Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 9, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Sean Spicer says there’s not going to be a trade war

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 9, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

Like sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives – or so goes the saying on the inevitability of life (or a softwood lumber dispute between Canada and the US). Here are today’s turns:

  • Stating that “regular trade remedy procedures are simply doing their job”, White House spokesman Sean Spicer says “there’s not going to be a trade war with Canada” (Canadian Press)
  • Claiming they are “not considered by purchasers to be interchangeable with other softwood species”, Canada is seeking exemptions on bed-frame components, garage doors, window frames and Western Red Cedar exports (Globe and Mail)
  • Tagged to play hardball for its softwood industry”, Alberta hires former Premier of Manitoba and former ambassador to the US, Gary Doer as lumber envoy (Calgary Herald)
  • Whenever the US Trade Commission’s finding came before an impartial third party”, writes Ed Lotterman of Real World Economics, “the US has never won the core case” (Idaho Statesman) 

Further to yesterday’s coverage on Washington State’s biomass bill—”that would help KapStone’s Longview pulp mill profit from production of renewable biomass energy”—Governor Inslee delayed his decision.

Finally, the Government of Canada “celebrates a milestone for tallest wood condo building in North America“, a 12-storey wood structure in Quebec City.


— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Canadian government seeks exemptions from U.S. lumber duties

By Brent Jang
The Globe and Mail
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The federal government is asking the Trump administration to exempt a wide range of items subjected to U.S. duties on Canadian softwood lumber, including bed-frame components, garage doors and window frames. The Canadian government’s list of wooden products proposed for exemption also covers door frames, clothes hangers, cutting boards, butcher-block countertops and certain fence pickets. Ottawa points out that the vast majority of exemptions envisaged are for remanufactured products made from softwood boards, versus lumber derived from trees and sent to U.S. home-construction sites. Another exemption sought is for Western Red Cedar exports. “Western Red Cedar commands a significant price premium to other softwood-lumber products and is not considered by purchasers to be interchangeable with other softwood species,” the federal government said in a letter to U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross.

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White House spokesman: No, there’s not going to be a trade war with Canada

By Alexander Panetta
Canadian Press in CBC News
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The White House is downplaying talk of a U.S. trade war with Canada, with President Donald Trump’s spokesman brushing off the notion when asked about it Monday. “No,” Sean Spicer said when asked whether he sees a north-south trade war escalating. He said regular trade remedy procedures are simply doing their job. The U.S. has slapped tariffs as high as 24 per cent on Canadian lumber, as part of its long-standing view that Canadian logging companies get unfair subsidies. The Canadian government is now considering retaliation in two areas: one is a possible ban on exports of U.S. coal from B.C., and government sources say the other is a study of potential duties against products from Oregon.

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U.S. bed manufacturers lose sleep over softwood dispute

By Brent Jang
The Globe and Mail
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

[CONTENT AVAILABLE ONLY TO GLOBE AND MAIL SUBSCRIBERS] No softwood tariffs, please, we’re American bed makers. U.S. manufacturers that use wooden bed-frame components are asking the U.S. Department of Commerce to exempt those type of products from duties imposed on Canadian softwood-lumber shipments. The frame-and-mattress makers south of the border are tossing and turning because of preliminary countervailing duties on Canadian lumber averaging nearly 20 per cent. The U.S. duties will lead to higher prices for bed frames and disrupt wood supplies from Canada, say bed-industry executives, who forecast a ripple effect that will trigger shrinking demand for mattresses and box springs. They are sounding the alarm about the risk of sagging sales of bed sets to U.S. consumers. …In letters to the Commerce Department, U.S. bed manufacturers complain that they have become collateral damage in the trade war. …Tempur-Pedic Management LLC, which employs 300 people at its Kentucky plant, echoed the sentiment in the co-ordinated letter-writing campaign: “Disruption, even if temporary, will eliminate jobs in the U.S. and damage the financial stability of the U.S. mattress manufacturing base.”

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Alberta taps Gary Doer to talk softwood lumber with U.S.

