Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 27, 2016

Business & Politics

EXCLUSIVE: Multiple safety infractions found at lumber yard prior to death of 2 workers

Global News
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Damning reports indicate WorkSafeBC found multiple infractions at a New Westminster lumber yard where two workers were killed last weekend. The accident, which occurred at United Gateway Logistics on January 23, involved lumber falling from a forklift. The two victims were 60 and 65 years old. After the accident, investigators issued a stop work order in which they noted “several piles of lumber that were not plumb, level or maintained in stable condition.” United Gateway Logistics has a long history of violations. WorkSafeBC inspectors prepared at least 18 reports on the company over the past two years.

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WorkSafeBC investigation into lumber yard deaths could take months

New Westminister Record
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

It could be weeks, if not months, before investigators and the public know exactly what happened at a New Westminster lumber yard where two people were killed in a workplace incident. Two men, reported be to in their 60s, were killed after being crushed by a load of lumber at the United Gateway Logistics Inc. yard, located at 201 Duncan St., but few other details are known. “What we’re trying to find out is what happened, how it happened, why it happened so that such a thing can be prevented from happening again in the future,” WorkSafeBC spokesman Scott McCloy told the Record on Tuesday. “This is obviously a deep concern to us and all workers in British Columbia. When two workers die this way, I think it’s pretty clear this is unacceptable and everybody would agree with that.”

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Countering the fear factor that has crept into forestry outlook

By Peter Woodbridge
Business in Vancouver
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

In light of the global stock market turmoil, the deep dive of the Canadian dollar and the ongoing commodities sell-off, what is the outlook for B.C.’s forest sector? On fundamentals, softwood lumber prices – in U.S. dollars – should not be as low as they are today. B.C.’s northern kraft pulp prices are weak because substantial new capacity, notably Southern Hemisphere short-fibred pulps, is coming on stream; oriented strand board is early in its recovery phase. Overall, this is not a recipe for disaster. Yet today’s steep price discounts for forest products stocks suggest other factors are at work. …What’s worrying investors is concern about the “lumber supercycle” – the prospect of which, not long ago, helped drive stock prices to bull-market highs. The China market has lost some of its former lustre.
For the past decade, it has been the darling of the global forest industry.

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Dollar looms as stumbling block in Canada-U.S. softwood negotiations

By Gordon Hamilton
Business in Vancouver
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Canadian dollar’s nosedive has disrupted North American lumber markets to the point that Canada is expected to face currency-induced pressure to make concessions in the next softwood lumber agreement with the United States.  …“I think the Canadian industry recognizes that this won’t be a straight rollover or renewal of the existing agreement in its current form,” Thomson said in an interview after the meeting. “…The most recent Statistics Canada data shows that as of November 30,
B.C. lumber shipments to the U.S. have increased by 7% year-over-year. …A 7% increase in exports is modest and in line with the gradual
recovery of the U.S. housing market, said David Elstone, executive
director of the Truck Loggers Association.

He said B.C. has diversified its markets and is continuing to ship large volumes to China despite a weaker market there.

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Ex-mayor pressing for details on Abitibi deal

Timmins Press
January 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

IROQUOIS FALLS – A former mayor of Iroquois Falls is raising questions about the new Abitibi Banks development project, much to the exasperation of the current mayor who said he is hunting for faults in an unambiguously good news story for the town. …At the public meeting held in Iroquois Falls last week, Mayor Michael Shea said the purchase agreement would be made public. Now the town’s former mayor, James A. Brown wants to know when that will be. “In my opinion too many unanswered questions,” wrote Brown in a letter to Mayor Shea. “Our community’s future was determined behind closed doors and without note. Much of this is public property without any public knowledge, opinion or input. I thought we lived in a democratic country,”

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Boomers to hand over region’s economy to Millennials, some researchers says there’s reason to be nervous

January 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Baby boomers are reaching the end of their careers but a missing Generation X won’t fill their shoes in Northwestern Ontario’s economy. The stability of the region’s traditional workforce will be left in the hands of Millennials and that worries some who study labour markets west of Thunder Bay. …Job-readiness among youth isn’t the only generational factor shaping job markets in the Northwest. A decade of forestry recession has left a wide age gap in its industrial workforce.  According to its 2015 report, NTAB claims at least half of those working in traditional resource extractive industries in the Kenora and Rainy River Districts are older than 50. …Wainio said forestry recoveries in Ignace, Kenora and Atikokan might be putting the brakes on year-over-year increases in Employment Services use by those between the ages of 25 and 44.

