Tree Frog Forestry News

Category Archives: Today’s Takeaway

Today’s Takeaway

CN, CP share rail lines to keep cargo moving

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 25, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway
Region: Canada

CN and CP have been quietly sharing their rail lines to ensure essential supplies reach communities in need. In other Business news: China halts tarriffs on US and Canadian hardwood lumber for one year. On the Wood Products front: timber towers continue to break records, push skyward in Toronto, Boston, Vancouver, Europe and Australia.

In Forestry news: the sad story of BC’s grey ghosts (caribou); Montana’s elk habitat is at risk in the Bitterroot National Forests; and after the beetles, Colorado’s forests start to recover. Finally, Australia’s fires may be out but concerns persist, and wildfires destroyed 20% of their forests.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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CN Rail forced to cancel 400 trains, adding to forest industry woes

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 20, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway
Region: Canada, United States

CN Rail was forced to cancel more than 400 trains amid rail blockades, driving up forest industry supply chain costs. In other Business news: Canada’s Natural Resources Committee plans to study the sector’s challenges; BC’s budget pleases Andrew Weaver but disappoints the opposition; as the government’s North Island MLA says the ‘working forest‘ message is being heard. Meanwhile, Nova Scotia adds an innovation rebate program to its forestry transition program.

In Forestry/Climate news: the forestry downside of Alberta’s Teck Mine approval; Canadian Parks & Wilderness calls for more protection; the fishery value of not logging in Alaska’s rainforests; and a new golden era for forestry in Scotland.

Finally, sustainable fashion—seeing the wood for the trees.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Industry takes action to protect its people and its business

Tree Frog Forestry News
March 27, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Forest industry leaders are taking action to protect their employees and the sustainability of their businesses. Here are today’s headlines:

On the question of who’s essential: FPAC urges Canada to recognize forestry as essential; Australia struggles with the same question; and BC includes the forest sector. Meanwhile: BC’s Chief Forester defers start of Interior planting program; US jobless claims soar; and no US Forest Service firefighters have confirmed cases of COVID 19.

Finally, more news here as aways, including the latest on forest sector events.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forest company reactions to COVID-19 driven by gov’t and markets

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 26, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Government directives and market forces are driving forest industry announcements on COVID-19. Here are the headlines:

  • FPAC calls emergency aid package a critical first step
  • West Fraser announces additional COVID-19 production adjustments
  • Harmac mill works to fill pulp orders for medical masks and gowns
  • Kruger says business as usual at Corner Brook Pulp and Paper
  • Norbord announces reduced operating schedules and capital expenditures
  • NRCan Scientists lend equipment to Quebec hospitals to test for COVID-19
  • COVID-19 impacts Northwest Ontario forest industry
  • Pellet Fuels Institute urges states to exempt pellet plant from shutdowns
  • Anthony Lumber keeps running despite hoax report of virus
  • Coronavirus is crippling California’s efforts to prevent catastrophic wildfires

In other news: Washington state approves forestry carbon bill; Life-cycle analysis demonstrates CLT’s credentials; and a new study on the role woody bioenergy plays in climate mitigation (lots!). Meanwhile, some forest industry groups are starting to reschedule their cancelled events.

Finally, Suzuki on how trees practice their own version of ‘social distancing‘.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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COVID-19 impact on forestry significant but strong bounce-back expected: FEA

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 25, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

“Is the US in a recession? Technically no. In reality, HELL YES!”, says FEA’s Brendan Lowney re: COVID-19’s impact on the forest products sector. In related news: Ontario’s sawmills and forestry operations are declared essential, as are logging and milling in many states. Other headlines include: 

  • Resolute to adjust capacity in wood product and paper segments
  • NorSask slashes workforce by half due to COVID-19 uncertainty
  • Harmac Pacific working full out to make cedar pulp for medical masks
  • UK urges public not to visit the nation’s woods and forests
  • COVID-19 poses lethal threat to chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans

In other news: the US votes to impose duties on Chinese cabinets; a new book tackles timber cruising; Kalesnikoff staffs up for CLT; and mass timber plans are unveiled in Los Angeles and the Philippines. 

Finally, don’t forget to help us help your colleagues stay informed. Pay it forward here.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor 

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Ontario deems the continuity of supply of forest products an essential service

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 24, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Ontario deems the continuity of supply of forest products an essential service. In related news: COFI applauds the government of BC for action in support of workers and businesses; FPAC calls on federal government to declare the forest sector as ‘essential’; Cascades to maintain operations in Canada and the US; and is there a point to looking at the latest housing starts data (yes and no).

