Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

BC’s goal is to break WFP’s hold on Crown tenures: Rob Shaw

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 20, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Postmedia’s Rob Shaw says the NDP’s goal with Western Forest Products is less about resolving the strike and more about breaking the company’s hold on Crown tenures. In related news: industry grasps for hope amid 7-month strike; closed mills begets higher lumber prices; and BC’s bridge loan to forestry contractors has some critics. Elsewhere: UNIFOR wants to be on Nova Scotia’s Pictou County transition team, as a neighbouring community offers advice from their paper mill closure.

In other news: David Suzuki says more conservation is needed to fight climate change; a new study says Northern Ontario forests are becoming less resilient to fire; the US Forest Service celebrates high timber sales in 2019; and the North American Wholesale Lumber Association’s 2020 Mulrooney Award goes to… Jim Robbins Sr. of Robbins Lumber in Maine.

Finally, what’s next after tall wood—a fungus megastructure?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US housing starts surge to 13-year high but permits fall

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 17, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

US housing starts surged to a 13-year high in December, as residential construction costs slowed, but permits [signalling future growth] fell. In other Business news: the BC Premier’s contractors-at-risk fund is welcomed by the Truck Loggers Association, but strike and mill-closure inaction riles Mayor Wickstrom and MLA Barnett. Meanwhile: more on the closures of Northern Pulp and Townsend RY and Louisiana Pacific’s North Carolina job cuts.

In Wood Product news: the New York Times and New York City on mass timber trends; CWC’s design awards; and APA’s new construction guide. Elsewhere: the BC Forest Practices Board celebrates 25 years; SFI engages Dovetail to update its standards; and applications are open for BC’s Student Ranger Program.

Finally, Microsoft, Forests Ontario and Frogs make climate change news.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Will UNDRIP block resource development? Good question

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 16, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Globe and Mail gives pause to Canadians on UNDRIP, as protests over resource development could become the norm. In other Business news: US homebuilder confidence remains strong; the US/China trade deal includes relief for hardwood lumber; Maine paper mill’s unexpected savior is ChinaResoluteFPInnovations and NRCan celebrate cellulose filament commercialization; Boise Cascade has a new CEO; and Rayonier buys Pope Resources.

In other news: the American Institute of Architects on zero-net-carbon structural materials; more Canadian firefighters head down-under; and the pros and cons of Thunderstorms on Australia’s bushfire-ravaged east coast.

Finally, laid-off BC and Nova Scotia workers get some job-search help.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Mill closures, housing demand keep softwood prices firm

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 15, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Madison’s Lumber Reporter says sawmill closures and US demand for housing are keeping softwood prices firm during this normally slow time of year. Forest-based communities making news include: Kamloops lowering Domtar’s tax rate; Campbell River calling for action on BC’s forestry strike; and Cumberland County and local sawmiller speaking out on Nova Scotia’s forestry crisis.

In Forest-tech news: NRCan’s remote sensing supersite; how LiDAR and Digital Twinning bring forest inventories to life; and an International LiDAR mapping forum. Meanwhile: France’s top architects say Notre-Dame’s roof should be rebuilt in wood; climate change’s impact on nature; North America’s vanishing birds; and a threatened bear den in BC’s Slocan Valley.

Finally, the always successful and newsworthy Truck Loggers Association convention—Vision 2020—kicks off today. Stay tuned for updates. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Horgan not happy with lack of progress in forestry strike

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 14, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Steelworkers and Western Forest Products remain at loggerheads as Premier Horgan and local residents express displeasure about the lack of progress on BC’s forestry strike. Companies in the news include: RY Timber closing its Townsend, Montana mill; fire hits Collins’ mill in Klamath Falls, Oregon; and Nova Scotia’s Port Hawkesbury Paper power rate hearings are set to begin.

In other news: National Geographic has a feature on the future of tall-wood; NRCan on how much biomass can be safely removed from forests; Australia warns of toxic smoke despite cooler weather; and Bloomberg expects the housing upswing to cushion the US economy.

