Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 23, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Hungry for trade – why not try logs-for-cheese

Tree Frog Forestry News
March 23, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Sierra Club’s Mark Worthing and Wilderness Committee’s Torrance Costa kicked off their “state-of-the-rainforest” road show in Port Hardy yesterday to “rail against forestry activities in old-growth areas and the export of raw logs”. Next up is Campbell River, Parksville and Courtenay. Concerns and calls for moratoriums on logging also appeared in Whistler (old-growth logging) Kamloops (critical Mountain Caribou habitat) and Clearwater (debris flows and mudslides) yesterday.

In response to US calls to restrict the flow of softwood lumber south and to open the gates to dairy flow north, a free-market think-tank is suggesting a “logs-for-cheese deal” which would “squeeze some protectionism out of both industries, be good for consumers and spur economic productivity.”

The latest Wood Markets ‘Top 40’ survey is out with the key takeaway being that “2016 was a good year” for softwood lumber producers. The Canadian top 20 lumber companies saw their output rise from 19.6 billion bf to 20.45 billion bf last year while the top 20 U.S. companies increased their output “at a pace that was almost twice that of the entire U.S. industry and 50% more than that of the top 20 Canadian companies“.

And ending on a ‘spectacular’ note, the discovery of a colorful little frog with an active nightlife in a South American cloud forest has just been announced.

–Tree Frog Editors

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Froggy Foibles

‘Spectacular’ New Frog Found in Ecuadorian Cloud Forest

By jen Viegas
Seeker
March 22, 2017
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: International

The discovery of a colorful little frog with an active nightlife in a South American cloud forest has just been announced. The frog is a newly identified species that Guayasamin and colleague Chris Funk of Colorado State University have named Pristimantis ecuadorensis, the Ecuadorian rain frog. “The discovery is surprising, mostly because of the colorful nature of this species,” Guayasamin said. “Often times, the most beautiful species are readily recognized and described. The description of P. ecuadorensis is an exception to this rule.”

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Business & Politics

Canada and U.S. “Top 40” lumber producers’ annual ranking: 2016

By Russ Taylor
International Wood Markets Group
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The latest WOOD MARKETS annual survey of the “Top 40” Canadian and U.S. softwood lumber producers featured steady production growth in 2016 due to the cooperation of a strong U.S. market, plus growth in China. Amid an absence of any major mill acquisitions, almost all of the production gains came from existing mills. Of the top forty companies, only three in Canada and four in the U.S. recorded any production declines – a sign of a good year. …The Canadian top 20 lumber companies saw their output rise from 19.6 billion bf in 2015 to 20.45 billion bf last year, while their share of national production slipped to 72% (from 74%). …The top five Canadian producers were as follows: West Fraser, Canfor, Tolko, Resolute and Western Forest Products. …The top 20 U.S. companies increased their output at a pace that was almost twice that of the entire U.S. industry and 50% more than that of the top 20 Canadian companies.

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A dairy-for-lumber deal? Think-tank paper proposes Canada-U.S. swap for NAFTA

By Alexander Panetta
Canadian Press in the Victoria Times Colonist
March 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

WASHINGTON — The most common uses of Canadian dairy normally include milk, cream, yogurt, butter and cheese. Yet a new report suggests an altogether different purpose for the calcium-packed, bovine treat. The idea — use it as a bargaining chip… Squeezing some protectionism out of both industries would be good for consumers in the two countries, spur economic productivity and ultimately result in more successful businesses, says the report from the Montreal Economic Institute. “Trade barriers have never made more than a small minority of people richer, at the expense of the vast majority,” says the paper, released Thursday. There are two major obstacles to this idea ever happening. The first is that all major Canadian political parties support supply management, which has vocal backing in rural areas, especially in Ontario and Quebec. There also was noisy opposition to the system being nudged open a bit in recent trade deals with Europe and Asia. The second is that there’s no guarantee U.S. negotiators would go for a logs-for-cheese deal.

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Forest sector sees some opportunities in federal budget

By the Forest Products Association of Canada
Yahoo Finance
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) sees some opportunities for Canada’s forest products sector in today’s federal budget… “Today’s budget made significant commitments to innovation. We now must work with the federal government on specifics to ensure that our sector is able to capitalize on these investments,” says Derek Nighbor, FPAC CEO. “We must be clear. Like many other business sectors in Canada, we are not immune to the potential negative economic impacts of trade uncertainty south of the border. We need a strong continued partnership with the federal government to ensure we can remain competitive and continue to employ over 230,000 Canadians living in over 200 rural and northern communities across the country.”

