Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 5, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Here’s Some Trivia You May Not Know

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 5, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Did you know that yesterday was National Trivia Day? Want to test your “forest IQ”? Click Read More for ten trivia questions posed by Splinter, the mascot of the Canadian Women in Timber. Warning: it’s supposed to be “child’s play”.

The National Observer has an interesting retrospective on the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement. According to the authors, the agreement was “one of the most complex multi-stakeholder negotiations ever undertaken in Canada” and “if there is one single lesson that stands out, it is surely that the sound and fury of public antagonism obscures more basic common interests”. The story includes many links to background on the topic such as Patrick Armstrong’s report on “lessons learned“.

Understanding and promoting urban tree cover has never been more important”, according to researchers at MIT who recently launched “Treepedia” in collaboration with the World Economic Forum. Using Google Street View, they measured the percentage of land covered by trees in 12 cities across the world, which ranges from 26% to 9% (the top five are Vancouver, Sacramento, Geneva, Seattle and Toronto while the bottom two are Paris and London).

Finally, Don Kayne, CEO of Canfor, Canada’s top lumber producer, looks back at 2016 and some of the key highlights for his company.

— Tree Frog Editors

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Business & Politics

Garneau will be under plenty of scrutiny in 2017

By Alex Binkley
National News Watch
January 5, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Transport Minister Marc Garneau has laid out an ambitious agenda in his Transportation 2030 strategy and turning the initial cross country praise for it into ongoing support will be no easy task. While legislation to improve air travel drew a lot of media attention, for business groups the focus was on a bill the minister promised for next spring to balance the power of the railways and their customers… The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) welcomed Garneau’s “concrete measures” to improve transportation system and generate enhanced data for the benefit of those who use the transportation system. “Transportation is a vital issue that impacts Canada’s competitiveness and export performance, and lack of access to a reliable and efficient system has challenged the forest sector,” says Derek Nighbor, the CEO of FPAC… The largely rural-based forest products industry is an export sector that has often faced bottlenecks and struggled to access reliable and effective transportation to get its goods to market in a timely manner. Transportation alone represents up to one-third of the production costs of any forest products firm.

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‘Trump needs Canada’: BMO’s Belski says Canadian investors too bearish on materials sector

By Nicole Gibillini
Business News Network
January 3, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

One investment strategist thinks Canadian investors needs to be more bullish on the materials sector, especially when it comes to softwood lumber, as President-elect Donald Trump prepares to take office later this month. “I think the Canadian investing public is probably too bearish on the softwood impact and what it’s going to happen to the pulp stocks and some of the paper stocks,” Brian Belski Chief Investment Strategist at BMO Capital Markets told BNN in an interview Tuesday. Softwood lumber negotiations have been ongoing between the U.S. and Canada as the 2006 softwood lumber agreement between the countries expired in 2015, and the one-year standstill period that allowed them to try to reach a new agreement ended in October.

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Looking Back at 2016

By Don Kayne, CEO Canfor
Canfor
December 31, 2016
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

As we prepare to welcome 2017, I would like to look back at some key highlights from 2016 that were featured on our blog. In April, we welcomed Wynndel Box and Lumber to the Canfor family. The acquisition diversified our product mix by adding outstanding products from southern British Columbia. Later in the year, we officially opened our Canfor Southern Pine headquarters, in Mobile, Alabama, which reflects our tremendous growth in the southern United States. In addition to our continued growth, Canfor is playing a key role in advancing industry innovations. Specialty lumber from our Radium and Elko mills was used in the 18-storey Brock Commons mass wood structure. This student residence at the University of British Columbia will be the world’s tallest wood building when it opens in May 2017. The structure and façade were completed in September – four months ahead of schedule.