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Boomers to hand over region’s economy to Millennials, some researchers says there’s reason to be nervous

January 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Baby boomers are reaching the end of their careers but a missing Generation X won’t fill their shoes in Northwestern Ontario’s economy. The stability of the region’s traditional workforce will be left in the hands of Millennials and that worries some who study labour markets west of Thunder Bay. …Job-readiness among youth isn’t the only generational factor shaping job markets in the Northwest. A decade of forestry recession has left a wide age gap in its industrial workforce.  According to its 2015 report, NTAB claims at least half of those working in traditional resource extractive industries in the Kenora and Rainy River Districts are older than 50. …Wainio said forestry recoveries in Ignace, Kenora and Atikokan might be putting the brakes on year-over-year increases in Employment Services use by those between the ages of 25 and 44.

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Swanson Group rebuilding plywood and veneer mill at site of 2014 Oregon fire

Woodworking Network
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. – A 200-employee plywood and veneer panel mill begins production in April 2016 as the Swanson Group invests $55 million in a Springfield, Oregon plant. A former plywood mill plant located there was nearly destroyed by fire in 2014. In March 2015, Swanson Group purchased the assets of Olympic Panel Products, and in 2016 it will move production of Olympic-branded products to this new facility in Springfield. The new state-of-the-art mill will be the largest, most advanced manufacturer of specialty overlay plywood in North America, the company says. “We like the existing site because of its proximity to ready labor, to the type and quality of logs we need, and a pulp mill to take wood waste,” says Chuck Wert, COO of the Swanson Group. 

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Sawmill to close, 123 jobs cut

Eureka Times-Standard
January 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

In a move that will eliminate 123 local jobs, Sierra Pacific Industries announced on Monday that it will soon close its sawmill on State Route 255 between Arcata and Manila. … The mill will stop running by March 25 but will have all leftover timber shipped out by April 22.  Workers able to move to other cities with SPI mills may be able to get another sawmill job, SPI spokesperson Mark Pawlicki said. “We have three other mills in Washington state. We have 10 other mills in California,” Pawlicki said. SPI is currently building a new mill in Shelton, Washington, and there are job openings in a mill near Quincy. “We’ll be able to place a lot of them but we don’t know how many,” Pawlicki said about the soon-to-be unemployed mill workers.

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Henry Ford’s Alberta featured showpiece mill, selective cutting

Marquette Mining Journal
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

ALBERTA – When the Forest Stewards Guild recently designated several square miles of Michigan Tech University’s working land as a Model Forest, it wasn’t the first time some of that land had been presented as an example. When Henry Ford started logging in the vicinity and built the village of Alberta and its sawmill in 1935 and 1936, it was as much a showpiece and social experiment as a working lumber operation, according to Kenneth Vrana, director of the Ford Center and Forest. “It was not a big production mill,” Vrana said, explaining Ford made much more of the lumber for his “Woodies” and other pre-World War II cars at larger mills in L’Anse, Pequaming, Big Bay and elsewhere.

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Verso halts payments to local wood suppliers

USA Today
January 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

WISCONSIN RAPIDS – Verso Corp., the owner of paper mills in Wisconsin Rapids and Stevens Point, has stopped paying local loggers amid rumors that it is on the verge of bankruptcy. Verso notified the timber suppliers within the past week that it no longer can pay them, Henry Schienebeck, executive director of the Great Lakes Timber Professionals Association in Rhinelander, told USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin on Monday. Schienebeck said he had received several calls from timber producers who have not been paid by Verso for wood already delivered to mills. “I can tell you there’s a lot of guys that aren’t hauling anything in there right now,” Schienebeck said.

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Madison Paper production cutback could last months

Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel
January 26, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MADISON — Madison Paper Industries temporarily has cut back on production two days per week, according to the mill’s union president, who said the curtailment is because of declining demand and will result in less pay for workers. Russ Drechsel, president and CEO of Madison Paper, declined to comment or confirm the hours cutback, citing a “strict silent period” that the company is under until financial information becomes public Tuesday, Feb. 2. The mill, which produces supercalendered magazine paper in downtown Madison, has operated 24 hours a day, seven days per week, but is now in its second week of operating on a Tuesday through Saturday schedule, a move that’s expected to be temporary but will last at least three months and possibly six.

