Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: June 13, 2016

Froggy Foibles

Saanich woman creates dipping sauces, vinegars and drinks from douglas fir needles

By Gavin Fisher
CBC News
June 12, 2016
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada, Canada West

A dipping sauce made from chili and douglas fir, douglas fir vinegar, and even sparkling douglas fir drinks — those are just some of the things Laura Waters came up with when she started experimenting with the needles that come from the large evergreen tree. …Waters has now created a variety of products using fir, including a bread made with juniper and douglas fir, and a herb blend of douglas fir seasonings that she said goes well with cream cheese and goat cheese and can be spread on bread. …She also makes vinegars from douglas fir, offering variations of blueberry and fir, strawberry and fir, peach and fir.

Read More

Business & Politics

U.S., Canada softwood lumber talks stalled, litigation looms: sources

By David Ljunggren
Reuters in the Globe and Mail
June 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Talks between Canada and the United States to resolve a dispute over exports of softwood lumber are making little progress and the matter likely will return to the courts, sources familiar with the negotiations said on Friday. U.S. producers complain that Canadian softwood lumber is subsidized, and have in the past launched trade challenges that resulted in the United States imposing billion of dollars in tariffs. The most recent round of arguments ended with a 2006 deal that expired in October 2015. Both sides agreed to take no action for a year after that, but without a new agreement, U.S. firms look set to file new damage claims. “The two sides are so far apart right now that a deal looks very unlikely,” said one person familiar with the talks.

Read More

Web Extra: What Does Our Future Look Like?

Douglas Magazine
June 9, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

On our 10th anniversary, Douglas asked local leaders to share their aspirations and predictions for the next decade. Read on for insights from Dan Gunn of VIATeC, Dr. Kate Moran of Ocean Networks Canada, George Hanson of Vancouver Economic Alliance, Paul Nursey of Tourism Victoria and Darlene Holstein of The Bay Centre. …“I think it’s going to have a profound and positive effect,” says Hanson. And collaboration is essential across the board in the coming decade, he adds. So is exploring the untapped potential of our major industries, including forestry and wood manufacturing. “We’d love to see a broadening market and room for growth in value-added manufacturing,” he says. “The North American market for value-added wood products is something like 600 per cent bigger than the softwood market, but we have a much smaller percentage of that market than the softwood market. We see tremendous potential for diversification and expansion, and it will take a lot of smart decision making and the traction of investment here.”

Read More

Forestry markets appear to be on upswing

Timmins Press
June 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TIMMINS – After some tough times, the future is finally starting to look bright for members of the Ontario Forest Industries Association. “We were pleased in September when we received a letter from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government acknowledging, and I am quoting: ‘Canada’s prosperity starts with its middle class and trade industries pay on average 50% higher wages than non-exporting industries which will give Canadians more money in their pockets,’” said Jamie Lim, president and CEO of the OFIA. “We all recognize the Ontario forest products sector has always relied heavily on exports to the U.S. for its prosperity and I guess what was good news in 2015 is that we finally started to see our sector recovering.

Read More

Weyerhaeuser Faces ERISA Lawsuit Over Retiree Benefits Cuts

Bloomberg BNA
June 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

A new proposed class action accuses Weyerhaeuser Co., one of the largest forest products companies in the world, of illegally terminating retirees’ vested lifetime health-care benefits. Weyerhaeuser in January 2015 unilaterally terminated its contributions to the retirees’ health plan in violation of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, according to a complaint filed June 8 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon. The retirees seek reinstatement of their benefits and $7.8 million in damages allegedly suffered after the company stopped making contributions to the plan. James Kepner and three other retirees, on behalf of themselves and others similarly situated, allege that they were recruited and retained by Weyerhaeuser as salaried employees based in part on the company’s benefits package, which included lifetime health-care benefits for retirees.

