Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: March 27, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Lithium-ion technology takes on their petrochemical counterparts

Tree Frog Forestry News
March 27, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Ottawa and the government of New Brunswick are challenging US duties imposed on supercalendered paper and supporting Irving Paper’s effort to reduce the specific rate being applied to Irving. The duties were assessed in response to the Nova Scotia government’s bail-out of the Port Hawkesbury paper mill in 2012, “ensnaring Irving and Catalyst Paper, even though they weren’t investigated“.

Consumer product giant Procter & Gamble, which counts Pampers, Tide and Gillette among its largest brands, will shortly launch a renewable energy biomass cogeneration facility in Albany NY, using forest and wood waste. In conjunction with a wind farm project in Texas, “the biomass plant will double P&G’s use of renewable energy to 20 percent of their needs“.

In response to an editorial “condemning wood construction“, in the wake of the Raleigh fire of an unfinished apartment building, AWC’s Robert Glowinski recommends “greater attention to fire security before sprinklers and fire walls have been installed“.

Although mostly an advert, a Pro Tools Review on how lithium-ion technology is taking on the chainsaw world caught our eye. According to the author, some models now approach and “even exceed their petrochemical counterparts”.

–Tree Frog Editors

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Business & Politics

The Continuous Digester – what we learned last week

By Paul Quinn
RBC Capital Markets
March 26, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Lumber – Random Lengths reported that SYP prices were down $8/mfbm to $467/mfbm while W.SPF rose $8 to $360. For SYP, mills sold at noticeable discounts to make quarter end sales targets, while producers largely held list prices flat, with the steeper discounts mostly disappearing by Thursday. For W. SPF, trading activity picked up this week, with stronger US sales driving Canadian producers to step up, resulting in an overall stronger market tone. OSB – OSB prices were largely flat in most regions, except the North Central and South East regions where prices rose slightly. 

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Doherty Pleased with Trip to Washington

By Greg Fry
250 News
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Prince George, B.C. – He didn’t come back with a new Softwood Lumber Agreement in his back pocket but Cariboo-Prince George Conservative MP Todd Doherty says he’s still pleased with a three-day trip he took to Washington DC this week. Doherty says the non-partisan trip was made up of Conservative, Liberal and NDP MPs and included a whopping 85 meetings. “It’s part of the Canada/U.S. Friendship Group where we go down and we continue the dialogue. We wanted to make sure that they understood that we’re friends, we’re allies and that we share a common border.” An outspoken critic on the need for a new Softwood Lumber Agreement between the two countries – Doherty said he spread his message loud and clear.

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Nanaimo MP finds oversights in federal budget

By Greg Sakaki
Nanaimo News Bulletin
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Nanaimo’s MP feels important Island issues were overlooked in this week’s federal budget. Sheila Malcolmson, NDP Member of Parliament for Nanaimo-Ladysmith, said B.C.’s coastal communities are being let down by a lack of measures to address derelict vessels, protect salmon or support forestry jobs. …She said forestry was another area where her party had anticipated seeing budget dollars. “We were expecting, given all of the concern about the softwood lumber agreement, that there might be some money set aside for forestry, jobs, and giving some reassurance to the industry and very sorry to see nothing there,” Malcolmson said.

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Two Steelworkers Locals Merge

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West


Prince George, B.C. – Two locals with the United Steelworkers have merged, creating one local that will serve most of Northern B.C. Local 1-425 in Williams Lake, and Local 1-424 here in Prince George, are now one says local 1-424 President Frank Everitt ” It’s a fairly significant change for both local unions as we merge forward in anticipation of having a founding convention in June. One local l union will be covering the northern part of the province, similar to what we had 40 years ago.” Both locals have ratified the merger. …There were about 1200 members of Local 1-425, and Everitt says joining forces means the new ( as yet to be named) local will have more clout especially during the current challenges facing forestry “Certainly that’s a hope we will have a better chance of dealing with the softwood lumber issue that’s coming at us, the reduced annual allowable cuts and also the merging of employers.