By Mia Rabson
Canadian Press in the Globe and Mail
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A former Manitoba premier and one-time Canadian ambassador to the United States has been tagged to play hardball for Alberta’s softwood lumber industry in Washington. Gary Doer will join officials appointed by other provincial governments to lobby on their behalf on the softwood file, including former Conservative international trade and foreign affairs minister David Emerson, who was named by British Columbia earlier this year. Quebec and Ontario have also appointed their own envoys. Mr. Doer says the goal isn’t to negotiate individual deals for provinces, but for a Team Canada approach to get a negotiated agreement for all. “We’re going to try to be as effective as we can and use our own unique contacts with the United States but at the same time at a the end of the day it’s going to be an agreement between Canada and the United States,” he told The Canadian Press in a phone interview.

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Opinion: Trade tariffs carry hefty unintended consequences

By Naomi Christensen and Jahangir Valiani
Edmonton Journal
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Starting this month, Canadian softwood lumber producers exporting to the U.S. will be slammed with a duty averaging 20 per cent. While US producers are celebrating, American homebuyers are about to get a nasty taste of what happened to Canadian homebuyers last year. In September 2016, at the request of the only gypsum manufacturer in Western Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency investigated the dumping of drywall boards into Canada. …In response, Canada imposed provisional anti-dumping duties of 105 per cent to 276 per cent on U.S. exports of drywall entering our country. The predictable result of Canada’s gypsum duty was higher prices for drywall. Importers raised their prices to construction consumers by about 55 per cent once duties were imposed. However, the price pressures on imports didn’t automatically benefit Canadian manufacturers. 

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Alberta hires former ambassador Gary Doer as softwood lumber envoy

By James Wood
Calgary Herald
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Alberta’s NDP government has enlisted former ambassador to the United States Gary Doer to advocate for the province’s softwood lumber industry, even as it hopes Canada can avoid a trade war with the United States. … In an interview Monday, Doer said he is confident a negotiated settlement can be reached but that the voice of American consumers and homebuilders — who benefit from Canadian lumber — needs to be heard in opposition to “a very small but loud group” in the U.S. lumber industry that wants tariffs.. …Economic Development and Trade Minister Deron Bilous said Doer brings extensive knowledge of the softwood file and a wide range of contacts south of the border, both in Washington. D.C. and in the states. “There needs to be a recognition that a prolonged softwood lumber dispute is going to cost billions of dollars,” Bilous said in an interview Monday..

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Spike in 2016 smell complaints at Kamloops pulp mill

By Kim Anderson
Infotel News
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West


KAMLOOPS – Hopefully the family dog isn’t getting the blame — it might have been Domtar. Last year the Domtar pulp mill had two events where emissions were higher than normal prompting 42 complaints from the public, up significantly over past years. There were no reported spills, but twice last year the amount of sulfur dioxide emissions released into the air were above the daily maximum, according to the 2016 annual air report submitted by Kristin Dangelmaier, Environmental Manager with Domtar Kamloops.  …Mill odour was a little higher in 2016 compared to 2015 and received 42 complaints over the year, with 13 coming from one person. There were only 18 community complaints in 2015 and the report suggests that locals are more likely to call in complaints if the smell is frequent, rather than if it’s especially strong.

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Softwood-tariff tiff reflects long U.S.-Canada feud — and our hands aren’t clean

By Ed Lotterman, economist and writer
Idaho Statesman
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

….We have fought over Canadian softwood for decades. And whenever it came before an impartial third party in the past, the U.S. has lost, regardless of what our own ITC had ruled. Over long periods we reneged on our word and refused to honor arbitration rulings, but we have never won the core case. We muscle Canada into some “voluntary” agreement that lasts for a decade or so and then we have another round of blustering. Recognize also that while a higher proportion of our own lumber comes from private lands, our history of timber sales from public lands is not exactly pristine. We long have auctioned off federal timber plots. But often, the Forest Service spends more money building improvements like logging roads than it got in payments. So we effectively gave that timber away. Moreover, while there is competition in U.S. forest products, sales of federal logging rights are not textbook perfect competition.