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Budget Pledges to Strengthen Trade Remedy Process, but More Must Be Done: Steelworkers’ National Director

By the United Steelworkers
Canadian Newswire
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – United Steelworkers’ National Director Ken Neumann says that while the federal budget commits to strengthening Canada’s trade remedy system, more must be done to protect jobs in vital economic sectors facing crisis in the industrial heartland and small communities across the country. “We welcome the government’s commitment to modernize Canada’s trade remedy system and enhance the right of trade unions to participate in the trade remedy process… “In the absence of a Softwood Lumber Agreement, forestry-dependent communities could well be decimated as a result of government inaction,” he said. “This budget could have taken concrete steps to put communities first by committing to provide federal loan guarantees to industry in the face of potentially punishing tariffs from the United States. 

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2017 Federal Budget: Coast Forest Notes Benefits

Coast Forest Products Association
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Coast Forest Products Association is pleased to see inclusion of some forestry supportive programs and initiatives in the federal budget announced today by Finance Minister Bill Morneau. Specifically, the provision of $40 million to Natural Resources Canada to increase the use of Canadian wood as a greener substitute for construction and to help to create new markets for our sustainable forest products is a direct and positive step in supporting the sector. Also, as they are revealed, further details will provide an indication of the extent to which the 2017 budget allocations to support clean technology ($1.8 billion), improvement in trade and transportation corridors ($5 billion), and employment and skills training for youth and Indigenous people ($1.8 billion) will impact Canadian forestry as it fights to be competitive in an increasingly challenging global marketplace.

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Supply management versus softwood lumber: It’s win-win

By the Montreal Economic Institute
Canada Newswire
March 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – With the United States on the verge of reopening NAFTA, Canada should seize this opportunity to open its agricultural markets, and in return ask for full access to American markets for its softwood lumber, argues an Economic Note published today by the MEI. “Trade between Canada and the United States having stagnated since the early 2000s, eliminating supply management and softwood lumber tariffs would be a good way of breathing new life into the economic partnership,” points out Alexandre Moreau, Public Policy Analyst at the MEI and author of the publication. …”Putting supply management on the table would be a good negotiating tactic that could convince the American government to drop the idea of imposing tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber,” adds Mr. Moreau. “We would thus avoid an nth softwood lumber dispute of the kind we’ve struggled through every five or ten years.”

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Agriculture Nominee Critical to Future of Rural Forests

By Tom Martin, president and CEO – American Forest Foundation
Morning Consult
March 23, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Later today, the Senate Agriculture Committee will begin the confirmation process for the man who will likely oversee our rural forests when it holds a hearing for former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue to be the next secretary for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Agriculture secretary plays an important role in shaping forest policy that impacts so many rural Americans. He holds sway on policies impacting the 192 million acres of forests owned by the US Forest Service and the 475 million acres of forests owned by rural families and other private entities. Some 22 million Americans own woods across America and some 900,000 people are directly employed in a forest products industry that is fueled by our forests. As President Donald Trump looks to boost the hard-hit economies across rural America, his forest policy and the Agriculture secretary will be key.

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US Forest Product Exports to Asia

By Stan Parton
Biomass Magazine
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The industrial wood pellet industry is catching its breath after an astounding surge since the turn of the millennium. Global production of pellets totaled roughly 2 million metric tons (MT) in 2001, and roughly 28 million MT in 2015… Of the approximately 19 million MT of wood pellets, lumber, logs and wood chips exported from the continental U.S. in 2016, 7.9 million MT (41 percent) were logs (Fig. 1). In total, 5.8 million MT (74 percent) of logs were exported out of the West, 1.4 million MT out of the South, and 0.6 million MT out of the North, to other countries. However, most logs (7.4 of 7.9 million MT) exported out of the U.S. were destined for Asian markets. The majority were exported out of western ports due to the region’s high-quality timber and closer proximity to Asia. 