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Sinclar Group Now Has Full Control of Four Vanderhoof Operations

By Elaine Macdonald-Meisner
250 News
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West


Vanderhoof, B.C.-The Sinclar Group Forest Products has assumed management of Nechako Lumber, Nechako Green Energy, L&M Lumber and Premium Pellets of Vanderhoof. The change comes as Robert Stewart Holdings and Ivan Andersen Holdings have doubled their ownership stake in the four companies to 100%. “The Andersen and Stewart families have been involved with Nechako and L&M for almost half a century, and we appreciate the partnership we have had with the local owners over that time,” said Greg Stewart, President of Sinclar Group. “However, ownership changes such as this are part of the evolution of companies.” Sinclar Group does not expect to make major changes at the Vanderhoof operations, and the community should not notice any changes in the way the company does business in the community, said Stewart.

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Taan Forest wins legal battle over contracting rules

By Andrew Hudson
Haida Gwaii Observer
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Taan Forest can continue hiring small contractors to work on Tree Farm Licence (TFL) 60 after winning a two-year legal battle with the United Steelworkers Union. The union is appealing the decision. Writing in a 118-page decision in January, labour arbitrator Stanley Lanyon called the case “unique, complex, and litigious.” United Steelworkers argued that according to the collective agreement it inherited when it bought TFL 60, Taan Forest could only use one or two “stump to dump” contractors. …After the hearings and a review of the 30-year history on TFL 60, which includes 37 per cent of the annual cut on Haida Gwaii, Lanyon ruled in favour of Taan by striking the “stump to dump” rule from the agreement.

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Irving Paper’s trade battle gets tougher with Trump administration

By Jacques Poitras
CBC News
March 27, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada


New Brunswick’s largest forestry company is continuing its battle against punishing trade duties imposed on some of its paper exports to the United States. Irving Paper Ltd. is pursuing the fight with the International Trade Commission in Washington over supercalendered paper made in Saint John. The provincial and federal governments have filed documents supporting the company and are also appearing before a tribunal to argue that the duties violate the North American Free Trade Agreement. They say it’s “particularly egregious” that the U.S. administration didn’t directly investigate Irving even when the company volunteered to undergo a probe. Instead, the U.S. estimated Irving was receiving a subsidy rate based on what two other Canadian companies were getting.

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Tembec expects $55 million from Quebec rebate program for big electricity users

Canadian Press in the Montreal Gazette
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – One of Quebec’s largest forestry companies says it expects to qualify for $55 million of electricity rebates due to a four-year capital investment program centred at its Temiscaming manufacturing site. Montreal-based Tembec Inc. (TSX:TMB) says its $136-million capital program will improve the competitiveness of its Quebec plants, particularly the specialty cellulose plant in the town of Temiscaming near North Bay, Ont. Tembec says the investment will qualify for rebates introduced in the province’s 2016-17 budget, worth about 40 per cent of the total capital investment. About 800 of the company’s 1,500 employees in Quebec work at the Temiscaming site, which uses wood fibre from the Abitibi-Temiscamingue region and converts it to specialty cellulose that’s used in a variety of consumer and industrial products.

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NLBMDA Members Prepare for Capitol Hill Visits

LBM Journal
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

NLMBDA will be hosting the 2017 Spring Meeting and Legislative Conference, March 27–29, 2017, at the Renaissance Dupont Hotel in Washington, D.C. As part of the meeting, on March 28, NLBMDA members will go to Capitol Hill to meet with their lawmakers about several issues affecting the lumber and building material (LBM) industry. …Dealers plan to focus on four issues as part of their visits on Capitol Hill: regulatory reform, renewal of a Softwood Lumber Agreement (SLA) between the U.S. and Canada, preservation of the mortgage interest deduction, and estate tax repeal. Congress and the Trump Administration have already taken action to reform the regulatory process.

