Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily Archives: November 17, 2017

Today’s Takeaway

Inaction in Jasper National Park results in eastern spread of Mountain Pine Beetle

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 17, 2017
Category: Today's Takeaway

A massive buildup of mountain pine beetles in Jasper National Park is exploding into commercially valuable forests along its boundaries.”They decided to consider the pine beetle a native disturbance agent“, said UBC researcher Allan Carroll, “and that hesitation precluded a plan with effective outcomes.”

In other Forestry news: Ken Day is considering more thinning to prevent future fires in UBC’s research forest; BC MLAs are unanimous on the need for incentives to salvage wildfire-damaged timber; and Nova Scotia woodland owners wonder how we got so detached from the forest products we use every single day.

In other news, Irving blames softwood duties for stalling its mill upgrade; NY researchers reduce carbon monoxide emissions from stored wood pellets; and new product rules help companies promote the environmental footprints of their cellulosic products.

Finally, a mystery photo of a red cedar being felled is sparking outrage among conservation groups… except that the location and date of when the tree was harvested is unknown. Hmmmm…

–Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Irving blames softwood lumber duties for stalling Doaktown mill upgrade

By Connell Smith
By CBC News
November 16, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

MLA Jake Stewart

J.D. Irving Ltd. put a $25 million overhaul of a Doaktown sawmill on hold after this month’s U.S. Commerce Department’s decision on softwood lumber duties, the company says. “We have undertaken engineering for the mill expansion,” JDI vice-president Mary Keith said. “Next steps are dependent on market conditions, including the resolution of the softwood lumber duty issue currently facing New Brunswick.” The sawmill modernization was one of several projects promised three years ago when the David Alward Progressive Conservative government signed a 25-year wood allocation contract with JDI as part of its forestry plan in 2014. …”When your revenues are cut by 10 per cent, capital projects will be reviewed,” said JDI vice-ppresident Jerome Pelletier, November 3rd. …Southwest Miramichi Progressive Conservative MLA, Jake Stewart was furious with the announcement,

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Atlas Engineered Products to Acquire Castlegar Truss Manufacturer and Announces Investor Relations Engagement

By Atlas Engineered Products Ltd.
Marketwired
November 16, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

NANAIMO, BRITISH COLUMBIA– – ATLAS ENGINEERED PRODUCTS LTD. (the “Company” or “Atlas”), a leading supplier of trusses and engineered wood products, is pleased to announce that it has entered into a letter of intent with Selkirk Truss (2010) Limited (“Selkirk”) whereby the Company has agreed to acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares of Selkirk (the “Transaction”). Guy Champagne, President of Atlas, commented, “We are very proud to announce the acquisition of Selkirk as the first step of our acquisition program to broaden our geographic reach. Not only will this transaction result in a 20% growth in annual revenues for the Company, it provides us with access to the Kootenay region.”

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No Big Lumber Deals Made in China or Japan

By Justin Goulet
My Comox Valley Now
November 16, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

There are no promises and no announcements of signed M-O-U’s as a result of the forestry trade mission to China and Japan. Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Doug Donaldson says China is a tough market with rugged negotiators, but there are developments that indicate we are on the cusp of something. When asked if he’s talked with the Chinese about concerns over the shipment of raw logs to the foreign country, Donaldson says that’s not the focus of his trip to China. “What we’re focusing on is projects that actually require manufactured lumber products.” President of the Coast Forest Products Association Rick Jeffrey says the opportunities are growing for Western Red Cedar as the Chinese become more well off and look to outdoor living and lifestyles.

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Future uncertain for employees at Williams Lake, B.C., sawmill following fire

By Courtney Dickson
CBC News
November 16, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A fire that caused extensive damage at the Williams Lake Lakeview Tolko sawmill has left 170 workers without a paycheque for the past two weeks, and their future at the mill is still uncertain. “The actual sawmill itself was not badly damaged in the fire,” said Tolko spokesperson Janice Lockyer. “The section that was impacted the most was the offices, and there was extensive damage in that area. It won’t be operational until the office area is reconstructed.” Lockyer said construction will likely take six months. In the meantime, Paul French, first vice president of United Steelworkers Local 1-2017 said the union is encouraging people to file for employment insurance.