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Ketchikan Pulp Mill closed 20 years ago

By Dave Kiffer
SitNews
March 22, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Ketchikan, Alaska – Twenty years ago this week, the hammer fell on the community of Ketchikan. On March 25, 1997, Louisiana Pacific announced the closure of the Ketchikan Pulp Mill, the primary engine of the Ketchikan economy for more than 40 years. The final bale of pulp – which is now on display at the Southeast Alaska Discovery Center – rolled off the production line that same day. The announcement was not a complete surprise, given the fact that the financial and political realities of operating a large pulp mill in the Tongass National Forest had changed dramatically in the 1980s and 1990s. …The closure immediately cost the community 514 year-round jobs and caused a ripple effect that was estimated at least 500 other direct jobs lost.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Britvic develops bottle made from sustainable wood pulp

Business Green
March 22, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Britvic, the owner of high profile drinks brands such as Robinson’s squash and Fruit Shoots, has revealed it has made significant progress in its quest to develop a drinks bottle made from wood fibre, with patents pending on a range of moulding and processing techniques. Britvic, which is also the UK bottler for soft drinks brand Pepsi, has spent the last three years working with Innovate UK and UK firm Natural Resources to develop a viable bottle made from sustainable wood fibres.

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Forestry

Ground-breaking bat cave discovery gives Alberta researchers baseline in fight against deadly disease

By David Bell
CBC News
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The recent discovery of a large cave or hibernacula in northern Alberta where hundreds of bats have found hibernating is giving researchers a baseline measurement in the fight against the deadly white-nose syndrome. “Up until now, within the bulk of Alberta, the large hibernacula we have found are in the Rocky Mountains, so it’s nice to find that this is the third-largest known hibernacula in the province,” Dave Critchley of the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bat Caver program told The Homestretch on Wednesday. …It’s a valuable find for researchers studying the devastating white-nose syndrome which can wipe out a bat population and has been observed in Eastern Canada and as close as Washington state. “It decimates populations, anywher

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British Columbia to increase investment in wildlife management

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

As part of the Province’s long-standing commitment to healthy wildlife populations, Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Minister Steve Thomson announced today that all hunting licence revenue will be re-invested to enhance wildlife management activities. Based on input from stakeholders over the last few years, the government will form a new agency in fall 2017 with startup funds of $5 million. The agency subsequently would be supported by hunting licence revenues of $9 million to $10 million each year. Currently, hunting licence revenues support a number of government activities. Hunting licence surcharges totalling more than $2.6 million annually would still be dedicated to the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation for its conservation projects.

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The science behind the magic of a wood fire

By Todd Whitcombe
Prince George Citizen
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A gas fireplace provides heat and light, but the fake wood and burners don’t have the same appeal as a real fire in a fireplace. Wood fires have an almost mystical quality with visions of castles and dragons dancing amongst the flames. It is the unexpected spark of a log or the collapse of branch that provides entertainment… With a wood fireplace, the crackle is not a direct result of the flame. It actually results from the structure of wood. In essence, the cells making up wood are tiny packages of water surrounded by cellulose – they are like little water balloons. Combustion involves just the cellulose portion of the cell, or the wood. Combustion is the conversion of carbon compounds, such as cellulose, to carbon dioxide and water, with the production of heat energy. The water inside each cell does not burn, but it does get hot… But further inside a log, the cells of the wood are surrounded and cannot readily release their water vapour. The pressure builds to a critical point, whereupon the cell explodes with a pop.

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City of Powell River postpones Lot 450 announcement

By Chris Bolster
Powell River Peak
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

City of Powell River staff has yet to make a determination on whether one-time timber rights for Lot 450 trees between Townsite and Westview had been extinguished before current holder Island Timberlands acquired them. Information on the city’s legal position on the ownership of the trees was expected to be released to the public on Friday, March 3, but that has been postponed indefinitely until the city can provide a complete response. In May 2015, the city paid Island Timberlands $1.2 million for trees in upper and lower Millennium Park on land owned by the PRSC Limited Partnership between the city and Tla’amin Nation.