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Editorial: Trump right on tariffs for Canadian lumber

Editorial Board
The Daily Astorian
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

Tariffs are intended to provide a competitive advantage for U.S. goods or to counteract an unfair disadvantage. President Donald Trump has moved to impose a tariff on softwood lumber imported from Canada, which could benefit U.S. timber interests. It isn’t often that an international argument has a direct impact on a local industry, but such may be the case with President Donald Trump’s move.  to impose a tariff of between 3 and 24.1 percent on softwood lumber imported from Canada. …Long experience with tariffs suggests they are usually not the best way to achieve goals that instead require careful and rational negotiations. However, in this case the Trump administration may have chosen the right tool for the right job.

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Reports: Canada considering tariffs on Ore. products

By Eileen Park
KOIN TV
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

PORTLAND, Ore. — The United States and Canada are in the middle of a bitter battle over trade. But as the Trump administration moves forward with a significant tariff on lumber, Canada has revealed it has a few tariffs in mind for American products. …Prime Minister Justin Trudeau responded to news of the tariff by stating, “You cannot thicken this border without hurting people on both sides of it.” New reports suggest Canada is now considering tariffs on exports from Oregon including wine, flooring and plywood in retaliation to Trump’s move. …But John Gallup, Portland State University professor of development economics, told KOIN 6 News we should get ready for more of these back-and-forth battles. …Gallup also said, when it comes to trade, countries don’t settle easily.

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Lumber tariffs could lead to long-term solution

By Katy Nesbitt
The Observer
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

ENTERPRISE — In an attempt to ensure fair softwood lumber trade between the U.S. and Canada, the U.S. Department of Commerce placed tariffs on Canadian imports this spring. … Bruce Dunn, of RY Timber in Enterprise, said the Canadian wood products industry has an unfair advantage over the U.S. because the Canadian government allocates the trees from its national forests to the timber industry, creating a supply of raw material at a nominal price. “Their timber industry is not based on a free market and competitive bidding system,” Dunn said. “This creates an unfair advantage against the U.S. industry. The only way to even the playing field is with a softwood tariff.” Eastern Oregon’s timber industry has dwindled in the last 25 years, but Boise Cascade still maintains two sawmills in Union County. Senior Vice President John Sahlberg said, philosophically, Boise Cascade supports free trade and is not an advocate for tariffs.

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Why Trump has decided to blame Canada

By Noah Feldman
Charleston Gazette-Mail
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

President Donald Trump has arrived at his new slogan: “Blame Canada.” But not because anything is actually Canada’s fault. Rather, process of elimination has led Trump to favor symbolic sanctions against America’s closest and best ally. …I’ve just come back from Canada, where bemusement with Trump is beginning to turn into annoyance. …Rather, what’s eating Canadians is the president’s apparent belief that he can go after them without serious consequences. …Yet the real culprit here is the U.S. Constitution and the limits it imposes on Trump’s capacity to do anything much on his own. 

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Multiple agencies battle fire at Western Excelsior in Mancos

Durango Herald
May 8, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

MANCOS – Multiple agencies battled a large fire Monday at Western Excelsior in Mancos that led to the evacuation of nearby homes because of heavy smoke. Although calmer winds and lower temperatures assisted firefighters in the evening, the blaze was not expected to be brought under control until early Tuesday, Montezuma County Emergency Manager Paul Hollar said. Officials say the fire was reported at 12:55 p.m. Monday and the manufacturing facility was quickly evacuated; there were no reports of injuries. The Veterans of Foreign Wars hall in Mancos opened for residents evacuated from eight homes in a mobile home park about 80 yards from the manufacturing plant, Hollar said.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Government of Canada Celebrates Milestone for Tallest Wood Condo Building in North America

By Natural Resources Canada
Government of Canada
May 8, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada


Developing new products and expanding our markets will strengthen Canada’s forest sector, create new jobs and benefit the communities that rely on the forest industry. Today, the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, on behalf of the Honourable Jim Carr, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, attended the capping ceremony for project Origine, a tall wood construction project in Quebec City’s Pointe-aux-Lièvres eco-district. The tallest wood-constructed condominium in North America, project Origine includes a 12-storey wood structure on top of a one-storey concrete podium, and stores 2,065 tonnes of carbon in its wood. The 41-metre tall condominium uses cross-laminated timber as its primary building material, a technology that greatly increases the technical limits for tall wood construction.

