Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: January 12, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Giants in the News

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 12, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

What do Cathedral Grove, Giant Sequoias and National Geographic have in common (other than stunning images of old growth forests). They’re in today’s news and the focus is “how best to protect them”.

Not surprisingly, wilderness campaigner Torrance Coste is advocating for “an end to old-growth logging” although, paradoxically, he’s also advocating for “a healthier wood-products industry with more sustainable jobs”. Retired RPF Bruce Devitt—recognizing the forest’s natural life cycle—is encouraging “conservation and management of relatively young Douglas fir ecosystems (e.g., 80 to 100 years) to become future Cathedral Groves”. And with news this week that California’s iconic tunnel tree is no more, National Geographic is giving us a bird’s eye (360 degree, virtual reality) view of what it’s like to be 250 feet up in the canopy. Impressive!

Finally, two interesting softwood lumber stories: “Trump could be Canada’s best weapon in the softwood fight?” and (a tongue-twister by Folly & Lardner LLP) “Will Trump Trade Free Trade for a Trade Blockade?

— Tree Frog Editors

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Business & Politics

Trump could be Canada’s best weapon in the softwood fight

By Naomi Christensen – a senior policy analyst with the Canada West Foundation
The Globe and Mail
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

As president-elect Donald Trump begins to shape his trade agenda, there are concerns about the effect on the Canadian economy, in particular because of our reliance on trade with the United States. However, there may be opportunities, too, and Canada must take full advantage where it can. This is particularly true when it comes to the softwood lumber dispute. Mr. Trump has billed himself as the president of the everyday man. …It would be a mistake to assume he will automatically be in the camp of the U.S. Lumber Coalition, the powerful lobby group behind the latest push for duties on Canadian softwood. …Mr. Trump comes to office unencumbered by the lobbyist establishment that has swayed the debate so far. Canada needs to tell the story of how our softwood contributes to U.S. economic growth, and how restricting its import will hurt most the very people who voted him into office. What is certain is that with Mr. Trump, things will not be business as usual. In an environment of uncertainty, this is a Canadian opportunity.

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Haida Gwaii logging companies receive heavy fines for shoddy practices

By Larry Pynn
The Vancouver Sun
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Three companies have been fined a total of up to $2.2 million in Masset provincial court on 10 counts under the federal Fisheries Act related to logging practices resulting in “complete devastation” and “wanton disregard” for fish habitat on Haida Gwaii. …In sentencing, Brecknell stated: “It would not be an exaggeration to describe the damage to DL 413 from the actions of I. Crosby under the lack of supervision by Howe Sound and Gwaii as cataclysmic.” The shoddy logging practices occurred adjacent to Highway 16 about 3.5 kilometres northeast of the Village of Port Clements on Graham Island, from June 24 to Oct. 20, 2010. Kumdis Bay Estuary and Mallard Creek were among the areas affected.

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Coast Forest Congratulates Karen Brandt, Interfor Vice President, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability

Coast Forest Products Association
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Coast Forest Products Association would like to take this opportunity to offer its sincere congratulations to Karen Brandt for the recent announcement regarding her newly created appointment as Vice President, Corporate Affairs & Sustainability at Interfor Corporation. In her new role, Ms. Brandt will be working closely with the members of Interfor’s senior management group to design, develop and implement programs to advance the company’s business objectives and brand. Since joining the company in 2012, Ms. Brandt has played a key role in its repositioning, serving initially as Director, Strategic Forestry Initiatives with Interfor’s Coastal Woodlands Operations and then as Director, Public Affairs and Corporate Communications.

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J.D. Irving to hire 184 people in Truro area

Truro Daily News
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

TRURO, N.S. – J.D. Irving is expecting to hire 184 employees in the Truro area over the next three years. The New Brunswick-based firm issued a press release Jan.11 to say they will be making 8,600 hires for all of their operations across Canada and the U.S. The total number of projected hires is down by about 1,600 from the previous three-year period. From 2014 to 2016 JDI hired 10,233 across their operations; 4043 in 2016, 3139 in 2015, and 3051 in 2014. …In the Truro area, JDI’s businesses include Cavendish Agri, Kent Building Supplies, Midland, Midland Courier, Woodlands office and Forestry and Sawmill in Valley – these are an agriculture supply store, building supply store, trucking and courier operations, forestry and sawmill operations.

