Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 3, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Solutions, sentiments or sound bites?

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 3, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Solutions, sentiments or sound bites? You decide. Here’s today’s list of interesting quotes on the softwood lumber disagreement:

  • Fix the exchange rate, the real problem is the dollar not unfair practices.” (Robert McGarvey, Troy Media) 
  • “Hit US Coal with carbon tax, which would make thermal coal shipped through BC uncompetitive”. (BC Premier Clark)
  • “Good luck with that – I think this is reckless, it’s irresponsible.”  (John Horgan, NDP Leader)
  • “Trash talk doesn’t help lumber trade, what a load of nonsense from both of them, and they know it.” (Tom Fletcher, BC Local News)
  • “Tariffs on Canadian lumber will increase lumber imports from overseas; result in higher costs of housing, and upward price pressure on sawlogs.” (Haken Ekstrom, Wood Resources International)
  • Who benefits when prices for Canadian lumber are low? Those who work in the housing industry and the hundreds of thousands of US families that buy homes each year.” (Jeff Jacoby, Boston Globe)

In other news, the second in a four-part series about technology and forestry focuses on advances in harvesting timber, including “full suspension logging to minimize environmental impacts in riparian areas“, and just released, a new book by David Suzuki and Ian Hanington entitled “Just Cool It! The Climate Crisis and What We Can Do”, poses the questionis there still hope for humanity?”

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Washington takes note of Clark’s targeting coal exports

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Christy Clark’s vow to ban or tax thermal coal exports moving through B.C. ports may be nothing more than election brinkmanship, but it seems to be having its intended effect in the U.S. According to Joe Aldina, a New York based energy analyst specializing in coal for S&P Global Platts, Clark’s recent targeting of thermal coal exports moving through B.C. ports has generated a bit of a buzz in the corridors of Washington. “I know from my contacts that I was just talking to, already they’re lobbying and having conversations behind the scenes in Washington,” Aldina told Business in Vancouver. “It’s certainly got people’s attention.” …. “I think it’s pretty smart posturing,” Aldina said. “It grabs headlines and is visible, so I don’t think Trump would want headlines – negative headlines – given that he’s made coal a rallying cry of his administration.”

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Record High Lumber Prices in the US and up to 24% Import Tariffs on Canadian Lumber Will Increase Lumber Imports From Overseas in 2017

Market Watch
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

High import tariffs on Canadian lumber to the US are likely to increase US lumber production and boost shipments from overseas in 2017, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. Another outcome of the countervailing duties is that Canadian lumber companies will probably be more aggressive in their search for alternative markets to the US. Continued increase in US housing constructions, growing demand for wood, high lumber prices, imposed import tariffs on Canadian lumber, and a strong US dollar are recent market developments that will impact forest products market dynamics in 2017, not only in North America, but on other continents as well, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly… Higher costs of housing, changes in log and lumber trade flows and upward price pressure on sawlogs in the US are some of the likely mid-term impacts from the new tariffs. 

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Trump Who? EDC Doubles Canada’s Export Growth Forecast

By Daniel Tencer
Huffington Post
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Despite all the protectionist noises coming from the White House these days, Canada’s government-owned export bank doesn’t seem worried. In fact, Export Development Canada’s spring 2017 forecast sees Canadian exports rise six per cent this year — twice the pace it predicted just six months ago in its fall forecast. Even the Trump administration’s battle with Canadian lumber won’t stop the sector from expanding its exports this year, EDC predicts. It downgraded its forecast for forestry exports, but still sees growth of five per cent. “However, the looming prospect of the U.S. imposing countervailing duties on softwood lumber exports increases the uncertainty for the forestry industry,” the report noted. The oil-exporting provinces will lead the way on exports, EDC predicts. 