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How to protect your wood deck from the sun’s harsh rays

By Tim Carter
Washington Post
May 8, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

My wood deck sits in the sun all day with no shade. It’s now treated lumber and requires sealing every other year. I’m tired of all the work, and I need some wood deck resurfacing ideas. My husband and I are also thinking about composite decking, but it’s quite pricey. What has been your experience with wood decks, and what would you do if you were me? — Diane K., Morgantown, W.Va. …I’ve built countless wood decks. They’ve been all sizes, shapes, and I’ve used all sorts of different wood species. …My guess is that a majority of the wood decks out there have treated wood decking and railing systems. Currently, treated wood is the least expensive material to use. Though treated lumber may resist wood rot and insect infestation, its downside is that it can’t resist the punishing effects of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) light.

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Albina Yards—Pioneering the Future of Sustainable Mass Timber Construction

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo
Dwell
May 8, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Although talk of taxing Canadian lumber brought into the United States may be one reason Americans are moving towards sourcing more of their timber domestically, the availability of domestically-sourced Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) will no doubt be another. CLT—a prefabricated wood panel product consisting of three to seven layers of lumber that’s glued together to form incredibly strong structural panels—has been a common residential building material in Europe, and has steadily gaining popularity in the U.S. Previously imported exclusively from Austria and Canada, CLT panels are now being fabricated domestically, and their use is starting to spread—and not just in residential projects.  Located in North Portland, Albina Yard is a 16,000-square-foot office building with ground floor retail that’s on the cutting edge of architecture. 

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Forestry

Where Great Bear Rainforest Protection Is a Lie

By Andrew Nikiforuk
The Tyee
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Here’s a tale of how Christy Clark’s BC Liberals manage the province’s resources. It is set in the Great Bear Rainforest. Great, this story is not. …Premier Christy Clark touted the Great Bear Rainforest agreement as “B.C.’s gift to the world.” But the Kwiakah will tell you otherwise, and they know because they live there. The new agreement promises increased logging and reduced land protection on their traditional territory. While the northern part of the Great Bear might claim 54 per cent protection for old growth, the government decided to award the southern part only 30 per cent protection. The sacrifice comes directly from Kwiakah land. How the remaining 70 per cent is logged — sustainably or rapaciously — is left to the timber corporations to decide because the BC Liberals made “self-regulation” the order of the day.

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TimberWest Proud Sponsor of Vancouver Art Gallery Emily Carr Exhibition

TimberWest
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver, B.C. – TimberWest is honoured to announce its Presenting Sponsorship for the Vancouver Art Gallery exhibition Emily Carr: Into the Forest, opening May 13th. The Gallery will showcase forty-five of Carr’s iconic paintings from the 1930s collection dedicated to the West Coast forest. “Emily Carr and her works are legendary in Canadian culture. Her ability to connect people to a time and place in history through her art is what makes her work inspiring and everlasting,” says Jeff Zweig, President and CEO of TimberWest. “Emily Carr brought the BC forests to life, and provided people with an appreciation for the rugged, wild beauty of our coast. In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary we are privileged to sponsor the Vancouver Art Gallery’s most recent exhibition Emily Carr: Into the Forest.”

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Time lapse map shows the loss of ancient forests on Vancouver Island

By Vicky Husband
CommonsBC
May 4, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A stunning new animated map of logging on Vancouver Island was released today by well-known BC environmentalist Vicky Husband. The map displays 150 years of logging in 30 seconds, and provides important perspective to public debate over logging and the escalation of raw log exports from the province. “More than anything, this map shows that we’re logging like there’s no tomorrow — for the forests and the fish and wildlife that depend on them for habitat, or for the communities that have depended on them for jobs and economic stability,” said Husband.