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Global Timber and Wood Products Market Update

By Wood Resources International LLC
Scoop Independent News
January 5, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The two Global Wood Fiber Price Indices were close to parity in the 3Q/16. The Hardwood Wood Fiber Price Index (HFPI) has rebounded by 5.6% from the 1Q/16 when it reached an 11-year low. The biggest price increases this year have been in Brazil, Indonesia, Australia and Chile where prices have gone up despite the strengthening of the local currencies. However, hardwood fiber prices have not gone up in all markets this year. Hardwood pulplog prices were lower throughout Europe, Eastern Canada and the US South.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

US Department of Energy launches REMADE Institute to boost material reuse

Waste Dive
January 5, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced plans for a new Reducing Embodied-energy and Decreasing Emissions (REMADE) Institute in Rochester, NY. This is part of the agency’s Manufacturing USA initiative and will be led by the Sustainable Manufacturing Innovation Alliance. The REMADE Institute’s mission will be to reduce the cost of technologies required to reuse, recycle and remanufacture metals, fibers, polymers and electronic waste. Through these efforts the goal is to see a 50% improvement in overall energy efficiency by 2027… Based on the long list of institute members the waste and recycling industry’s interest in this sizable. Members include the American Chemistry Council, American Forest and Paper Association

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Plant material discovery could benefit future wood skyscraper construction

By Chris Wood
Construction Dive
January 4, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Cross-laminated timber (CLT) and engineered bamboo have driven a growing interest in wood-constructed high-rises, and the application of new cellulose and xythan binding properties will likely find their way into future wood projects. Designed by PLP Architecture in collaboration with Cambridge University, London’s proposed Oakwood Tower — at 80 stories and 1,000 feet tall — is set to become the world’s tallest timber constructed building and the second tallest building in London overall. 

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Forestry

Canadian Forest Service to fill many Science Director positions across Canada

Natural Resources Canada
January 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The Canadian Forest Service – Natural Resources Canada is planning to fill many Science director positions across the country, including one position right here in Victoria, BC. Please have a look to the details below and feel free to share the information across your networks. Deadline is January 13, 2017. The Science Director is responsible to manage a group of research scientists, technicians, and other professional and administrative staff at their local research laboratory. The Director plays a critical science leadership role locally and nationally, and helps shape the research agenda in line with organizational priorities. The Director will foster a culture of innovation and integration, encouraging client-focused and holistic approaches to complex problems according to systems thinking. 

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Rejecting rail ties burning could keep a sawmill running

Letter by Sage Birchwater
Williams Lake Tribune
January 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I agree with Reg Norberg on one thing in his Dec 28 letter to the Tribune. Williams Lake can’t afford unnecessary sawmill cutbacks. That’s why I think Mr. Norberg and his colleagues should support the Rail Ties Be Wise campaign to reject the B.C. government permit allowing the burning of 50 per cent rail ties in Atlantic Power Corporation’s Williams Lake Energy Plant. According to lumber industry leaders, forcing the energy plant to continue burning clean residual woodfibre over toxic rail ties could contribute to the survival of one more sawmill in Williams Lake than might otherwise be the case. They also say processing and hauling clean biofuel to the energy plant will create 50 to 60 forestry jobs.

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Royal Roads area users fear loss of forested land

By Amy Smart
Victoria Times Colonist
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The green space surrounding Royal Roads University is a well-used recreational spot, and those taking advantage of it Tuesday afternoon hope its character is retained. The Department of National Defence, which owns the property, is preparing to dispose of it — with the Songhees and Esquimalt First Nations a possible part of a future deal. Both have expressed an interest in the property and identified it as a core part of their claimed traditional territories, DND spokeswoman Jessica Lamirande said. …The land once belonged to James Dunsmuir, who purchased it in 1907 and commissioned the construction of Hatley Castle as a place to raise his children, entertain guests and retire. A military training facility was established in 1940 and functioned under various names until 1995, when the final class of students graduated from Royal Roads Military College.

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Best practices from the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement

This article is produced in partnership with Teck Resources Ltd., Tides Canada and Vancity Credit Union
National Observer
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Resource development in Canada is so often mired in bitter conflict that it’s worth remembering there are shining examples of collaborative problem solving. The 2016 Great Bear Rainforest agreement is a model that offers important lessons. It was one of the most complex multi-stakeholder negotiations ever undertaken in Canada. But its lessons are relevant to business, First Nations and environmental leaders engaged at all scales of resource conflict. If there is one single lesson that stands out, it is surely that the sound and fury of public antagonism obscures more basic common interests. They may not be easy to find, but if they exist, and if they are artfully cultivated, they can become the basis for solutions that were unimaginable in the heat of battle. The hardest part is often getting started.

