Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: May 18, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Minister Carr rated on the Canadian Press Baloney Meter

Tree Frog Forestry News
May 18, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

The northward shift of forests due to climate change has been the guiding principle of researchers and ecologists for years but a new study suggests “an even greater shift is occurring to the west”. Their hypothesis: “climate change is also altering rainfall totals but harvesting, forest fires and other disturbances may be even more significant.

With Republican calls for “dramatic change” and conservative chairs of forest related congressional panels, Western forest industry leaders have “new hope for easier access to timber in national forests.

Canadian Federal Minister Carr’s assertion that Canada has “won every court challenge linked to softwood trade over the past 30 years is a little baloney”, according to the Canadian Press’s Baloney Meter. Although Canada has generally prevailed, the Canadian Press author claims it’s more complex than that, as the US has had some success. “A more accurate description is to say the US has never won”.

Nature Magazine has a story on large timber buildings and the “Wooden Renaissance”. As advance technologies enable wooden buildings to approach the heights of more conventional landmarks, such as London’s Big Ben, “they also offer a way to slow down global warming“.

Finally, Timber Kings—the TV show that brought handcrafted wood/log buildings into prime time—is being cancelled by HGTV after an amazing four-season run. Sad.

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Special Feature

Wood Markets Conference

By Paul Quinn
RBC Capital Markets
May 17, 2017
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, Canada West

Russ Taylor and his team at Wood Markets hosted its annual softwood log and lumber conference in Vancouver last week. A few highlights [from RBC’s Research Note] include:

  • Canadian lumber production is expected to be flat going forward – Conference presenters expect that MPB-related harvest reductions in the BC Interior will be made up by increases in Alberta and the rest of Canada. 
  • Chinese demand continues to grow for both logs and lumber – With both log and lumber import graphs moving from the lower left to the upper right, wood consumption continues to trend higher. 
  • Top Chinese log importers are Russia and New Zealand, while Russia and Canada are the largest lumber importers. Chinese port log inventories are currently estimated at 3.8 MM m3 and considered to be slightly high, especially for Radiata Pine. 
  • Chinese lumber import prices from Canada are expected to decrease with the imposition of the softwood lumber duties to the US, but higher freight on European lumber imports (~2x 2016 levels) could partially offset the drop.
  • Russian lumber production continues to grow – With an AAC over 300MM m3 and an annual harvest of 200MM m3, this is potential upside if forestry companies can solve the infrastructure issue in Russia. In the meantime, lumber production should increase as industry players re-invest in their mills. 
  • It is anticipated that Russian log exports will slowly decline over time as lumber producers utilize more of this resource. Russian lumber exports to China are growing at ~15%/year and expected to continue for some time given the significant capital spending occurring in the country. 
  • New Zealand log exports could see 15%+ growth – While harvest volumes used to average only 20 MM m3 prior to 2009, they increased by roughly 50% to 30 MM m3 by 2013. In addition, the volume exported doubled given the strong demand environment in China and low shipping costs.
  • US South log prices not expected to see a material rise for some time – Global timberland markets are estimated at $80B to $100B for the 137 MM ha, with almost half in located in the US. While wood consumption rises in the US, on the continued housing recovery and growing R&R demand, sawlog prices in the US South have been on the decline for the past 2 years.

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Business & Politics

Little baloney in Carr’s assertion that Canada has won softwood challenges

By Andy Blatchford
Canadian Press in the Victoria Times Colonist
May 18, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr has been offering reassuring words as the country prepares to defend its softwood lumber industry yet again from duties imposed by the United States. The latest round marks the fifth time in about 30 years that Canada will engage in a softwood dispute with its biggest trading partner. “We have prevailed in the past, and we will do so again,” an optimistic Carr told reporters late last month….Has Canada indeed been victorious in every court challenge linked to softwood trade disputes with the U.S.? Spoiler alert: The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney” (complete methodology below). This one earns a rating of “a little” baloney…..Overall, experts say Canada has generally prevailed through four rounds of the softwood lumber dispute with the U.S., even if the Americans saw some less significant success along the way. For that reason, Carr’s statement rates “a little” baloney.