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Sierra Club Produces Podcast Critical of Plum Creek’s Plan as Alachua County Vote Nears

WUFT.org
January 25, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Within a month, the public will know what the eastern part of Alachua County will look like in the next 25 years. Will Plum Creek’s proposed change to the county’s growth plan pass through county commission or get voted down? And if it passes, how quickly will the eastern part of the county — largely a wetland today — begin to change? One certainty: Alachua County has more than tripled in population in the past 50 years, and the state projects another 50,000 people will live here by 2040. We’re going to keep growing. But how? Plum Creek Timber Company, which owns the most private land in the county and across Florida, would like to see some of that growth spread east of Gainesville.

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Growth potential – investing in forestry

Solid yields and low risk factors make forestry an increasingly attractive investment option
Irish Independent
January 27, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

There is a growing interest worldwide in forestry as an investment due to a combination of its low volatility, relatively risk free status and level of returns achievable. Investors have been making inroads into the sector long before the recent turbulent ride on the stock market as many consider forestry as an investment that moves away from traditional asset classes. Forestry has many natural properties such as age, class, species, market and end use which allows flexibility in management to achieve best financial returns. Traditionally it is seen as providing a solid yield, due to its growth rates, with relatively low ongoing capital investment. Forestry is one of the oldest forms of investment with the diversity of timber products produced now part and parcel of everyday life including timber to build homes, fuel and food packaging.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Luxor Teams With Millennium to Protect Lumber

GlobeNewswire
January 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Luxor Industrial Corporation, a leading manufacturer and distributor of engineered commercial and residential wood building products, today announced that it has partnered with Millennium Fire LLC to use its Millennium Advanced Framing Lumber™ technology (MAFL16) to protect wood. Luxor will initially apply this coating on its architectural wood products.  Millennium Fire’s core product, which is MAFL16 has five key ingredients, one of which is a technology developed by No Burn Inc. that defends against fire. Additional key ingredients create a protective coating that defends against, mold, ultra violet and moisture, which among other things protect the lumber during construction exposure. 

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Wood symposium tackles tall timber tower construction

By Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
January 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The annual WoodWORKS! International Wood Symposium this year is all about tall towers. Towers constructed from timbers, that is. Among the themes: Who is building them, what are the latest materials and techniques and how are developers getting them built in a sector still geared toward concrete and steel? Designers of the world’s tallest timber tower (for now), the 14-storey, 52.5-metre-tall Treet building in Bergen, Norway, attended this year’s edition, sharing their experience and passing the torch to the most prominent project in British Columbia, the 18-storey, 53-metre Brock Commons student residence at the University of B.C.

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2015’s Top States for LEED-Certified Space Per Capita

By Hanley Wood Data Studio
Builder Magazine
January 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released their annual ranking of the Top 10 States for LEED this morning, with Illinois claiming the top slot for 2015. With a total of 161 LEED projects and 3.43 square feet of LEED-certified space per resident, the state of Illinois has retained the no. 1 position in the U.S. for the third consecutive year. LEED, or Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification, according to USGBC rules. “LEED has become an essential tool for the transformation of building design and construction,” said Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair of USGBC. 

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Kebony is Named in the 2015 Global Cleantech 100 for the 5th time

Blue & Green Tomorrow
January 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Kebony, the sustainable alternative to tropical hardwood, today announced it was named in the prestigious 2015 Global Cleantech 100, produced by Cleantech Group, whose mission is to connect corporates to sustainable innovation through its i3 Connect platform and global events. The Global Cleantech 100 represents the most innovative and promising ideas in cleantech. Featuring companies that are best positioned to solve tomorrow’sclean technology challenges, Global Cleantech 100 is a comprehensive list of private companies with the highest potential to make the most significant market impact. 

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Norwegian project breaks tall wood building record

Journal of Commerce
January 26, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Ole Kleppe and Rune Abrahamsen didn’t set out to build the world’s tallest wood building. But when faced with building restrictions and a nearby bridge in Bergen, Norway, it soon became an elegant solution. The pair discussed the project at the 2016 International Wood Symposium in Vancouver, B.C. Kleppe, of Norwegian housing association BOB, set out to build a sustainable housing project in Bergen, but soon ran into several problems. A competing bridge close by meant more height was needed, but the city only allowed buildings nine storeys tall. So, the team decided to use wood. Norway has a rich history of wooden structures and boasts some wood buildings more than 800 years old that are still standing. The team pitched the project as a nod to wood heritage with the added prestige of breaking a world record for wood construction.