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New CEO Weighs in on the Forest Industry

By Kelly Many Guns
First Nations Drum
April 28, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Canada’s forest products industry is a $67 billion dollar a year industry that represents 2 per cent of Canada’s GDP, and recently hired CEO Derek Nighbor for The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) says he’s ready for the challenges that lay ahead. First Nations Drum recently had the opportunity to meet-up with Nighbor at an event in Vancouver. We discussed his plans and initiatives including FPAC’s plans and partnerships with the Aboriginal community. …“There are two things, we sponsor a couple of Aboriginal Scholarships for Aboriginal students studying for a career in forestry, and partnering with CCAB (Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business) and awarding Aboriginal businesses for their work in forestry, and we engage our members with best practices when it comes to working with the Aboriginal businesses and contractors.”

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Fix the exchange rate, solve the U.S.-Canada trade problem

By Robert McGarvey
Troy Media
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

It’s beginning to look like Donald Trump has developed a paranoid obsession with Canada. Pick a market segment and the American president has slammed Canada for unfair trade practices. He threatened to impose a 20 per cent tariff on Canadian softwood lumber. …The only way to normalize trade relations between Canada and the US is to level the playing field. That means fixing the exchange rate between the US and Canadian dollars. …When the Canadian dollar traded at $0.63 over a decade ago, disputes between Canada and the US were chronic. …The longest-running dispute is over softwood lumber. …We can establish the world’s largest and most efficient free-trade zone by taking the power to alter dollar exchange rates away from foreign exchange traders on Wall Street.

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Trump’s tariff will hurt Americans

By Jeff Jacoby
Boston Globe
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

… suppose for argument’s sake that Canada does subsidize its timber industry, and that Canadian companies as a result are able to sell the softwood lumber prized by US homebuilders at a bargain price. How does it follow that Canada is being a bad neighbor, or that Americans are being unfairly taken advantage of? A more sensible conclusion is that the Canadian government is bestowing a valuable benefit on its neighbors to the south… Who benefits when prices for Canadian lumber — which accounts for 30 percent of the wood used to build US homes — are low? The millions of Americans employed in housing construction do. So do those who work in all the industries sustained by housing. So do the hundreds of thousands of US families that buy homes each year… Far from making America great again, protectionism will only make it poorer.

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Loggers converge on Vernon

By Richard Rolke
Vernon Morning Star
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Forestry has long been a pillar of the North Okanagan’s economy, and that strength will be on display for all to see. The Interior Logging Association’s 59th annual conference and trade show begins Thursday and runs until Saturday in Vernon. “It’s a great opportunity for people to learn more about the industry and its role in the community,” said Wayne Lintott, general manager. …“Our theme this year is women working in the forestry harvesting industry,” said Lintott. It’s anticipated that the conference will attract about 400 delegates and a number of seminars are planned at the Vernon Lodge Hotel. Among the speakers will be Melinda Morben, operational logistics manager with Island Timberlands; Kathlene Werstiuk, manager of wildfire risk with the B.C. Wildfire Service; and Cherie Whelan, director of Safe Companies of B.C. Forest Safety.

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Forest sector remains vibrant

By the Editorial Board
Vernon Morning Star
May 3, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There’s no question that B.C.’s economy continues to evolve as technology, tourism and natural gas gain strength. However, while those new sectors are welcome, we need to remember that the province was built on forestry and it continues to play a significant role. As an example, a 2015 study from MNP indicated that the forest industry contributes $12 billion annually to the provincial gross domestic product and it employs 146,000 people. Forty per cent of regional economies rely on forestry. Here in the North Okanagan, Tolko Industries has a major presence with its corporate headquarters in downtown Vernon, as well as mills in Spallumcheen, Coldstream and Lumby. On top of this, a number of smaller companies, including logging contractors and equipment suppliers, have deep roots in the valley and they provide critical employment from Oyama to Grindrod and from Cherryville to Falkland. We raise the importance of forestry because the Interior Logging Association’s 59th annual conference and trade show begins Thursday and runs until Saturday in Vernon.

