Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 30, 2016

Froggy Foibles

Gresham homeowners cut 44 trees on public land to improve views, $661K lawsuit claims

The Oregonian
March 29, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: United States, US West

The regional planning agency Metro has filed a $661,000 lawsuit against two Gresham couples — claiming that they brazenly cut down 44 trees in a protected natural area next to their homes in order to create even better views of the city below. The couples mowed down a 400-foot swath of mostly “large and mature trees” below their homes, which are perched side by side on Gresham Butte above the Springwater Corridor Trail, according to a lawsuit filed Friday in Multnomah County Circuit Court. “The cut clearing substantially enhanced the view west from (the homeowners’) property, over and across (Metro’s) property towards the city and natural landscape, including the scenic valleys and buttes that characterize east Multnomah County,” states the suit.

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Business & Politics

Quesnel business fined for high wood dust

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafeBC has fined a Quesnel wood products manufacturer for high accumulations of combustible wood dust. C&C Wood Products Ltd. was levied a penalty of $68,121.24 after an inspection uncovered the material on surfaces and fixtures in the sawmill canter room, around the canter outfeed landing table, and in the chip screen and sawmill chipper rooms. “These areas had not been identified by the firm as requiring cleanup, although they were not hidden and were frequented by workers and supervisors,” WorkSafeBC said in an online posting on the matter. Dust accumulations as deep as 10 centimetres (four inches) were found in direct contact with potential ignition sources, such as electrical equipment, junction boxes, and light fixtures.

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WorkSafeBC fines Apollo Forest Products $75,000

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafeBC has fined Fort St. James sawmill Apollo Forest Products Ltd. $75,000 after an inspector caught a worker using a wooden stick to clear a jam from the cutter heads of a planer. “Although power to the planer heads had been shut off, the planer had not been locked out as required,” the agency said in an online posting and added that the firm’s written procedure for clearing jams from the planer permitted this method but contravened WorkSafeBC regulations. The fine was levied in September 2015.

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Serious injury leads to fine for wood manufacturer

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Mackenzie wood manufacturer East Fraser Fiber Co. Ltd. was fined $65,235.12 by WorkSafeBC after a worker suffered serious injuries to her arm when she reached across a ripsaw to clear a piece of wood. Although the power had been locked out, the ripsaw’s eight blades were still spinning when the worker, who was a new employee, made the move according to an online posting by the agency. Stored energy in the blades meant they were “still spinning so fast that their movement was imperceptible.” “Lockout procedures for the ripsaw were complex and were not posted anywhere near the machine,” WorkSafeBC continued in an online posting on the matter.

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Vanderhoof finger joint plant fined for dust

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

WorkSafeBC has fined a Vanderhoof finger joint plant $48,401.84 for hazardous accumulations of wood dust. The fine against Vanderhoof Specialty Wood Products-NW Wood Preservers was issued in October 2015 after an inspection found accumulations as high as 7.6 centimetres (three inches) in the chipper room and in an old boiler room. It was bad enough for the agency to issue a stop-work order until the dust was removed, according to an online posting. The dust covered more than five per cent of the chipper room’s area and in the boiler room, dust coated a gear motor, reducer, foundation ledge, roof beams, wall purlins, and the boiler itself.

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Conifex fined $75,000 for wood dust

Prince George Citizen
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Fort St. James sawmill has been fined $75,000 for hazardous accumulations of wood dust. WorkSafeBC levied the penalty against Conifex in October after potentially combustible dust was found around the main conveyor belt, under the sorters, and behind the sawmill chipper. How much was found was not provided in an online posting on the matter, but the agency did issue a stop-work order to have the areas cleaned up. … Conifex has appealed the decision.

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Education agreement ends with jobs for First Nations students

Northern Ontario Business
March 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

When Austin Atatise-Morriseau graduates from Cambrian College in 2017, he won’t have to spend any time handing out his resumé. Atatise-Morriseau and his five classmates have guaranteed jobs at Resolute Forest Products upon graduating from the Sudbury college’s two-year industrial mechanical millwright technical program. It’s part of a new education funding model that brings together government, industry and First Nations communities. Cambrian College, Resolute and the communities of Red Rock and Fort William First Nation are working with funding from the Ontario government to offer the training to six members of the communities.

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10 years after Domtar, is Cornwall better or worse?