Finally, the secret of 1000-year-old ginkgo trees revealed.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Northern Pulp begins shutdown, CEO defends actions taken

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 13, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Northern Pulp begins to wind down as Paper Excellence blames unrealistic timeline and undefined process for its closure. In related news: a Councillor pans Resolute’s behaviour on Fort Frances mill closure; buyers interest exists for Kenora’s bankrupt sawmill; and Steelworkers and Port McNeill mayor exchange barbs on BC’s forestry strike; while the value-added sector grows despite the dwindling fibre supply. 

In other news: NRCan study says wildfires are changing the boreal forest; the El Niño-La Niña effect may beget quieter fire seasons; and changes to the US Environmental Policy Act are said to bolster the timber industry. Meanwhile, in Australia wildfire news: a fourth veteran firefighter dies; the Prime Minister launches an inquiry, firefighters go on the offence, and designers call for more fire-resilient homes.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Northern Pulp signals it wants to continue operating in Nova Scotia

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 10, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Nova Scotia’s transition team meets and announces support for forestry workers, as Northern Pulp signals it wants to continue operating in the province. In related news: Ontario pledges money to study Fort Frances mill redevelopment; and BC supports Quesnel after Tolko mill closure.  

In Wildfire news: NRCan scientists say frequency of boreal wildfires could lead to big changes in the landscape; water runoff is still impacted 40 years after a Washington state fire; health risks from California smoke need urgent study; and topics associated with Australia’s wildfire crisis now include active forest management and animal rescue teams. 

Finally, it’s cold in Saskatchewan but not cold enough to deter the pine beetles.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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No plan for transition after Northern Pulp: loggers

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 9, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Tree Frog Editors are sporting big happy smiles today as we announce that our site transition to a bigger server has finally been completed. An increasing number of readers and a massive archive of forest stories needed a bigger home. Next up – we plan to reconfigure our site to better serve YOU! Stay tuned for updates and an opportunity to share your suggestions for our future. 

Nova Scotia loggers say the province had no post-decision plan on Northern Pulp, and contractors need transition support. In related news: no new talks in BC’s forestry strike; Tolko’s Kelowna mill’s last day; and MP McLeod calls on feds to support forestry workers. Meanwhile, on the US/China trade war front: US wood moulding and millworkers initiate trade action; while US furniture makers look to Cambodia as Vietnam’s wages rise.

In Forestry/Wildfire news: Canada offers more aid for Australia, as firefighters look to reduce fire risk with controlled burns; BC moves to hire laid-off Alberta firefighters; and researchers say a tipping point is reached once 50% of the land is deforested.

Finally, Stucturlam lauds building code changes and Canadian Pacific donates to Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Nova Scotia focuses on workers not Northern Pulp

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 8, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Nova Scotia fires “transition team member” focused on the future of Northern Pulp, offers ‘emotional support’ for mill workers as forest harvesters try to remain optimistic. In other Business news: innovation is not optional for Atlantic Canada’s forest future; a freight train carrying wood pellets derails in BC; and Enviva’s CEO and a wood energy spokesman push back on a North Carolina’s wood-pellet exposé. 

In other news: a Globe and Mail feature on BC’s old-growth explorers; climate change is increasing the risk of Canadian wildfires; and US researchers assess the pros-and-cons of increased CO2 on trees. Meanwhile, Oregon ENGOs get another chance to stop owl killings; and more on Australia’s slow motion economic wildfire disaster.

Finally, Toyota’s zero-emission city building plan will feature carbon neutral wood.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry’s 2019 annus horribilis and outlook 2020

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 7, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC forestry’s 2019 annus horribilis, per FEA Canada’s Russ Taylor, was due in part to changing worldwide sawmill competitiveness, but rising lumber prices may forestall mill closures in 2020. In other Business news: the US South is expected to dominate the US housing market; BC Liberals call for minister Donaldson’s removal; and meetings set for Northern Pulp’s soon-to-be unemployed workers.

