Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 12, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

BC’s caribou plan threatens forestry restart in the Northern Rockies

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 12, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

The economic viability of the Northern Rockies Municipality is “threatened by BC’s caribou plan“, according to Mayor Bill Streeper. The once vibrant community of Fort Nelson, heralded as the forestry capital of BC in 2006, “now has a 70 per cent vacancy rate for commercial properties”.

Not to be outdone by Apple (in California), Microsoft plans to plant hundreds of acres of native woodlands in Ireland, “the largest single corporate investment in Irish forestry in a decade”.

More rumblings on softwood lumber (of course) but also a story on how the US duties proposed for Chinese-made hardwood plywood producers will affect residential furniture producers. According to Tomas Russell of Furniture Today, it “doesn’t affect finished goods coming in from China but rather panels that are used in the assembly of kitchen cabinets”.

Picture-evidence that wood is good from Stora Enso and “you don’t have to be an architect or a tree-hugger to be dazzled”. Finally, Wood Expo 2017 is “virtually a sellout” according to Eric Gee of the Southern Forest Products Association—a new Tree Frog News Sponsor. The three-day event scheduled for mid-June in Atlanta Georgia includes 29 first-time exhibitors.

And don’t forget – it’s Mother’s Day on Sunday.

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Caught Between Ottawa And Trump, Our Softwood Industry Needs Support

By Jerry Dian, National President, Unifor
Huffington Post Canada
May 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Like those before it, the countervailing tariffs imposed by the U.S. on Canadian softwood lumber will no doubt be quashed once they are challenged at the international tribunals meant to look into such matters. But before that happens, jobs will be lost. Lives will be disrupted. Families and their communities will struggle. The cuts that result from these tariffs could have lasting impact, which will still be felt across this country by the time the next federal election comes along. This is about protecting and saving thousands of jobs across Canada. …It is no surprise, then, that delegates to the Canadian Labour Congress convention adopted a resolution Wednesday committing the CLC to push the federal government to vigorously defend the industry. …We need to make sure there is a strong and viable industry still in Canada when that victory comes. Achieving that requires action now.

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Canada and the United States: Trade, Softwood, and Uncertainty

By Sheldon Birkett, research associate, Council on Hemispheric Affairs
Council On Hemispheric Affairs
May 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

On April 26, 2017 President Donald Trump quickly agreed not to terminate NAFTA. However, only two days earlier, Trump announced a tariff on Canadian softwood lumber, a policy that has chronically rekindled threats against the future of free trade. The Trump administration’s imposition of tariffs on Canadian softwood as well as his threat to terminate NAFTA is widely viewed as a political tactic to renegotiate trade flows between Canada and the United States. …Duncan Davis, …Interfor Corporation, took a combative approach against Trump’s tariff, according to Reuters, “For us, (U.S. Tariffs are) a negative effect on our Canadian business, but the real loser in all of this is the U.S. homebuilder and U.S. consumer…That’s why we think this is such a misguided effort.” This further underlines the interdependent nature of Canada-United States trade relations. …Despite the challenges of free trade one thing is certain for both Canadians and Americans, as stated by the former Canadian Ambassador to the United States, Michael H. Wilson: “If we had not had that free trade agreement, our country [Canada] would be a very different place than it is today.”

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The Montreal Economic Institute awards the John Dobson Medal for Free Enterprise to Richard Garneau

By the Montreal Economic Institute
Canada Newswire
May 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

MONTREAL – Yesterday evening, the MEI presented the John Dobson Medal for Free Enterprise to Mr. Richard Garneau, President and CEO of Resolute Forest Products. “We award this medal to individuals who defend free enterprise, among other things by standing up to lobby groups that attempt to undermine economic end entrepreneurial freedom. And on this count, this year’s recipient is quite a fighter!” says Michel Kelly-Gagnon, President and CEO of the MEI. When Greenpeace began targeting his company and his workers by claiming they “destroyed forests” and by producing multiple disinformation campaigns aimed at making them lose important customers, Richard Garneau decided to stand up to them by adopting an attitude of, in his own words, moral leadership. “If you believe you’re on firm ground, you stand firm,” points out Mr. Garneau.

