Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: September 18, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

The surprising emissions from Oregon’s forests

Tree Frog Forestry News
September 18, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

With an ever-increasing area burned, fire ecologist Robert Gray asks “will we ever see an end to summers with this much area on fire”. Meanwhile; BC lifts state of emergency after two months, wildfires have burned four times the province’s AAC, Oregon deserves explanation for forest fire funding denial and Oregon companies are eager to see the fires end.

Focusing on wildfire impacts, a BC First Nations chief calls for a halt the moose hunt while the Forest Minister says the population remains strong, a UBC professor says the burnt-out forests should be allowed to regrow instead of logging them, and the Mail Tribune says second-guessing our forestry agencies is unhelpful. Catherine Mater, a member of Oregon’s Global Warming Commission, contrasts wildfire impacts with the surprisingly huge CO2 emissions that occur naturally in forests—calling it a “black swan event“.

In economic news:

— Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Strong market means little uptake yet in govt softwood aid, minister says

By Mia Rabson
Canadian Press in News 1130
September 15, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr

OTTAWA – Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr says forest producers in Canada have so far been largely unharmed by the duties the United States imposed on Canadian softwood imports earlier this year. Carr said the consensus at a meeting of federal and provincial forestry ministers Friday was the financial hurt thus far is “not significant.” Canadian producers have paid an estimated $500 million in countervailing and antidumping duties since the end of April but those costs are offset by historically high market prices for wood coupled with a low Canadian dollar and ever-increasing demand. In fact, the main people feeling the pinch are American consumers who are paying up to 20 per cent more for housing materials thanks to the duties.

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Oregon legislators go to bat for lumber industry

By Nicholas Johansen
The World Link
September 15, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Earlier this week, Oregon legislators testified on behalf of the U.S Lumber Coalition at a hearing with the U.S International Trade Commission about softwood lumber trade with Canada. …At the hearing Oregon’s fourth district  Rep. Peter DeFazio said, “As someone who represents a very substantial portion of Oregon’s softwood lumber production, I know how devastating under-priced imports and unfair trade practices can be on vulnerable timber dependent communities … for many of the timber communities I represent, the local lumber producer is the single largest, and potentially only source of employment.”

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‘Captive’ shippers call for more data to address ‘rail service failures’

By Jesse Snyder
The Financial Post
September 15, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

OTTAWA — Teck Resources Ltd., a Vancouver-based metals and mining giant, told a federal committee this week that “rail service failures” has been costing the company anywhere between $50 million and $200 million over 18-month periods during the past decade. …The sentiment was echoed by other mining, agriculture and forestry companies, at committee meetings in Ottawa this week. Shippers contend that Canadian rail carriers should be forced to publicize certain internal shipping data, a legislative change they say would vastly improve the bargaining power of captive shippers in remote areas. …Companies shipping lumber, grain, minerals and a host of other products from rural, remote regions often suffer from an “imbalance of power,” according to a briefing from the Forest Products Association of Canada.

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Daines, Tester call out ‘unfair’ Canadian subsidized timber influx

By David Erickson
The Missoulian
September 15, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

Montana’s two U.S. senators tried this week to convince the International Trade Commission that an influx of cheap, Canadian government-subsidized lumber imports threatens Montana jobs and the state’s wood products industry. Jon Tester, a Democrat, and Republic Steve Daines testified Tuesday that Montana lumber mill workers are facing unfair trade practices, and spoke of the importance of removing subsidized Canadian lumber from the American market. …“U.S. producers purchase timber in a free market that constantly fluctuates in terms of availability and price, while Canadian producers rely on their government for subsidies and access to cheap timber,” explained Chuck Roady, vice president and general manager of the F.H. Stoltze Land & Lumber Co. in Columbia Falls.