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Forestry training offered in Revelstoke, Shuswap

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Province is committing $749,872 to help unemployed people find forestry jobs through a paid training opportunity with Okanagan College. The funding will give up to 16 people in Revelstoke and the Shuswap areas 16 weeks of paid training in the forestry sector and 10 weeks of on-the-job work experience with local forest operators to prepare them for full-time employment. Once the participants have completed the training, they will be better suited to find full-time work in the industry. The project is being carried out in two groups of eight Employment Insurance-eligible participants. Under the guidance of Okanagan College, participants in the project will be trained in areas such as tree falling, machine work, forestry technology, and risk management, as well as personal employment attributes including conflict resolution, interviewing and job search skills. 

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Government funds forestry training in Revelstoke through Okanagan College

Revelstoke Mountaineer
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Province is committing $749,872 to help unemployed people find forestry jobs through a paid training opportunity with Okanagan College. …Under the guidance of Okanagan College, participants in the project will be trained in areas such as tree falling, machine work, forestry technology, and risk management, as well as personal employment attributes including conflict resolution, interviewing and job search skills. The project is part of the BC Skills for Jobs Blueprint, which is putting British Columbians first in line for the nearly one million job openings expected by 2025. …Community and Employer Partnerships are featured in B.C.’s Skills for Jobs Blueprint and provide more support to people who are struggling to gain a foothold in the job market. They help build stronger partnerships with industry and labour to connect British Columbians with classroom and on-the-job training, while making it easier for employers to hire the skilled workers they need – when and where they need them.

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New thinking on old-growth

Letter by Angela Mellor
Pique Magazine
March 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

In regard to the logging of old-growth trees in our community forest: This issue is bigger than Whistler. It’s not just the worry that cutting these trees — some of which are more than 1,000 years old — will affect our tourism economy in the future. It’s about what do we value and how to make decisions about industry that reflect those values. In the short 150 years since Canada was established, most of the accessible old-growth trees in the Sea to Sky have been clearcut logged. New advances in the logging industry have made hard to reach areas of rugged terrain accessible now — but this land is vital ground for animal habitat connectivity. …We need to make decisions that are reflective of our shared values – and I do not meet many who support old-growth logging. What people say is: “Let’s work more on our second-growth forest and nature-based tourism.”

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Enact industrial logging moratorium

Letter by Anne Neave, director, Wells Gray Gateway Protection Society
Kamloops This Week
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An open letter to Premier Christy Clark: In spite of five years of consultation between the Upper Clearwater Referral Group (1000clearcuts.ca), Canfor and the Ministry of Forests, our multiple concerns about proposed industrial logging in the Clearwater Valley adjacent to Wells Gray Provincial Park have been ignored. Canfor is applying for permits to log four more blocks on the western slopes of Trophy Mountain adjacent to the Wells Gray boundary and immediately above the corridor road to the park. Three permits have already been issued. This area attracts tourists from all over the world to visit the beautiful Trophy Mountain flower meadows. Old logging sites above the road have resulted in multiple road washouts in the past 20 years, so slope stability is of great concern. In addition, logging would occur smack dab in the middle of critical habitat for mountain caribou, a species at risk.

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Environmentalists speak to Port Hardy crowd about old growth and raw logs

By John Harding
Comox Valley Record
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Two self-described “friendly neighbourhood environmentalists” came to logging country this week to rail against forestry activities in old-growth areas and the export of raw logs. Mark Worthing of the Sierra Club and the Wilderness Committee’s Torrance Costa presented slide shows and handed out maps of Vancouver Island showing the loss of old-growth forests since logging began here. Port Hardy was the first stop in their Island tour of this presentation… Worthing said many of the trees being harvested on Vancouver Island are many year older than Canada itself and he said he had “very little patience” for talk from industry and government about sustainable practices… At least half of the 35 people who attended the presentation at Guido’s Cafe on Monday night work or worked in the forest industry. Some of them took exception to what Worthing and Coste were saying. The meeting had the potential to get nasty, but it remained civil…Worthing and Coste were scheduled to host these State of the Rainforest meetings in Campbell River (March 21), Parksville (March 23) and Courtenay (March 24).