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Chips are down for producers as softwood lumber is back on the poker table

By Reg Clayton
Kenora Daily News
May 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Canada are taking a cautious approach in dealing with U.S. trade officials over the latest dispute on softwood lumber. …Regardless of the outcomes of past challenges in Canada’s favour, the U.S. government appears intent on negotiating a better deal on softwood lumber, which is currently not included under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) but that too may change.The situation will obviously impact Ontario’s softwood lumber industry. …The Kenora Forest Products sawmill has been back in operation for nearly a year since it reopened in early 2016 after a six-year closure. A good deal of credit is due to the Prendiville family, owners of the Kenora sawmill and similar operations in Manitoba for their tenacity and commitment to the community in weathering the storm.

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Effect of hardwood plywood duties remains uncertain

By Thomas Russell
Furniture Today
May 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

RESTON, Va. – How any duties on Chinese-made hardwood and decorative plywood producers affect domestic residential furniture producers would depend to a large extent on how producers use those materials in their finished goods. The case clearly does not affect finished goods coming in from China but rather panels that are imported from China and used in the assembly of kitchen cabinets and some furniture still made in the U.S. …A related anti-dumping case requested as part of the petition aims to address concerns that products included in the scope of the investigation are being sold into the U.S. at unfair prices, or prices that are considered below raw materials costs. Preliminary anti-dumping duties could be announced in June. Final duties could be determined later this year, pending further investigation by the U.S. International Trade Commission regarding injury to U.S. hardwood and decorative plywood producers.

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Fossil sawmill earns a state loan to improve its juniper production

By Eric Mortenson
Capital Press
May 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States, US West

A one-man sawmill in Fossil, Ore., that specializes in Western juniper products is the recipient of two state business loans intended to support efforts to remove the intrusive trees. Kendall Derby, owner of the In the Sticks sawmill, was approved for loans totaling $148,550, according to Business Oregon, the state department that administers the funding. Derby said the money is meant to increase production and jobs, and some of it is forgivable if he meets certain conditions. Derby said he is buying a more efficient electric saw to cut juniper logs. He’ll also use the money to buy logs and will purchase a better skid-steer loader to move logs and lumber. …The money comes a fund approved by the state Legislature in 2015 and administered by Business Oregon.

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Forest Products Expo Approaches Sellout

By Eric Gee
Southern Forest Products Association
May 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

With only two exhibit spots remaining, Southern Forest Products Association’s (SFPA) 34th Forest Products Machinery & Equipment Exposition – Expo 2017 – is virtually a sellout. The three-day event will fill Building A, Exhibit Halls A2 & A3 of the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, June 14-16. “A late surge in exhibit space sales has filled the hall with more than 170 exhibitors, ready to showcase the latest machinery and technology,” noted exposition director Eric Gee. “Among exhibitors, we are proud to welcome 29 first-time exhibitors to the show floor, including companies that have not participated in the last 10 years,” he added.

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Locked-out workers intensify Myrtleford timber mill feud

By Nick Toscano
Sydney Morning Herald
May 12, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

The union representing 200 workers who have been shut out of an Australian timber mill is seeking to have the company stripped of its certification as an ethical producer. In a major escalation of a three-week pay battle at the Myrtleford timber mill, it has been alleged that the company, Carter Holt Harvey, has acted in breach of the conditions of the Forest Stewardship Council Certification by refusing to respect the rights of its workers. Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union secretary Michael O’Connor said losing the crucial certification would lead to a massive drop in the company’s market share, and the decision to apply for its termination had not been taken lightly. “Without certification it will be difficult for the company’s products to get on to building sites and on the shelves of the big timber and hardware retailers,” he said.

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Coillte profits up almost 7pc in 2016 as forestry giant eyes further growth

By Ciaran Moran
Irish Independent
May 11, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: International

Coillte, Ireland’s largest forestry and land solutions company, today announced its annual results for 2016. The company delivered record earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) of €98.3m, up 10pc on the previous year. Operating cash flow at €15.2m was up 130pc on 2015 while operating profit (before exceptional items and revaluation gains) increased by 6.6pc to €64.4m. Coillte manages a forest and land estate of over 440,000 hectares, which is equivalent to approximately 7pc of the country’s land. From this land, it operate three businesses, its core forestry business, wood panels manufacturing business (Medite SmartPly) and a Land Solutions business. Coillte says its core forestry division has the potential to be the best forestry company in Europe and the plan is to increase the return on this business from 1pc today to 3.5pc by 2020.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Why violin makers’ choice of wood is the key to perfection