Read More

Södra’s members increased volumes of wood deliveries

Lesprom
June 10, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Södra’s members are delivering increasingly higher volumes of wood to the company’s industries. A focus on improved forest management has led to a steady increase in forest growth. This, in turn, has enabled more harvesting. In southern Sweden, growth is so strong that forest stocks are rising as harvesting operations increase. “Our members are managing their forests so well that forests are now growing better than ever. And, although we continue to harvest more forest, there is still more forest remaining. This is a very positive trend,” says Håkan Larsson, President of Södra Skog. There is so much potential for trees as a raw material and we need to use the forest more actively if wewant to meet the challenges of climate change and the transition to a fossil-free society.” Most of the wood delivered by Södra’s members is softwood – pine and spruce.

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Code changes bring learning curve

By Ian Harvey – Adapting to new building rules means taking time to understand nuances.
The Toronto Star
June 11, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Figuring out the construction of six-storey wood buildings is a learning curve for everyone in Ontario and it takes a little more time to understand the nuances. “It hasn’t been a walk in the park,” said David Moses of Moses Structural Engineers, who is working on both Heartwood The Beach and Cabin Toronto. He worked in B.C. for a decade and moved to Ontario 10 years ago, and so he has a background in multi-storey wood structures. “We’re telling clients that even before they’ve bought the property to get us involved, including the city.” Moses said there is some reluctance on the part of some developers because it’s a new concept and they don’t want to be the first.

Read More

Wood-framed structures on the rise

By Ian Harvey
The Toronto Star
June 11, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Changes to the Ontario Building Code allowing for taller wood-framed structures are upping the construction landscape. From the outside, they might look like any other midrise condominiums springing up in Toronto neighbourhoods, but at their core, they are the vanguard of a trend changing construction in Ontario. Wood-framed buildings are common in single-family homes and townhomes but have been limited to four storeys. Changes that were made to the Ontario Building Code in January 2015 now allow for up to six storeys, and the first such projects in Toronto are being built this year. While there are up to 15 multi-storey wood buildings in construction across Ontario, the first in the city of Toronto will be Heartwood The Beach, at 1884 Queen St. E., at Woodbine Ave. Work is expected to start in June, said Quadrangle architect Richard Witt.

Read More

Mass-Timber Towers Become a Reality, One Additional Floor at a Time

Architect Magazine
June 8, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

In October, developers will break ground on Framework, a 12-story, 130-foot-tall mixed-use tower in Portland, Ore., designed by local firm Lever Architecture. Fast on its heels is SHoP Architects’ 475 West 18th Street, a 10-story, 120-foot residential tower in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, which is now awaiting final approval from the city of New York. Even though the two projects are set to become the tallest mass-timber towers in the U.S., they represent something even more noteworthy: a break in a fundamental building paradigm. …But don’t expect steel and reinforced concrete to disappear from mid- and high-rise construction anytime soon. For all of CLT’s promise, a growing number of skeptics warn that it and other engineered-wood products, such as glue-laminated timber, have a long way to go before they become mainstream in America.

Read More

Vienna Will Be Home To World’s Tallest Wooden Building

Green Building Elements
June 10, 2016
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Vienna will soon be home to the world’s tallest wooden building. Designed by Rüdiger Lainer and Partner, the so-called HoHO project will be built in theSeestadt Aspern area, one of Europe’s largest urban development sites. It will stand 276 feet tall and house a hotel, restaurant, and wellness center together with apartments and offices. It will cost about $65 million to construct. 76% of the building expected to be made from wood. Unlike concrete, which adds significantly to carbon emissions, wood from sustainable forests absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequesters it for the entirety of a building’s life. The architects say the HoHo tower will save 2,800 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions compared with a similar concrete structure.

Read More

Forestry

Backcountry backlash: Public access to B.C.’s wilderness runs into roadblocks

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
June 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It snakes through Vancouver Island’s interior, a 700-kilometre wilderness hike stretching from Victoria up to windswept Cape Scott at the Island’s northern tip. Little more than one metre wide in some places, the Spine Trail winds through dense forest, past lakes and over rushing streams. …Public access to wilderness, hunting areas and fishing lakes has been eroded for decades by private land owners who erect fences and gates to keep the public out, according to a white paper prepared by the Environmental Law Clinic at the University of Victoria. …Legal protection for public access to the land goes back to the 13th-century Charter of Forests, a companion document to the Magna Carta that guaranteed the British people the right to enter the forest, even where it was privately owned.