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Forestry

Scientists ask B.C. government to preserve Spirit Bear habitat

January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

On the eve of a long-awaited land-use agreement for the Great Bear Rainforest, scientists are decrying the fact that Gribbell Island — the greatest habitat on the coast for B.C.’s official mammal, the Spirit Bear — won’t receive official protected-area status. One of those scientists, veteran bear biologist Wayne McCrory, a director of the Valhalla Wilderness Society, fears that without full protection, Gribbell Island could be logged or mined in future, with involvement by the Gitga’at First Nation, and that the Spirit Bears’ critical habitat won’t be assured. “This is Canada’s unique bear Galapagos …” McCrory said. “Both of the only two valleys that support small runs of salmon on this small island have been heavily clearcut so there is no longer any margin for ecological error and misjudgment.”

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Book details lesser-known part of logging industry history

Terrace Standard
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Cedar Poles and Iron Peevees: Pole Logging in the Kitsumkalum Valley recounts a lesser-known part of the logging industry here. Flush with photos, the book details the early part of the century when the LH&K Mill was established when George Little’s sawmill, the largest in Terrace, was sold to George’s son Dudley Little, Chris Haugland, and Duncan Kerr, who named the sawmill after themselves. It details how logs were loaded, transported and off loaded in various ways and includes memories and photos from John Wright, who began his 43-year forestry career here working for LH&K.

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Islands in the Sky: Chopping Ancient Walbran Valley Forest Spells Extinction for Treetop Species

DeSmog Canada
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

High in the trees that have been growing in the Walbran Valley on Vancouver Island for up to 1,000 years, unique colonies of insects and invertebrates are thriving. Carpets of soil which develop in the massive branches of the old-growth trees contain a plethora of species not found anywhere else on Earth and, since 1995, University of Victoria entomologist Neville Winchester has climbed more than 2,000 trees to document and catalogue this life in the tree-tops. “These ancient forests are a repository of biodiversity,” said Winchester, who has had more than a dozen beetle mites, aphids and flies named after him and who is giving a public talk this Friday at 6:30 p.m. at the University of Victoria. Together with UVic graduate students, Winchester has conducted one of the most extensive canopy research projects in North America, using ropes to scale trees the equivalent of 18-storeys high in the Carmanah and Walbran valleys.

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Timber supply crunch drives loggers to more dangerous terrain

by Nelson Bennett – Higher-cost steep slope logging touted as solution to diminishing wood supply
Business in Vancouver
January 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Logging contractors in B.C. are caught in a dilemma. With easy-access timber pretty much used up, they are logging in increasingly challenging terrain, including steep slopes that had previously been bypassed because they’re too steep for traditional machinery. A relatively new approach to operating on steep slopes is tethered, winch-assist logging, which has solved the access problem. It is being used with success in places like New Zealand, contractors were told at a Truck Loggers Association (TLA) conference held in Vancouver January 13-15. B.C. logging contractors say they have no choice but to follow New Zealand’s example….Going higher means more expenses,” said TLA executive director David
Elstone. “Steeper slopes also means greater safety concerns.”

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Respect the axe: Get your lumberjack on in Halifax

The Chronicle Herald
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Have you ever been holding an axe, and just felt the urge to hurl it at something? If you have, there’s a new business opening up that will let you satisfy that urge, and then some. In March, the Timber Lounge will be opening its doors at 2170 Agricola St. in Halifax. Darren Hudson, owner and operator, took time on Tuesday to explain his vision for “the greatest indoor axe-throwing facility in Canada.” “This place is going to allow people to experience the thrill of axe-throwing,” said Hudson, 38. “It’s a fun sport, it’s a social sport, and it’s great for blowing off some steam and relaxing with your friends,” he said in an interview. The Timber Lounge will feature a series of throwing lanes where axe-enthusiasts can test their precision on the targets.

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Winter woodlot tour will be more interactive than ever before

CBC News
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

P.E.I.’s sixth annual winter woodlot tour will be bigger, with more interactive activities than in previous years, organizers say. The free family-friendly event is hosted this year by the Wheatley River Improvement Group in North Rustico. It features both self-guided and guided interpretive walks, presentations on Island plants and wildlife and winter activities such as snowshoeing, horse-drawn sleigh rides and maple syrup tapping. …Gary Snider, project co-ordinator of the McPhail Woods Ecological Forestry Project, will host a walk on improving forest health and the importance of managing wildlife habitats.