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Resolute U.S. racketeering lawsuit against Greenpeace moved to California

By Colin Perkel
The Canadian Press in the Kelowna Daily Courier
May 17, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

TORONTO – A racketeering lawsuit launched by multinational forestry giant Resolute Forest Products against Greenpeace should be heard in California, an American court has ruled. Amid a ramped-up public relations offensive by both sides, a district court in Augusta, Ga., found that Montreal-based Resolute had failed to show why the $300-million lawsuit should be held in the state. Both sides were quick to put their own spin on the ruling, with Greenpeace calling it a major victory and Resolute characterizing it as of little consequence. …”The Georgia federal court declined to dismiss the case on the merits, and our complaint alleges overwhelming evidence and compelling claims that will prevail in any venue,” Seth Kursman said. “The judge’s decision was limited entirely and explicitly to whether Resolute alleged fraud or extortion specifically within Augusta.”

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Burns Lake helps Moricetown mill

By Flavio Nienow
Burns Lake Lakes District News
May 17, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Last week Burns Lake council decided to support a lumber remanufacturing company in Moricetown that’s been struggling with the countervailing duties (CVD) recently imposed by the U.S. In a letter to the Village of Burns Lake, Kyahwood Forest Products says it will be “particularly hard hit” by the 19.88 per cent CVD announced last month. “For one thing, the CVD is retroactive 90 days as of May 1, 2017,” explained Kyahwood manager Gary McKinnon. “In the past 90 days, Kyahwood shipments to the U.S. grossed $1,918,159, making the retro sum a whopping $381,330.” …Burns Lake will support the Moricetown company by writing a letter to support their grant applications, which will be intended to conduct a feasibility study to examine other markets for their wood. Burns Lake councillor Susan Schienbein said it’s important to support neighbouring communities such as Moricetown because Burns Lake could potentially face a similar situation in the future.

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SFPA: Southern pine lumber exports increased by 11% in February

Southern Forest Products Association
Lesprom Network
May 17, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Exports of Southern pine lumber remained steady in February, amounting to just under 58 million board feet (MMbf). This volume represents an increase of 11% above the same month last year, contributing to an overall year-to-date increase of 13% when compared with the first two months of 2016… Offshore shipments during February roughly break down as follows: 31.1 MMbf dressed, 6.2 MMbf rough, and 20.3 MMbf treated lumber. Softwood lumber imports to the U.S. remained high in February, reaching 1.4 billion board feet, a dip of 15% from the volume imported during February of 2016. Through the first two months of this year, softwood imports are down seven percent when compared with the first two months of a year ago.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

The wooden skyscrapers that could help to cool the planet

By Jeff Tollefson
Nature
May 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, United States

Large timber buildings are getting safer, stronger and taller. They may also offer a way to slow down global warming. One building stands out in the old logging town of Prince George, Canada. But it is more than an architectural marvel. As the home of the Wood Innovation and Design Centre at the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), it is also an incubator for wooden buildings of the future — and a herald for a movement that could help to tackle global warming. …By substituting concrete and steel with wood from sustainably managed forests, the building industry could curb up to 31% of global carbon emissions, according to research1 by Chad Oliver, a forest ecologist at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. In time, such a shift could help humanity to pull CO2 out of the atmosphere, potentially reversing the course of climate change. 

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Studio Corelam Launches a Collection for Those Living in Compact Spaces

By Caroline Williamson
Design Milk
May 18, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Vancouver, B.C.-based studio Studio Corelam formed to create designs that were practical, simple, and beautiful, while supporting their local community with their production and distribution practices. On top of that, they’ve chosen to focus on sustainability through their use of environmentally-friendly materials and processes, with the goal of reducing their impact on the environment. To kick things off, they’re launching a three-piece collection, called Tidal, which will be launching on Kickstarter on May 16th. The pieces are all lightweight but durable and easy to put together and take apart, making them perfect for those who move frequently or live in smaller spaces. The material they work with is called Corelam™ and it’s the result of research by Vancouver designer and professor, Christian Blyt, who created the lightweight, corrugated plywood. It requires little energy to produce in their custom hydraulic press which forms each piece under 400 tons of pressure.