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This time, Canada must secure new softwood markets

By Naomi Christensen – senior policy analyst at the Canada West Foundation
Exchange Magazine
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Fort McMurray – Here we go again. Canadian softwood lumber exports are once again subject to a U.S. countervailing duty. In June, an additional anti-dumping duty will be imposed. The news from Ottawa this week that trade missions are being organized to help build markets in the Asia Pacific for Canadian wood products is encouraging. Yet, we are always keenest to diversify when the U.S. causes us trade grief – over any commodity. Unfortunately, we’ve been all too willing to run back into the welcoming arms of the U.S. as soon as conditions approve. Let’s not make that mistake again this time around with softwood. …Our best hope for a quick resolution is to get the new U.S. administration onside. At first glance, this may seem like a pipe dream, but softwood duties have noticeable economic impacts on both sides of the border. Canada should be working with our natural allies in the U.S. such as the home builders and lumber retailers to reiterate that message.

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Log exports a lifesaver for small northern town

Letter by Mike Lane
Victoria Times Colonist
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Recently, I went on a road trip through northern B.C. and stopped in at the small community of Stewart. There weren’t too many customers at the local diner, so I chatted with the waitress for a while… “Oh, we ship logs from the deep-water port here. That’s the only thing that’s a steady business right now… Just something to keep in mind at election time. Here in southern B.C., the opinion of some politicians seems to be to ban all log exports. But keep the residents of Stewart in mind. Without log exports, the hotel, diner, gas station … most would have to shut down. Log exports aren’t necessarily a bad thing.

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Christy Clark wants U.S. coal hit with carbon tax after softwood levy

By Jonathan Hayward
Canadian Press in the Vancouver Sun
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

MERRITT — British Columbia Liberal Leader Christy Clark appears to be betting that the simmering softwood dispute with the United States is fertile ground for votes as she increased the pressure in the trade spat Tuesday, promising a hefty carbon tax on U.S. thermal coal. Clark said she would tax the coal that’s shipped through the province’s ports to make it uncompetitive and defend workers from the policies of U.S. President Donald Trump… “The levy would make thermal coal shipped through British Columbia utterly uncompetitive in the global market,” she said while campaigning in Merritt… NDP Leader John Horgan said that if Clark was serious about thermal coal she could have done something about it years ago, accusing her of only reacting now because of the election. “I think this is reckless, it’s irresponsible,” he said.

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Labour boss defends himself over B.C. Liberal accusations

Canadian Press in the Victoria Times Colonist
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States, Canada West

VANCOUVER — The international president of the United Steelworkers Union says claims by British Columbia Liberal Leader Christy Clark that he supports U.S. tariffs on Canadian softwood are lies. Leo Gerard says his members know he’s been fighting for them on both sides of the border. Gerard says he questions if Clark really wants to protect B.C. jobs and calls her accusations dishonest and hypocritical. He says Clark collected an extra $50,000 salary from the Liberal party and the money was coming from contributions made by the same timber companies that are pushing for a tariff on Canadian exports. Gerard says he has no plans to come to B.C. before next Tuesday’s election to campaign for the New Democrats because he believes forestry workers won’t believe the Liberal attacks.

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B.C. mills brace for retroactive U.S.-lumber tariff hit

By Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dakeryn Industries president Rob Chimko is bracing for the prospect of writing a cheque to U.S. authorities for wood he’s already sold south of the border that would wipe out a huge part of his firm’s profits, thanks to the Canada-U.S. softwood lumber dispute. That’s because North Vancouver-headquartered Dakeryn is one of dozens of Canadian lumber producers hit with not just the punishing countervailing duty on its U.S. exports, which took effect Friday, but an additional retroactive penalty to Feb. 2… “We are a low-margin, high-volume business,” Dakeryn said, “we’re not making buckets of money. I can’t just pay the 20-per-cent tax. This will require financing.” However, it could be months before Dakeryn and other value-added wood producers know whether they’ll even be caught-up in the retroactive penalty, according to Susan Yurkovich, president of the B.C. Lumber Trade Council.