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Heli-logging used in fight against fir beetle

By Monica Lamb-Yorski
Williams Lake Tribune
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Efforts being made to combat Douglas-fir beetle infestations around Williams Lake have been front and centre in Williams Lake in recent weeks. That’s thanks to a heli-logging crew who have taken on the highly visible and dangerous job of removing infected trees within the city limits one at a time in populated areas. During a presentation to city council at its regular meeting just before Christmas, resource manager Jennifer Bowman and district forest health specialist Kristine Wilker told council the areas targeted include 168 Mile behind the stockyards, off Hodgson Road in the Esler subdivision, and above South Lakeside. “There has been an outbreak and you can see many red trees that indicate they were attacked last year,” said Bowman, noting all the sites were identified through an aerial survey as well as some ground probing.

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Toronto beats NYC, Paris, London in new tree ranking, but experts say more work needed

By Laura DaSilva
CBC News
January 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

A new urban forestry project is touting Toronto’s tree canopy as one of the most luxuriant in the world, but silviculturists say a lot of work needs to be done to keep the city green. “It’s great to be celebrated, but it’s important to pay attention to how you lose it,” said University of Toronto forestry professor Sandy Smith. …Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently launched their Treepedia project in collaboration with the World Economic Forum. At 19.5 per cent, Toronto ranked fifth — ahead of Los Angeles, New York, London and Paris. Vancouver took the top spot with 25.9 per cent.But with new condos going up frequently here, Smith said she’s worried that Toronto’s becoming more grey than it is green.

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House GOP rules change will make it easier to sell off federal land

By Juliet Eilperin
Washington Post
January 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

House Republicans on Tuesday changed the way Congress calculates the cost of transferring federal lands to the states and other entities, a move that will make it easier for members of the new Congress to cede federal control of public lands. The provision, included as part as a larger rules package the House approved by a vote of 233 to 190 during its first day in session, highlights the extent to which some congressional Republicans hope to change longstanding rules now that the GOP will control the executive and the legislative branches starting Jan. 20. Many Republicans, including House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Rob Bishop (R-Utah), have been pushing to hand over large areas of federal land to state and local authorities, on the grounds that they will be more responsive to the concerns of local residents.

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Firefighting is too costly: Innovation is needed now

By James Lee Witt and J. Keith Gilless
San Francisco Chronicle
January 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


In the wake of almost 7,000 wildfires that burned more than 565,000 acres in California in 2016, fire departments and emergency management professionals are facing more dangerous and expensive fires. But too little is being done to turn around this unsustainable trend. The deadly wildfire season in the West is growing longer and hotter; the Southeast is now more susceptible and conditions will only worsen. The problem is begging for new approaches. Yet, despite being a nation of innovators and problem-solvers, our approach to fighting forest and rangeland fires has essentially been the same for decades. There have been no major recent advances in fire suppression science and technology. …That is why we are launching a public-private partnership to help bring together the best minds to develop new ideas, tools and strategies to stop wildfires in their tracks — when we need to.

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Fryingpan logging makes sense

Letter by Bret Conant
Aspen Times
December 31, 2016
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

This letter is in response to the article published by The Aspen Times, on Nov. 30, 2016, entitled, “Basalt, Frying Pan Road could see up to 933 logging truck trips from forest health project.” All national forests (including the White River National Forest) have an obligation to plan, implement and administer timber sales and vegetation management projects. The management of our national forest lands is necessary in order to maintain diverse, healthy and resilient forests. The timber, water, pasture, mineral and other resources of the national forest lands are for the use of the people, and shall always be. It is somewhat disturbing to me that so many residents living in the Roaring Fork Valley, including but not limited to public officials, …My response to Mr. Schendler and other opponents is simple: Conflicting interests must be reconciled and decided from the standpoint of the greatest good of the greatest number in the long run.

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Zinke will straighten out forest management problems

By Jack D. Jones – retired wildlife biologist with the Montana Bureau of Land Management
Montana Standard
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

There still may be some hope for the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management with a complete change in the administration in Washington, D.C. John Mundinger, Helena, touched on the problem in the Standard 12-25-2016 with the article about the USFS today: “The crisis condition on national forests.” “Instead of advocating scientific management, foresters like Bosworth and Blackwell used NEPA and NFMA (National Forest Management Act) to perpetuate single use management and fire suppression.” Yes, I know John Mundinger as a FWP biologist when he was working for Montana F&G in research on waterfowl in Malta. …I am confident Rep. Ryan Zinke as the new Secretary of the Interior will straighten out the BLM; the Secretary of Agriculture for the USFS is yet to be announced.