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Domtar Windsor mill: Precision tree-harvesting

Pulp and Paper Canada
January 10, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

William Angus and Thomas Logan chose Windsor, Que., as the site of Canada’s first wood-based pulp mill in 1864. Today, with more than 150 years of continuous operation, the site now known as Domtar’s Windsor mill is the city’s largest employer. Advances in technology and sustainable forestry over the past 152 years have dramatically changed the landscape of the industry and environment in Windsor. In fact, today’s high-tech tree-harvesting techniques would be nearly unrecognizable to those who brought papermaking to the area. Because few people outside of the industry actually get to witness sustainable forest management practices in action, the Windsor mill created its Harvesting with Precision video to demonstrate how tree harvesting techniques that mimic the forest’s natural cycle can actually benefit the land.

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Trade Commission moving forward with potential import duties on Canadian lumber

By Sean Barry
Construction Dive
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

A group that includes producers Weyerhaeuser and Potlach as well as the Carpenters Industrial Council and the U.S. Lumber Coalition has said that duties are required to offset the damage caused to U.S. lumber mills by Canadian softwood subsidies and dumping of that product in the U.S. Imports of Canadian softwood lumber in the first eight months of last year were over 33% higher than in the same period the prior year, according to a report in November.

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International Trade Litigation and the New Trump Administration: Your Top Ten Questions Answered

By Robert Huey and Gregory Husisian with Foley & Lardner LLP
JD Supra Business Advisor
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Globalization and the need to efficiently deploy corporate resources have led many multinational companies to establish global supply networks. Although these efforts often lead to the efficient deployment of capital, diversify the revenue base among countries, and minimize currency exchange risk, these efforts also increase the exposure of the company to political risks that impact the long-term economic assumptions that undergird multinational investment. Mr. Trump’s campaign introduced several forms of unanticipated risk for multinational companies. Whether the focus was on the supposed problems of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), or trade with countries where the United States maintains a significant adverse trade balance (especially China and Mexico), the common theme was that the rules are stacked against U.S. interests and costing jobs, especially in the manufacturing sector.

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Local timber economy may be headed for downturn

By Danielle Stafford
Washburn County Register
January 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

WASHBURN COUNTY – The local timber economy is heading toward what some in the industry see as a downturn. “We will be going through some pains here in the forest products industry, at least for the next year or two,” said Max Ericson, who is a local logger and operator of the Springbrook Wood Yard in the Town of Springbrook. The problem comes from a combination of issues, one being that the price per cord of wood that loggers are receiving is down, as is the ability to sell their harvest. Despite the loss of profit, Ericson said that is not stopping loggers.  

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BSW Timber appoints UK operations director

Builders’ Merchants News
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Mike Lomas has joined BSW Timber as UK operations director from Metsa Wood where he held the role of VP sales and operations leading the UK business. At BSW Timber, Mr Lomas will be responsible for overseeing UK operations and will report to chief executive Tony Hackney. Mr Lomas has a strong background in the timber industry, including more than a decade with Finnforest UK where he also held the role of operations director. He brings a wealth of experience in management and commercial strategy to his future role at BSW Timber.

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Stora Enso to invest in biocomposite granules and microfibrillated cellulose production

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
January 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International


The investment projects are meant to develop new products for packaging, consumer goods and industrial application, and accelerate the company’s “transformation into a renewable materials company,” says Stora Enso. Stora Enso plans to invest a total of €21m in two different projects at its paper and board mills in Sweden and Finland. The two investments will be reportedly implemented in the company’s consumer board and wood products business divisions. According to Stora Enso, this will expand the company’s product portfolio and improve profitability of the corresponding business divisions.

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Metsä Group to sell wood element business to Lapwall

EUWID Wood Products and Panels
January 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Metsä Wood parts with its wood element business, agrees with Lapwall on multiyear delivery contract for laminated veneer lumber and spruce plywood. Metsä Wood, the wood products industry division of the Metsä Group, is divesting its wood element business in Pälkäne, Finland, to Lapwall Oy. The transaction is expected to be finalised by the end of January with the entire staff working in the wood element business being transferred to the new owner. According to an announcement released by Metsä Group on 11 January 2017, the divestment will have no material impact on the group’s financials.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

CNC hosts skills showdown

By Frank Peebles
Prince George Citizen
January 11, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Avery Bell has rung up the competition once again. For the second year in a row, the celebrated young carpenter is the high school champion in the cabinetmaking category of the Skills Canada Central Interior Regional Skills Competition. “The Grade 12 student from Correlieu Secondary in Quesnel was the provincial winner last year, and went on to place third at the Skills Canada National Competition in New Brunswick,” said Catherine Hansen McCarthy, communications officer at the College of New Caledonia where the event was held. Second place in high school cabinetmaking went to Garnet Grenon and third to Scott Sargent.