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Softwood issue turned into political football

By Mark Nielsen
Prince George Citizen
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States, Canada West

The sight of the United Steelworkers international president standing next to U.S. president Donald Trump as he launched his attack on Canadian softwood lumber has become grist for an often-aired attack ad in which the B.C. Liberals question NDP leader John Horgan’s motivation…. But as the old adage goes, appearances aren’t always what they seem. Leo Gerard, the man who was standing next to Trump, has since issued a letter that opens this way: “No matter what side of the border I work on, more and more I hear from right-wing politicians who don’t really have any ideas of their own so they just make things up. Apparently this B.C. election is no different. …Gerard goes on to outline why the tarrifs could backfire for the U.S., claiming it will cost Americans 8,000 jobs in the construction industry alone due to the consequent higher cost of lumber. He also asserts Canadian lumber companies like West Fraser and Interfor “stand to benefit no matter what.”

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Trump lumber tariffs cause local concern Whitecourt Star

By Jeremy Appel
The Whitecourt Star
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision on April 24 to impose a 20 per cent tariff on Canadian lumber was met with stiff opposition from local industry leaders. “We’re completely opposed to it,” said Brock Mulligan, spokesman for the Alberta Forest Products Association and the Alberta Softwood Lumber Trade Council. …Whitecourt Mayor Maryann Chichak emphasized that this is an ongoing dispute in U.S.-Canada relations, regardless of which president or prime minister is in power. …“This brings a heightened awareness to the importance over the upcoming decade that we really strengthen and encourage industry and our provincial government to look for other markets for lumber, that we don’t rely on the United States in the event that there’s a sixth dispute in the future,” said Chichak. Alberta Premier Rachel Notley recently returned from a 10-day trade mission to China and Japan, for which Chichak expressed her approval.

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What’s Ahead for the BC Economy at the Independent Contractors and Businesses Association Industry Outlook

Journal of Commerce
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Independent Contractors and Businesses Association of British Columbia hosted a panel discussion from several industry leaders titled “B.C.’s Economy – what’s ahead and where is the work?” at their annual Industry Outlook, held May 23 in downtown Vancouver. The panel consisted of Woodfibre LNG vice president of corporate affairs Byng Giraud, Vancouver Fraser Port Authority president and CEO Robin Silvester and Council of Forest Industries president and CEO Susan Yurkovich. …Yurkovich started by stating people are looking for green building product and “that is our wheelhouse.” Forest products are about 1/3rd of B.C. exports, shipped to more than 100 countries. …”But from a softwood perspective we are highly dependent on the United States,” Yurkovich said. U.S. consumption is growing, and “they need our lumber,” Yurkovich said. She added there will be a supply gap, particularly in the southern U.S. “if you’re building a wall.”

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Trash talk doesn’t help lumber trade

By Tom Fletcher
BC Local News
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

One of the unfortunate things about the latest lumber trade attack from the U.S. is that it comes in the midst of the B.C. election campaign… BC Liberal leader Christy Clark wasted no time in last week’s TV debate. She claimed NDP leader John Horgan “turtled” in the fight over softwood lumber trade with the U.S., while casting herself as the only one tough and “calm” enough to defend the B.C. forest industry… She uses a selective quote from Horgan about the prospects of getting a new deal despite the harsh protectionist mood of U.S. President Donald Trump. “Good luck with that,” Horgan said, in an ill-advised reply to a reporter’s question about the prospects for success. Horgan soon developed his own factually challenged response, noting that Clark didn’t personally go to Washington D.C. to engage with Trump administration officials about the benefits of Canadian lumber… What a load of nonsense from both of them, and they know it. This fight goes back 30 years, and for most of that time it has been a truce via what is politely called “managed trade,” meaning either quotas or border taxes imposed by the U.S.