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N.S. Liberals promise coastal law, face criticism for lax approach to polluters

By Michael Tutton
Canadian Press in the Chronicle Herald
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — Nova Scotia’s eroding coast and forest clearcuts emerged as election issues Monday as the Liberals promised new studies and laws, while the Tory leader said existing environmental rules are gathering dust. … McNeil also said the province would extend the moratorium on hydraulic fracking and re-announced a pledge made in the recent budget to appoint an independent review of forestry practices. However, the Progressive Conservatives said there’s reason to suspect McNeil’s commitment to bringing in significant legal reform after his government showed limited willingness to enforce existing rules…. Meanwhile, NDP Leader Gary Burrill said in an interview that the New Democrats would plan to fulfill a goal to reduce clearcutting by 50 per cent — as laid out in the previous government’s natural resource strategy.

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Oregon State University to discuss Elliott State Forest with State Land Board

Oregon State University
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

CORVALLIS, OR – Oregon State University has been asked by state Treasurer Tobias Read to engage in discussions with the State Land Board regarding options to retain public ownership of the Elliott State Forest. “OSU and its College of Forestry have long advocated for investments in comprehensive, sustained research and data collection to better inform the relationship between forest management and conservation of listed species,” said OSU President Ed Ray. “With the right management structure, the Elliott State Forest could offer a great opportunity for research and education that would have long-term benefits for our state.” Ray said that three principles have guided the university’s consideration of options involving the forest. “First, the university has no interest in contributing to the disruption of a sale of the forest that previously received a majority of support by the State Land Board,” Ray said.

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Fighting fire with fire: Program shows benefits of prescribed burns

By Hannah Jones
The Mail Tribune
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

For many, coming in contact with any kind of forest fire may prompt panic. But for Susan Prichard, University of Washington fire ecologist, the fire of prescribed burns is a good thing, the best way to combat devastating wildfires that have been on the rise in recent years. Prichard gave a talk at Southern Oregon University last week, addressing the catastrophic damage of wildfires, specifically around her home in Washington’s Methow Valley, in addition to how communities can adapt to the fires and plan for them. …“We now know that it’s not if we’re going to get a fire, it’s when we’re getting a fire,” said Prichard. “So the question is now ‘How do you like your smoke?,’” referring to the thin white smoke of controlled burns instead of the heavier uncontrolled smoke from wildfires. Prichard studied three major fires in the past decade in Washington state: the Tripod, Carlton and Okanogan Complex fires that collectively burned more than 700,000 acres of land.

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Study refutes findings behind challenge to Sierra Nevada forest restoration

By Brett Israel
University of California Berkley
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A study led by ecologists at UC Berkeley has found significant flaws in the research used to challenge the U.S. Forest Service plan to restore Sierra Nevada forests to less dense, and less fire-prone, environments. Until recently, the consensus among forest ecologists was that before European settlers arrived in the Sierra, the forests were mostly open conifer forests dominated by big trees and low-to-moderately severe fires every eight to 12 years. ….But recent studies, using a newly developed methodology, have argued that the Sierra Nevada was actually a more dense forest than the consensus view. …“We went through the data and showed that, in every case, this method estimated that the density of trees was two to three times higher than was the reality,” said Carrie Levine, a Ph.D. student of forest ecology at Berkeley and lead author of the study.

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The high cost and low benefits of state timber sales

By Eric Holle, president of Lynn Canal Conservation in Haines
The Juneau Empire
May 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

In his State of the State Address, Gov. Bill Walker said that Alaska should export finished products, not raw resources. I couldn’t agree more. Processing resources locally makes sense. Otherwise we become a resource extraction colony, exporting jobs in exchange for a degraded environment. Large timber sales of hundreds or thousands of acres fall into the second category. The Baby Brown timber sale, on the Haines State Forest, just upriver from the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve, will provide few local benefits while the timber is sent unprocessed to Oregon. Most shocking is that Alaskans pay dearly for this. Industrial scale sales like the Baby Brown have never made money for either the state or the federal government in Southeast Alaska.