In mass timber news: the Softwood Lumber Board reports staggering growth;  Denver adopts the new tall timber building code; and Toronto’s Sidewalk wood-towers face code challenges. Meanwhile: JetBlue looks to biomass to reduce CO2 emissions; and Australia’s bushfire crisis may be replicated in New Zealand. 

Finally, if you experience delays, your patience is appreciated. Our rebuild is still in process.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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2020 outlook positive on multiple fronts

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 6, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Despite a challenging 2019, FPAC’s Derek Nighbor says the future is bright for Canada’s forest product industry. So too say ERA’s Kevin Mason; CNBC’s Diana Olick; Furture Markets’ Willam Strausss and the Motley Fool. Meanwhile: Nova Scotia names transition team on fallout of its Northern Pulp decision, while the company considers keeping the plant in hot idle.

In Forestry/Wildfire news: spring flooding in BC may be worsened due to logging; Washington state is being sued by ENGOs and others over plans to sell timber; agriculture contemplates life without glyphosate; and Canada and the US send more specialists to help Australia as the gov’t calls up 3000 reservists, and says it will pay “whatever it takes“.

Finally, we’re still working out the bugs with our bigger and better server. Your patience is appreciated (as is your feedback along the way).

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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The year-in-review and a look to the future

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 3, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Tree Frog News is still “under construction”. We hope to have the regular story format back in place by next week. For now, here are your forestry news headlines:

Business and Politics

Finance & Economics

  • Zack’s industry ranking gloomy for wood’s near-term prospects. (Nasdaq)
  • Profits declined faster for sawmills in Finland than Sweden (Wood Resources Int.)
  • Lumber Going into 2020 (Seeking Alpha)

Wood, Paper and Green Building

Forestry

Forest Fires

Have a great weekend. 

~Brought to you by Kelly, Sandy and Heidi

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Happy New Year! We hope that the year 2020 brings all that is good to you and our sector

Tree Frog Forestry News
January 2, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Over the holidays, the Tree Frog News moved to a bigger server to support our growing readership. However, due to some unforeseen challenges, we do not have all of our functionalities up and running yet. As such, we are pleased to provide you with this brief summary of the top news hits from the last week, and will update the more detailed news as soon as our site is fully functional. 

Business and Politics

Finance & Economics

Wood, Paper and Green Building

Forestry

  • Scotland marks 100 years of public forestry (BBC News)
  • Indonesia’s top court bars plantation activity in protected forests (Reuters)

Carbon, Climate and Bioenergy

Health & Safety

We thank you for your patience as we finalize the changes to our database and programming. 

~Brought to you by Sandy, Kelly and Heidi

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Conifex sells its US sawmill business to Resolute

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 24, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Conifex Timber has entered into an agreement with Resolute Forest Products for the sale of its three US sawmills (located in Florida and Arkansas). Meanwhile, Northern Pulp’s closure has sawmills in Nova Scotia seeking new chip markets; BC takes a more active role on WFP strike; announces a log export fee reduction and support for Interior communities.

In other news: Oregon to appeal landmark timber revenue case; Structurlam takes its expertise stateside; the world’s first timber football stadium is coming to the Cotswolds; and how to give your Christmas Tree a second life.

Finally – a very merry Christmas greeting to you—our valued reader. Unless something big breaks, we’ll see you next year. January 2nd, 2020 to be precise.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Elation and despair in wake of Northern Pulp decision

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 23, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

 

Kelly, Sandy and Heidi

Nova Scotia’s decision generates despair and elation given Northern Pulp’s coming closure. In related news: Tom Fletcher sits down with Premier Horgan as the BC forest and labour ministers opine on the forestry strike; and Thunder Bay’s hardships are called the canary in the coal mine for the rest of Canada.

On a more positive note: Derek Nighbor on the climate change power of Canada’s forests; Canada’s GHG projections show progress is being made; and the path to sustainable construction with mass timber. Meanwhile: the search for the non-festive mistletoe; and 69 Canadians spend the holidays with their Australian (firefighter) brethren.