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Tembec CEO says he expects high lumber prices will prevent layoffs — for now

By Ross Morowits
The Canadian Press in CTV News
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL — The CEO of one of Quebec’s chief forestry companies says he doesn’t think job losses are in the offing for his company, at least in the short term, despite the imposition of U.S. softwood lumber duties. James Lopez, head of Tembec, says he believes higher lumber prices will offset the 19.88 per cent preliminary duty that took effect Monday against the Montreal-based firm on its softwood shipments to the U.S. “My forecast right now has no layoffs in it,” Lopez said in an interview Tuesday from New York City. He said the situation could change, however, especially in Quebec, if prices fall during the seasonal end to the home construction season. The province has the highest wood costs in the country.

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Tembec anticipates a rise in timber tax, thanks to Trump policies

Canadian Press in the Montreal Gazette
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada


Tembec Inc. says it expects a portion of the duties being imposed by the Trump administration on imported Canadian softwood will be passed on to its customers. The Montreal-based forestry company says it’s in good financial position despite being hit by a preliminary 19.88 per cent duty on its softwood shipments to the United States that took effect on Monday. Tembec says it intends to vigorously defend itself against the U.S. duties, but it anticipates the duties will mean higher lumber prices for customers. The comments came as Tembec says it earned $24 million or 24 cents per share in the quarter ended March 25 compared with a profit of $27 million or 27 cents per share a year earlier.

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Why Lumber Liquidators Quarter Wasn’t as Shiny as a Newly Installed Hardwood Floor

By Michelle Lodge
The Street
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

Lumber Liquidators latest results weren’t as shiny as a newly installed hardwood floor.  On Tuesday, North America’s largest retailer of hardwood flooring reported net sales at $248.4 million, up 6.4% for the first quarter, and ahead of Wall Street estimates for $247.3 million. …”We continue to be pleased with our top-line sales performance, as we move from negative to low single-digit growth in comparable store sales,” said the company’s CEO Dennis Knowles in a statement. …The lumber business has found itself in the cross hairs of President Trump recently, when he decided to impose tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber imports. …While most of the companies directly affected are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, a handful of U.S.-listed companies have exposure as well. Among them, Washington-based lumber company Weyerhaeuser and timber real estate investment trusts Rayonier and Potlach.

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Woodland Biomass fined for $4.22M for disposal of hazardous waste on ag lands

Daily Democrat
May 3, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Woodland Biomass Power is being told to pay $4.22 million for penalties, costs, and remediation, as a result of a civil settlement reached in an environmental protection action filed in Yolo County by the District Attorneys of Yolo, Solano and San Joaquin counties. Woodland Biomass Power operates a biomass facility in Woodland that burns wood fuel to produce electricity, and, in the process, generates ash, according to Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig. …“For years, Woodland Biomass Power claimed its ash was non-hazardous,” Reisig stated. “This claim, however, was supported with faulty methods, and at times, falsified summaries of the test results for its ash. The company’s own test results have shown that much of its ash had elevated levels of dioxins and constituted hazardous waste because of high levels of pH and high concentrations of contaminants like arsenic, lead, and copper. Woodland Biomass Power also provided these falsified records to various governmental entities, individuals, and companies.”

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Tariffs on Canadian wood products will hurt U.S. consumers

By Eric Bretan
Florida Weekly
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Fort Myers — When you think of countries that conduct unfair trade practices that hurt American companies and consumers, which do you think of first? China, with its currency manipulation? Mexico, with its cheap labor?… If you are Donald Trump, the first country that comes to mind appears to be … Canada. Yes, our “hostile” neighbor to the north became the first target of President Trump when he imposed new tariffs on imported soft wood products into the US… Clearly, the lumber industry in the U.S. has been hurt by cheap Canadian lumber crossing the border. U.S. loggers are losing their jobs to foreign Canadian workers. In fact, if you polled most Americans, I would bet the vast majority would be against these Canadian “unfair” trade practices. But what if you asked those same Americans if they would be in favor of a “new” Canadian government proposal to write every new homebuyer in the U.S. a check for $3,000, no strings attached? I would bet that close to 100 percent of those same people would be in favor of such a plan.