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Crews start removing dead, dying trees from Pioneer Fire

By Steve Bertel
KIVITV.com
January 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

LOWMAN, ID – Restoration and recovery work started Monday in the area damaged by last year’s massive Pioneer Fire, and will likely continue for the two weeks, according to forest officials. The Pine Flats hazard timber sale was awarded to the Boise Cascade Company, after it offered the highest bid of $96,853.00 for 1,714 tons — about 60 to 70 truckloads — of ponderosa pine and other coniferous species. Salvage operations are expected to be completed Jan. 16, 2017. …The primary purpose of the salvage sale is to remove dead and dying trees to prevent bark beetle infestation in the campground, according to Lowman District Ranger John Kidd. “This one action actually has numerous benefits: besides deterring beetles, the timber will support local businesses as well as help us prepare the campground for the 2017 season,’ he said.

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Cold Hollow Woodlots Program to expand to 8000 acres

Vermont Biz
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Vermont Business Magazine Vermont’s Cold Hollow to Canada (CHC) (link is external), a regional conservation partnership program (RCPP) operating in seven towns along the western spine of the Green Mountains, will expand an existing cross boundary management initiative. The Cold Hollow Woodlots Program (link is external) initially engaged 12 landowners spanning over 2,000 acres in the town of Enosburg. RCPP will help expand this work to 50 landowners and 8,000 acres by adding woodlots in Richford and Montgomery, as well as serving the existing woodlot group in Enosburg. This effort will be supported with RCPP project funds totaling $640,000.

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Extension offers timber workshop

By Tyler Hargett
Franklin County Times
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Owners of timberland and those involved in the production of forest products need to be aware of certain income tax issues in the timber industry. To address this, the Alabama Cooperative Extension System is hosting Timber Tax Workshops in six locations across the state, hoping to draw the attention of landowners, foresters, accountants and attorneys.

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Will wildlife search save Shawnee forest from logging?

By Marion Renault
The Columbus Dispatch
January 5, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

When spring comes, experts who study plants and lichens, and insects, amphibians, reptiles, birds and other creatures will descend on Shawnee State Forest in what they call a full-blown “bioblitz.” …There is a mission to this field trip: to gather evidence of threatened or endangered species in the upper portion of the forest’s Rock Run watershed. By documenting the area’s rare biodiversity, a group of environmentalists plans to build a case against logging proposed in the area. …Legal protections prohibit human disturbance there. And special state and nonprofit measures shield lower portions of Rock Run from heavy logging. But the group wants to see all of Rock Run protected.

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What to expect for rainforests in 2017

By Rhett A. Butler, CEO, Mongabay
Mongabay
January 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

While 2016 lacked the drama of Indonesia’s 2015 fire and haze crisis, surging deforestation in Earth’s largest rainforest and ongoing destruction of forests for industrial plantations meant that it was far from a quiet year for the planet’s rainforests. So what’s ahead for 2017? Below are eight things we’ll be closely watching in the new year. …1. Will deforestation continue to rise in Brazil? After a much heralded decade-plus of declining deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, the region has now experienced back-to-back years of sharply increasing forest destruction. …2. Indonesia: haze, politics, and land rights. President Joko Widodo, or Jokowi, extended and strengthened an unprecedented moratorium on new concessions in peatlands and forest areas.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Is wood a green source of energy? Scientists are divided

By Warren Cornwall
Science Magazine
January 5, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

It took half a century for an acorn to grow into the 20-meter-tall oak tree standing here in a North Carolina hardwood forest near the banks of the Northeast Cape Fear River. But it takes just seconds to turn the oak into fuel for the furnace of a European power plant. A logging machine—a cross between a tank and a one-armed crab—grabs the tree with a metal claw. With a screech, a spinning blade bites through the trunk. Ultimately, the thickest bits of this tree and hundreds of others from this forest will be sliced into lumber. But the limbs from large trees like this, along with entire small or crooked trees, go to a specialized mill to be squeezed into tiny wood pellets. Shipped across the Atlantic Ocean, they will likely end up fueling a giant power plant in the United Kingdom that supplies nearly 10% of the country’s electricity.

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