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British forestry value to grow post-Brexit

Cabinet Maker
March 24, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Forestry sites sold across the UK valued at over £80m in what was another strong transactional year for the forestry sector. According to the latest forestry market research by Savills and Scottish Woodlands, more than 18,300 hectares of forestry was sold during the year at a value of £83m. Although the average price per hectare across the whole market dropped slightly from 2015 levels, this was due to significant changes in the market share by region, with nearly 80% of all property sold north of the Forth-Clyde canal. Demand for UK grown timber improved over the year with the prospect of further rises as Britain enters a post-Brexit-world. The research indicated that a revision of EU timber trade regulations could enable UK forest products to be used more widely in construction.

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Log protected forests to keep Victoria’s Heyfield timber mill open, Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce says

By Tom McIlroy
The Sydney Morning Herald
March 27, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The Victorian government has rejected a proposal by Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce that would see the federal government open up protected forests for logging, to save the Gippsland-based Heyfield timber mill. Mr Joyce had also suggested the endangered status of the Leadbeater’s possum, which is currently listed as critically endangered and is native to the logging-affected area, could be reviewed to save the mill… The Nationals leader said the future of the mill – the largest in Australia – and the livelihoods of staff and the wider Victorian forest industry, deserved greater consideration by the Victorian government. “I don’t mind possums… but I like people having a job more,” Mr Joyce said. “The possum’s not so much endangered as the timber worker is.”

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Mass Timber Offers Exciting Possibilities for Building with Wood

By reThink Wood
PR Newswire
March 27, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, United States

WASHINGTON — Over the past several years, there has been a rise in mass timber construction around the world, demonstrating the strength, stability, and design flexibility of next-generation lumber technologies. To help inform architects, engineers, developers, industry professionals, students and interested parties, reThink Wood has launched the reThink Wood Research Library to serve as the go-to industry resource for those seeking information on the latest advancements in wood’s performance and advantages in the built environment. Today, mass timber technologies, including cross-laminated timber (CLT), nail laminated timber (NLT) and glued laminated timber (glulam), are gaining traction in the United States for mid-rise and tall wood structures.

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Construction site security a necessity

Letter by Robert Glowinski, President & CEO, American Wood Council
The News & Observer
March 25, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Regarding the March 21 editorial “Amid the fire, a warning”: In the wake of the Raleigh fire, we commend the Raleigh Fire Department for its commitment and demonstrated capability. Before condemning wood construction, as was done in the editorial, it is important to remember that fires occur in all types of buildings built with all types of materials. In completed buildings, it is most often the contents and furnishings we bring in to them that burn. …For buildings under construction, site security is a necessity; for wood buildings particularly so before sprinklers and fire walls have been installed. Construction site fire security needs much greater attention, and the American Wood Council has produced manuals and videos to help prevent these types of construction fires that be found at www.constructionfire.com.

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Kjellander Sjöberg Designs Four Cross-Laminated Timber Blocks to Enrich the Uppsala Cityscape

By Niall Patrick Walsh
Arch Daily
March 24, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Swedish architecture firm Kjellander Sjöberg has released images of their proposed new city block to enrich the Swedish city of Uppsala. The four competition-winning residential buildings, known collectively as the Tunet, will feature cross-laminated timber construction and wood detailing, creating an environmentally-friendly addition to the city. …Flexibility was central to the design of the residential blocks. All the apartments have rational plans featuring a central functional core and balcony zones which lend themselves to future adaptation. The ground floor will provide generous commercial space, further activating surrounding streets. The blocks will be constructed with a core structure of cross-laminated timber with wood detailing and window hatches, further contributing to an atmospheric and individual cityscape.