Finally, after tomorrow, the frogs will be off until January 2nd. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Nova Scotia rejects Northern Pulp, creates transition fund for workers

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 20, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Kelly, Sandy and Heidi

As Northern Pulp prepares to shut down, Nova Scotia’s Premier has rejected the company’s plea for an extension, despite rallies for and agin. Meanwhile: BC makes changes to ease the forestry crisis but is not prepared to legislate to end the strike—to the dismay of local mayors and the opposition liberals. Elsewhere: JD Irving reacts to New Brunswick decision to give private woodlots a larger share of the market.

In other news: after impeachment, the US House passes NAFTA 2.0; Pinnacle to build a new pellet plant in Alabama; BC updates its building code to allow tall wood buildings; and more to ease the stress of BC’s economic downturn from the BC Forest Safety Council. 

Finally, an early Christmas greeting to all our readers and please note—Tuesday’s News is the last of 2019, barring any breaking news over the holiday.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Pundits ponder as Nova Scotia premier defers until Friday

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 19, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Nova Scotia premier holds off commenting on Northern Pulp’s future until tomorrow, drawing opposition ire and pundit conjecture. Meanwhile, despite the efforts of BC’s labour minister and premier Horgan’s hopes, the forestry strike drags on; US housing starts fail to spur lumber prices, US homebuilders applaud NAFTA 2.0; and analyst’s revise Canfor’s target price up after failed takeover bid.

In Climate/Forestry news: Canada’s top ten weather stories point to more extremes; Australia experiences record temperatures, declares wildfire emergency; the Sierra Club’s take on old-growth logging and greenhouse gas emissions.

Finally, is your wrapping paper recyclable? Try the AF&PA scrunch test.

Kelly McCloskey, Editor

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Northern Pulp in jeopardy after Nova Scotia non-decision

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Nova Scotia’s request for more info on Northern Pulp’s pipeline plan puts future of Pictou mill in jeopardy—CEO Brian Baarda. In related news: NAFTA-2 will close the WTO dispute-settlement loophole used by the US; BC’s working forests aren’t working for BC; and Fortress Global secures court protection to keep operating.

Meanwhile: the WFP/Steelworker negotiations break down (again); the BC Forest Safety Council on coping with the stress of BC’s forestry downturn; and stock market fallout after Jim Pattison abandons Canfor offer.

Finally, a 17-storey wood tower, 7 benefits of using timber and 7 shopping days to Christmas.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Jim Pattison fails in bid to take Canfor private

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 17, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor and Great Pacific terminate their agreement as Jim Pattison fails in his bid to take Canfor private. Other companies in the news include: EACOM’s pension agreement; Weyerhaeuser’s timberland sale; and New-Indy’s product-change. In preparation for Nova Scotia’s decision on Northern Pulp‘s effluent plant, the fed’s forgo the need for an environmental assessment. Meanwhile, good news on the US housing front as starts and prices rise. 

In other news: post-COP25, the EU plans to re-assess the carbon neutrality designation of biomass energy; not all Alberta pines are created equal when it comes to the beetle; and FPInnovations agrees to share research with Sweden on harvesting automation.

Finally, looking for an inexpensive Christmas gift? How about a free subscription to the Tree Frog News for your friends, family (and colleagues).

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC Premier promises end to months-long forestry strike

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 16, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC’s ongoing forestry strike has got to end, says BC premier Horgan. In related news: loonies for loggers; contractor rally scepticism; and the Green’s perspective. Elsewhere: Nova Scotia awaits pulp mill decision; ENGO’s pan Ontario’s toxic wastewater regulations; Oregon counties feel vindicated by lawsuit; and New Brunswick premier heads to Ottawa to talk softwood lumber.

In the debate over forestry’s role in climate change: how wood buildings can help; clearcutting is part of the problem; burning wood isn’t the solution; and planting trees is the way forward for Scotland. Meanwhile, grizzly bears are on the move as Canada’s northernmost communities warm.