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Island logging contractor, set to close, pins hopes on review

By Andrew Duffy
Victoria Times Colonist
September 16, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

George Abbott

The owner of a 90-year-old logging firm that expects to close its doors for good this fall believes there is still hope for other logging contractors in the industry if the province acts to open up the playing field. Graham Lasure, who announced this week that W.D. Moore Logging of Winter Harbour will shut down for good in November, said he expects the logging contractor sustainability review, which is underway, could offer a means of keeping small contractors in the game. “I have huge hopes for that,” said Lasure. He said the stories contractors have been telling about an unfair system will be laid bare for the government in that review. “It will all come out and it will be up to the government to [determine] what they are willing to do with it.” The review, being undertaken by former B.C. Liberal cabinet minister George Abbott, is designed to improve the competitiveness of forest-sector contractors and strengthen relationships between logging contractors and licensees. The review is to be completed in January.

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My Post-Hurricane Loss, Your Profit: Buy WOOD

By Joseph Shaefer
Investing.com
September 17, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Joseph Shaefer

My wife and I built a home in the Lower Florida Keys in 2010. Miss Irma decided to do a foot stomp on our place a week ago. …All in all, a very unruly young lady. We will rebuild, of course, and our home will be better and stronger for it. It will take time, savings and something else: timber. Lots and lots of timber. Also lots of paper packaging for the batt insulation that is now drenched and matted. …In addition, the turn from brick-and-mortar retail to the convenience of Internet shopping means exponentially higher use of cardboard and other paper products. The additional catalyst I see right now is the rebuilding that will take place in the US after the dreadful fires out West.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Study highlights potential benefits of cross laminated timber

By Emily Hoard
The News-Review
September 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

The production of cross-laminated timber, or CLT, has the potential to create significant job growth in the Pacific Northwest, according to a study published in July 2017 by Oregon BEST, a Portland-based nonprofit. …The 110-page study, “Advanced Wood Product Manufacturing Study for Cross-Laminated Timber Acceleration in Oregon and SW Washington,” was funded by $120,000 from the U.S. Economic Development Administration. The study included wood products companies from across the region, including D.R. Johnson in Riddle, the first structurally certified CLT producer in the U.S. Valerie Johnson, president of D.R. Johnson, said she agrees with the study that cross-laminated timber will increase employment for rural areas in Oregon like Douglas County.

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Maine Compass: When it comes to wood, buy local

By Lee Burnett
Central Maine
September 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

One of Maine’s most environmentally advanced school buildings showcases a most traditional Maine building material. Good old white pine paneling covers the walls and ceilings of the Friends School of Portland in Cumberland. The expanses of blonde planking, custom milled from trees on the site, was “a huge selling point” to school directors, according to builder Peter Warren of Freeport. “They love it … Wood in the school came right off the lot,” said Warren, who worked with Kaplan Thompson Architects on the school’s ultra-energy efficient Passive House design. …Local wood consciousness may lag local food awareness. But the upside for local wood may be far greater than local agriculture.

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Southeast Urban Wood Exchange promotes use of urban tree removals

By Karl D. Forth
Woodworking Network
September 15, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

RALEIGH, N.C. — The Southeast Urban Wood Exchange is enrolling a growing number of forest and wood product professionals who want to put urban tree removals to their highest possible use. UrbanWoodExchange.org is a new clearinghouse for businesses ranging from professional tree care and removal services through sawyers, kiln dryers and lumber suppliers to connect and expand local urban wood networks. The exchange features a searchable database that makes it easier for businesses to find potential urban wood partners in their area. North Carolina has served as the pilot project of the new website created to encompass the 13 states located within the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region 8. Already dozens of businesses throughout North Carolina including have posted business and product listings on the exchange.

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IISER scientists develop wood-pulp balls to clean oil spills

The Economic Times, India
September 18, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

NEW DELHI: IISER Kerala scientists have found an inexpensive and efficient way to clean up marine oil spills by using marble-sized balls made of wood pulp. Marine oil spill is one of the common disasters worldwide, which has long-lasting, negative impacts for economy and the environment. Apart from leading to huge economic losses, such accidents affect the flora and fauna.. …”We have made small balls of cellulose and dipped them in a solution of the gelator,” Sureshan said. The gelator repels water and only absorbs the oil. It congeals the absorbed oil, which could be recovered by applying pressure or through distillation. “We have chosen these material because the cellulose pulp is very cheap and biodegradable,” said Sureshan, one of the authors of the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