By Emma Crichton-Miller
Financial Times
May 11, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Each instrument is a unique product of plant genetics, the terrain and climate that grew the tree, and the skill of the maker. …Wood is fundamental to the luthier’s trade. Each instrument is a unique product of plant genetics, the terrain and climate that grew the tree, and the skill of the maker. Contemporary violins, violas and cellos are modelled on Italian pieces from the late 17th and 18th centuries, with instruments by Antonio Stradivari (c1644-1737) and Giuseppe Guarneri “del Gesù” (1698-1744) the most celebrated. Classically these are made from spruce, a softwood, for the belly of the instrument, which is largely responsible for the quality of the sound, and figured maple, a hardwood related to the British sycamore, with its glamorous three-dimensional shimmer, for the back, which provides the power. Ebony is used for the fingerboard and pegs.

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8 incredible buildings that prove wood is good

Stora Enso
The Local
May 11, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

You don’t have to be an architect or a tree-hugger to be dazzled by this new generation of wooden buildings. When people think of the Nordics, they often think of landscapes covered by vast green forests punctuated by compact urban innovation hubs. And a sense of responsibility about how to use resources sustainably. So it should come as no surprise that the region’s unique marriage of nature and innovation is redefining the way buildings are conceived and built – with the aim of making construction, buildings, and even entire cities greener and more sustainable. …How? By developing new wood-based construction materials that have the potential to replace the steel and concrete commonly used today.

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Forestry

Province’s caribou plan threatens forestry restart in the Northern Rockies

By Bronwyn Scott
Alaska Highway News
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The economic viability of the Northern Rockies hangs in the balance as the province’s new push to protect boreal caribou impedes the region’s planned rejuvenation of its forestry industry. The province has launched a draft Boreal Caribou Implementation Plan, which protects vast swaths of forest, including areas the regional municipality had targeted for timber harvesting, and where locals say caribou don’t live. “I’m speaking to you from a community that, quite honestly, without exaggeration in many ways is fighting for its economic life,” said Mike Gilbert, community development officer for the Northern Rockies Regional Municipality (NRRM). … “There is the potential for a significant impact on our ability to restart the forest industry here because certain areas that would be excluded (from harvesting under the plan) would really make it difficult for industry to re-establish, just because of where they’re located,” Gilbert said.

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Comfor engages local contractors

By Flavio Nienow
Burns Lake District News
May 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West


Local contractors recently had a chance to provide feedback to the Burns Lake Community Forest (BLCF) on its existing contract and bidding award policy. During the engagement session, held at the BLCF office, contractors were asked what type of contract opportunities they would like to see at Comfor, what length of contracts would be ideal, and if they considered the bidding process fair. When it comes to contract opportunities, participants said they would like to see more harvesting contracts, larger block sizes, silviculture, trails and staffing opportunities at Comfor. When asked what length of contracts would be ideal, participants said longer term contracts would allow people to stay in the community and allow contractors to bid lower in exchange for job security.

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‘Stunning grove’ of unprotected old-growth trees located near Port Renfrew

By Kevin Laird
Campbell River Mirror
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Ancient Forest Alliance has discovered an unknown old-growth forest near Jordan River. The forest contains a stunning and impressive grove of unprotected, monumental old-growth trees along a three-kilometre stretch between Jordan River and Port Renfrew. It lies mainly on Crown lands adjacent to Juan de Fuca Marine Trail Provincial Park and its popular coastal hiking trail not far from Highway 14 in the traditional territory of the Pacheedaht band….There are no approved or proposed logging plans on these lands, according to the B.C. Forest Ministry. The Ancient Forest Alliance plans to meet with Ministry of Forests officials, B.C. Parks, and Pacheedaht council to discuss conservation and access issues regarding the area.

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Tree-bound bugs marked for death as Winnipeg begins spraying

CBC News
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

City crews will begin spraying trees for forest tent caterpillars starting this weekend and elm bark beetles later this month. Weather permitting, workers with the city plan to fan out across insect management areas 43 and 51 Sunday at 9:30 p.m. and spray areas known to attract the pests, with a focus on municipal parks and boulevards. …As larvae, forest tent caterpillars chew their way through an assortment of leafy trees found throughout Winnipeg, including green ash, Manitoba maple, American elm and ornamental species. City crews will use an organic product called Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) to stem the spread of the pests. It’s available to the public at several Winnipeg garden and home stores. The pests ingest leaves covered in the spray and die off in two or three days, according to the city.