Cornwall Standard-Freeholder
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

A decade after Domtar’s departure, is Cornwall a better place? As a different person in the Seaway City that question and you’re likely to get a different answer. Even the numbers don’t cut through the decades clearly enough to show us whether we’re better off today, at the 10th anniversary of the plant’s closure than we were when it was open, thanks to the experiment of the 2011 National Household Survey. The most well-known of these hard figures is population, which hasn’t varied much from the 47,137 in 1991, through a low point of 45,965 in 2006 to 46,346 in 2011. Looking at other numbers and relying on that unstable NHS suggests there were about 600 fewer people employed in Cornwall in 2011 than in 2006 – taking into account the official count date for this figure came after the Domtar closure at the end of March.

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Timmins triumphant

Wood Business
March 28, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

March 28, 2016 – Buildings don’t cut lumber and don’t generate revenue. But they can grind your business to a screeching halt. Such was the case for EACOM Timmins, where a fire in the building’s exterior caused millions in damage and stopped operations for almost two years. The sawmill property along the Mattagami River has been active for many generations, long before EACOM acquired the mill and four others from Domtar in June of 2010 for $126.5 million. Among the assets on the property was a Quonset built in 1970 to house the main sawline. The Quonset used a combination of laminated beams, strapping, insulation and tin to form the structure of the facility.

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New Coalition Dedicated to Free Lumber Trade

LBM Journal
March 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

With the expiration of the U.S.-Canada Softwood Lumber Agreement last fall, NAHB is forming a coalition that is committed to providing American consumers access to a stable, dependable and affordable supply of lumber and building materials. The American Alliance of Lumber Consumers (AALC) supports free trade in lumber and building materials. Access to lumber and other readily available building materials and products allows home builders to provide safe, decent and affordable housing at competitive prices. NAHB believes any new agreement must be mindful of the U.S. housing market and ensure American consumers of lumber have access to a stable, dependable and affordable supply. The current share of Canadian imported lumber in the U.S. market is 28% (three-year average), and any new trade agreement has the great potential to disrupt the stability of the market and reduce the current share of imports.

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King tours areas hit by ‘natural disaster’ of paper mill closures

Bangor Daily News
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MILLINOCKET, Maine — An economic hurricane has devastated the state’s paper industry, but unlike what would happen if an actual weather disaster had struck, the federal response to the devastation has been paltry, U.S. Sen. Angus King said Tuesday. “What’s happened in the paper industry is like a natural disaster. We have lost six mills in five years. We had some data that there are about 1,400 direct paper jobs lost, but there have been something like twice that many lost or compromised in associated industries,” King said. That’s why King is leading a group of leaders from several federal economic development agencies on a two-day tour of the Lincoln Lakes and Katahdin regions. King’s goal is to help create a united, comprehensive federal effort to help the state’s forest products industries.

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Energy Bill Would Prop Up Maine’s Ailing Forest Products Industry

Maine’s Public Radio
March 29, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Gov. Paul LePage has joined with some state lawmakers in trying to find ways to help the state’s suffering forestry industry. That effort could include price supports for electricity produced by biomass energy plants, which have been facing financial difficulties. The state’s biomass industry has been hit with a double whammy: First, the low-cost of energy produced with natural gas has in turn depressed the margins for higher-cost biomass plants, which make electricity by burning low-quality wood. And second, in January, Massachusetts tightened its standards for what kind of energy qualifies as “renewable,” shutting off price supports for several Maine biomass facilities that sell power to the Massachusetts electricity market. The result: more pain in Maine’s forest-products industry, which is already reeling from a disheartening string of paper plant shutdowns.

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Astec Industries Announces Receipt of $122.5 Million Pellet Plant Order

Stockwatch
March 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., — Astec Industries, Inc. (Nasdaq:ASTE) today announced it has received an order for the final $122.5 million of a pellet plant order for Highland Pellets along with a related deposit on that order. The Company also received the remainder of the contracted payment on the first $30 million order. The Company previously announced receipt of the initial $30 million order on August 20, 2015. The Company plans to build and deliver the equipment in the additional order during 2016 and will discuss the details of the entire order on its first quarter earnings release conference call.

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Finland hopes for new growth from shrunken forest industry

Reuters
March 30, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

It has created a modest 200 jobs in a Finnish forestry industry that has lost around 20,000 in the past decade, but UPM-Kymmene’s new biofuels plant offers long-awaited growth and hope. The 180 million euro ($200 million) investment in wood-based renewable fuel production marks the first major case of transformation in a sector that has long been managing decline. UPM still makes 50 percent of its revenue from sales of paper, and biofuels can’t yet plug a gap created by consumers in European export markets shifting from magazines and newspapers to smartphones and tablets. But the new plant, a global first, is already breaking even after little more than a year in operation in the eastern town of Lappeenranta; its success now needs to be replicated across the economy if Finland is to drag itself out of stagnation.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