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Forestry

Canadian Institute of Forestry pays tribute to graduating students

Tree Frog News
March 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

More than 140 students graduating from the UBC Faculty of Forestry took part in the Canadian Institute of Forestry (CIF) Silver Ring Ceremony this weekend in Vancouver. Dr. Robert Kozak was back at the helm as the Master of Ceremonies—and in his signature style had students and their family in stitches with his dry humour. Students representing the Forestry Undergraduate Society and the CIF gave impressive presentations. The keynote address this year was delivered by well known academic Sally Aitken. Representing the CIF, Candace Parsons explained the significance of the silver rings and proudly handed one to each of the students as they were called across the stage. UBC was the first of the Canadian forestry schools to present rings to their students. Although not an indication of graduation (exams are still on the horizon) the rings unite graduates at a national level, defining a bond that goes beyond difference in employment, geography and language. Click the read more to see our galley of images. Tree Frog’s own Sandy McKellar was proud to attend as Dr. John Worrall’s date!

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New $7.1-million Cariboo Fire Centre ready for action

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 23, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


The British Columbia government has enhanced the province’s firefighting capability in the Cariboo-Chilcotin with the opening of a $7.1-million facility at the Williams Lake Airport. The new, one-storey building, which covers 2,139 square metres (23,000 square feet), was officially opened today by Coralee Oakes (Minister of Small Business and Red Tape Reduction and MLA for Cariboo North) and Donna Barnett (Minister of State for Rural Economic Development and MLA for Cariboo-Chilcotin). One of the four existing outbuildings was renovated as part of the construction project, which got underway in August 2015. The updated facility is home to the Cariboo Fire Centre’s main office, associated support services, and ground crew and air crew facilities. O

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New plan calls for bigger city forest

By Kevin Ma
St. Albert Gazette
March 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A new report sets out how St. Albert should protect what one city planner says could be a $7 billion asset: its forests. City council received a draft of the proposed urban forest management plan Monday. The plan, if approved, will outline how the city will protect and enhance St. Albert’s forests over the next 20 years. “St. Albert’s trees represent an irreplaceable asset,” the draft reads, one that, unlike sidewalks and roads, will increase in value over time. Part of this management plan will involve calculating the value of that asset in terms of ecological services such as carbon storage, city parks and open spaces manager Louis Stewart said in an interview. A previous study she did for Strathcona County found that community’s forests removed some $28.1 million of pollution and $1.3 million of carbon a year, and had a structural (i.e. replacement) value of about $16 billion.

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Partnership lands invitation for community forest near Fort Nelson

By the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Government of British Columbia
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Opportunities for greater input into local forest management are expanding near Fort Nelson following an invitation from Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations Steve Thomson to the Fort Nelson First Nation and Northern Rockies Regional Municipality to apply for a community forest agreement. Fort Nelson First Nation and the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality now have 365 days to formalize their intended partnership and submit an application for approval. The invitation to apply is for approximately 185,000 cubic metres of allowable annual cut over a 25-year term. The partnership will need to submit a management plan to the ministry’s district manager for approval prior to submitting the application for a community forest.

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Protecting trees against emerald ash borer focus of public meeting in Thunder Bay

CBC News
March 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


As warmer weather approaches, people in Thunder Bay, Ont. are being encouraged to learn more about the arrival of the destructive emerald ash borer, and what can be done to save the city’s vulnerable ash trees. The invasive green beetle, which was found in the city in June of 2016, is the topic of a public meeting being hosted by the northwestern Ontario Emerald Ash Borer Task Force, on Tuesday March 28. “We have found [the emerald ash borer] within the city of Thunder Bay in three different locations. So we know it’s here,” said Gaspar Horvath, a forester with Rutter Urban Forestry in Thunder Bay, and the co-ordinator of the public session. Horvath said the focus will now be on monitoring the growth of the population, which he said might be slowed by the city’s northern climate. “There may be an opportunity to actually put the lid on this,” he said.