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Forest ecologist uses science to show clearcutting must stop

By Sara Ericsson
Digby County Courier
May 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada


TUPPERVILLE, NS –
Forest ecologist Donna Crossland has lots to say about forests in Nova Scotia and its all rooted in science. …Crossland says clearcutting must stop if forests in Nova Scotia are to survive and support healthy wildlife populations. Many residents in Digby and Annapolis have echoed these sentiments, with some submitting concerns to Digby Municipal Council to be forwarded to the province. Diverse old-growth, hardwood trees – red spruce, eastern hemlock, yellow birch sugar maple and beech – are nearly gone, unable to survive the current clearcutting regime and short harvest rotations. This is due to the department’s unsustainable clearcutting practices on Crown lands, said Crossland. …Crossland sees many issues with current harvest methods. She said the government’s strategy of intensive forest management through the creation of plantations and harvesting natural forests on a short 55-year rotation won’t work and serves only to create low quality forests.

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Women who work in, with and for the woods

By Lacey Rose and Jessica Kaknevicius
Wood Business
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Although sometimes the forest sector still seems like a man’s world, there have been powerful and inspiring women paving the way for several decades, and there is room for more. Women in Wood (WIW) was started in 2015 as a way of bringing together women in the forest, office, woodshop and elsewhere in the sector, to learn from each other. Women in Wood officially started with the creation of a private Facebook group. …Over the past two years, this network has grown to be Canada-wide with almost 200 members, and certainly surpassed our expectations of the benefits to be gained from building a community. 

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North American forest sector launches new communications effort – Walk in the Woods with Us

By the North American Forest Partnership
RISI
May 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON, DC -Today members of the North American Forest Partnership, a diverse group of individuals, companies, state agencies, the U.S. Forest Service, non-profits and professional organizations committed to the management of sustainable, healthy forests, launched a first-of-its-kind communications effort -Walk in the Woods. The effort tells the stories of the men and women who work in the forest sector in the U.S. and Canada and opens a dialogue about the important work they do as caretakers of precious forest resources. “We’re inviting those outside our sector to walk in the woods with us and learn about our work as responsible, innovative stewards of North America’s many different forests,” said Will Novy-Hildesley, Executive Director, North American Forest Partnership.

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Scholarship offered to further forestry/forest ecology study

By the Paul Bunyan Days Association
Ft. Bragg Advocate-News
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The Paul Bunyan Days Association is proud to offer a forestry/forest ecology scholarship for students and residents of the Fort Bragg and Mendocino Coast area. The Paul Bunyan Days Association has proudly promoted forestry and ecology for over 77 years. Today’s forest-related industries are aware that taking care of forests and the ecology found within them is of prime importance. The forests, streams, meadows and wildlife must be protected and preserved for future generations to enjoy, while remaining accessible to good forest harvesting, hunting, fishing and recreation. The association supports those who work to further their education in those interests. This scholarship is open to anyone on the Mendocino Coast, from Gualala to Rockport.

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Everything you need to know about the Elliott State Forest’s future

By Rob Davis
The Oregonian
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

An existential question was resolved this week: The Elliott State Forest, the 82,500-acre tract in Coos and Douglas counties, won’t be sold to a timber company. It will stay public. But what happens instead with the forest remains a loose collection of big ideas. Gov. Kate Brown wants to borrow $100 million to lift restrictions requiring the most sensitive parts of the land to produce revenue for schools and to create a blueprint outlining what areas could be logged. Treasurer Tobias Read wants Oregon State University to pick up the rest of the tab ($120 million) and use the forest for research. Secretary of State Dennis Richardson says the state shouldn’t borrow a dime and instead should swap the Elliott for federal land.