Finally, BC’s new UNDRIP Act raises more questions than answers.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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EU moves to reclaim trade dispute process after US cripples WTO

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 13, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The European Union moves to reclaim trade authority after US cripples WTO’s dispute settlement process. In other Business news: the Toronto Star says NAFTA-2 is better but still a bad deal; Fortress pulp mill to close near Ottawa; Nova Scotia’s new forestry regulations won’t be public until the New Year—while its decision on Northern Pulp could put taxpayers on the hook for damages

On the BC front, after Wednesday’s forestry worker rally—Minister Donaldson says we’re listening, while Premier Horgan says help is on its way. Meanwhile: WFP strike discussions are postponed to next week, and an op-ed by the BC Forest Safety Council’s Rob Moonen on how the principles for preventing injuries can help during these difficult times.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC and federal gov’t relief sought on forest crisis

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 12, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Laid-off forest workers gathered at the BC legislature seeking provincial relief, while local MP seeks emergency debate by federal parliament. In other Business news: Fort Frances holds faint hope for use of old Resolute mill, Canfor corrects misleading info on proposed privatization vote; Cascades adds to its interest in Greenpac; Oregon is relieved over NAFTA 2 deal; and Hampton’s CEO Steve Zika calls lawsuit verdict a reality check for Oregonians.

In other news: Quebec is criticized for caribou/wolf kill plan; the Urban Land Institute, MIT researchers tout wood’s CO2 benefits over steel and cement; a 12-storey wood tower is coming to Kelowna; and Dr. Daniel Unger (Austin State U) receives coveted SAF forestry education award.

Finally, new hope for California’s endangered yellow-legged frog.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canfor’s vote looms as WFP/Steelworkers resume talks

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 11, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

With less than a week to Canfor’s privatization vote, investors balk and analysts debate. Meanwhile: Western Forest Products and its striking workers head back to the table—but why the delay; NAFTA 2 is done—here are the changes and the US Homebuilder’s response. Companies in the news include: Fortress Paper’s cash crunch; Northern Pulp’s ‘nuanced’ effluent impact; Structurlam’s Walmart connection; and Christmas curtailments at Canoe Forest Products and Corner Brook Pulp & Paper.

In other news: Quebec repurposes some Caribou protection lands; Ontario’s forest strategy supports wood construction; a new report on BC’s 2012 sawmill explosions; and UNDRIP’s First Nations energy opportunity.

Finally, how the 2008 financial crises is pushing up the cost of a Christmas tree.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Stucturlam Mass Timber to expand to Arkansas

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 10, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Structurlam Mass Timber Corp. will build its first US plant in Conway, Arkansas—and Walmart’s new headquarters will be the first customer. In labour news: Western Forest Products CEO asks Premier Horgan to intervene, as retired MLA/labour rep. pans  WFP’s negotiating approach; EACOM ratifies six-year agreement in Timmins; and a worker is injured at Resolute’s Thunder Bay sawmill.

On the executive front: David Elstone resigns from the Truck Loggers Association; Mike Birkeland will lead Minnisota’s forest industry; Oregon State University names Tom Deluca as dean for the College of Forestry; and the Canadian Institute of Forestry appoints Mark Pearson as executive director.

Finally, a St. Francis Xavier ecologist myth busts Northern Pulp effluent pollution.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Weyerhaeuser, Resolute must pay for Grassy Narrows maintenance

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 9, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

In a split decision, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that Weyerhaeuser and Resolute must pay for Grassy Narrows mill-site maintenance. In other Business news: Russia surpasses Canada in softwood lumber exports; BC’s forestry crisis a huge risk to NDP; Ontario’s forest strategy means more logging; Corner Brook Pulp and Paper is closing for two weeks; and letters for and agin Northern Pulp’s future.