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Fleming College student wins international forestry award

kawarthaNOW
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fleming College student Reginald Eddy has received the prestigious Prince of Wales Forest Leadership Award, which includes a $12,000 bursary and the opportunity to travel on exchange to the United Kingdom to complete a forest internship. Eddy, in his fifth semester of Fleming College’s Urban Forestry Technician (UTF) Co-op program at the Frost Campus in Lindsay, was one of two Canadian students to receive the award from Canadian Institute of Forestry.  …“Having an opportunity to work in the Duchy of Cornwall, an incredibly historic and well-managed private estate, is something I can barely imagine,” Eddy says. “I am looking forward most to being emerged in such a culturally significant part of the United Kingdom. My take away, I hope, will be a more encompassed understanding of the forestry industry and the addition of international connections in my professional network.”

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Wild Olympics legislation trying to protect something that’s already protected

Letter by Richard Cahill, retired state Department of Natural Resources forester
Peninsula Daily News
March 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer and U.S. Sen. Patty Murray have re-introduced Wild Olympics legislation to “protect environmentally sensitive areas, support outdoor recreation and preserve and grow jobs,” according to the March 6 Peninsula Daily News [“Kilmer, Murray Re-introduce Wild Olympic Legislation”]. …The 923,000-acre Olympic National Park, the core of the Peninsula, is surrounded on the peripheral by the 600,000-acre Olympic National Forest. Combined, the national park and national forest provide substantial protection of the Peninsula’s forests and rivers. …Instead of promoting another attempt at previously failed legislation, Rep. Kilmer and Sen. Murray might consider exploring additional natural-resource-based job opportunities for their constituents.

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Logging threatens our national forests, which don’t need ‘restored’

By Brett Haverstick, education and outreach director, Friends of the Clearwater
Idaho Statesman
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

National forests across the West are facing dire threats from politicians, the timber industry and the U.S. Forest Service. The public is being misled into thinking that our forests are “unhealthy” and that they need to be “restored” due to “beetle infestations” and “insect and disease.” All of this is euphemism to drastically ramp up logging. America’s national forests are not unhealthy. Some people may want forests to look a certain way, but that desire or perception ignores scientific research, which suggests that fungi, bacteria, insects, disease and wildfire are key components of forest function and resiliency. If you want a healthy forest, these natural processes must be allowed to play out.

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Controversial Logging Project Debated In NE Oregon

By Courtney Flatt
Oregon Public Broadcasting
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West


There’s a tiny stretch of land in Northeastern Oregon that can inspire lofty description like this: “An amazing treasure,” said Peter Barry, who lives in Joseph, Oregon. “I don’t want to extol its virtues too much because it’s already so crowded.” … It’s soon to be home to a controversial thinning project that’s backed residents into separate corners. The project is igniting a debate over what constitutes forest thinning for wildfire prevention and forest health. Critics see it as exploitation of a loophole — and perhaps the start of a trend in increased logging in the name of forest health across the West. Supporters say it’s a project that needs to get off the ground soon. The U.S. Forest Service says hazardous trees riddle the Lostine — trees dead from bug infestations and disease. District Ranger Kris Stein said removing those trees also reduces wildfire risk.

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As money for forest work dwindles, chances for bigger wildfires increase, caution fire officials

By Christine Peterson
Casper Star Tribune
March 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…And it’s the federal budget that officials like Terry and Bill Crapser, Wyoming’s state forester, are worried continues to shrink. President Donald Trump’s proposed budget includes a 21 percent cut to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the U.S. Forest Service, and a 12 percent cut to the Department of Interior, which controls the Bureau of Land Management. At a time when budgets for pricey forest remediation projects were already running thin, and the West is growing ever hotter and drier, fire officials worry additional cuts could mean bigger and more destructive wildfires are not a matter of if, but when. Wildfires need three things to grow: oxygen, heat and fuels. In firefighting classes, it’s presented as a triangle — get rid of one of those elements, and you stop the fire. And out of those three, fuels is the only one humans can control.

