year AF&PA has honored Domtar for its sustainability efforts. The awards were presented at AF&PA’s annual meeting on Friday, Nov. 13 in San Antonio, Texas. Domtar received an Innovation in Sustainability Award for its Plymouth K-Lime Project in North Carolina and the Leadership in Sustainability Award for Sustainable Forest Management for its Marlboro Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Partnership project in South Carolina. AF&PA’s annual sustainability awards are designed to recognize exemplary sustainability programs and initiatives in the paper and wood products manufacturing industry and are given in multiple categories.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The old is new again with Nail Laminated Timber

by Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
November 25, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

We get so excited about Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT), the fancy plywood on steroids that we talk so much about on TreeHugger. But in fact, there is a much older technology for building with wood, that warehouses and factories were built out of 150 years ago with a fancy new name: Nail-Laminated Timber, or NLT. It used to be known as heavy timber or mill decking and is drop-dead simple: you just nail a pile of lumber together and voila. Lucas Epp of Structurecraft stunned the audience in a presentation at the Wood Solutions Fair in Toronto, showing extraordinary projects built out of the stuff. Because while CLT is great stuff, it’s pretty new in North America, it’s expensive, and it’s not fully understood by the building inspectors. Whereas if you are doing a simple span, NLT does the job just fine, It’s a lot cheaper, can be made by anyone with a hammer and has been in the building codes forever.

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Will New York embrace the wooden tower movement?

The Real Deal Magazine
November 25, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

In some ways, a wooden condominium tower planned for Chelsea has roots in an 18th-century barn. Chris Sharples, a principal at SHoP Architects, remembers the barn as one of his first encounters with architecture, at his childhood home in Pennsylvania’s Chester County. He recalls marveling at its beautiful, exposed wooden beams, and it’s this intimate quality of bringing the “tectonic outside” inside that he hopes to replicate at 475 West 18th Street. “It’s just amazing that we could actually think about building mid-rise, high-rise buildings out of this very traditional material,” he said. “We’ve come full circle.” The Chelsea project is the first of its kind in New York City, but across the world, a growing number of developers and architects are trading steel’s luster for logs.

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Alex de Rijke creates inspirational timber architecture

Domain.com.au
November 26, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Building material cross laminated timber (known as CLT) possesses a warmth and tactility that lends itself to institutional and domestic environments. That quality has been explored with stunning results by British architect Alex de Rijke, founder of dRMM in London, a long-time timber advocate. In a series of talks in Australia, sponsored by Wood Solutions, Rijke has advocated that new engineered timbers, such as CLT, can replace concrete in large-scale buildings and also help save the environment; so long as demand doesn’t outstrip timber plantation supplies. Rijke introduced CLT to Lendlease? leading up to the London Olympics and, in doing so, he says, played a part in changing Australia’s construction history. Melbourne is now home to Forte, Australia’s tallest engineered timber apartment block, and Library at the Dock.

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New Swiss laminate floors replacing natural timber in homes at a lower cost with all the same health benefits

Architecture and Design
November 25, 2015
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…Natural timber, for instance, is not only a popular home building material in Australia but is also proven to contribute to the wellbeing of residents. A research report by Planet Ark, ‘Wood: Housing, Health, Humanity’ compiled findings from different studies conducted around the world on the psychological and physiological effects of timber on humans. …Swiss company Kronoswiss has invested in the latest production technology to engineer a new generation of laminate floors that replicate natural timber species in almost every possible way including grain, texture and tone.

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Forestry

Report From the Hill (Parliament Hill, that is … not the ski hill!)

The Castlegar Source
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…Last week I was given the roles of Critic for Post-Secondary Education and Deputy Critic for Natural Resources. …And natural resources—forestry and mining—are also critical to the economy of South Okanagan-West Kootenay, from the smelter in Trail, the pulp mill in Castlegar, to forestry operations and mines throughout the riding. Issues are similar across Canada, and I look forward to working with industry leaders and land managers to find the policies that bring the greatest benefits to Canadians in developing these resources while protecting the natural environment.