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The evolutionary story of birch, told through 80 genomes

By Charlotte Hsu
University of Buffalo
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


BUFFALO, N.Y. — Forests of silver birch stretch across Europe, and they are a wonder to behold: stands of slender, white-barked trees sheltering vast swathes of earth. But these woodlands also have value beyond their beauty: They are an economic asset, generating raw material for papermaking, construction, furniture-building and more. A new study illuminates the evolutionary history of birch, a tree that has not been studied much by scientists despite its commercial value. “Birch is one of the major trees for forest products in the Northern Hemisphere. Others, like spruce, pine and poplar, all have genome sequences, but birch did not — until now,” says University at Buffalo biologist Victor Albert, who co-led the Finnish-funded project with Jaakko Kangasjärvi, Ykä Helariutta, Petri Auvinen and Jarkko Salojärvi of the University of Helsinki in Finland. Helariutta is also a professor at the University of Cambridge.

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Professional Logging Contractors of Maine holds 22nd Annual Meeting

By the Professional Logging Contractors of Maine
Bangor Daily News
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

BREWER – The Professional Logging Contractors (PLC) of Maine held its 22nd Annual Meeting Friday, May 5 with guests including U.S. Representative Bruce Poliquin, and raised a record $44,000 for the Log A Load for Kids Foundation to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. The event also included the presentation of awards to Congressman Poliquin, Maine State Senator Paul Davis, former Maine State Representative Jeff McCabe and many PLC members for their outstanding contributions to the logging industry over the last year. …The Congressman praised the work ethic and generosity of Maine loggers, noting the funds raised in the Log A Load auction.

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Wildlife returns to FSC-certified forests

Forest Stewardship Council
March 28, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

In Wales, an extremely rare, nocturnal member of the weasel family has bounced back from the brink of extinction thanks to translocations to woodlands managed by Natural Resources Wales. The pine marten is the second rarest carnivore in Britain and viewed as a priority species for conservation efforts in Wales and Scotland. This small population is now on the road to recovery: at least four of the translocated female pine martens had given birth by the spring of 2016, marking a victory for conservationists. The Vincent Wildlife Trust, a charity working on British and Irish mammal conservation, conducted research and surveys on pine martens for thirty years and determined that action was urgently needed to prevent the complete extinction of the pine marten. 

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Galway forest at ‘major risk of destruction’ due to gorse fire

RTÉ
May 8, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Thousands of acres of forest, moorland and wildlife in Co Galway are at “major risk of destruction” because of a gorse fire, according to Coillte. A fire service is battling the fire at Cloosh Valley, which escalated out of control this afternoon. It said that Galway Wind Park, Ireland’s largest wind farm, is located within the forest and is at close proximity to the fire. The fire is described as being “out of control” and rough terrain and high winds are making the operation to contain the blaze more difficult. It is hoped that when temperatures drop as night falls the fire may subside a little. There is a plan to fight the fire using two helicopters tomorrow morning. Gerard Murphy, Managing Director of Coillte Forest, said: “The recent outbreak of fires, particularly across the west and north of the country, has been responsible for the worst damage to Coillte’s estate since 2011.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Governor delays action on biomass bill

Longview Daily News
May 8, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

At the last minute Monday, the administration of Gov. Jay Inslee delayed a decision on a bill that would help KapStone’s Longview pulp mill profit from production of renewable biomass energy. Inslee initially was expected to sign the bill Monday morning, but his office withdrew it for further review and rescheduled it for his signature May 16, the governor’s press office said. Spokeswoman Tara Lee said the governor still is expected to sign the measure, but she said nothing is certain until it is inked. The bill would allow older biomass facilities like the one owned by KapStone to sell renewable energy credits. KapStone stands to earn hundreds of thousands of dollars annually under the legislation. The bill glided through both houses of the Legislature. It was sponsored by state Sen. Dean Takko, D-Longview.

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