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Is your rosewood legal?

By Karl D. Forth
Woodworking Network
January 11, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Starting this month, companies that import rosewood and rosewood veneer must comply with a new regulation and have a required permit. Wood products companies are advised to make sure their trading partners are in compliance with the new regulation, even for material shipped before the rule implementation on January 2. Rosewood and veneer are used in musical instruments and residential furniture. Earlier, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) adopted new regulations that would subject approximately 80 percent of the multi-billion dollar global trade in precious rosewoods to stricter regulation and increased transparency to assess legality and sustainability.

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Forestry

Royal Roads forest a future Cathedral Grove

Letter by Bruce Devitt, RFP (Ret)
Victoria Times Colonist
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Re: “Royal Roads area users fear loss,” Jan. 4. Cathedral Grove, along the Port Alberni Highway, is recognized as a rare remnant of an ancient Douglas fir ecosystem. It is a must-do stop for those travelling to Alberni and beyond. The natural cycle of life is slowly impacting its future as weather and age bring down the big old trees. There is another Douglas fir ecosystem located in our backyard that is being threatened by development. Darren Stone’s lovely picture of hikers walking the trail in the DND property at Royal Roads illustrates perfectly a Douglas fir forest well on its way to becoming a future Cathedral Grove.

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Let’s make 2017 the Year of the Forest

By Torrance Coste, Vancouver Island Campaigner for the Wilderness Committee.
Victoria Times Colonist
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The new year is going to be an important one for B.C. On Vancouver Island, there’s hunger for change on an issue that brings local environmentalists back to their roots: forests. At the Wilderness Committee, we began battling in court last year against the logging company that is destroying rare old-growth rainforest in the Walbran Valley. …Forest policy in B.C. is set by the provincial government, and there’s an election in May. Neither the government nor the official Opposition has called for a ban on old-growth logging. This puts them offside with citizens, businesses and municipal governments. The excuse they make is that they can’t oppose any logging practice because we need to protect forestry jobs.

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Don’t transfer the land, fix the failures

Redding Record Searchlight
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

On the first day of the 115th Congress, House Republicans took aim at a former president’s legacy — not Barack Obama’s but Teddy Roosevelt’s. As part of the resolution setting the rules for the new session, members — including our own Rep. Doug LaMalfa —voted to make it easier to transfer federal land to states, local governments or Indian tribes. Although it’s clear where Democrats stand on the issue — they are nearly uniform in opposing land transfer to states —– it’s less clear what kind of proposal if any might actually emerge from the Republicans who now control each branch of government. …The reality is that despite the fast action by the House, land transfers will be far more complicated than they sound in a cable TV interview — and probably would end up being a net loss for the country, the environment and the economy.

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Angeles National Forest lowers fire danger level, but warns of lingering risk

89.3 KPCC
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Angeles National Forest officials lowered the area’s fire danger level from “Very High” to “High” on Wednesday. After a series of devastating wildfires this past summer, Angeles Fire Chief Robert Garcia said in a statement that the forest’s vegetation is soaking up moisture, thanks to this week’s storms. But even with the rain, the danger of a wildfire lurks. The various plants – grasses, brush and trees – absorb moisture at different rates, Nathan Judy, spokesman for the Angeles National Forest, told KPCC. Grasses have absorbed several inches of rain, but trees and brush remain dry due to their tough exterior, he added. “We’re not out of the woods just yet,” he said.

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Stunning 360 Pictures Reveal Tops of Giant Sequoias

By Brian Clark Howard
National Geographic
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Harnessing up and climbing to the top of a giant sequoia is a “magical, life-changing experience,” says canopy biologist Anthony R. Ambrose of the University of California, Berkeley. “They are massive organisms that have been growing for thousands of years,” Ambrose adds. “When you get up into their enormous, complex crowns you feel like an ant.” Ambrose hopes the public can now experience part of what it’s like to scale a rope up a 250-foot tall giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) while planted safely on the ground. He and his colleague Wendy L. Baxter are featured in new 360 videos produced by National Geographic for Facebook. The videos were shot in June in the storied Giant Forest of California’s Sequoia National Park, home of the General Sherman and President trees.