Read More

Caterpillars nearing end of destructive cycle

Western Producer
June 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A feeding frenzy that has turned tree lines, windbreaks and woodlots across the West into leafless disaster zones will soon be over — at least for this year. Greg Pohl, a forestry expert with Natural Resources Canada’s Canadian Forestry Service in Edmonton, said tent caterpillar larvae will soon be finished feeding and will enter their pupal stage. Pupation, which normally begins in mid- to late-June, is where mature caterpillars spin themselves in silk cocoons and emerge as moths, about eight to 12 days later. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that a similar feeding frenzy won’t occur next year. “We usually start to see adult moths in early- to mid-July, but they typically don’t fly all that far,” said Pohl, an insect and disease identification officer.

Read More

UBC researchers work to save endangered woodpeckers

Williamson’s sapsucker is listed as an endangered species in B.C. with only about 400 pairs remaining
CBC News
June 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

UBC forestry researchers are using radio devices to track endangered woodpeckers in B.C., hoping to save the birds from disappearing. Williamson’s sapsucker — a medium-size woodpecker — is mostly found in the U.S. However there is a small population in B.C. The birds are listed as an endangered species in B.C., with only 400 pairs left in the province, usually scattered throughout the Kootenay and Okanagan regions. It is estimated they could disappear completely by 2025. Habitat loss, caused by factors such as tree cutting, is driving the decline. “One of the problems is that this species has been poorly studied. We need to find out what kind of habitat requirement they have, so we can maintain it when human activities are taking place,” said Kathy Martin, a UBC forestry professor.

Read More

Artist creates powerful reflections on logging industry

Williams Lake Tribune
June 9, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

With sweeping brush strokes, a rich colour palette and a painterly style reminiscent of the great Canadian Group of Seven, Annerose Georgeson’s paintings in the Station House Gallery this month are an honest and commanding representation of the logging industry in northern B.C. At first look one gets the impression that the show simply titled, Logging, is a criticism of the industry, but this would be as far from the intention of the artist as one could get. …Her show is part of a series of landscape paintings about the various changes in the forest industry including logging, forest fires, farming and pine beetles. As one viewer at the pening last week who has worked in the bush said he could feel the intensity and urgency in the paintings to get the beetle killed timber out of the forest while it is still salvageable.

Read More

Weyerhaeuser Renews Commitment for Free Public Land Access

June 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Settling concerns among outdoor recreationists and state officials for the time being, Weyerhaeuser Co. has signed an agreement with the state of Montana to allow free public access on its vast landholdings for another year.Weyerhaeuser, a Washington-based timber giant that merged with Plum Creek Timber Co. in February, renewed Plum Creek’s annual contract with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks late last month through the state’s block management program. The agreement, which was voluntarily renewed by Plum Creek for decades, will allow hunters and other recreationists to access the private land in exchange for state game wardens patrolling the property. …“Here in Montana, Weyerhaeuser does not have any plans to make changes to the current access policy,” said Tom Ray, a former resources and manufacturing leader at Plum Creek and the new Montana resource team leader for Weyerhaeuser.

Read More

Old growth trees spiked by eco-warriors in Oregon to stop logging

RT
June 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Environmental activists warned those who cut down ancient trees for profit that giant logs in an Oregon mill have been spiked in protest. Earth First! released the statement Saturday, claiming dozens of spikes had been placed in timber at the Noti mill to stop the company from “processing the oldest and largest trees,” so workers wouldn’t be harmed by cutting into them. Nails were also placed in the trunks to prevent the company from using metal detectors to easily remove spikes. “This action was taken to stop production and is not intended to harm any worker at the mill,” the group said in their statement. They dedicated the act of civil disobedience to Marius Mason, an activist currently serving a 22-year sentence for arson and property damage aimed at the fur and genetically-modified food industry.