In Forestry/Climate news: Harmac Pacific accesses BC’s clean energy fund; Quebec’s Premier heads to Hollywood to talk carbon trading; the potential of biomass is overlooked in the UK; saving the Tongass from renewed logging; and Brazil says it can’t stop deforestation without the help of rich countries.

Finally, Kelowna’s wood-frame high-rise; and tackling climate change one building at a time.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wildlands League report exaggerates the impacts of forestry: FPAC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 6, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Wildlands League report on Canadian logging focuses on 30 year old practices, exaggerates the impacts, says FPAC’s Derek Nighbor. In related news: Tolko defends plan to log in community watershed; Oregon adopts plan for marbled murrelet; Spain launches app to fight illegal wood trade; the NY Times on Amazon deforestation; and Oregon State Univ. on forest fragmentation in the tropics.

In Business news: Conifex concludes sale with Hampton Lumber; Domtar shifts pension liabilities; the Canadian Supreme Court set to rule on Grassy Narrows site; FPInnovations applauds Ontario on its forestry strategy; and a pending strike in Finland could close half the country’s sawmills.

Finally, a Forbes writer endorses CLT, fears the buzzsaw of building overregulation.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC forestry workers frustrated by lack of gov’t lifeline

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 5, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A video of BC Cabinet Minister meeting with frustrated forestry workers goes viral, as WFP strike continues to take its toll. In related news: Aspen Planers restarts second shift; Congress introduces law to fight trade cheating; and US kitchen cabinet industry trends and statistics.

In Forestry news: BC bans border logging after urging by Seattle mayor; Ontario makes forestry open for business; and Tolko’s plans may threaten Lake Country drinking water. On the Bioenergy front: the latest biomass fuel developments; Alberta’s bioeconomy opportunity; US and EU ENGO’s protest burning wood; and TED conference to focus on power and the build environment.

Finally, Canadian Tire promotes fake trees, and all roads lead to Rome—thanks to the Roman timber trade with Gaul.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Ontario releases draft forest sector strategy

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 4, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Ontario government released its long awaited draft strategy on the future of the forest sector. In other Business news: softwood lumber prices stabilize; Japan housing starts fall; WTO’s dispute body is coming to an abrupt halt; and logging contractors and local businesses feel the pinch as WFP strike drags on.

With COP25 underway in Spain—stories on greener ways to heat your home, liquid fuels from forest residues; and under-reported deforestation from Canadian logging roads. Elsewhere: should humans intervene to save the spotted owl; Europe’s bark beetle explosion; and BC assists Australian fire fighters.

Finally, holiday gift advice from bird-friendly coffee to forest-saving chocolate.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Tenant interest driving mass timber expansion: JLL

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 3, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US commercial real estate giant JLL says tenant interest in “sustainable, wellness-oriented office space” is driving demand for mass timber, and Canada is leading the charge. In other Business news: BC forest crisis top economic story of 2019; North Island MLA meets with struggling contractors; Enviva secures approval for Alabama pellet plant; and Miller Western has a new CEO.

In Forestry/Climate news: no breakthrough expected on carbon pricing at COP25; high-res mapping to help monitor tropical forest carbon; bark thickness linked to tree death in Amazon wildfires; and Tree Canada says get real—when it comes to choosing a Christmas tree. 

Finally, WorkSafeBC may lose its oversight role on the laying of criminal charges.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Layoffs and mill closures plague BC forest industry

The Tree Frog Forestry News
December 2, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

As BC politicians argue in the legislature, workers and their families face an uncertain future. In related news: the Interior logging truck rally fails to gain ground; and BC’s pine beetle kill comes home to roost.

In other Business news: Ontario forestry research and innovation funding; Northern Pulp decision has Nova Scotia’s credibility on the line; West Fraser’s a top 100 employer; Aaron Frost earns most valuable (BC Forest Safety Council) player award; and Pete Fournier is chair of the Wood Manufacturing Council.