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ATCO Wood Products up for BC Exporter of the Year award

By Sheri Regnier
BC Local News
November 17, 2017
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Fruitvale forestry company is being recognized as a top-tier leader in the export of B.C.’s natural resources. ATCO Wood Products will export approximately $28 million of softwood veneer, wood chips, bark and garden ties before the end of 2017. The family-run business has long been recognized locally as a vital corporate citizen. Now its impressive export-focused operations are being recognized on a larger scale – ATCO Wood Products was recently named a finalist for BC Exporter of the Year in the Natural Resource Category. “ATCO Wood Products was nominated by one of our technology partner companies, Syspro Inc.,” CEO Scott Weatherford told the Trail Times. “Who was impressed with our export focused operations, long history in the region as an exporter of manufactured natural resources, and our ability to meet the selection criteria (in the Natural Resource Award Category).”

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Product Category Rules for North American paper and paperboard, tissue and containerboard manufacturers now available

FPInnovations
November 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada

Vancouver, BC – FPInnovations, in collaboration with The American Forest and Paper Association (AF&PA) and Forest Products Association of Canada (FPAC), developed a Product Category Rules (PCR) for North American market pulp, paper and paperboard products, tissue, and containerboard manufacturers. This PCR allows North American pulp, paper, tissue and containerboard manufacturers to communicate the environmental footprints of their products in compliance with international standards. The primary objective of PCRs is to provide the rules and requirements for conducting life cycle assessment (LCA) project reports and developing environmental product declarations (EPDs) for certain product categories.

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Cross-laminated timber could lead a mid-rise revolution

By Bill Millard
The Architect’s Newspaper
November 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Engineers specializing in cross-laminated timber (CLT) see its future less in boutique prototype towers, requiring case-by-case demonstrations for approval, than in a meat-and-potatoes mid-rise market. While, according to Colorado State University’s John van de Lindt, “some of those pioneering early CLT buildings are really almost like a partial R&D project in disguise,” he and colleagues predict that the field’s maturation depends on the incorporation of research-driven CLT standards into building codes. … “But if you want to go taller, especially [if] you want to go above 85 feet— that is currently IBC [International Building Code] for Type IV, heavy timber—then you have to do something else…a lot of testing to try to convince the local building-code officials.” He views CLT beyond about 20 stories skeptically, on economic grounds: “In my projects, I say it’s tall wood; it’s not high-rise wood.”

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Massive cross-laminated timber building planned for Chicago

By Robert Dalheim
Woodworking Network
November 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

CHICAGO – Claiming it will be the largest mass timber structure in the United States, real estate developer Hines will build a six-story, 270,000-square-foot office building on Chicago’s North Side. Fire-resistant and environmentally-friendly, the proposed T3 Goose Island building (T3 for timber, technology, and transit – and located in a former Goose Island lumberyard) would be the largest cross-laminated timber (CLT) building in the United States. The building is proposed by Hines, a Houston-based real estate developer responsible for a similarly-constructed 220,000-square-foot seven-story apartment complex in Minneapolis, also named T3. Hines also has plans for a mass timber office building in Atlanta, and the firm wants to develop similar buildings throughout the country, said Steve Luthman, the Hines senior managing director who oversaw the Minneapolis project.

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Southern Exposure

By Alex Bozikovic
Canadian Architect
November 16, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

… I can smell the fragrance of forest. In this case it’s emanating from some planks of softwood attached to a lobby ceiling at T3, an office building in downtown Minneapolis. …Its developer—Houston, Texas-based Hines—has named it T3, for “timber, transit and technology,” and all of this woodiness, real and symbolic, indicates the building’s raison d’être. Its main distinction is the mass timber framework that supports the bulk of its 220,000 square feet. …There is no structural timber to see until you enter the tenant floors above, and even the particular technologies employed there—nail laminated timber (NLT) and glue-laminated timber—are not new. So the building doesn’t live up to that breathless Dezeen billing, which, like much of the current discourse on wood, overhypes the material’s current possibilities.