Read More

Editorial: Where is the forest funding?

The Bend Bulletin
June 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Members of Oregon’s Congressional delegation have introduced bills to extract some of the craziness from the way the federal government takes care of national forests. Both Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat, and Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, have bills that take on what’s called fire borrowing. It should be called fire thievery. When the federal government’s budget for fighting wildfires is exhausted — as it usually is — money for forest restoration, trails, timber sales and other parts of managing the forest is drained to pay for wildfires. But there’s more craziness that is not being addressed. There are many definitions of what is a healthy forest. Almost nobody, though, thinks that’s what we have. A joint effort from the Forest Service and the Nature Conservancy estimated in January 2015 that it would take 50 years at the current rate of restoration work to get Oregon forests to a healthy place.

Read More

Salvage Logging Can Reduce Danger For Decades

Payson Roundup
June 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Massive fires that rage through the ponderosa pine forest leave a haunted wasteland in their wake. To find a stunning example, just drive on Forest Road 300 through the blackened scar of the Dude Fire, which charred 30,000 acres and killed six firefighters more than 20 years ago. Many of the blackened snags still stand, many more lie piled on the ground like jackstraws. But at least the burn area forms a firebreak. Right? Not necessarily. A tree-killing fire actually increases the amount of readily burned fuel on the ground for 20 years or more, according to a recent study by the Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station published in the Journal Forest Ecology and Management. The study gives support for the controversial practice of salvage logging, which gives timber companies the go-ahead to move in quickly after a wildfire to harvest the dead and downed trees killed — but not consumed — by the fire.

Read More

Weyerhaeuser Renews Commitment for Free Public Land Access

June 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Settling concerns among outdoor recreationists and state officials for the time being, Weyerhaeuser Co. has signed an agreement with the state of Montana to allow free public access on its vast landholdings for another year.Weyerhaeuser, a Washington-based timber giant that merged with Plum Creek Timber Co. in February, renewed Plum Creek’s annual contract with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks late last month through the state’s block management program. The agreement, which was voluntarily renewed by Plum Creek for decades, will allow hunters and other recreationists to access the private land in exchange for state game wardens patrolling the property. …“Here in Montana, Weyerhaeuser does not have any plans to make changes to the current access policy,” said Tom Ray, a former resources and manufacturing leader at Plum Creek and the new Montana resource team leader for Weyerhaeuser.

Read More

Michigan Tech, MSU partner to drive development in state’s forestry industry

MiBiz
June 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A consortium of academics, government officials and industry leaders wants to refocus the state on wood products and create a hub for bio-materials produced from Michigan’s forests. The Michigan Forest Biomaterials Institute was created in partnership between Houghton-based Michigan Technological University and Michigan State University in East Lansing. With the initiative, the members hope to create a statewide effort to establish manufacturing capabilities to produce, use and recycle wood products in innovative ways. At the same time, stakeholders in the Biomaterials Institute are also busy drumming up support for Reforge, a program that spun out from the group that aims to solicit more funding from the state to support forestry research.

Read More

Plan to clear N.J. forest land divides environmentalists

NorthJersey.com
June 11, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

A plan to help endangered birds by cutting down dozens of acres of state forest on Sparta Mountain represents a radically different approach to land management for New Jersey — and has bitterly divided New Jersey’s major environmental groups. The plan, developed by the New Jersey Audubon Society for the state Division of Fish and Wildlife, would clear-cut small patches of forest totaling up to 210 acres to simulate a young-growth forest in the 3,500-acre Sparta Mountain Wildlife Management Area in Sussex and Morris counties. An additional 185 to 465 acres would be subject to less aggressive, selective tree removal to open the forest canopy and allow more sunlight to spur quicker growth of mature trees to imitate an old-growth forest.