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USDA grants fuel ongoing forest projects

By Kurt Liedtke
Herald and News
January 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Two recent grant approvals through the U.S. Department of Agriculture will aid in Klamath County forest health, totaling more than $3 million in funding awarded to the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and National Resource Conservation Services (NRCS). The grants apply to two collaborative projects between USFS and NRCS focused on the Fremont-Winema National Forest and Deschutes National Forest, one of which is already underway. The North Warner multi-ownership Forest Health Project provides $1.15 million in funding split between the participating agencies for a three-year project to conduct forest health treatments through commercial harvest, small tree thinning and slash operations on federal and private lands. The project will encompass designated sites within the North Warner’s 410,000 acres, where private landowners and agencies are working across ownership boundaries to promote forest health and fire resiliency.

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Crandall logging to thin budworms

By Gib Mathers
Powell Tribune
January 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


It’s a tough time to be a tree in the Shoshone National Forest. Spruce beetles, Douglas-fir beetles, mountain pine beetles, mistletoe and Comandra rust have all been taking a toll on the forest’s vegetation. However, it’s now the western spruce budworm ravaging trees in the Sunlight/Crandall area. In response to the budworms’ ongoing infestation, Shoshone National Forest staff are proposing to log approximately 2,000 acres in the Crandall area. The western spruce budworm is a widely distributed defoliator, according to a Shoshone handout. The brownish moths are one-half inch long and are able to fly. Budworms don’t necessarily kill the tree, but Crandall trees have already suffered pine beetles and drought, said Olga Troxel, Shoshone environmental coordinator and project team leader. Mortality to budworms isn’t 100 percent, but it’s very high.

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BLM to pay $4.7M in timber payments to Douglas County

By Emily Hoard
The News-Review
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Bureau of Land Management plans to distribute about $19 million from timber sales to the 18 western Oregon counties covered under the 1937 Oregon and California (O&C) Lands and the Coos Bay Wagon Road Acts, the agency announced Tuesday. “As far as the BLM’s concerned, we’re happy to be able to provide these payments to the counties from the harvest activities that have occurred this past year,” Roseburg District BLM spokesperson Cheyne Rossbach said. Half of all timber sale receipts on the 2.4 million acres of O&C lands are distributed among Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Tillamook, Washington and Yamhill counties.

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Telegraph forestry project gets green light

By Tom Kuglin
Helena Independent Record
January 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest has decided to proceed with a nearly 5,700-acre forestry project southwest of Helena aimed at protecting firefighters in heavily beetle-killed forest. Forest Supervisor Bill Avey on Monday signed a record of decision for the Telegraph Vegetation Project. The nearly 24,000-acre project area is located 15 miles southwest of Helena and 5 miles south of Elliston, and includes logging and prescribed burning. “The interdisciplinary team determined that the need for action in this analysis area is compelling,” the Forest Service decision says. “By taking actions now, a more diverse and more sustainable forest will be the outcome, moving the area towards meeting the Forest Plan direction of having a healthy, resilient and productive forest ecosystem.

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Clatsop County: Flushing away $12 million tax dollars?

By Taxpayer Association of Oregon
Oregon Catalyst
January 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

It has recently come to our attention that Clatsop County commissioners are preparing to flush $12 million taxpayer dollars down the toilet. In 2016, Linn County initiated a class-action lawsuit against the State of Oregon for breach of contract over Oregon’s Forest Trust Land. In addition to Linn County, class members include more than 150 Oregon counties and special districts that are beneficiaries of dedicated revenues from management of county forest trust lands. …Clatsop County could stand to receive $12 million annually from the breach of contract lawsuit. Yet, extreme environmental groups are encouraging Clatsop County Commissioners to opt out of the statewide lawsuit.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Researchers look to brace Great Lakes forests for climate change

By Marie Orttenburger
Great Lakes Echo
January 11, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East

Great Lakes forests will get warmer and suffer more frequent short-term droughts, scientists say. “We know climate change is going to really stress these systems in ways they haven’t been stressed in the last several thousand years,” said Stephen Harper, a climate change specialist with the U.S. Forest Service. How trees will respond to such different growing conditions is unknown. But experts say they can’t wait to find out. “You don’t wait until the car has already gone over the cliff,” Harper said. “You hit the brakes when you can. You steer and find a better way around the cliff.” Harper is among the researchers who are taking the wheel. They are already figuring out what forest managers can do to mitigate potentially devastating impacts. The stakes are high.

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