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Prefab workers’ housing to be built out of cross laminated timber

By Lloyd Alter
TreeHugger
May 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Modular prefabs have predominated in the fossil fuel camps in Alberta and British Columbia; most last about 15 years before they are worn out. Now Perkins+Will has designed a new unit made out of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT). The 312 SF unit is designed for a huge 646,000 square foot facility for Nexen CNOOC Limited’s Remote Workforce Accommodation project in Dilly Creek, British Columbia… “The module was designed to address the construction challenges inherent in the Workforce Accommodation project’s remote location and harsh weather conditions,” says Susan Gushe, managing director at Perkins+Will’s Vancouver office. “By providing a unique off-site prefabricated and modular solution, we were able to ensure that a high quality, healthy, and durable building was constructed efficiently while further reducing labour inputs.”

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Silk proteins paired with renewable wood nanocellulose to produce the strongest artificial spider silk yet

By Nitesh Mittal et al
Phys.org
May 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Possibly the strongest hybrid silk fibers to date have been created by scientists in Sweden using all-renewable resources. Combining spider silk proteins with nanocellulose from wood, the process offers a low-cost and scalable way to make bioactive materials for a wide range of medical uses. Published in ACS Nano by researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the technique brings together the structural and mechanical performance of inexpensive cellulose nanofibrils with the medicinal properties of spider silk, which is difficult and expensive to fabricate on a large scale. The bioactive properties of spider silk have been known for centuries. In ancient Rome, spider webs were used to dress soldiers’ battle wounds. But producing large-scale amounts of spider silk material today is an expensive process that often relies on fossil-based sources. KTH Researcher My Hedhammar says that by comparison, wood-based nanocellulose is cheap and sustainable.

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Innovating with Wood

Architectural Record
May 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Can wood do that? This question is one that building project teams hear less and less these days. In almost every circumstance, the answer is yes, wood can do that. Large midrise and even high-rise buildings in the United States and Europe employ engineered wood assemblies as structure. Wood products and finishes are safer and more code-ready than ever before. Plus, there’s the raw market appeal: More people want to live with wood, a natural, appealing material that end-users connect with on a basic human level. …Yet even more-fundamental advances add to the prospects for continued growth. …So, the answer is yes. Wood can do that.

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Forestry

Forest spraying is not necessary

Letter by Maureen Fitzmaurice
Victoria Times Colonist
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations is up to its old tricks. If you live in the Elk Lake/Bear Hill Regional Park area of Saanich, you are going to be or already have been sprayed with pesticide from the air. It will be in your water, in your gardens, in the air and on your lawn. Symptoms reported after a spray have included: flu-like symptoms, nausea, skin rashes, itchiness, allergic reactions, breathing difficulties, asthma and headaches. The pesticide they are using is a product called Foray 48B (Btk/chemical formula). …Foray 48B kills most spring feeding butterfly and moth caterpillars, including rare and endangered species. Birds, bats and some fish are also affected. The Ministry of Forests sprays for one reason: to ensure they can continue to export raw logs.

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Vancouver-created TV shows cancelled

By Marke Andrews
Business in Vancouver
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

May is make-or-break month in the television industry, and three long-time Vancouver-generated reality series have fallen to the axe. Yukon Gold, Timber Kings and Chopped Canada, all shows created by Vancouver-based Paperny Entertainment, will not be renewed by Corus Entertainment. …Timber Kings, in its fourth season on HGTV, chronicled the work done by Williams Lake company Pioneer Log Homes, which builds handcrafted log houses in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

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Watershed Alliance aiming to curtail logging practices

Peachland View
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Locals who are upset that Peachland tap water looks like something out of a World Vision commercial have formed a group. The Peachland Watershed Protection Alliance has been founded to advocate for better watershed practices. Over the past decade, members have observed greater frequencies of logging in the watershed, which they believe has led to a greater amount of boil water notices. …But they have a much bigger goal, which is to impose a moratorium on logging in the watershed. Without any industrial logging occurring during a moratorium – ideally a year at least – members of the Alliance would be able to compare the quality of the watershed before and after. …While most of the political oversight belongs to the Ministry of Forests, [Alliance director Taryn] Skalbania hopes the District will still have some authority to curb the activities of three logging companies – Tolko Industries Ltd., Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd. and Westbank First Nation Development Co. Ltd.