Read More

Atlanta has a new plan to save trees

Atlanta Journal-Constitution
June 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Local governments throughout metro Atlanta generally try to balance clear cutting of land for new development by replanting trees elsewhere, but the city of Atlanta is considering a new approach to save existing trees by buying them. Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, the city’s director of sustainability, said the city’s “green team” is working on a change to Atlanta’s tree ordinance that would allow the city to buy mature trees on private land and give that property to the parks department for “passive” recreation. Essentially, the change would protect portions of the city’s tree canopy from development by creating mini tree preserves….Benfield said the ordinance change would allow the city to use some of the recompense fees to buy up parcels with trees already on them, preserving them from future development. She said the city would only deal willing sellers — “opportunistic purchases,” she called them.

Read More

Forestry workers still using cancer-linked chemical despite ongoing safety review

ABC News, Australia
June 13, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Forestry workers in Western Australia are still using the herbicide glyphosate despite the chemical’s safety being under review by the national regulator. The World Health Organisation’s cancer research arm last year found glyphosate was probably carcinogenic. The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) is now reviewing the safety of the chemical. Last week, Forest Products Commission (FPC) workers began aerial spraying of glyphosate over pine plantations near Southampton Homestead, an organic farm near Balingup. WA Nationals leader and Warren-Blackwood MP, Terry Redman, has defended the use of the chemical.  “FPC’s done everything it possibly can in terms of managing its relationship with neighbours in proximity to its plantation forestry,” he said.

Read More

National Forest Policy by Ministry of Climate Change

Times of Islamabad
June 12, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Ministry of Climate Change has sent a final draft of the National Forest Policy to the Council of Common Interest (CCI) for approval in its next meeting. “The policy, hammered out in strenuous and elaborate consultation with provincial forest and wildlife departments and other relevant federal governmental departments and forest officials of the Gilgit- Baltistan, FATA and Azad Jammu & Kashmir regions and non-governmental organizations, will be implemented to conserve existing forests, bring more trees through community participation and meet international obligations related to forests,” a senior official of the ministry told APP. The official said that Prime Minister, Muhammad Nawaz Sharif in March 2015 had directed to formulate a National Forest Policy.

Read More

Forestry awards for Northumberland woodland and Scouts

Nothumberland Gazette
June 10, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: International

At the Royal Forestry Society’s (RFS) Excellence in Forestry Awards, Ford and Etal Estates’ Ford Westfield Woods, owned by Lord and Lady Joicey and managed by Egger Forestry, took silver in the RFS Silviculture Award. The judges said: “Work throughout was of a high standard, clearly based on a good knowledge of site variation across the estate.” The owners said: “The Joicey family and the rest of the Estate forestry team are delighted to receive this award. “Our forestry team is something which the Estate is extremely proud of, as it gives the opportunity to manage the habitats and timber resource on the Estate closely and with real flexibility depending on site conditions. “Moreover, alongside our sawmill, the department provides employment to a number of staff members and supports the local rural economy and society, something which is highly important to the Estate.”

Read More

Forest Fires

South African employer of firefighters apologizes for ‘international incident’ after pay dispute

June 13, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The South African government-funded program that employs firefighters now embroiled in a pay dispute in Alberta has apologized to Canadians. The program, called Working on Fire, issued a statement on Friday saying it is “extremely disappointed” the controversy could not be settled internally before it “escalated into an international incident.” The story of 300 South African firefighters and their eventual battle over what they’re being paid has been making headlines for two weeks. They became a big news story in Canada the moment they arrived, singing and dancing after they got off a flight the Edmonton International Airport.

Read More

South African employer of firefighters apologizes for ‘international incident’ after pay dispute

June 13, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The South African government-funded program that employs firefighters now embroiled in a pay dispute in Alberta has apologized to Canadians. The program, called Working on Fire, issued a statement on Friday saying it is “extremely disappointed” the controversy could not be settled internally before it “escalated into an international incident.” The story of 300 South African firefighters and their eventual battle over what they’re being paid has been making headlines for two weeks. They became a big news story in Canada the moment they arrived, singing and dancing after they got off a flight the Edmonton International Airport.