In Forestry/Climate news: the EU is encouraged to practice proforestation; logging and waste in BC’s Great Bear Rainforest; the cost of wood pellets in North Carolina; and protecting the endangered white bark pine in Golden BC.

Finally, get your trees early, there’s a Christmas tree shortage.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Scientists debate the carbon potential of planting trees

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 29, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Scientists debate the carbon potential of planting trees in Science Magazine (wonkish but interesting). In related news: Ikea invests to become climate positive; and cue the loggers—Arizona has too many trees.

Re: BC’s forest crisis: Minister Donaldson says aid is on the way; a ministerial aid calls the rural dividend program a slush fund; Western Forest Products clears the air on efforts to end the strike; and calls for federal action by the TLA and an MLA. In Wood Product news: BC’s building code change will increase wood use; and the rise of mid-rise wood construction in the US.

Finally, the LA Times says stop building homes in high fire-risk areas.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forestry Strike is killing our communities: Port McNeill Mayor

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 28, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Happy US Thanksgiving!

Port McNeill’s Mayor begs WFP and the Steelworkers to get back to the table for the communities’ sake. In related news: Kelowna MP Dan Albas calls for federal leadership; and Port Hardy Save On Foods adds striking loggers to their list of Christmas charities

In other news: a new study says caribou habitat restoration may be ineffective; changes to Canada’s building code to help an ailing forest industry; a truly amazing wood structure in Norway; and researchers look into touch-sensitive wood in car dashboards. Lot’s more news here of course but first—Happy Thanksgiving to our US readers and a safe Black Friday to all!

With respect to the latter—although Black Friday was coined in the 1960s to describe traffic jams in Philadelphia the day has a more fateful connotation in Australia. This due to their Black Friday fires in 1939, where on January 13th [a Friday no less], a total of 69 sawmills were burned and 71 lives lost.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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CN Rail settles, lumber prices are up, US housing remains strong

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 27, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Although the negative impacts will linger, encouraging news on CN Rail’s work stoppage; US GDP, new home sales and softwood lumber prices. In other Business news: Western Canadian Timber Products lays off 50; communities grapple with lack of progress on Western Forest Products’ strike; idled Canfor workers are now eligible for assistance; and Northern Pulp’s effluent report is panned for lack of details.

In other news: a BC Supreme Court judge rejects ENGO petition against BC Timber Sales; Oregon’s recent forestry court ruling could devastate the state’s budget; and how the US-China trade war works against sustainable forest management.

Finally, wind turbine towers built with timber rather than steel.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canfor adds Christmas closure to BC forestry curtailments

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 26, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canfor adds Christmas closure to BC curtailments, removing 58 million board feet of production. In related news: BC’s laid-off workers still waiting for bridge-funding: Domtar (Kamloops) forced to look elsewhere for fibre supply; the CN Rail strike threatens pulp mills; and more on Tolko’s Soda Creek mill. Meanwhile: the US affirms its duty determination on Chinese hardwood plywood; and key takeaways from the EU’s International Softwood Conference.

In Forestry news: a cancelled Sierra Club event becomes a pro-forestry rally in Campbell River; opposing herbicide spaying can be dangerous for your career in New Brunswick; the Australian logging ban may endanger some old growth forests; and Brazil’s deepening forest malaise.

Finally, wood fibres, electrodes and wearable electronics – oh my!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Tolko, Mosaic announce additional downtime in BC

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 25, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Tolko Industries is moving to a 3 day work week at its Soda Creek mill, with woodland and head office layoffs likely to follow. Meanwhile, Mosaic is shutting down its coastal logging operations ahead of the usual winter shutdown—impacting 2000 workers; and COFI renews the call for a “working forest” to revitalize the sector. In other Business news: Repap backs away from purchasing Resolute’s old Fort Francis, Ontario mill; and a former cabinet minister on Northern Pulp’s sweetheart loan. 

In Forestry/Climate news: logging to proceed on BC’s Sunshine Coast (the Narwal); the link between herbicides and forest fires (CBC News); and Florida’s iconic palms come up short when it comes to carbon sequestration.