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Interview with Alison Brooks at the 2017 World Architecture Festival

By Isabel Narea
Designboom
November 17, 2017
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

‘The Smile’ by Alison Brooks Architects has been presented with the ‘display’ award at the 2017 world architecture festival. the project was one of the london design festival’s landmark projects, and was designed to be inhabited and explored by the public. effectively a beam curving up at both ends, the spectacular, curved, tubular timber structure measured 3.5m high, 4.5m wide, and 34m long. showcasing the structural and spatial potential of cross-laminated american tulipwood, the smile was the first ever ‘mega-tube’ made with construction-sized panels of hardwood CLT. At the world architecture festival in berlin, designboom spoke with alison brooks about her involvement in this year’s event, why she thinks the public should be involved in discussions about architecture, and being female in a male-dominated field.

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Forestry

Gender balance shift in B.C. forestry: More women enter industry, study forestry (Audio Story)

By The Early Edition
CBC Radio News
November 14, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Sally Aitken

British Columbia’s forestry industry has historically been a male-dominated field but the gender balance has recently started to tip as more women occupy leadership positions and complete post-secondary studies in one of the province’s key industries.

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Audit is critical of B.C.’s grizzly bear management strategy

By Wendy Fraser
Bridge River Lillooet News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

An audit of B.C.’s Grizzly Bear Conservation Strategy has found poor co-operation and communication between the provincial ministries of the Environment and Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, as well as a lack of follow-through from the government. In a report issued last week, the Office of the Auditor General said it expected “that these two ministries would be managing B.C.’s grizzly bear populations co-operatively and effectively. In establishing and defining the roles of these two ministries, however, government created an unclear organizational structure for wildlife management. This makes it difficult for MoE to deliver on its mandate to provide leadership in pursuit of healthy grizzly bear populations.” The report continued, “While government has undertaken activities to conserve grizzly bears, some of their commitments have gone unfulfilled.

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Arrow Timber Supply Area AAC gets slight reduction

By Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Government of BC
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

VICTORIA – The new allowable annual cut (AAC) for the Arrow Timber Supply Area (TSA) in the southeastern part of British Columbia is being slightly reduced to 500,000 cubic metres, chief forester Diane Nicholls announced today. “After consulting with First Nations and looking at all available information on timber and non-timber resources in the TSA, I am satisfied the harvest level will accommodate objectives for all forest resources over the next 10 years and, at the same time, support social and economic goals in the area,” said Nicholls. The chief forester’s determination takes into consideration winter range for ungulates, including mule deer, white tailed deer, rocky mountain elk and moose. Grizzly bear populations are protected through wildlife habitat areas.

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Tell it to the province

Letter by Geoff Craig, Sunshine Coast Community Forest
Sunshine Coast Reporter
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

To Ross Muirhead of Elphinstone Logging Focus (“A rational response,” Letters, Nov. 10): It seems to me self evident that the reason our Forest District has not established Ungulate Winter Ranges for elk on the Sunshine Coast is that we do not have the “severe winter conditions” in which “a population can die off.” Our climate is considerably milder than the Kootenays or North Central Vancouver Island where such ranges have been established. The 2004 Provincial Order you have referenced only says winter ranges may be required, so it is not unreasonable that forestry and wildlife officials have not prioritized the studies you referenced for this more temperate area. … if you have concerns about the elk, please take them up with the relevant provincial authorities. 

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Community Forest uploads response

By Dave Lasser, Sunshine Coast Community Forest
Sunshine Coast Reporter
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Dave Lasser

All forest licensees in B.C. have to go through a rigorous and complex process to obtain permission to harvest trees on public land in B.C.  The Community Forest is no different. It is a slow process to review and implement all of the applicable laws, regulations and requirements set by government, First Nations, utilities, etc., for each cutblock. We must meet the same requirements that the largest licensees must meet. There is a significant amount of consultation with the Sechelt Band. We have worked hard over the years to maintain a respectful and good working relationship with the Sechelt Band. …We hope when the public reviews the information on our website, they will better understand and appreciate the processes involved. 

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Love of huckleberry picking squashed for the bears

BC Local News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

…This year, B.C. saw a staggering amount — as much as a thousand pounds per day — of huckleberries commercially picked from the forests of the Kootenays, particularly the East Kootenays. This amount may not be a sustainable rate of harvest when thinking about the forest as an ecosystem that feeds itself. Arguably, berries in the forest are more valuable to the wildlife that live there than to us. Bears play an important role in the ecosystem and are intricately intertwined with many life processes. Though they are large, 85 per cent of a black bear’s diet is plant-based. Food is important to all animals but for bears, one season is critical to their survival.