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Canada says American lumber duties will hit Canadian timber jobs and US consumers

Timber Trades Journal
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Canada has criticised the US government’s decision to impose countervailing duties of up to 24% on Canadian softwood lumber entering the US. “These duties stand to hurt hard working men and women in our mill communities across Canada,” said Derek Nighbor, CEO of the Forest Products Association of Canada… Mr Nighbor also said the duties would have a negative impact not only here in Canada but also on US consumers. “Currently, American demand for lumber far exceeds what the American industry is able to produce. They need Canada’s softwood lumber.”

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Stora Enso’s wood products division sees 34% Q1 earnings growth

Timber Trades Journal
May 2, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Stora Enso’s wood products division has recorded a 34% improvement in Q1 operational earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) compared to a year ago. Divisional sales were up 8.9% to €416m (Q1 2016: €382m), while deliveries grew 11.6% to 1.21 million m3. Stora Enso said operational earnings were better due to higher volumes and slightly higher sales prices, especially for spruce sawn products. The sales boost was also due to strategic investments in the Varkaus LVL line, the modernisation of Murów sawmill and increased cross-laminated timber volumes and prices.

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Forestry

Unspoiled, ‘tremendously special’ forest at west edge of Edmonton to open to public in the fall

By Phil Heidenreich
Global News
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Bunchberry Meadows Conservation Area, a 250 hectare old-growth forest just 30 kilometres from downtown Edmonton, is expected to be open for nature lovers to enjoy this fall, according to the Edmonton and Area Land Trust (EALT). The EALT, along with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, held a media event at the parcel of land west of Alberta’s capital on Tuesday to talk about its future now that it has acquired the land. The property, acquired from private landowners, features diverse vegetation and wildlife. ‘It features aspen parkland woods as well as pockets of white spruce, tamarack, jack pine and wetlands, giving way to diverse plant communities throughout the whole area,” the EALT’s website says. “This natural area is an important refuge for wildlife and is home to many species including moose, deer, squirrels, owls, hawks and songbirds.”

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Reduced working forest, not log exports is killing forestry jobs

Truck Loggers Association
May 3, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It’s election time and as if on cue that old populist punching bag issue, BC’s log exports, has been pulled out to rally the masses. Unfortunately, many of the statements being made about log exports and jobs are misinformed. “While the forest industry may have lost 30,000 jobs in the last 15 years, it is definitely not because of log exports,” explained David Elstone, TLA Executive Director. “It is because the working forest has shrunk dramatically in that time.” …On the coast, the size of the working forest has fallen by a third—from a high of 24.5 million cubic metres in 1985 to 16.5 million cubic metres today. This 33% reduction took place slowly as British Columbians worked to find a balance between environmental protection and a healthy forest industry. If you reduce the working forest by a third, it’s going to impact jobs. [press release includes a link to “Log Exports: Your Questions Answered”]

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National omnibus bill contains Mental Health Trust-Tongass land trade

By Liz Ruskin
Alaska Public Radio Network
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A bill to fund the federal government through September is on the move in Congress, and it includes a long-sought land trade in Southeast Alaska. The swap would exchange Alaska Mental Health Trust land near Ketchikan, Petersburg and other Southeast cities for about 20,000 acres of the Tongass National Forest. It would allow the Trust to gain logging revenues to pay for mental health programming from land that is less controversial. The Trust’s plans to log areas near Ketchikan and Petersburg were strongly opposed by many community members. A bill allowing the land trade is also moving through the state Legislature. The federal spending bill is expected to pass the House this week. It covers the rest of this fiscal year. It does not include many of the domestic spending cuts President Trump proposed for FY2018.