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Silver Lake Camp finds new operator from Squamish

By Liz Hostland
Kelowna Now
May 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Silver Lake Camp (SLC) is starting up its summer camp season for kids and youth with a new operator. Located about 20 kilometres northwest of Peachland, Silver Lake Camp has been operating for almost 40 years. This year the camp is being operated by the Evans Lake Forestry Education Society. Evans Lake, founded in 1960 is a Squamish-based society. SLC camp runs a forestry and outdoor education program that allows kids to learn in an experiential environment. SLC camp has spent the past year looking for an operator when Evans Lake joined the board and agreed to operate SLC’s summer camps. “Basically they’ll bring their staff out from Squamish in the summer and they’ll stay up there all summer and operate the camps for us,” said Emma Oliver, camp manager of SLC. “Evans Lake is the only other Forestry Education Society in B.C. so it’s a good fit for us,” she said.

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Forestry museum to open new viewpoint this Friday with big kickoff event

Revelstoke Mountaineer
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The fourth annual Timber Days Friday Night Kick Off event is happen this Friday, May 19. The location is once again the BC Interior Forestry Museum just before the Revelstoke Dam on Highway 23 North. …At 6 p.m. the official opening of the Forestry Museum’s new viewpoint will be attended by our new local MLA Doug Clovechok and local Councillor Scott Duke.

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Panel Calls for Active Management to Improve the Health of National Forests

Committee on Natural Resources United States House of Representatives
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Subcommittee on Federal Lands held an oversight hearing on “Seeking Better Management of America’s Overgrown, Fire-Prone National Forests.” Members and witnesses called for a paradigm shift in the way we manage the nation’s increasingly overgrown, disease infested and fire-prone federal forests and grasslands. “Our forests are dying […]Nationwide, the Forest Service reports it is accomplishing less than 20 percent of its post-fire reforestation needs,” Subcommittee Chairman Tom McClintock said. “The American people want our forests returned to health. They want the growing scourge of wildfire brought back under control. They want the destruction of mountain habitats by fire, disease and pestilence arrested and reversed. They want the prosperity of their forest communities restored.”

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Leaving Timber Behind, An Alaska Town Turns To Tourism

By Melissa Block
National Public Radio
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

What happens to a town when a key industry collapses? Sometimes it dies. But sometimes it finds a way to reinvent itself. Case in point: Ketchikan, Alaska, where the demise of the timber industry has led to a radical transformation. Many people who used to earn their livelihoods through timber have now turned to jobs in tourism. It’s an identity shift that makes the city far different from what it was in the logging heyday. “It was this boomtown!” says longtime Ketchikan resident Eric Collins. “It was just a crazy, wild frontier place.” Now, it’s a tourism magnet. Ketchikan is expecting 1 million visitors this summer. They’ll flow into town off as many as six giant cruise ships a day….For many decades, the spruce, hemlock and cedar trees of the Tongass have also been a source of timber for the logging industry. … One by one, those pulp mills shut down, faced with global competition, new environmental regulations, lawsuits and fines for pollution violations.

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Timber! Loggers hope to fire up chain saws with help of Trump, GOP-run Congress

By Michael Doyle
Idaho Statesman
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Washington — Western timber industry leaders have new hope for easier logging in national forests, aided by their Capitol Hill allies and perhaps the still-shorthanded Trump administration. With devoutly conservative Republicans from California and Utah chairing forest-related congressional panels, and a business-friendly administration antagonistic toward environmental regulations, the time appears opportune to some and dangerous to others. A hearing Wednesday revved up the debate about making it easier to turn trees into commerce. “There are a number of barriers … (and) stay-away zones,” Steven A. Brink, vice president of public resources and logging advocate for the California Forestry Association, told lawmakers, adding that “we will never get the forest into a resilient condition if we have to walk away from half of it.” …“The forests are dying,” McClintock said, adding that “the American people want our forests returned to health. They want the scourge of wildfire brought under control.”