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Oh, deer: Lack of wildfire brings deer closer to cities

By Carli Berry
Pentiction Western News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

It may seem like fires are increasing, but for mule deer populations it’s not enough to create the habitat they need. According to the BC Wildlife Federation, the reason why mule deer are moving into urban environments is the lack of wildfire in the past several decades, said director Jesse Zeman, of the fish and wildlife restoration program with the BC Wildlife Federation. Mule deer are used to adapting to the natural wildfire patterns that occur every 10 to 40 years, said Zeman. With the regrowth in Okanagan Mountain Park since the 2003 fire, the deer are in search of a new food source and have moved into town. “Generally speaking habitat quality is going down, especially in Kelowna,” he said.

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Thinning the forests could change wildfire patterns, forest manager says

CBC News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The manager of the UBC research forest near Williams Lake says that after a summer of wildfires, he’s considering more frequent thinning of the forest to prevent such out-of-control fires in the future. When a fire started in the Alex Fraser research forest on the afternoon of July 7, 2017, Ken Day remembers looking out his window and seeing a stormy sky. Half an hour later, he said it looked like a volcano going off in the forest near the Williams Lake Indian Reserve.  …Day said the areas of the forest that had been thinned burned in a significantly different way “It got me thinking that maybe there’s an opportunity to manage our landscape differently if we do more thinning,” Day said. “If thinning becomes a component of our regular harvest practices, we could potentially make the landscape more fire resilient.”

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MLAs unanimous on BC wildfire recovery

By Tom Fletcher
Alberni Valley News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

MLAs touring B.C. communities in advance of the NDP’s first budget have called for incentives to salvage wildfire-damaged timber, and increased forest fuel management and reforestation. The all-party committee of the B.C. legislature held hearings in 12 communities this fall, and unanimously focused their main recommendation on the aftermath of B.C.’s record area burned in summer forest fires. …In an phone call from Tokyo during B.C.’s annual Asia lumber trade mission, Donaldson said efforts are underway to implement the main recommendations of the finance committee. “We’re expediting the harvest of fire-impacted timber and getting it to the mills in a timely manner, because we know how the wood can degrade quickly,” Donaldson said. “Also, we have allocated $140 million over the next two years into forest enhancement, and that also involves the management of urban interface forests and fuel mitigation.”

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Ancient cedar felled

By Rob Gibson
Castanet
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A photo of an ancient red cedar being cut down on Vancouver Island is sparking outrage among conservation groups. The Wilderness Committee has received a photo of a record-sized ancient red cedar tree being cut down. The exact location and date when the tree was harvested is not clear but it is believed to be somewhere on northern Vancouver Island. “The fact that companies are cutting down the last of them highlights the unsustainable nature of old-growth logging and the fact that some companies are not willing to change course. BC needs a law to protect remaining old-growth forests,” said Torrance Coste, Vancouver Island Campaigner with the Wilderness Committee. The tree appears to be as big or even bigger than other record-sized members of its species.

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Pine beetles from Jasper National Park moving in to commercial forests

By Bob Weber
The Canadian Press in CTV News
November 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

EDMONTON – A massive and uncontrollable buildup of mountain pine beetles in Jasper National Park is starting to explode into commercially valuable forests along its boundaries. Foresters along the park’s edge have seen a tenfold increase in beetle infestation in just months, and some scientists wonder if Parks Canada could have done more to control the invasion a few years ago. “They decided to consider the pine beetle a ‘native disturbance agent,”‘ said Allan Carroll, who has studied the beetles since the late 1990s. …”Just that hesitation intrinsic to producing a management plan precluded any effective outcomes.” West Fraser Timber manages about 13,000 square kilometres along the park’s eastern edge and runs a large mill in the town of Hinton just outside the boundary. The company removed about 40,000 bug-infested trees last year. That number has grown.

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Education key in understanding lumber industry

By Stacie Carroll, Federation of Nova Scotia Woodland Owners
The Chronicle Herald
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

As I look around at folks who carry paper protest signs on sticks and ask you to bring tissues to an event that celebrates the death of a renewable resource — while eating their cardboard-packaged granola bars, holding their paper coffee cups and carrying a large wooden coffin — I start to wonder where the logic has all gone. How did we get so detached from the things we use every single day? …By biting the hand that feeds them and by using emotional stimuli, the organizers of these types of protests continue to confuse the public and don’t communicate facts that help Nova Scotians understand forests, forestry and the renewable resource management, which are a major contributor to the financial stability of this province. There are more forests in this province than there were 100 years ago despite there being twice the population.