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Proposed logging road threatens Quebec woodland caribou: environmental groups

Montreal Gazette
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Though much of Quebec’s Cree territory has been flooded, razed and clearcut to make way for hydroelectric dams, herds of woodland caribou still roam throughout the Broadback Valley. Local hunters say that the game in this small, densely forested area is noticeably richer than any other place in Quebec’s vast wilderness. Located about 1,000 kilometres north of Montreal, the Broadback Valley is also home to large moose, geese and beaver habitats. Now a proposed logging road threatens one of the last Quebec habitats for the woodland caribou — a species that’s rapidly declining across Canada. The Matériaux Blanchet sawmill put forth its plan to cut a 126 kilometre swath south of the Broadback River at a public hearing last week in Montreal.

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Plan calls for boosting forest restoration around New Mexico

Associated Press in KFDA
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – More than 140 square miles of overgrown, fire-prone areas around New Mexico have been thinned over the last several years, but state forestry officials are telling lawmakers they need more funding to continue the work. The Forestry Division is seeking another $4 million in capital funds to expand a statewide watershed restoration program. Acting State Forester Eddie Tudor told members of a House committee Monday that his agency is on track to complete several projects by the end of the year. However, he says there are more areas that still need to be treated, including parts of the Santa Fe watershed.

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2 NM forest projects win federal grants

Albuquerque Journal
January 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Two New Mexico State Forestry Division projects have been awarded $599,000 by a U.S. Forest Service program aimed at protecting forests and conserving forest landscapes. New Mexico’s projects were ranked first and fourth among the 16 selected to receive shares of the $4.5 million available through the Forest Service’s Western Landscape Scale Restoration program. Micaela Hester, State Forestry public information officer, said both New Mexico projects have unique aspects that helped them stand out from the more than 40 applications from 17 Western states and Pacific Island territories considered for the grant money. She said State Forestry submitted some project proposals that were not funded.

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OREGON STANDOFF: Timber collapse fuels resentment of federal policy

E&E Publishing
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HINES, Ore. — A collapsed roof at the former Hines Lumber Co. timber mill symbolizes Harney County’s hard fall from its logging heyday. The hulking mill at one time employed about a fourth of the county’s workforce with high-paying union salaries, but it shut down in 1995 after the Forest Service banned the cutting of old-growth ponderosa pine. Its demise offers fodder for Ammon Bundy’s claims of federal overreach as he leads an armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge into its fourth week. While Bundy has mainly courted frustrated ranchers, he’s recently broadened his pitch to the timber industry. He said last week that federal forests in Harney have up to a decade’s worth of downed timber that could resuscitate the mill and get loggers back in the woods — if only the federal government would loosen its grip on the lands.

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A stubborn, unseen insect devastates DC-area parks

Washington Post
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Follow the woodpeckers. That’s the mantra of horticulturists, arborists and nature lovers who monitor the health of ash trees. When the birds chisel away tree bark, it’s because they’re feasting on a green beetle’s larvae, and experts know it’s too late. The beetle, known as the emerald ash borer, has infested the tree and will eventually kill it. “Unfortunately, they’re so hard to detect that often the woodpeckers find trees that are infested before we can,” said Patrick Harwood, a horticulturist for Montgomery County’s parks department as he inspected an infested ash tree along Rock Creek Trail in Kensington this month.

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Griffin: Take a closer look; new bat rules are common sense

Midland Daily News
January 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Federal bureaucrats have a reputation for being inflexible; here’s evidence they’re not. We often bemoan what seems a lack of common sense in regulations, especially at the federal level. But common sense can happen, and deserves mention when it does. It happened this month when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials announced final rules for protection of the northern long-eared bat, last year listed a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act, and since protected under interim rules. …The interim rules were written to err on the side of over-protecting the mammals; the final rules are more practical.  Under what the FWS called “flexibilities” under a section of the ESA, the final rule will protect the bats during their most sensitive life stages, “while minimizing regulatory requirements for landowners, land managers, government agencies and others within the species’ range.”

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Breakthrough mapping of tropical forests reveals broad extent of tree loss

Thomson Reuters Foundation
January 27, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

New advanced satellite maps of tropical countries reveal that more than 90 percent of recent tree cover loss took place in natural forests rather than plantations, threatening ecosystems and biodiversity, research shows. The maps mark a breakthrough in forest monitoring that allows researchers to distinguish between natural growth and oil palm, rubber, timber and other plantations, according to Transparent World, a Russian non-profit, and the U.S.-based World Resources Institute (WRI). The data found that in Brazil, Colombia, Liberia and Peru, more than 90 percent of tree cover lost in 2013 and 2014 was natural forest, they said. “It’s surprising and a little bit disturbing and shows us how much is at stake in those four countries, where most of the forest being lost is natural,” Rachael Petersen, WRI analyst, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on Wednesday.