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Forest Sale, Off the Table

By Judy Stiegler
Bend Source
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Last week the State Land Board took up the issue of the sale of the Elliott State Forest once again… It’s obvious that the story of the Elliott isn’t over yet. The Memorandum of Understanding with Oregon State University gives them until Dec. 31, 2023, to exercise the option to purchase the Elliott. This will be dependent upon a multiplicity of factors coming together, not the least of which is the successful negotiation of a Habitat Conservation Plan referenced above. This will be no easy task. As Treasurer Read expressed in our conversation with him, though the HCP as well as other factors could very well “have an impact on various parts of the proposal,” he felt that “pursuing the OSU option is the best possibility for a win for all.”

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Leaving Timber Behind, An Alaska Town Turns To Tourism

By Melissa Block
KASU Radio
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

What happens to a town when a key industry collapses? Sometimes it dies. But sometimes it finds a way to reinvent itself. Case in point: Ketchikan, Alaska, where the demise of the timber industry has led to a radical transformation. Many people who used to earn their livelihoods through timber have now turned to jobs in tourism. It’s an identity shift that makes the city far different from what it was in the logging heyday. “It was this boomtown!” says longtime Ketchikan resident Eric Collins. “It was just a crazy, wild frontier place.” Now, it’s a tourism magnet. Ketchikan is expecting 1 million visitors this summer. They’ll flow into town off as many as six giant cruise ships a day.

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Timber industry faces severe loss as wildfire burns

By Noelani Mathews
WCTV
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

ST. GEORGE, GA – The West Mims fire has scorched more than 150,000 acres of land since it began in early April, and only about a quarter of it has been contained. Fire officials say nearly 32,000 of those acres are private property. Some of that property belongs to the Toledo Manufacturing Company, a long-standing member of the timber industry in St. George, Georgia. “Every time I drive through it, I get sick,” says President Joe Hopkins. More than 30 acres of burned pine trees have been cleared from his lot, and Hopkins says there are nearly 1,300 acres to go. The burned timber will sell for a fraction of the original cost, if it sells at all. Hopkins says his business is facing huge damages. “We don’t get to write any of this loss off, the way the IRS code is. According to the IRS, we haven’t lost anything.”

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Peru lost more than 1 million hectares of Amazon forest over a period of 15 years

May 18, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Technology has become a headache for those who indiscriminately clear forest in the Peruvian Amazon. Until a few years ago, it was thought that deforesting an area of ??primary forest in a secluded, remote area could not be discovered by authorities or experts. Today the use of high-resolution satellite images confirms that it is possible to detect in real time where forests are being cleared. You can even determine the main drivers. The Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), through more than 50 reports published between April 2015 and November 2016, has contributed to the use of the technology and updated the data of the historical record of deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon. The total figure is enough to send a cold chill down the spine: 1.8 million hectares of Amazonian forests were lost between 2001 and 2015. Peaks of loss occurred in 2005, 2009 and 2014.

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Myanmar’s extensive forests are declining rapidly due to political and economic change

By Peter Leimgruber and Ned Horning
Science Daily
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The loss of intact forest cover in Myanmar has accelerated over the last decade, according to a study published May 17, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE… Due to its long political and economic isolation, Myanmar has retained much of its original forest cover but much of the intact forest is unprotected and is increasingly subject to pressures from rapid political and economic changes in the country. …To investigate changes to forest cover, Leimgruber, Horning and colleagues used Landsat satellite images to map forest cover in Myanmar between 2002 and 2014. …In Myanmar, 38% of forest cover is intact forest and during the study period the authors found that this intact forest declined by 11% (more than 2 million hectares) with an annual loss of 0.94%.

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Marlborough Forest Industry Association launches new fund to attract young workers

By Oliver Lewis
Stuff.co.nz
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Money may not grow on trees, but a new initiative helping young forestry workers and those looking to get into the industry will take away some of the costs. The Marlborough Forest Industry Association’s Vocational Training Assistance fund aims to attract more young people and advance their career prospects in the industry. Forestry is growing in Marlborough, it frequently ranks as one of the main contributors to regional GDP, and directly employs up to 900 people. However, attracting young people is a challenge. The associations hopes the new fund, the first of its kind in Marlborough, will help attract and retain people in the sector, by paying for things like course costs, transport and accommodation for study. MFIA executive officer Vern Harris said there was a number of reasons why the industry was struggling to recruit young workers, pointing to the perception the industry was dangerous as an example.