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Halifax naturalist unhappy after Long Lake parkland chopped down

Martin Willison is calling for better oversight and regulations after more than 8 hectares cut down
CBC News
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A Halifax naturalist says he was “horrified” to discover at least eight hectares of protected park were levelled within the last week. Martin Willison, a retired biology and environmental studies professor from Dalhousie University, believes a wood harvesting machine was used. The area is just behind a strip of trees along Old Sambro Road, which runs right through the 2,095-hectare Long Lake Provincial Park. “If I were to pick a flower here, technically speaking, I would be breaking the law. Yet somebody’s come in and they’ve destroyed many acres of natural forest,” said Willison. He says the levelled area was dense with softwood and hardwood, primarily black spruce. He expects it will take about 10 to 20 years for the trees to grow back.

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Dozens of acres of forest ‘bashed’ down in Long Lake Provincial Park

The Chronicle Herald
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A well-known naturalist and former university professor says he’s “horrified” that more than a dozen hectares of land within Long Lake Provincial Park have mysteriously and suddenly been cleared of trees. Martin Willison estimates that 16 to 20 hectares were cut within the last few days along the eastern edge of the park. Fresh stumps and fallen trees, scrub and foliage are left where second-growth forest existed just days ago. Willison said he doesn’t know who is responsible for the damage. “The purpose of this is absolutely unclear,” said Willison, a former professor of biology and environmental studies at Dalhousie University who lives near the park.

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A case for thinning forests of the Northern Rockies

Letter by Chris A. Linkenhoker
Ravalli Republic
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Silviculture is a specialized field of forestry that is concerned with the long-term health and productivity of a stand of trees, or many stands of trees. While a forester’s job often ends with the completion of a timber sale, the silviculturist is a practicing forest/plant and fire ecologist who uses state-of-the-art science to manage stands of trees into the future. …Thinning an overstocked stand of trees is one of the most important and cost-effective practices a silviculturist can prescribe, especially in cold and dry environments, with short growing seasons, such as we have here in the Northern Rockies. The primary purpose is to give the remaining trees adequate room and resources to grow, in a healthy manner, until the next scheduled treatment, which may be another thinning, 20 years hence.

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Rocky start for 4FRI contractor needs smoothing out

Arizona Daily Sun
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

And with Congress disinclined to increase Forest Service budgets, the only end in sight is when there are no more forests left to burn. But in the four national forests of northern Arizona, a different scenario is being played out, at least on paper. The Four Forest Restoration Initiative has enlisted the private sector to pay for the thinning and controlled burns in exchange for a guaranteed, long-term supply of marketable wood. We say “on paper” because, as we have reported, 4FRI has had more than a few growing pains. The first major contract was for 300,000 acres over 10 years. That comes out to 30,000 acres a year, but after more than a year, the main contractor, Good Earth Power-AZ , has thinned just 5,000 acres.

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Honor the Maine woods tradition

Opposition to national park is rooted in fear of change, not acceptance of current reality of a dying paper industry.
Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
November 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

t’s striking that three-quarters of the Maine congressional delegation chose Thanksgiving week to again express displeasure at the prospect of federally protected land in northern Maine. Up to now, the argument has been chiefly about a Maine Woods National Park, proposed by landowner and potential donor Roxanne Quimby, now represented by her son, Lucas St. Clair. …The remaining argument against federal ownership is that restricting timber harvesting within a 150,000-acre area would somehow damage the Maine economy. Twenty years ago, when Restore: The North Woods was touting a 3.2-million acre park, that point had some credibility, but the area now proposed amounts to less than 2 percent of the North Woods.  And, as the former paper mill towns have a hard time acknowledging, the paper industry, which requires intensive, short-rotation management, is dangerously near collapse.

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Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, a bygone tradition

The Newark Advocate
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

…Today, we no longer see the giants that filled our forests. Between 1920 and 1940, an Asian blight wiped out nearly all of the American chestnuts, and scientists have worked ever since to restore them. …Scientists are studying three ways to rescue the trees from extinction: crossing them with a Chinese variety, attacking the blight with a virus that eliminates it or genetically modifying the trees. Some progress has been made with all three methods. …Whatever force is at work, people who are fond of chestnuts are hoping the scientific studies will offer some hope for new growth in the chestnut forest. Some also have suggested that chestnut starts could be grafted onto another nut start in much the same manner apples are grafted.