RAIC Journal: Take a break in Nanaimo

Canadian Architect
March 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

The 2016 Festival of Architecture, which takes place June 8 to 11, 2016, in Nanaimo, BC, offers a perfect chance to enjoy a mini-vacation on stunning Vancouver Island. Known as the Harbour City, Nanaimo sits between scenic mountains and sparkling ocean. The city and vicinity are also home to a wealth of must-see architectural sites, new and old. This map and guide provide a taste of what you can experience by taking an extra day or two to explore. Attend the Festival and earn continuing education points with sessions by leading experts; hear inspiring keynote speakers; participate in lively social events with fellow architects from across Canada, and encounter the cultural richness of First Nations communities. 

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Ready for Something (Truly) NEW in DOORS?

Lynden Door Blog
March 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

It is not every day that…

  • a couple of superstar students at the University of British Columbia – an engineer and an MBA student – collaborate on an innovative interior door idea and create a new product concept…
  • at the same time, door company executives fortuitously get lost on the campus and stumble across some of the stellar prototypes…
  • the innovators are invited to exhibit at a event with the door maker where they are they stars of the show…
  • all these align and now a partnership has been formed to create a genuinely unique new product that promises to change the way homes and buildings are ventilated; reduce costs and offer a green alternative with a profound wellness upside; and simultaneously address sound privacy and aesthetics in ways no previous construct has been able to do!

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Cross Laminated Timber-built hotel suits Army-aligned developer

Concrete Products
March 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Privatization of Army Lodging (PAL) program developer Lendlease Americas staged a ribbon cutting for the Candlewood Suites on Redstone Arsenal, billing the 92-room property near Huntsville, Ala., as the country’s first hotel constructed completely of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). The 62,700-sq.-ft. structure incorporates 1,200 CLT wall panels—fabricated from pressed lumber board stacked in alternating directions—and 200,000 CLT fasteners. An 11-man crew erected the building in 10 working weeks. By developer estimates, the labor factor and construction window amount to a 40 percent reduction in crew size and man hours, and 37 percent faster turnaround than conventional framing materials and methods.

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Fire tears through apartment building at Village North

Gladwin County Record & Beaverton Clarion
March 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

GLADWIN – A fire at Village North Apartments Saturday left multiple people homeless, according to the Gladwin Rural-Urban Fire Department. …The presence of appropriate fire and smoke barriers and insulation installed during construction are credited with helping control the spread of fire into other parts of the wood frame structure.

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Wood, Metal Or Plastic: How Pallets Stack Up

By Peter Connors
Manufacturing.net
March 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Almost every product on the consumer or industrial market has spent time sitting on a pallet. The humble pallet is the device that allows easy forklift access to goods and expedites the loading and unloading of freight worldwide. Pallets come in a variety of materials. Wood (including wood byproducts) is the most popular choice, making up 95 percent of worldwide pallet usage. Plastic and metal pallets constitute the remaining 5 percent of the market. As a manufacturer of pallets, we are often asked, “How do I choose the best pallet for me?” The answer will depend on your business’s prioritization of strength, durability, sanitation and value.

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Villa Circuitus sets a new precedent for high-quality sustainable design

Construction Global
March 29, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Developers Simone Kreutzer and Tommy Wesslund have recently completed work on an eco-home in Sweden, clad in Kebony. Villa Circuitus, meaning ‘a going around’ in Latin, is a spacious, circular 175 square metre passive house containing four bedrooms and open plan kitchen and dining area. …Recycled paper and glass are used throughout the structure and the whole house is built on a wooden frame with Kebony cladding. Kebony is a modified softwood that acts as a sustainable alternative to tropical hardwood. Developed in Norway, the Kebony technology is an environmentally friendly, patented process, which enhances the properties of fast growing sustainable softwood with a bio-based liquid. By impregnating the wood with furfuryl alcohol, the wood’s cell wall is polymerised resulting in greatly improved durability and dimensional stability. Kebony therefore offers the performance qualities of a tropical hardwood, such as teak or mahogany, without the environmental damage.

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Does timber high-rise equal high risk?

The Fifth Estate
March 30, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

…Much of our building code has evolved from the Great Fire of London. …t laid down that all houses were to be built in brick or stone, with the number of storeys and width of walls carefully specified. Three-hundred-and-fifty years later, we still see construction above three storeys as risky business. But is it? From 1 May, the National Construction Code will introduce a new “deemed-to-satisfy” provision for timber buildings up to 25 metres, or eight storeys high – as long as they include a raft of requirements, such as fire sprinklers and fire-resistant cladding.  This has the potential to change the way we build and the shape of our cities. It may spark innovative and entrepreneurial builders, many of them in smaller companies, to look at medium-rise apartments in our middle-ring suburbs – and at prices that the average Australian can afford.