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Students head into the woods to learn about forest jobs

By Greg Barnette
Record Searchlight
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A chainsaw whirred in the distance as a group of fifth-graders watched a logger cut down a tree from inside the cab of a crane, proving that the logging industry is not dead. It’s only gone high-tech, some 500 elementary students were told during a visit to a forest harvest demonstration about 9 miles east of Shingletown on Tuesday hosted by the Sierra-Cascade Logging Conference. “Get good at computers, because everything out here is run on computers,” said Equipment Operations and Maintenance Instructor John Livingston from Shasta College as he displayed a freshly cut piece of plywood after it passed through a saw.

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Technology of harvesting timber

By Emily Hoard
The News-Review
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

This is the second in a four-part series about technology used in the timber industry. Technological advances in harvesting timber can not only make operations safer and more efficient, but address environmental concerns and help foresters plan for the future. “We love to see innovation in wood products all the way from forest to frame,” said Sara Duncan, director of public affairs for Oregon Forest & Industries Council. “The folks in the timber industry are passionate about what they do and certainly interested in finding new ways to do it.” Though there’s a misperception that the timber industry isn’t innovative, she said, the work itself requires the industry to adapt and advance in technology.

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The future of the forest: the spruce beetle Part 2

By Kasey Kershner
KRDO
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

WAUGH MOUNTAIN, Colo. – The spruce beetle continues to wreak havoc on Colorado’s Forests, with the small bug spreading rapidly. It is infesting, and eventually killing, spruce trees all over the state. Looking at the trees from above, though, the trees do not look sick, so for foresters, it can be hard to detect. So we may not be seeing that gray in the Waugh Mountain area yet, but traveling to the southwest, specifically the Wolf Creek Pass area, it’s a much different view. You can see hundreds of thousands of gray, dead trees, which is a sign of an earlier infestation of the spruce beetle. Plus, with so many trees in the beetle’s line of fire, it is creating a fire danger all on its own. For those in charge of fighting the fires, it is something they have to consider.

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Big timber sale proposed in Mount Hood National Forest

By Brittany Allen
Pamplin Media Group
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Mount Hood National Forest officials plan to log 13,272 acres to reduce forest-fire risks and boost timber harvesting in the Barlow Ranger District. The area proposed for logging, in what the forest service calls its Crystal Clear Restoration project, includes land within the White River, Middle Deschutes River, and Beaver Creek watersheds. “The purpose of the Crystal Clear Restoration Project is to provide forest products where there is an opportunity to restore resiliency to forested areas and reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire behavior,” the national forest says on its website. Bark, an environmental group that focuses on Mount Hood issues, is dubious. “You can only use fire to justify so much logging,” says Bark staff attorney Brenna Bell.

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Blighted Welsh forest restocked with more diverse tree range

By Gavin McEwan
Horticulture Week
May 2, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Natural Resources Wales (NRW) has begun restocking areas of Cwmcarn Forest in Ebbw Vale which are gradually being cleared of Phytophthora ramorum-infected larch. The new trees have been grown from locally collected seed and will cover around 80 hectares of land across the southern part of the forest. They include both conifers and native broadleaves in an effort to boost resilience to climate change and disease in the future. Felling of over 160,000 larch trees meanwhile is expected to continue until 2020, with around 30% of infected trees having so far been removed from the forest. Temporary closures and diversions of trails and paths remain in place.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

‘Just Cool It’: Seeking Hope in an Age of Climate Crisis

By Sharon J. Riley
The Tyee
May 2, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada, Canada West

David Suzuki and Ian Hanington’s new book opens with a question that many of us may have been asking ourselves as of late — in the face of rising seas, increasingly intense storms, melting polar ice sheets, drought, wildfire, or whatever the climate-related news of the day may be — “is there still hope for humanity?” In their new book, Just Cool It, Suzuki and Hanington remind us that this question is as relevant as ever, as climate change marches forward whether it’s in the headlines or not. “Even if all countries that signed the [Paris] agreement meet their stated targets on time,” they write, “global average temperatures will rise by 2.7 to 3.5 degrees Celsius — which scientists agree would be catastrophic for humans and numerous other species.”

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