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Proposed logging prompts call for moratorium

By Lachlan Labere
Eagle Valley News
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A proposed logging operation near Hummingbird Creek has unleashed a wave of protest by Swansea Point residents and others who don’t want to see history repeated. The floodgates opened when Swansea Point residents Lois and Dave Schurek received a letter from Tolko Industries informing them of 11 cutblocks being proposed for the uplands above Swansea Point and the Schureks’ home, located on the east side of Highway 97A along Hummingbird Creek… The Schureks have since ignited a protest against the proposal, a response driven by memory of the large, devastating debris flows Swansea Point experienced in 1997 and 2012, as well as numerous smaller mudslides in the area, including one that occurred on Tuesday, March 14… Tolko spokesperson Janice Lockyer said the letter received by the Schureks is part of a process that’s in its infancy… “We are working right now with a hydrologist and geotechs to start the modelling for this process”. 

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Softwood and software: Prince George tech sector relies on forestry for growth

CBC News
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

When you think about the high tech sector economy, you might think of things like social media or video games. You probably don’t think of wood. But a group of tech leaders in Prince George, B.C. is trying to develop that city’s high tech sector through tie-ins with the well-established local forestry sector. B.C.’s rural jobs plan leans on high-speed internet and Kinder Morgan. “There’s lots of new technologies being developed for or adapted for use in the forestry sector,” Matt Hutcheon, executive director of the Innovation Central Society told Radio West host Audrey McKinnon. “We’re seeing everything that spans from robotics to assist with harvests, looking at drones and [unmanned aerial vehicle] technology to assist mapping and of course looking at biofuels and alternative uses of the fibre itself.”

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Senate bill offers protection from aerial sprays

By Lisa Arkin, executive director, Beyond Toxics
The Register-Guard
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Imagine how you’d feel if you woke up one day and found your land contaminated with Atrazine and 2,4-D. Imagine further if your business depended on that land being organic. I think you’d be angry! … …Senate Bill 892, sponsored by Sen. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, requires the timber industry to work with the Department of Forestry to provide advance notice and chemical information about timber aerial spray practices. Oregon’s timber industries force rural communities to pay a high price for aerial sprays with illness and contaminated drinking water. Organic farmers risk significant losses when their organic certification is compromised. When these two industries clash, we all lose by favoring the timber industry.

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Forest Service signs Record of Decision for Lower Joseph Creek restoration

By George Plaven
East Oregonian
March 21, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Accelerated restoration is coming to the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, including an increase in logging and burning. The U.S. Forest Service has approved a massive proposal to treat more than 100,000 acres on the Wallowa Valley Ranger District north of Enterprise, part of a broader regional effort to increase the pace and scale of forest restoration across Eastern Oregon and Washington. Tom Montoya, supervisor for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, signed a record of decision for the Lower Joseph Creek Restoration Project on Friday. Activities will include more than 16,500 acres of commercial logging and fuels reduction, and up to 90,000 acres of prescribed burning over the next decade.

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Project to test forest management techniques in Olympic Experimental State Forest

By Jesse Major
Peninsula Daily News
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PORT ANGELES — Researchers are preparing for a large-scale forest management experiment in the Olympic Experimental State Forest with hopes of benefiting the environment, economy and surrounding communities. It’s a first-of-its-kind experiment for the state and could influence forest management across the Pacific Northwest, said Bernard Bormann, director of the Olympic Resource Center and a lead for the project. The study, a joint Department of Natural Resources and University of Washington effort called the “Large-Scale Integrated-Management Experiment,” will compare four management strategies across 16 watersheds in the Olympic Experimental State Forest.

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Eugene environmentalists cheer judge’s recommendation on timber sale northwest of Crater Lake

By Dylan Darling
The Register-Guard
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A federal judge in Eugene has recommended that Umpqua National Forest planners better study the environmental impacts of a potential timber sale 60 miles east of Roseburg, near Crater Lake National Park, before it can go ahead. Forest officials say the Loafer timber sale would thin overgrown pine stands and create shrubland patches on about 1,450 acres. Environmentalists say the logging would take away precious northern spotted owl habitat and degrade popular recreation magnets, including the North Umpqua Trail and Umpqua Hot Springs. The logging would occur in federal forestland northwest of Crater Lake National Park. U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie Russo issued her recommendation Monday, stopping the U.S. Forest Service for the time being from moving forward with its plans for the Loafer timber sale.