Other COVID-19 actions include:

Finally, a timely (and reassuring) long-view by Steve Zika, Hampton Lumber CEO. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Staying informed on COVID-19 and the forest sector

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 23, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Given these difficult times—taking care of your health is critical, as is staying informed on COVID-19’s effect on forest sector events and the industry we all rely on. In related news: Western Forest Products curtails production; US homebuilders are still working but slowdown looms; US wood product producers and lumberyards are declared essential services; US wood pellet exports continue uninterrupted; and California firefighters struggle to prepare for the fire season

In other news: Bob Brash, RPF is the Truck Loggers Association new Executive Director; an ENGO perspective on International Day of Forests; and forest sector promise for First Nations in Manitoba.

Finally, it wasn’t easy being a real-life beachcomber in BC. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Industry responds to COVID-19, changing market conditions

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 20, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Forest companies are taking steps to protect their employees, respond to changing market conditions. Here are the headlines:

  • West Fraser to temporarily curtail production, defer capital expenditures
  • Tolko doesn’t foresee closures, layoffs based on the current situation
  • Interfor cuts production and staff at Grand Forks, Castlegar mills
  • Pinnacle makes plans in case supply of sawmill residual fibre is reduced
  • Port Hawkesbury Paper wood delivery curtailments add to Nova Scotia’s woes
  • Georgia Pacific increases toilet paper shipments by 20%
  • Oregon pulp and paper industry seeks “essential business designation” to stay open
  • US Building Supplier Dealers seek “essential service” classification to stay open
  • Sun Paper officially terminates Arkansas paper mill project
  • New Zealand offers relief package for forest workers hurt by COVID-19

In other news: Ontario and Oregon shutter their parks; Project Learning Tree works online and four more forest industry conferences are put on hold.

Finally, US toilet paper caper is a reminder of Johnny Carson’s Fake News faux-pas.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Interfor to temporarily curtail production by 60%

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 19, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

In response to COVID-19, Interfor will temporarily curtail production by 60% in BC, the Pacific Northwest and the US South. In related news: trade in cargo will continue under US/Canada border closing; Longview WA paper mills to continue operating; Resolute and Georgia Pacific are working overtime on toilet paper production; US and Canadian housing markets start to tilt—provide benchmark for the coming storm; and two more forest industry conferences are put on hold.

In other news: BC’s business community creates COVID-19 Cabinet; epidemiologists use forest fire analogy to describe how the coronavirus will spread; and Alberta’s wildfire season is underway.

Finally, Johnny Carson demonstrates (in absentia) how misinformation can lead to toilet paper hoarding.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canada & US close border, allow commerce to continue

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 18, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canada and the United States announce a deal to partially close the border, allowing trade and commerce to continue. In related news: Boston orders a stop to all construction projects; US builder confidence declines somewhat but trend is expected to worsen; and six more forest industry conferences are put on hold.

In other news: US wildfire agencies, Nova Scotia gear up for the return of wildfire season; Ontario’s bear hunt is coming back while the province seeks input on its invasive species policy. Meanwhile, despite an abundance of toilet paper, stocking empty shelves is proving difficult. Be thankful we no long use corn cobs and rope ends.

Finally, as COVID-19 compels more working from home, the Tree Frog News is committed to keeping you abreast of its impact on our sector. Please share this link with your co-workers or encourage them to subscribe.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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More coronavirus chaos amid news of a potential cure

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 17, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

A team of Australian researchers may have found a cure for coronavirus with drugs already registered and available. Meanwhile, Wall Street wobbles after yesterday’s crash; an update on cancelled forestry and wood product events; why Americans are hoarding toilet paper; predictions of US housing market woes; and lumber dealers grapple with the fallout. In related news: Minister Donaldson says BC lumber exports are hampered at port of Prince Rupert, and Hampton Lumber closes its Tillamook mill for a day after employee falls ill.

In other News: the Huu-ay-aht First Nation takes majority ownership of Western Forest Product’s TFL 44; a new study on climate change’s impact on boreal plants; and hands-off forestry offers no protection for American forests.

Finally, Happy St. Patrick’s Day – a welcome distraction from the day’s news.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus begets Fed action, cancellation of forestry events

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 16, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US Federal Reserve took emergency steps to help the economy withstand the coronavirus, and most forestry and wood product events are cancelled or postponed. In other Business news: Canada gives royal assent to new NAFTA trade deal; US forest industry revenues forecast to rise through 2024; Canada’s pulp market may be in for another hit; is now the time to bet on timber stocks; and the run on TP pushes IP’s stock up.