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Forestry

Metis community reflects on ‘positive’ meeting with province over logging permits

MBC Radio Online
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A northern Metis community says the Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment will be taking into consideration traditional lands when handing out logging permits. The Ministry held a meeting with members of the Kineepik Metis Local out of Pinehouse on Monday. According to Vince Natomagan, Executive Director of the Metis Local, the meeting was to determine if there was any infringement on harvesting rights during forest cutting operations. Natomagan says they presented the Ministry with maps they developed between 2010 and 2013 outlining areas they use for traditional sustenance activity.

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Vancouver Island’s old-growth forest an ‘ecological emergency’: Sierra Club

by Justine Hunter
The Globe and Mail
March 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Looking down from an elevation of 400 kilometres or so, Vancouver Island appears to be covered by a mostly intact jade-green forest from one end to the other. Using a Google Earth mapping tool that incorporates logging data, however, the Sierra Club of B.C. has created a different image – one showing just a few remaining pockets of rich old-growth forest. “This can be described as an ecological emergency,” said Jens Wieting, forest campaigner for the Sierra Club of B.C. “The last big, contiguous old-growth areas with giant trees, such as the Walbran on the southern island and East Creek on the northern island, should be considered as rare as white rhinos.” Just one-tenth of Vancouver Island’s 32,000 square kilometres of land is still old-growth rainforest, he said, while the most productive ancient Douglas fir forests make up only 1 per cent of the land base – and some of that is currently approved for logging.

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Yukon on alert for spruce beetle resurgence

‘Spruce bark beetle is the most destructive pest to Yukon’s spruce stands,’ says forest health specialist.
CBC News
March 30, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s been a few years since Yukon’s last devastating spruce bark beetle infestation petered out, but government forest officials are trying to determine the risk of a resurgence. According to the territorial government, Yukon experienced the most severe and long-lasting spruce beetle infestation in Canada, beginning in the early 1990s. Over two decades, it spread across 400,000 hectares of white spruce forest in southwest Yukon, before finally fizzling out — leaving what seemed like an endless supply of dead trees along the way. The territorial government will undertake a “hazard assessment” this summer, to get a handle on how likely another massive infestation is, and figure out how the government might respond.

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Facebook page tracks tree pests and diseases on PEI

CBC News
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A Facebook page set up to track outbreaks of tree insects and diseases on Prince Edward island is garnering attention. Trees Insects and Diseases: P.E.I is loaded with photos and videos of common diseases and pests and the type of damage they do to trees on the Island. The Forests, Fish and Wildlife division of the Department of Communities, Land and Environment has been building the page for a year. Dave Carmichael, a horticultural technician, told Island Morning the page is a great way to have a two-way conversation with Islanders about tree pests and diseases because Facebook is “a little more user friendly for folks.”

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Court: Tongass Roadless Rule remains in place

KRBD
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The U.S. Supreme Court will not take up a case that could have expanded logging in Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. It’s the final step in one legal battle involving what’s called the Roadless Rule. But there’s another case. About 15 years ago, the U.S. Forest Service issued a ban on logging, roadbuilding and some other development in many of the wilder lands under its jurisdiction.The forest association’s Graham said lawsuits are just one approach to increasing the amount of timber available for harvest. Another would be to seek congressional action. “And then the other thing is we could just get a … federal administration that’s friendly toward responsible resource development and they can just rescind the rule, because it’s an administrative rule. It’s nothing that Congress passed,” he said.

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Fire Season Now Looming

Payson Roundup
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Firefighters throughout Rim Country are already bracing for a dangerous fire season — with the El Niño conditions delivering a merely normal amount of snow and rain this winter. After a decade of intermittent drought, we’d prayed the rain would continue on through the spring. Granted, we could get some rain today — and the National Weather Service still holds out hope for a wet April. But with the Salt and Verde rivers now running at about half normal, we could find that the rains of January and February will serve only to grow enough grass to make the fire danger acute in the hot, dry months of May and June — as we wait for the monsoons.