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Forestry

Moose populations remain strong despite BC wildfires: minister

By Lasia Kretzel
News 1130
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER – BC’s moose population may walk away from this year’s wildfires relatively unsinged, and that’s good news for the hunting season. Of the 240 radio collared moose in the Central Interior and Cariboo regions, BC Forests Minister Doug Donaldson says none of them have been killed by wildfires. The province is still trying to assess the wildfires’ impact on wildlife populations, according Donaldson, but measures were already instituted last year to protect moose. “We instituted measures in 2016 to include limited entry hunt for Bull Moose only for that area of the Cariboo,” Donaldson said.

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Let BC’s burnt-out forests regrow instead of logging them: UBC professor

By Simon Little
Global News
September 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

With nearly 1.2 million hectares of forest scorched during this year’s record wildfire season, the province is now turning to what comes next. But one UBC forestry expert says he’s worried about the impacts of plans to clear the land. The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resources is preparing to issue expedited salvage logging permits to forestry companies and First Nations for B.C.’s burnt out woodlands. That’s a process that UBC forestry Prof. David Andison said could save lumber, but at the cost of healthy forests in the future. “Unfortunately it happens at a very delicate time in the stage of the development of the ecosystem. Immediately after a fire you’ve got sort of an opportunity for Mother Nature to reset the clock,” Andison said.

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Chief calls to end moose hunt in B.C. following wildfires, habitat loss

By Linda Givetash
Canadian Press in CBC News
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Tl’etinqox Chief Joe Alphonse

A First Nations chief is calling on the British Columbia government to halt the moose hunt this year, arguing the historic wildfire season has caused enough trauma to the species. Tl’etinqox Chief Joe Alphonse said the flames that have charred thousands of square kilometres of habitat in the province’s Interior and hunting will only further endanger the moose population. “Anyone who chooses to point a gun to a moose in the Chilcotin is contributing to the eventual problem of having no moose in the Chilcotin down the road,” he said. The largest fire ever recorded in the province’s history at more than 5,210 square kilometres in size is still burning across the Chilcotin plateau, an area about 60 kilometres northwest of Williams Lake.

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Forest fire prevention forces hard choices

By Robert Gray, fire ecologist
The Vancouver Sun
September 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The area burned by wildfires this summer in B.C. is enormous by any measure. Over 1.2 million hectares as of Aug. 22, and there are still several weeks of fire season remaining. This wildfire season adds to an ever-increasing area burned over the past decade. Will we ever see an end to summers with this much area on fire? …A reasonable question is whether or not at some point will enough burned area actually start to impede fire activity? The answer depends on future climate and what we as society do with regard to vegetation and dead fuels.. … Traditionally, our approach to post-burn landscapes is to salvage any remaining economic value from burned stands, often leaving logging slash and then replanting the site. This pattern simply perpetuates the problem. 

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Engineers and Geoscientists BC and the Association of BC Forest Professionals working to address issues raised in Forest Practices Board report

By the Engineers and Geoscientists BC and the Association of BC Forest Professionals
Marketwired
September 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER, BC – Engineers and Geoscientists BC and the Association of BC Forest Professionals are taking action to address concerns raised by the Forest Practices Board about the construction of resource roads in steep terrain. In its report released September 13, the Forest Practices Board (FPB) cited several instances in which professional guidelines and standards for construction on steep terrain were not followed, resulting in unsafe segments of road. “The Forest Practices Board report points to some troubling examples. As the regulatory bodies overseeing engineers, geoscientists, and forest professionals, we are committed to upholding high standards of professional practice,” said Ann English, P.Eng., CEO and Registrar for Engineers and Geoscientists BC. “We’ll be working together to gather more information in order to assure this work is undertaken with the appropriate professional oversight, and by individuals equipped with the necessary skills and competencies for this work.”

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Starting the school year off with timber!