Finally, the UK wood awards and a computer-driver wooden nail gun.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC Building Code changes support increased use of wood

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 22, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Building code changes support tall wood structures, 6-storey wood-frame as a means to ease BC’s rental housing shortfall. In related news: mass timber is trending in San Francisco; Scandinavian Airlines switches to fibre-based packaging; and New Zealand’s Zero Carbon Act is worrisome to the steel industry.

In other news: Australia bushfire smoke reaches record levels; BC and Alberta researchers on the health impacts of fighting forest fires; and a CBC video story on the link between herbicides and forest fires. Meanwhile; more on the CN Rail strike, and Tolko mill closure.

Finally, outdoor wood furniture with solar panels to recharge your laptop.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Oregon failed to maximize timber harvests on state forests: jury

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 21, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

A jury has ruled that Oregon failed to maximize timber harvests on state forests, depriving rural counties of millions in past and future revenue. In other Business news: Lowe’s is closing 35 Canadian stores; and the lack of trucking alternatives will exacerbate the CN Rail strike. Companies in the news include: the Northern Pulp dilemma; Western’s strike impact; and Canfor’s privatization vote.

In Forestry news: the McGill Review says BC’s forestry slump is bad for the environment; the Suzuki foundation’s interactive map shows industry impact on caribou habitat; illegal logging threatens Melbourne’s drinking water; and Australian timber workers aren’t ready to stop logging native forests.

Finally, UK wood awards top prize goes to house made with cork bricks.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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CN Rail strike to exacerbate downturn in forest sector

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 20, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The CN Rail strike elicits calls for federal intervention due to concerns it is a trade roadblock that will exacerbate the forest sector downturn. In related (BC forestry strike) news: Western Forest Products’ disappointment, an MP’s call to return to bargaining; and Port Alberni’s support for affected workers. Meanwhile: Canada will announce new federal ministers for environment and forestry; Alberta to reduce forestry red tape; and Nova Scotia’s decision on Northern Pulp is coming soon.

In Wood Product news: the New York Times featured stories on the benefits of mass timber, and the architectural use of the scent of trees. Elsewhere, wood use is celebrated in New Hampshire (office buildings); BC (pools and ice arenas); and Australia (a Passive House-certified school).

Finally, stunning hardwood floors from long-lost Ottawa River logs.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US housing starts rebound, Steelworkers reject Western’s offer

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 19, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

US housing starts rebound despite a slight drop in homebuilder confidence, pointing to housing market strength. In other headlines: the Steelworkers Union rejected Western Forest Products’ offer and their request for binding arbitration. Meanwhile: a Marshall Plan to rescue the BC Interior; Canfor shareholders to vote on going private; and Irving Tissue invests in Georgia, big time.

In other news: Mosaic employs cameras to deter backcountry vandals; opposition rises to US Roadless Rule changes; and Scientist uncover resistance genes for the deadly ash tree disease.

Finally, Sierra Pacific’s Red Emmerson; Vancouver Sun’s Gordon Hoekstra and BC conservation officer Blake Parker are recognized for their good works.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC’s forestry slowdown means job cuts at CN Rail

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 18, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

Lower freight volumes in BC’s forest sector result in job cuts at CN Rail. In related news: a Quebec hardwood flooring company lays off 165; the US-China trade war’s impact on Kentucky hardwood producers; Roseburg adds to its layoff total in Oregon; and BC’s market-diversification trade mission to China and Japan is a wrap.

In Forest History news: looking back at an 1800s New Brunswick lumberjack; and the generosity of messers McMillan, Bloedel and VanDusen as the Bloedel Conservatory turns 50. Meanwhile, stories on: the last American caribou; BC’s old growth review; Oregon’s wildfire reduction investments; Montana’s grizzly recovery plans; and California’s new carbon offset standard for the tropics.

Finally, tree farmer (and Rolling Stone) Chuck Leavell is awarded Superhero for the Earth.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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