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Ending Aerial Spraying Of Clearcuts Up For Vote In Oregon’s Lincoln County

By Andy Walgamott
Northwest Sportsman
May 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Voters on Oregon’s thickly forested and heavily logged Central Coast will decide this coming Tuesday whether to ban the aerial spraying of tree farms, but advocates face stiff headwinds from local officials and the timber industry. It marks a high point for those concerned about the large-scale use of pesticides in the Northwest on clearcuts, with worries centering around the chemicals, their composition and what happens when they drift from spray sites to nearby homes and streams or percolate into local ground water. And now in Lincoln County, some citizens want to prohibit corporate tree farmers from showering their plantations with the toxic stew that is meant to tamp down competition from brambles, brush and other fast-growing plants against valuable Douglas firs.

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Oregon State University must be cautious about Elliott idea

By the Editorial Board
Albany Democrat Herald
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The idea is intriguing: Enlist the Oregon State University College of Forestry to help manage the controversial Elliott State Forest. But we’re a long way from inking any kind of deal between OSU and the state — and OSU officials, in particular, should proceed with caution. The Elliott State Forest has been at the center of controversy for years. It covers 82,500 acres of low-elevation woodlands in the Coast Range north of Coos Bay and features significant strands of old-growth trees. …Still unanswered is the question of who would actually manage the land. That’s where OSU potentially could enter the picture: Before the board’s vote this week, Read reached out to OSU officials, suggesting that the university could buy the forest for $121 million after the state’s initial $100 million payment.

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Tempers short at public airing of final Sparta Mountain plan

By Bruce A. Scruton
New Jersey Herald
May 10, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

SPARTA — More than 100 people confronted state Department of Environmental Protection and New Jersey Audobon officials Tuesday night as the final plan for the Sparta Mountain Wildlife Management Area was given a public airing. …Tempers were short and, at one point, moderator Dave Golden threatened to shut down the hearing. Golden, who is director of land management for the Division of Fish and Wildlife, took exception to the work being planned for the 3,400-acre management area being described as a logging plan. That is the description that the New Jersey Sierra Club has used since the plan was first made public 17 months ago. …Many of the first 20 speakers represented forestry groups, sportsman’s associations and other outdoor activity associations, which caused later speakers to accuse the DEP of stacking support. Among the 50 or so speakers who had spoken by 10 p.m. — others were still waiting to talk — sentiments were split about evenly between those favoring the state’s plan and those against it.

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Prescribed forest fire frequency should be based on land management goals

Feedstuffs.com
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


In recent decades, scientists and land managers have realized the importance of controlled forest fires for reaching specific forest management objectives. However, questions remain about how often forests should be burned. Recently, researchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time. They found that the frequency of prescribed forest fires should be determined based on the long-term goals of land managers. … Knapp found that in the areas that were burned regularly (every one or four years), small trees up to 12 cm in diameter died, resulting in open woodland ecosystems that are easy to walk through and include a diversity of small, herbaceous plants.

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Behind the fire lines of the West Mims Fire

By Destiny Johnson
First Coast News
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States


ST. GEORGE, Ga. — Forestry agents took members of the media behind the lines of the West Mims Fire, far beyond the sign that says ‘road closed’ to see some of the damage the flames have caused. Officials said that the weather has been a major factor in the strange burn patterns of the fire. It is hard to predict the way the fire is going to move because of strong winds. So often when we think of wildfires, we think of a wall of huge and fast-moving fire, and sometimes that is true, but not always. All it takes to start a fire across a street or in a place that has already been burned is one small dry pine needle falling to the ground silently and coming into contact with a still-warm ember to light a new blaze. Officials are working tirelessly to fight these small fires as well at the large blaze that has already burned over 140,000 acres.

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Birch Thefts Highlight Importance of Managing Wisconsin’s Forests

By Scott Bowe
WXPR.org
May 9, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Last fall forestry and law enforcement officials in northwestern Wisconsin started receiving reports of paper birch trees being stolen from public and private lands. The tree’s Latin name is Betula papyrifera, and like the name implies, its white, papery bark is popular for Northwoods-style decorations and crafts, driving demand for raw material. Theft of smaller paper birch trees, saplings and limbs are common, with buyers paying up to $2 per pole. Wardens from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources estimate that a prolific poacher can make hundreds of dollars per day with no investment other than a pickup truck and hand saw. Private, tribal, county, state and national forests in northern Wisconsin, Minnesota and Upper Michigan are all facing this birch theft. …Birch theft is the unfortunate result of consumer demand, unscrupulous harvesters and buyers.