By Samantha Tipler, Klamath County School District
Herald and News
September 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

GILCHRIST – For students in Brian Wachs’ class, the start of the school year is an adventure. On the second day, students in his woods and metals shop class at Gilchrist School hike out behind the school. Their mission? Fell a tree using only hand tools, geometry and math. …On Wednesday, Sept. 6, the Gilchrist students took a two-handed bucksaw to a tree Wachs’ had picked out. They decided which direction they wanted the tree to fall, then began sawing angled cuts into the tree’s trunk to cause it to fall in that specific direction. Katie said getting out and sawing into a tree was very different from reading about the logging industry in a book.

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Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument should shrink in size, Interior Secretary tells Trump: report

By Shane Dixon Kavanaugh
The Oregonian
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Southern Oregon’s Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is one of four federally protected areas that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has recommended President Trump scale back in size, according to a copy of a government report obtained by The Washington Post. The White House has refused to publicly disclose the report since Zinke first submitted it last month following a 120-day review of roughly two dozen federal monuments around the U.S. The Post published the 18-page memorandum, addressed to the president, on Sunday night. The memo does not lay out exact reductions or modifications to the 113,000-acre Cascade-Siskiyou monument, which was first established by President Bill Clinton in 2000 and later expanded by President Barack Obama before he left office this year.

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Second-guessing firefighting unhelpful

By the Editorial Board
Mail Tribune
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

The wildfire smoke diminished late last week, as cooler temperatures heralded the approach of fall. But the improving air quality didn’t stop the constant flow of criticism aimed at forestry agencies for their perceived failings in fighting this season’s many wildfires. The invective was particularly hot on social media, where commenters variably blamed the Forest Service, environmental groups and government officials for the severity of the fires, the number of the fires and the inability of fire crews to “put them out.” Depending on the particular allegation, much of the blame was misdirected, oversimplified or flat wrong. …Other commenters — and writers of letters to the editor of this newspaper — have claimed forestry officials were employing a “let it burn” policy toward the Chetco Bar and other fires. That’s simply wrong.

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Worker dies in industrial accident at northern Idaho mill

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

ATHOL, Idaho Authorities say a worker at a northern Idaho lumber mill died in an industrial accident on Friday. The Kootenai County Sheriff’s office says the 45-year-old man was fatally injured while trying to clear a broken piece of wood from a machine at the Merritt Brothers Lumber Company in Athol. The man’s name was not released. Emergency workers were called to the mill just after 6 a.m. on Friday, and the man was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead. The accident is under investigation. (END OF STORY)

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Oregon deserves explanation about firefighting resource request denial

Statesman Journal
September 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Gov. Kate Brown last month asked the federal government for more resources to help fight wildfires in Oregon that are burning, in many cases, beyond control. The response she got was less than hoped for, and we believe Oregonians deserve an explanation. …What the state has received so far in terms of Gov. Brown’s request is 200 active duty Army personnel. This while the governor has activated more than 600 Oregon National Guard members to battle blazes.  …But is disheartening that the fed’s response did not match the governor’s request.  …The interior secretary said one of his priorities was to build trust with local communities, and ensure federal land managers get the resources they need to make good decisions. Three months later, Oregon asked for help. We expect these leaders to keep their promises to residents of the West.

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Gianforte derides litigation over Forest Service projects at Helena roundtable

By Tom Kuglin
Helena Independent Record
September 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A court-halted forestry project near Lincoln has become a lightning rod in the political debate over litigation and forest management, and took center stage in a Helena roundtable of project supporters hosted by Rep. Greg Gianforte on Friday. …Environmental watchdogs Alliance for the Wild Rockies and Native Ecosystems Council sued over wildlife concerns, chiefly the impacts to federally listed Canada lynx and grizzly bear habitat. …But the lack of collaboration was a sticking point for those at the roundtable. Proponents of collaboration see the process as consensus building and the way to incorporate a variety of viewpoints into recommendations to the Forest Service.  “It wasn’t the Forest Service that stopped the project, it was somebody who didn’t participate in the collaborative project,” Gianforte said, and others agreed.