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Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest celebrates 10 years

West Hawaii Today
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest is a major contributor to improving understanding of how to conserve and manage tropical forest ecosystems. It celebrates its 10-year anniversary on March 23. “Hawaii Island, along with many of its neighboring islands, has seen an unprecedented increase in environmental change and threats from invasive species, fire and ecological stressors in the last several decades,” said Ric Lopez, director of the U.S. Forest Service’s Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry in Hilo, which oversees management of the experimental forest. “The Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest gives us a unique opportunity to study how the land responds to these challenges and develop methods for land managers that can help sustain these ecosystems and ecological functions for future generations.”

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Aerial spray ban best way to ensure clean water

By Justin Workman
The Register-Guard
March 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Spring is upon us, inspiring images of flowers in colorful bloom. But for some in Oregon, it means the beginning of the spray season. It’s a time when the big timber corporations such as Weyerhaeuser, Seneca, Roseburg and Giustina use helicopters to aerially spray cancerous concoctions of herbicides on their clearcuts. These timber companies are creating their own special spring shower that kills everything living except for newly replanted fir trees… There is enough evidence and history right here in Lane County that suggests we should end the use of forestry herbicides all together. But if we must compromise with the timber barons, then let’s at least ban the aerial application of herbicides. They will then use their safer traditional method of backpack spraying. This will create jobs, tax revenue, and “exceptional water quality.”

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McCain says he’s concerned about wildfires, forest thinning

Associated Press in The Idaho Statesman
March 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

PHOENIX – U.S. Sen. John McCain on Friday said he was concerned about the slow pace of wildfire prevention efforts in Arizona. The Arizona Republican wrote in a letter to the U.S. Forest Service head that he was concerned about one contractor in particular that had only thinned a little over 8,000 acres of forest despite being about five years into a contract. McCain says the company was supposed to thin 300,000 acres by 2016. McCain wants to know what other options there are to accelerate forest restoration work and how much longer it will take for more forest to be thinned out.

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Forester takes the helm of statewide group

March 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Jib Davidson has been outdoors since he can remember. His interest in forestry blossomed as he aged. And now, after 40 years of tending to the country’s woodlands, that passion has been rewarded. President of locally-based Columbia Timber Company, Davidson was elected chairperson of the Florida Society of American Foresters and will serve as the senior leader of 300 certified foresters operating statewide. “I think it’s a great honor,” said Norman McRae, co-owner of Columbia Timber. “Hell, he means a lot to me. … I think he’s very well deserved to have the position he has.”

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Echo 58V Chainsaw Review CCS-58V4AH

By Michael Springer
Pro Tool Reviews
March 26, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

I recently had all kinds of fun conducting a shootout of eight battery-operated chainsaws for Pro Tool Reviews. As I mentioned at the time, I did a similar test four years ago but the field was much thinner due to the relative lack of power compared to what we have today. Now, more manufacturers are competing as battery technology improves and consumers have seen how lithium-ion technology can approach and sometimes even exceed their petrochemical (AKA gas) counterparts. One such lithium-ion breed in the shootout was the Echo 58V Chainsaw, which I’ll focus on today. …When the (saw)dust settled, the Echo 58V Chainsaw took first place among the 8 contestants in cut speed as well as run time and efficiency. It alone earned Very Good ratings for both bucking and felling grips.

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Barnaby Joyce wants Australia’s Leadbeater’s possum off endangered list to boost logging

By Calla Wahlquist
The Guardian
March 27, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Barnaby Joyce is pushing for the conservation status of the critically endangered Leadbeater’s possum to be downgraded to open up areas of protected forests in Victoria for logging, in an effort to save 250 jobs at the Heyfield sawmill. Joyce wrote to Victorian premier Daniel Andrews on Sunday criticising the decision to reduce the sawlog quota offered to Heyfield mill operators Australian Sustainable Hardwood from 155,000 cubic metres a year to 80,000 cubic metres in 2017-18 and 60,000 cubic metres in 2018-19 and 2019-20, in order to protect habitat used by the possum. He said the decision “will cost jobs and ruin the forestry industry”, and suggested that an increase in the number of sightings of the Leadbeater’s possum in the past five years indicated that its numbers had recovered.