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More research needed to help moose

Letter by Mark Roalson
Duluth News Tribune
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

It is heartening to see foresters and biologists combining their expertise and trying to increase one of Minnesota’s keystone species, the moose (“Forest project targets moose,” April 26). Those of us who have worked in or spent time in the boreal forest know that logging and/or fires causes new healthy growth of woody browse, herbs and forbs for both moose and deer. It is my opinion, based on personal experience, however, that large clear cuts will not just benefit the moose but deer as well. The carriers of brain worm (deer) were not native to northern Minnesota but followed man’s logging clear cuts and agriculture westward from states out east. Deer will increase in the area along with wolves which will go after the new food supply.

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Vast area of unrecorded forest revealed

Australian Associated Press in Special Broadcasting Service
May 12, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

An area of forest more than half the size of Australia has been discovered, dotted across several continents. Researchers from the University of Adelaide are among the team led by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) to have uncovered the 467 hectares of previously unreported forests and woodlands. The forests have been identified in drylands in the Sahara desert, around the Mediterranean, southern Africa, central India, coastal Australia, western South America, north-east Brazil, northern Colombia and Venezuela and northern parts of Canada and Russia. They have previously been difficult to measure because the density of trees is low, making them hard to detect using satellite images and other technologies.

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Tech giant Microsoft gets into the Irish native trees business

By Kevin O’Sullivan
Irish Times
May 11, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Microsoft is to plant hundreds of acres of native woodlands in Ireland over the next few years in the largest single corporate investment in Irish forestry in a decade. The plan by the tech giant Microsoft will concentrate on native trees, such as Pedunculate Oak, Downy Birch, Common Alder and Scots Pine and will help to contribute to reducing Irish greenhouse gas emissions. Natural Capital Partners (NCP), a company specialising in working with businesses on meeting their environmental commitments, is working with Microsoft on the forestry plan. The project will enable the planting of trees on 137 hectares of land in different parts of Ireland over the next two years. Forestry specialists Forest Carbon Ltd, and Irish-based forest managers Green Belt, are working with NCP to source sites, establish and maintain the forests for the project.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

EIA updates short-term biomass power forecasts

By Erin Voegele
Biomass Magazine
May 11, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States


The U.S. Energy Information Administration has released the May edition of its Short-Term Energy Outlook, which includes 2017 and 2018 forecasts for biomass power generation. The EIA currently predicts wood biomass will be used to generate 110,000 MWh per day of electricity this year and next year, down slightly from 111,000 MWh per day in 2016. Waste biomass is expected to generate 60,000 MWh per day of electricity in 2017, and 2018, maintaining the level generated in 2016. The electric power sector is expected to consume 0.219 quadrillion Btu (quad) of wood biomass this year and next year, down from 0.222 quad in 2016. The sector consumed 0.287 quad of waste biomass last year. That level is expected to be maintained this year, increasing to 0.289 quad next year.

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Measuring the impact of a changing climate on threatened Yellowstone grizzly bears

Phys.Org
May 11, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Climate change is altering the environment in Yellowstone National Park and its surrounding region and scientists at the University of California San Diego and Unity College are studying its impacts on the diets of threatened grizzly bears. …Evidence from the team’s research in the study area and a recent habitat-selection study by Montana State University indicates that grizzly bears continue to forage for whitebark pine seeds as a diet staple. Diet proportions derived from isotopic data, however, suggest that some bears could be responding to reductions in whitebark trees by consuming more plants and berries. …”Whitebark pine trees have declined due to an introduced fungal disease called blister rust, and, more recently, to increased infestation by the mountain pine beetle, which is exacerbated by climate change,” said study coauthor Carolyn Kurle, an assistant professor at UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences.

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How New Zealand’s forests may transform in the future

By Victoria University
Phys.org
May 12, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International


Research from Victoria University of Wellington suggests the ancient forests on New Zealand’s West Coast may be under threat from climate change in the near future. A study by Matt Ryan, who graduates next week with a PhD in Geology, examined sediment cores from the ocean about 100 kilometres west of the central South Island. “The sediments can tell us a lot about how New Zealand’s vegetation and landscape have changed over different time periods,” says Matt. “Because of the high erosion rates and the large sediment volumes transported down submarine canyons in this region, it’s the perfect spot to study fossil pollen grains, which are delivered along with the sediment to the ocean floor.

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