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Oregon wood products companies eager to see wildfires end

Associated Press in The Seattle Times
September 15, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

EUGENE, Ore. — Eugene and surrounding area wood products companies are tallying the damage as Oregon wildfire season dwindles. Both Eugene-based Seneca Jones Timber Co. and Springfieldbased Roseburg Forest Products lost thousands of trees last month in a fire in Douglas County, which has burned through private and federal forests. Fires throughout the state and hot and dry conditions led to authorities to impose complete or partial restrictions on logging and other work on public and privately owned lands, hampering timber output, The Register-Guard reported.

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Fuel and Fire – A Case for Federal Forest Management and Reforms

By Julia Altemus
Ravalli Republic
September 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

For most Montanans, this is not just another fire season. …Montanans know that summer brings wildfire, however, over the past 15 years fire season starts earlier, ends later, and burns hotter. …Even though Montana has lost 30 mills in the past 30 years, we are fortunate to have eight large sawmills still in operation, three engineered manufacturing facilities, two chipping operations and many small-scale and secondary wood manufacturers. Even though we sit in an over-stocked wood basket with ability to take on more raw fiber, the timber harvest from our federal partners is not meeting the needs of the forest nor the industry. Congress must act or the fires of 2017 will just be a precursor to events to come. 

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Group working to keep water-powered sawmill in operation

Associated Press in the Idaho Statesman
September 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

CALAIS, Vt. A nonprofit group in Vermont is working to repair an early 19th century, water-powered sawmill to serve as a living history site where the public can watch trees cut into lumber in much the same way it was done 200 years ago. The Robinson Sawmill group in Calais has received an $8,500 grant from the Vermont Arts Council to restore the mill’s penstock, a metal pipe that carries water to the sawmill machinery. Replacing the penstock is part of a $200,000 project involving the 1803 mill that includes repairs to the dam, the mill building and dredging the mill pond.

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Mirboo North community hopes to buy Victorian state forest to prevent VicForests logging

By Laura Poole
ABC News, Australia
September 18, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Jon Wood

A South Gippsland landowner has offered to buy state forest to prevent the timber being harvested by Victorian Government-owned logging company VicForests. Jon Wood runs beef cattle on the edge of the intended harvest area at Mirboo North in eastern Victoria, and said harvesting the logs would reduce land value. VicForests has outlined plans to harvest up to 50 hectares of timber near the town. “It’s a tiny little precinct of a biodiverse eucalypt forest, in a region totally devastated by farming over the last 100 years,” Mr Wood said. “I disagree with the total premise of milling state forests. State forests are given to the State Government in trust for the community for our future children.” Mr Wood said he was investigating developing a fund to buy the state forest from the Government. “What we’re going to do is try and bring the politicians to account, and make them understand that they have been given these assets in trust for the community,” he said.

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Forest Fires

B.C. lifts state of emergency declared 2 months ago due to wildfires

By Linda Givetash
Canadian Press in CTV News
September 15, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

VANCOUVER — The provincial state of emergency has been lifted in British Columbia more than two months after thousands of residents were chased from their homes and hundreds of buildings were lost in ferocious wildfires that set records for destruction. The state of emergency that expires at midnight Friday was declared July 7 after dozens of out-of-control wildfires broke out in B.C.’s Interior. At the peak of the disaster, almost 50,000 residents were staying with family members or living in shelters, hotels and campgrounds. Forests Minister Doug Donaldson said Friday that fire and emergency crews along with volunteers provided a “phenomenal effort” through the fire season that continues to threaten some parts of the province. “We still have certain areas in certain regions facing volatile situations and we’re continuing to actively and vigorously fight the fires in those areas,” he said, adding people should remain prepared and follow directions of local authorities if fires flare.

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Wildfires have burned four times province’s annual allowable cut

By Tim Petruk
Kamloops This Week
September 15, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada, Canada West

The B.C. government is “looking at all means” to help keep the forestry industry standing after this summer’s unprecedented wildfire season scorched an estimated 53-million cubic metres of timber — an amount four times the province’s annual allowable cut. Forests Minister Doug Donaldson said the province is working to figure out how much of the impacted timber is salvageable. “It’s similar to the pine beetle situation,” he told reporters Friday. “If it is merchantable, we want to get in and get it cut and get it to the mills before it is too dry.” Donaldson said provincial officials are keeping their options open.