Read More

Evacuation Levels Lowered; Akawana Fire 44 Percent Contained

Associated Press in Oregon Public Broadcasting
June 10, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The Oregon Department of Forestry says it has lowered evacuation notices for many homes near a wildfire in central Oregon. The Akawana fire was ignited by lightning Tuesday and grew to 2,000 acres north of the town of Sisters, near Lake Billy Chinook. On Friday, the forestry department said it is now 44 percent contained. Level two evacuation notices — which means to be set to go at a moment’s notice — have been lowered to level one in a subdivision but some other homes remain at level two. The department says its fire-behavior analyst, Mike Haasken, told firefighters that forest fuels remain very dry despite cooler weather. Firefighters using hand tools and a bulldozer have established containment lines and will be strengthening them, and mopping up hot spots.

Read More

Wildfire: A Dangerous Tool

Forest Service struggling to turn wildfires into a management tool in dense, unhealthy forest
Payson Roundup
June 10, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The thousands of acres on fire all across Rim Country in the record-heat for early June offer a stark illustration of the transformation of the Forest Service’s approach to wildfires in the past decade. The rapidly evolving approach toward wildfires also reflects a much broader realization that many regions must learn to live with fire rather than always rush to battle the flames. The shift in Rim Country has been stunning, as evidenced by the reassuring updates on the now 30,357-acre Juniper Fire near Young, the 16,500-acre Jack Fire near Happy Jack, the 138-acre Reservoir Fire near the C.C. Cragin Reservoir and the 7,884-acre Mormon Fire near Flagstaff.

Read More

Juniper Fire Contained At 30,000 Acres

Blaze still proivdes “significant benefits”
Payson Roundup
June 10, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

…The Juniper Fire continues to provide significant benefits to the ecosystem in the Sierra Ancha Mountains, meeting the expectations of fire managers. Yesterday, firefighters conducted burnout operations using both hand and aerial ignitions in the Parker Creek and Pocket Creek areas. Ground crews completed handlines on a significant portion of the northwestern section of the fire. Due to a combination of firefighter efforts, lower temperatures and increased relative humidity, fire activity is decreasing along the north, northwest and southeast perimeter.

Read More

The Monster Has Returned

Payson Roundup
June 10, 2016
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The nightmare rises from the ash and reaches out its charred arms for us. This week, a brush fire near Yarnell forced the evacuation of 300 people, precisely three years after another wildfire advancing on that unincorporated community killed 19 Prescott firefighters. Mercifully, a shift in the weather and quick action by firefighters appears to have averted the worst — this time. But the news inspired nightmarish flashbacks — and another chance to measure whether we’ve done nearly enough to honor the tragic sacrifice of those firefighters. Fortunately, Yarnell learned some harsh lessons from its failure to prepare for that inevitable fire. In the past three years, the community, the state and the U.S. Forest Service cooperated to thin a firebreak on the edge of town. That provided a safe place for firefighters to make a stand against the onrushing flames.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

New Face for Canada’s Biofuels, Biobased Sectors

CRFA mission moves beyond biofuels, rebranding itself as Renewable Industries Canada.
Ethanol Producer Magazine
June 9, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

It is an exciting time for Canada’s renewable fuels and biobased product sectors. Industry leaders are impacting the energy landscape greatly, building the nation’s biobased economy and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To reflect this, the national voice of Canada’s biofuels sector has rebranded from the Canadian Renewable Fuels Association to Renewable Industries Canada. The change reinforces our 32-year-old association’s mission to promote the use of value-added products made from renewable resources. RICanada’s mandate now goes beyond renewable fuels to include advanced biofuels and policy programs that will support greater research, development and commercialization of renewable and biobased industrial products. For us, this is a natural extension of who we are and what we do best.

Read More

Talking Biotech: Oregon’s Steve Strauss on benefits, challenges to genetically engineered trees, forests biology

Genetic Literacy Project
June 13, 2016
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Dr. Steve Strauss is a Distinguished Professor of Forestry at Oregon State University. He has been at the forefront of forest biology and genetic engineering of trees, contributing greatly to the understanding of fundamental tree biology, as well as the development of techniques and tools to perform genetic engineering in tree species. We discuss the many opportunities in tree breeding, as well as the limitations and other challenges.

Read More