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Stand by the plan for Tongass timber

By Kate Troll, United Fishermen of Alaska
Alaska Dispatch News
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

…Consistent with the recommendations of the Tongass Advisory Committee, the state of Alaska and the U.S. Forest Service are undertaking a comprehensive inventory of the largest and most mature young-growth timber stands. This inventory will conclude in 2018, and will help inform how and where young-growth harvest will occur in the future. Nothing in the plan amendment prevents the Forest Service from continuing to offer old-growth timber to help bridge the gap until such a time as young-growth stands become merchantable. It would be a shame to undo all this progress, not just for a transitioning timber industry, but also for the region’s major sources of employment: fishing and tourism.

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Compliance with Delaware forest harvest law protects water quality

By Kelli Steele
Delaware Public Media
November 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

Delaware timber harvests achieved a 93-percent rate of compliance with best management practices designed to protect water quality and limit soil erosion, according to a new report. Recommended practices included: pre-harvest planning to properly locate access roads, avoiding stream crossings and wetlands, curtailing harvests during wet periods, and maintaining sufficient forest buffers near water. Dr. Anne Hairston-Strang, a forest hydrologist with the Maryland DNR Forest Service, sought to assess the use and effectiveness of BMP’s by surveying a total of 72 sites in Maryland and Delaware from 2014 to 2016.

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State sold Yellowwood trees too cheap

Letter by Christine Linnemeier
Indianapolis Star
November 16, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: US East, United States

I am a partial owner of a woodlot in Washington County. While the state was auctioning off trees in the Yellowwood Back Country Area we were taking bids on a managed cut in our woodlot. I was shocked at the huge difference in what we were offered for our trees versus what the state was being offered for theirs. The state sold approximately 1,730 trees estimated to be 447,644 board feet for $108,785. We are selling 546 trees plus 229 culled trees estimated at 260,944 board feet for $158,600. The state sold their trees for 24 cents a board foot and ours are going for 60 cents a board foot. By the number of trees — the state is getting $62 a tree and we’re getting $290 ($204 with the culls.) The species of trees is similar.

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Timber training centre tipped for M’boro

By Blake Antrobus
Fraser Coast Chronicle
November 17, 2017
Category: Forestry
Region: International

MARYBOROUGH MP Bruce Saunders has proposed a new timber centre to help skill up workers for the region’s timber industry. The centre, which would be a joint project between the State Government and private timber enterprises, would help teach workers the necessary skills like operating machinery, loading and truck driving, to work in Maryborough’s timber mills and factories. Mr Saunders said the proposal would help address the shortage of trained timber workers in the Heritage City. “It will be an economic boost to the town, having the centre to train people here and help them get local jobs,” Mr Saunders said. 

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Researchers reduce CO emissions from stored wood pellets

Biomass Magazine
November 16, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: United States

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority recently announced that Clarkson University discovered a new process to eliminate the release of dangerous carbon monoxide (CO) gas from wood pellets in storage. The use of wood pellet boilers and stoves to replace heating oil, propane or older wood boilers supports Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s nation-leading energy goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030. The breakthrough discovery solves an important health and safety concern that will enable New Yorkers to use wood pellet stoves and boilers while safely storing the pellets. The research leading to the new process was funded through the State’s Renewable Heat NY initiative.

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Nineteen nations say they’ll use more bioenergy to slow climate change

Reuters
November 16, 2017
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

BONN, Germany – China and 18 other nations representing half the world’s population said on Thursday they planned to increase the use of wood and other plant matter from sustainable sources to generate energy as part of efforts to limit climate change. The group would work out collective targets for increasing the use of what they called sustainable bioenergy, they said during talks in Germany among 200 nations on bolstering the 2015 Paris climate agreement. Argentina, Brazil, Britain, Canada, China, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, India, Indonesia, Italy, Morocco, Mozambique, the Netherlands, Paraguay, Philippines, Sweden and Uruguay signed up for the plan. They agreed to “develop collective targets prescribing the contribution of sustainable bioenergy to final energy demand and as a percentage of transport fuel use”, their joint Biofuture Platform initiative in a statement.

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