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CARROLL: Continuing the bark beetle battle

Rapid City Journal
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Black Hills National Forest is preparing to pick up the broken shards of two decades of relentless beetle attacks. Our focus since 1997 has been stopping, blunting or slowing the most significant bark beetle attack since the turn of the last century. Different experts spin it different ways, but there are more than 450,000 acres where beetles killed trees, only 30 percent of which were used by industry for lumber. The rest of the standing dead trees rotted or are rotting and falling to the ground. Lots of them we cut on purpose using cutting and chunking, a practice that was poorly understood by the public but that may have been somewhat effective. Anecdotally it worked in various areas to reduce numbers of viable beetles in time for the next attack. Realistically, it’s not clear how much difference it made.

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Bitterroot Forest logging road plans upset homeowners

NBC Montana
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

HAMILTON, Mont. -Hamilton-area residents whose property borders or is near the Bitterroot National Forest are concerned about proposed log truck travel along access roads in their neighborhood. Ravalli County commissioners took public testimony on a Forest Service plan to thin 2,300 acres of timber southwest of Hamilton. T… The Forest Service said it is an effort to improve forest health, to reduce the threat of wild land crown fires, enhance forest habitat and to provide forest products and jobs to local communities. …Just about everybody who came to the hearing said they support reducing fuels in the wooded area where they live. But residents don’t want log trucks on roads like Blue Jay Lane. It’s a county road but residents maintain it.

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Environmentalists Wield Powerful ESA to Kill Jobs

The Heartland Institute
March 25, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…The closed mills and lost jobs are due primarily to a 1991 court ruling, in which a group of local environmentalists, the Seattle Audubon Society, convinced a court protecting the spotted owl was more important than the robust logging industry in Washington State, Oregon, and California. ….The Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) is a radical environmental legal action group that’s known for frequently suing to block commercial, industrial, and personal activities in an effort to “save the environment,” regardless of who gets hurt. One of the group’s leaders and co-founders, Kieran Suckling, was a well-known activist in the 1980s and has been linked to vandalism and sabotage group Earth First!

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MDC recognizes outstanding urban forestry efforts

Missouri Department of Conservation
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Kansas City, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and the Missouri Community Forestry Council recently recognized a civic leader and a non-profit group for outstanding service for community tree programs in the Kansas City area. Recipients received honors on March 9 at the Forestry Council’s annual conference in St. Joseph. Presenting the awards were Missouri State Forester Lisa Allen and Missouri Community Forestry Council Chair Casey Jo Kellner.

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Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Populations Begin Rebound

USDA Blog
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

It isn’t often that an endangered species successfully recovers, which is why the story of the red-cockaded woodpecker is so inspiring. Once found throughout 90 million acres of longleaf pine forests in the southeast, the red-cockaded woodpecker’s population on National Forest System lands today number approximately 3,150 active clusters of typically one to five birds each. This is a 60 percent increase from the low of 1,981 active clusters in 1990. The biggest threat to this rare woodpecker’s existence today is the lack of suitable habitat, but the Apalachicola National Forest provides a safe refuge for its largest population in the world.

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Researchers work on chestnut tree hybrid that can thrive in N.J. woods

NorthJersey.com
March 28, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

… American chestnuts sometimes made up half the trees in a given forest. At their peak, they numbered as many as 4 to 5 billion from Maine to Georgia. The tree was memorialized in American culture, through the poems of Longfellow, the writings of Tho­reau and the lyrics of the classic Christmas carol made famous by Nat King Cole. But today, the species is nearly wiped out. … An experimental stand of chestnuts, planted six years ago by a research team from Rutgers University and still only a few feet taller than the researchers themselves, grows in an open area of a wooded plot in Somerset County.

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Artists capture stunning photos of the Tasmanian in conservation campaign against logging

Daily Mail
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

A group of 120 artists from across Australia and overseas have completed a three-day residence in the Tasmanian wilderness, all in the name of conservation. Base camps were set up to accommodate the photographers, painters, musicians, printmakers, and multi-media artists for three nights over the long weekend as they used wilderness areas including the state’s northwest Tarkine as inspiration for sculpture, film, textiles, and music. Their works are going on show as part of a travelling exhibition by the Bob Brown Foundation, calling for greater protection against logging and four-wheel driving through forests.

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Tests find trees tolerant to olive tree killer pathogen

BBC News
March 29, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Dr Stancanelli added that these results were important in terms of providing information for tree breeders. However, it was too early to say whether or not the olive yields from the varieties that have displayed tolerance to the infection are nonetheless reduced or adversely affected, he observed. The EFSA Panel on Plant Health produced a report in January warning that the disease was known to affect other commercially important crops, including citrus, grapevines and stone-fruit. However, the results from the latest experiments offered a glimmer of hope. “Olives seemed to be the main host of this strain while citrus and grapes did not show infection, either in the field or by artificial inoculation,” Dr Stancanelli said.

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