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World heritage forests burn as global tragedy unfolds in Tasmania

The UK Guardian
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A global tragedy is unfolding in Tasmania. World heritage forests are burning; 1,000-year-old trees and the hoary peat beneath are reduced to char. Fires have already taken stands of king billy and pencil pine – the last remaining fragments of an ecosystem that once spread across the supercontinent of Gondwana. Pockets of Australia’s only winter deciduous tree, the beloved nothofagus – whose direct kin shade the sides of the South American Andes – are now just a wind change away from eternity. Unlike Australia’s eucalyptus forests, which use fire to regenerate, these plants have not evolved to live within the natural cycle of conflagration and renewal. If burned, they die.

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Forest corridors prove critical to biodiversity and pollination success in the tropics

Phys.org
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

As tropical forests become increasingly broken up by roads, farm fields, pastures and other developments, corridors of trees provide vital pathways for pollinators and contribute to a rich diversity of plant species, scientists have confirmed. A study at the Las Cruces Biological Station in Costa Rica shows that when forests are linked by continuous corridors of trees, pollination has a greater likelihood of success. In contrast, when patches of forest are isolated from each other, pollinators are less abundant and plants frequently fail to reproduce. More than 94 percent of flowering tropical plants and 75 percent of the world’s leading food crops require pollination by animals such as bees, bats and hummingbirds.

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Kate’s career in forestry

The Scottish Farmer
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

HOW DOES a young woman from Brighton find herself in the midst of the Scotland’s forestry industry, carving out a successful career in what has traditionally been a very male-dominated sector? Kate Sheppard, forestry consultant with Bidwells, will be answering that question at a Forestry Commission reception in the Scottish Parliament this Wednesday night (January 27). Kate will be one of a number of people from within the world of forestry to be questioned at the event. The theme will be the recently published report – The Economic Contribution of the Forestry Sector in Scotland – and the key note speaker will be Minister for Environment Dr Aileen McLeod.

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Former Greens leader Bob Brown’s arrest caught on video at Tasmanian forest protest

Yahoo 7 News
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Former Greens leader Bob Brown has posted a video of his own arrest during a protest in a Tasmanian forest, and it may just been the dullest arrest footage ever recorded. In the clip, which was uploaded to Dr Brown’s Facebook page, he is seen speaking to a police officer during a community protest over logging in northwest Tasmania. After the police officer asks Dr Brown to leave the site of the logging project at Lapoinya, Dr Brown politely refuses. …The 71-year-old has since been released on bail. “I didn’t go with the intention of being arrested, but when I saw the destruction, I had to take a stand,” he told AAP after his release.

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Timber council gets award from world’s largest forest certification scheme

The Malaysia Star Online
January 26, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

THE Malaysian Timber Certification Council (MTCC) recently received an award from the Programme for the Endorsement for Forest Certification (PEFC) for the third highest increase in the number of certified companies through Chain of Custody (CoC) certification in 2015. The Certificate of Appreciation by PEFC was presented to MTCC by PEFC International during the PEFC General Assembly in Montreux, Switzerland. PEFC is the world’s largest forest certification scheme, comprising two thirds of all certified forests globally. MTCC chief executive officer Yong Teng Koon said it had registered 59 new CoC certificate holders in 2015, representing a 21% increase compared to the previous year.

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General

Scientists ask B.C. government to preserve Spirit Bear habitat

January 27, 2016
Category: Uncategorised

On the eve of a long-awaited land-use agreement for the Great Bear Rainforest, scientists are decrying the fact that Gribbell Island — the greatest habitat on the coast for B.C.’s official mammal, the Spirit Bear — won’t receive official protected-area status. One of those scientists, veteran bear biologist Wayne McCrory, a director of the Valhalla Wilderness Society, fears that without full protection, Gribbell Island could be logged or mined in future, with involvement by the Gitga’at First Nation, and that the Spirit Bears’ critical habitat won’t be assured. “This is Canada’s unique bear Galapagos …” McCrory said. “Both of the only two valleys that support small runs of salmon on this small island have been heavily clearcut so there is no longer any margin for ecological error and misjudgment.”

Read More