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Brazil’s lower house OKs reducing protection in Amazon park

By Stan Lehman
Associated Press in the Times Colonist
May 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

SAO PAULO — Brazil’s lower house of Congress has approved a measure significantly reducing the size of a fully protected national park in the Amazon rain forest and opening up a big chunk of land for agriculture and other activities. Lawmakers agreed Tuesday night to convert 1.2 million acres of the 3.2 million-acre Jamanxim National Park in Para state into what is called an environmental protection area. That would let the land be used for the extraction of lumber, agriculture and mining — activities not allowed in a fully protected national park. The legislation is seen as a victory of Congress’ rural lobby representing agribusiness. It now goes before the Senate and would also have to be ratified by President Michel Temer to take effect. Environmentalists fear the move will lead to a rise in deforestation and to a wave of illegal occupations.

Read More

Peru lost more than 1 million hectares of Amazon forest over a period of 15 years

May 18, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International


Technology has become a headache for those who indiscriminately clear forest in the Peruvian Amazon. Until a few years ago, it was thought that deforesting an area of ??primary forest in a secluded, remote area could not be discovered by authorities or experts. Today the use of high-resolution satellite images confirms that it is possible to detect in real time where forests are being cleared. You can even determine the main drivers. The Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), through more than 50 reports published between April 2015 and November 2016, has contributed to the use of the technology and updated the data of the historical record of deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon. The total figure is enough to send a cold chill down the spine: 1.8 million hectares of Amazonian forests were lost between 2001 and 2015. Peaks of loss occurred in 2005, 2009 and 2014.

Read More

Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

American Trees Are Moving West, and No One Knows Why

By Robinson Meyer
The Atlantic
May 17, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

As the consequences of climate change strike across the United States, ecologists have a guiding principle about how they think plants will respond. Cold-adapted plants will survive if they move “up”—that is, as they move further north (away from the tropics) and higher in elevation (away from the warm ground). A new survey of how tree populations have shifted over the past three decades finds that this effect is already in action. But there’s a twist: Even more than moving poleward, trees are moving west. …The results are fascinating in part because they don’t immediately make sense. But the team has a hypothesis: While climate change has elevated temperatures across the eastern United States, it has significantly altered rainfall totals.  

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Go west, young pine: U.S. forests shifting with climate change

By Seth Borenstein
Associated Press in the Seattle Times
May 17, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

WASHINGTON — A warmer, wetter climate is helping push dozens of Eastern U.S. trees to the north and, surprisingly, west, a new study finds. The eastern white pine is going west, more than 80 miles since the early 1980s. The eastern cottonwood has been heading 77 miles north, according to the research based on about three decades of forest data. The northward shift to get to cooler weather was expected, but lead author Songlin Fei of Purdue University and several outside experts were surprised by the move to the west, which was larger and in a majority of the species. New trees tend to sprout farther north and west while the trees that are farther south and east tend to die off, shifting the geographic center of where trees live. Think of it as a line of people stretching, said Fei.

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Inslee signs biomass bill

By Marissa Luck
Longview Daily News
May 16, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

After some delay, Gov. Inslee signed a bill Tuesday that will allow KapStone’s Longview mill to profit from selling biomass renewable energy credits. KapStone Paper and Packaging Corp. stands to earn hundreds of thousands of dollars annually under the legislation. Originally Inslee had been scheduled to sign the bill last week, but his office pushed it back for further review. The governor had previously vetoed a similar bill last year out of a concern that it would allow biomass energy to out-compete other renewable energies, such as wind and solar power. However, this year’s version of the bill was narrower in scope and did not receive the same opposition from environmental groups.

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Maine biomass bill postponed until 2018

Bioenergy News
May 17, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: US East, United States

Discussion on a bill to boost Maine’s biomass industry has been postponed until next year, because of both time constraints and concerns over the complexity and controversial nature of the legislation. According to the Portsmouth Press Herald, the bill’s sponsor, Senator Tom Saviello, suggested the State Legislature’s Energy, Utilities and Technology Committee postpone the measure until next year. The committee voted unanimously to agree with Saviello’s suggestion.

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