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Open Biomass Plant Will Help Tree Mortality Efforts

By B.J. Hansen
My MotherLode
March 20, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


The Pacific Ultrapower plant in Chinese Camp is back running, which is helping the local tree mortality efforts. There had been earlier concerns about the ability to process biomass in Tuolumne County, following an extended closure for retrofitting, and an expiring contract with PG&E. Tuolumne County Tree Mortality Project Coordinator Mike Albrecht spoke about it on Mother Lode Views this past weekend. “After about five months of retrofitting, they (Pacific Ultrapower) have put in a whole new boiler package into it, and lot of boiler tubes. They spent nearly $3-million on the plant, so that tool is now back available to us. A requirement in their new contract is that they have to use a lot of the tree mortality product to even run the plant. This year, in rough calculations, they are going to use about 2,400 truckloads of tree mortality product, which is about 60,000 tons.

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Apache Tribe Blames US for Forest Ailments

By Brandi Buchman
Courthouse News Service
March 21, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WASHINGTON – Taking the United States to court, an Arizona-based Native American tribe blames federal mismanagement for putting their once thriving timber industry against the ropes. Describing itself as the country’s 11th largest Indian reservation, the White Mountain Apache note that their vast natural resources “are of enormous economic importance to the tribe.” “If managed correctly, the reservation’s natural resources would sustain the tribe and its members into the foreseeable future,” their complaint states, filed on March 15 in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Though the United States has held these resources in trust for the tribe since at least 1871, the White Mountain Apache say mismanagement has resulted in substantial losses — the full extent of which is not yet known.

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What’s unusual about the growing Linville Gorge fire? How it started.

By Bruce Henderson
Charlotte Oberserver
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


Lightning probably caused a wildfire raging in the Linville Gorge wilderness that has burned 1,750 acres, federal officials say. The White Creek fire, which was reported Thursday at 75 acres, is burning near Shortoff Mountain at the southern end of the gorge in Pisgah National Forest. It is 30 percent controlled; 169 firefighters are on the scene. The gorge is popular with hikers and rock climbers. Firefighters on Tuesday burned areas within the controlled area to consume fuels that would feed the wildfire. Steep terrain has hampered their work, and the gorge’s federal wilderness designation means firefighters are trying to minimize impacts to the ground and vegetation.

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Wildfire season upon us as forestry officials warn what one spark can do

By Dan Scanlan
The Florida Times-Union
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

What started as an unpermitted burn on Nassau County’s west side Wednesday turned into a raging brush fire that triggered a mandatory evacuation in Bryceville as firefighters worked to corral the blaze… “The soil is dry because the plants are sucking the water out of the soil to green up for the spring, and there’s less rainfall. You typically get drier air this time of year,” Winter said. “… As of Tuesday, the Florida Forest Service reported 13 active fires burning 1,216.4 acres in Baker, Clay, St. Johns, Putnam and Nassau counties. Statewide this year through Wednesday, 885 fires burning 35,886 acres have been reported.

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Best placing yet for UK tree in European Tree of the Year

By Gavin McEwan
Horticulture Week
March 22, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The Brimmon Oak in Wales has finished runner-up out of 17 entrants in the European Tree of the Year contest, whose results were announced last night (21 March). The result is the best ever for a UK tree in the seven-year history of the continent-wide contest, organised by the Czech-based Environmental Partnership Association. The ancient pollarded oak, near Newtown, Powys, is thought to be at least 500 years old, has been cared for by one family for generations. In 2015 it was threatened with destruction by a new bypass, but this was averted after a public campaign.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

The new ecological industrial era

By Guillaume Roy
Canadian Biomass Magazine
March 22, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada East, Canada

Heat and CO2 coming from the Resolute pulp mill will power one of the most efficient greenhouses in the country, the Toundra Greenhouse. 48.65° North. It’s -10 °C outside and a foot of snow already covers the ground. An intense orange light appeared in the Northern Lac Saint-Jean skies just over a month ago showing some signs of industrial development. But forget about any forestry or aluminum development like the region is used to. This time around, it’s all about cucumbers. And it’s big – a $38 million greenhouse project spreading over 8.5 hectares of land. Inside, state-of-the-art Dutch technology produces amazing results: 360 cucumbers growing per square metre, much more than the forecasted 275 per square metre.  “It is now the most productive greenhouse in Canada,” states Eric Dubé, Toundra Greenhouse general manager, who compares the productivity to Quebec’s (80 cucumbers per square metre) and Canada’s (200 cucumbers per square metre) average. 

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