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Will rain help or hurt Eagle Creek fire in the Gorge? It’s complicated

By Allan Brettman
The Oregonian
September 17, 2017
Category: Forest Fires
Region: United States, US West

The benefits of rain on fire seem obvious. But firefighting officials were concerned Saturday about erosion and flooding threats in the Columbia River Gorge posed by several days of anticipated precipitation. Given two weeks of steady burn activity in the Gorge, those officials believe some damage is inevitable. But it was impossible to forecast the extent Saturday, they said, in part because the Eagle Creek fire is still burning. “Usually it takes years – four to five – for vegetation to grow back and the ground to stabilize,” said Steven Sobieszczyk, a U.S. Geological Survey hydrologist in Portland.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Forest Bioeconomy Framework sets Stage for an Innovative, Low Carbon Economy

FPInnovations
September 15, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

Montreal, Quebec – FPInnovations applauds the Forest Bioeconomy Framework for Canada as presented by the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM) during their annual meeting this week in Ottawa, Ontario. The Framework seeks to create a low-carbon, sustainable economy based on one of Canada’s primary industries, the forest sector. Highlighting innovation, collaboration, and investment, the Framework is a clearly defined roadmap that opens the door to further enhancing the sustainability of the forest sector through research, innovation and strong public policy.

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Forest sector applauds Canadian Council of Forest Ministers Forest Bioeconomy Framework

By the Forest Products Association of Canada
Canada Newswire
September 15, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – The Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC) fully supports the Forest Bioeconomy Framework launched today by Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr and the Canadian Council of Forest Ministers (CCFM). “The Forest Bioeconomy Framework builds on our sector’s world-leading sustainability practices and our focus on finding environmental and economic value for every part of the tree.  It will help position Canada’s forest sector as a solutions provider in our move to a lower-carbon economy,” said FPAC CEO Derek Nighbor. “This framework is a significant move forward to position forestry as a key player in the bioeconomy, will support the creation of new jobs and help us meet Canada’s climate change commitments,” Nighbor added.

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Canadian Council of Forest Ministers Release Comprehensive Approach for Advancing Canada’s Forest Bioeconomy

By Natural Resources Canada
Canada Newswire
September 15, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: Canada

OTTAWA – Canada’s forests hold the world’s largest biomass reserves – the basis for making renewable bioenergy, biomaterials and other bioproducts. Leveraging this renewable resource will help spur innovation, investment, research and partnerships. The Canadian Council of Forest Ministers today unanimously supported a comprehensive approach for increasing and accelerating bio-based activities in its Forest Bioeconomy Framework for Canada at their annual meeting. The Framework is a non-binding commitment among CCFM partners and specific pathways may be endorsed, adopted and mobilized by jurisdictions accordingly. To take immediate action in advancing Canada’s forest bioeconomy, the CCFM identified short-term priority areas. Through collaborative efforts, federal, provincial and territorial governments will focus on stimulating the supply of forest bioproducts through improved standards and enhanced data collection and increasing demand for biomass through outreach and effective regulations.

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The surprising emissions from Oregon’s forests

By Catherine M. Mater – Oregon Global Warming Commission, chair – Task Force on Forest Carbon
The Oregonian
September 17, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States, US West

Once in a while, you’ll hear reference to a black swan event, an episode that comes as a surprise, has a major effect, and is often inappropriately rationalized after the fact. The fires raging through Oregon underscore such an event. Not the fires themselves, but the death and damage that occurs before lightning ever strikes. …The black swan event happening in our forests is driven by the sheer annual volume – about 22 million metric tons a year — of these long-term emissions released as Oregon’s trees die. That’s the equivalent of nearly all annual statewide emissions derived from the transportation and power generation sectors combined. More alarming, while national forests comprise less than 50 percent of all forestlands statewide, they contribute 70 percent of Oregon’s annual long-term emissions due to tree mortality. …These same forests each year also absorb a stunning 80 million metric tons of long-term emissions from the atmosphere through new tree growth. This means that Oregon’s forests acquire a net 35 million metric tons of long-term carbon from the atmosphere every year.

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