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Maine agriculture department asks public to report moth sightings

Bangor Daily News
November 25, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

AUGUSTA, Maine — The state’s Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry is asking the public to keep its eyes open for winter moths and report sightings. Winter moth defoliation was first recorded in the state in 2012, according to a statement released Wednesday. According to an aerial survey, heavy defoliation was occurring in Cumberland County, while light to heavy defoliation was seen in scattered locations from Kittery to Rockland. Commissioner Walt Whitcomb stressed that filling out a simple online survey set by the department to report winter moth sightings is very important.

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Hot, windy as firefighters battle Marlborough forest fire gallery video

Stuff.co.nz
November 26, 2015
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Waikakaho Valley residents are being urged to evacuate their homes as a huge forest fire continues to rage near Blenheim. More than 100 firefighters and helicopter crew were involved in a “holding operation” to contain the flames on Thursday. Three extra helicopters were also brought in, along with 21 rural firefighters from the Marlborough Sounds. They joined the 60 firefighters who had replaced crews working through Wednesday night. Nine helicopters, with monsoon buckets, were fighting the fire – the maximum number that is safe for the airspace they were working in, said Marlborough Kaikoura Rural Fire Authority principal fire officer Richard McNamara.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Scotia Atlantic Biomass survives fibre shortage

33,000 tonnes of wood pellets to be shipped from Halifax this week
CBC News
November 26, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

After a wood pellet shortage last winter, Scotia Atlantic Biomass Inc. is making a comeback this week by shipping 33,000 tonnes of Nova Scotia-made wood pellets to a U.K. power plant where it’s destined to be used to generate electricity. Julie Millington, general manager, left the Scotia Atlantic Biomass plant in Upper Musquodoboit to oversee the large load out. This quarter, the plant turned its first profit since parent company Virdis Energy bought it in a receivership three years ago. “This is a big milestone,” said Millington. “We’ve been trying to figure out what are the right things we need to do from a staffing, cost, fibre, operating and staffing perspective.”

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Commercial use of wood energy picks up steam

November 26, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

New Hampshire’s forests connect us to nature, provide a home for wildlife, bring tourists across our borders and provide a wide variety of forest products to meet our everyday needs. Increasingly, they are also a source of cost-effective and environmentally responsible electricity and heat. … But as more local governments and commercial building owners discover that wood energy offers significant savings over oil, the use of wood-based heat and hot water systems is on the rise. Across the state, schools, hospitals, libraries, county complexes and other municipal and commercial buildings have converted to wood-based heat and hot water systems, saving millions of dollars each year.

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NZ forest-owners say ETS review can reboot carbon forestry

Carbon Pulse
November 26, 2015
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

The government signals provided in New Zealand’s ETS review can kickstart carbon forestry and help reverse the trend of declining greenhouse gases stored in NZ forests, the Forest Owners Association said on Thursday. The Ministry for the Environment on Tuesday released the long-awaited ETS review discussion paper, making it clear the scheme needs to be amended in order to driver bigger emission cuts . “The discussion document is refreshing in its candour. It clearly states that New Zealand needs to reduce its carbon emissions and for this to happen, policy settings need to change,” David Rhodes, chief executive of the Forest Owners Association said. The association has previously been highly critical of the ETS, and in February warned the weak scheme rules risked causing emissions to balloon later in the decade as the low NZU price failed to encourage more planting of trees.

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General

Commercial use of wood energy picks up steam

November 26, 2015
Category: Uncategorised

New Hampshire’s forests connect us to nature, provide a home for wildlife, bring tourists across our borders and provide a wide variety of forest products to meet our everyday needs. Increasingly, they are also a source of cost-effective and environmentally responsible electricity and heat. … But as more local governments and commercial building owners discover that wood energy offers significant savings over oil, the use of wood-based heat and hot water systems is on the rise. Across the state, schools, hospitals, libraries, county complexes and other municipal and commercial buildings have converted to wood-based heat and hot water systems, saving millions of dollars each year.

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