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Why reignite Tasmania’s forest wars – to produce logs no one will buy?

By Lenore Taylor
The UK Guardian
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

I thought I’d seen the turbid depths of policy driven by ideology and perceived political self-interest, but then I turned my attention back to the Tasmanian forest “wars”. I first started reporting on this issue in 1988 when Bob Hawke and his environment minister Graham Richardson appointed a former judge, the late Michael Helsham, to investigate whether parts of the Tasmanian forest were worthy of world heritage listing. That resulted in the first of many agreements over the decades (in 1989, 1997, 2005 and 2013) in which federal and state governments paid hundreds of millions of dollars to “end the forest wars once and for all” by restructuring the industry and determining which forests should be protected and which should be open to logging.

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Simulated beaver attacks trick aspens to produce seeds

By David Gregory-Kumar
BBC News
March 25, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Aspens are one of our most beautiful native trees and there’s a huge demand for seeds to grow new ones for planting. Trouble is, the aspen tree itself doesn’t like to produce seeds which makes life very difficult for everyone. But last year I visited Shropshire company Forestart and helped them out with their plans to get their aspens in a seed producing mood. Forestart harvests a billion wild tree seeds every year to grow into new trees for planting. …The last time aspens in Scotland flowered and produced seeds was twenty years ago. So Robert Lee from Forestart had a plan. I helped him remove a ring of bark around each of his aspen trees. Not all the way around as that would kill the tree, but a strip about an inch wide round most of the trunk. The idea was to simulate a beaver attack on the tree, stressing the tree out and forcing it to produce flowers and then seeds.

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Tasmanians fear logging plans will overshadow mountain bike boom in state’s north-east

By Felicity Ogilvie
ABC News, Australia
March 24, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Tasmanians in the state’s north-east are concerned the success of the region’s mountain bike boom will be overshadowed by the State Government’s controversial decision to open up forest around popular trails for logging. The Government will overturn a peace deal set up by Labor and the Greens that protected about 350,000 hectares of forest around the state, claiming the land should not be held in reserve. Tasmania is experiencing a tourism boom in the state’s remote north-east, where in a few weeks a world series mountain biking event will be held in small town of Derby. Locals like 14-year-old Miles Smith said the town had been transformed for the better by an influx of tourism. “It’s exceptional just to know I live in what once felt like a ghost town to me,” Miles said.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

New biomass plant should be operational within next 90 days

By Brad McEwen
Albany Herald
March 25, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

ALBANY — After years of assembling some very complex pieces, officials close to the project to build a renewable energy biomass cogeneration facility adjacent to Albany’s Procter & Gamble say things are progressing as planned and that the $200 million plant should begin producing energy and steam for its customers in the next few months. “The project is in its final stages of completion,” said Brenden Quinlivan, executive director of distributed energy origination for Constellation, the energy company that will operate the facility once it’s completed. “There’s going to be a defined testing period, both for the power and the steam that the project will generate, and that will take its own course over, let’s call it, the next 90 days.

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General

Forester takes the helm of statewide group

March 27, 2017
Category: Uncategorised

Jib Davidson has been outdoors since he can remember. His interest in forestry blossomed as he aged. And now, after 40 years of tending to the country’s woodlands, that passion has been rewarded. President of locally-based Columbia Timber Company, Davidson was elected chairperson of the Florida Society of American Foresters and will serve as the senior leader of 300 certified foresters operating statewide. “I think it’s a great honor,” said Norman McRae, co-owner of Columbia Timber. “Hell, he means a lot to me. … I think he’s very well deserved to have the position he has.”

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