In other news: three three First Nation chiefs on the import of biomass to Northern Ontario; doubt replacing hope for proposed pellet plant in Newfoundland; BC adds funds to wildfire prevention in the north; and Australia’s fire-ravaged forests are recovering.

Finally, a full-throated take care from the Tree Frog News team.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus—the sense of urgency and alarm is contagious

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 13, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The coronavirus is the great awakening that the world has changed and like the pandemic itself, the sense of urgency and alarm is contagious. Amongst many, the New York Times is tracking the outbreak. In related news: the virus and US anti-dumping duties on China have increased Vietnam’s 2020 wood exports; and Canada’s biggest producer says there is plenty of toilet paper to go around.

In other news: Vancouver’s construction costs skyrocket; New Brunswick adopts code to allow six-storey wood-framed buildings; Nova Scotia’s forestry future includes working forests; and an Alaska judge stalls logging in the Tongass.

Finally, are you superstitious – it’s Friday the 13th.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus conference cancellations, travel restrictions

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 12, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Coronavirus hits tipping point on conferences, public gatherings and travel restrictions. Here are the headlines:

In other news: NAFTA ratification heads into final round; Wet’suwet’en title issue doesn’t fix pipeline problem may create uncertainty for forestry; Northern Pulp shutdown could affect Nova Scotia’s high-production forestry plans; Stella-Jones stays profitable; and EACOM’s Kevin Edgson appointed chair of FPAC.

Finally, the Architect’s Newspaper highlights six innovative timber projects.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Uncertainty persists as US housing hit by opposing forces

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 11, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Uncertainty persists as US housing is hit by two opposing forces—low rates and virus-fuelled economic turmoil. Here’s the latest from CNBC, Bloomberg and the WSJ. In other Business news: the WTO cancels all meetings due to coronavirus case; the Bank of England considers a ‘brown penalizing factor‘ for climate risky investments; Western US sawmill production is down in January; and the San Group’s new reman plant takes shape in Port Alberni, BC.

In other news: Washington state recognizes timber industry as carbon-negative; FPAC supports efforts to address Canada’s truck driver shortage; UBC Faculty of Forestry’s unique Professional Master’s programs; the best and worst of one tree planters life; and stone frame and CLT floors team up in this conceptional 30-storey alternative to concrete and steel.

Finally, Scottish loggers find a long-lost WWII bunker; aka Churchill’s secret army.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus notwithstanding, US housing fundamentals remain positive

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 10, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

No one really knows how the coronavirus will impact the US real estate market, but that doesn’t stop the Motley Fool from trying. Meanwhile: the NAHB reports that US housing fundamentals remain positive, with residential employment jobs up, but remodelling growth down. In other Business news: six First Nations are suing New Brunswick to access timber; and Oregon’s historic forestry agreement may be in jeopardy.

In other news: BC provides more grants to reduce wildfire risks; the UN/Arbor Day Foundation recognizes Tree Cities of the World; tropical deforestation is linked to malaria transmission; and the UK is fighting climate change by planting one Tiny Forest at a time.

Finally, a theif steals a truck full of West Fraser Mills lumber. Seriously!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Forests prove resilient to warming. Stock markets plunge.

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 9, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

A new study says tropical forests are more able to withstand climate change than previously thought. In related news: Diane Francis says Canada should get carbon credit for its forest absorption; ENGOs call for more old-growth protection near Cathedral Grove; and selling Western Red Cedar as a climate-change mitigator.

In Business news: Canadians say blockade of rail lines not acceptable; First Nations speak out on Canfor/Interfor tenure transfer; Oregon loses appeal of timber harvest lawsuit; Seattle is under siege from the coronavirus; and New Zealand loggers are reaching breaking point.

Finally, despite stock market plunge, Aussie wood chips keep toilet paper rolling.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Logging the most dangerous job in 2018: US Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 6, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries says logging was the most dangerous profession in 2018. In other news: the CP Rail blockade south of Montreal is dismantled; 2×4 housing gains traction in Japan; prefabrication was key to China’s rapid hospital build; and the Dubai WoodShow is postponed due to the coronavirus. 

In Forestry/Climate news: BC’s Forest Practices Board says TimberWest responded well to Great Bear Rainforest concerns; ENGOs want more of Cathedral Grove’s old-growth protected; Sweden pushes back on ENGO forestry critics; the Paris Agreement has Russia looking to its forest; and warming temperatures threaten growth of New Brunswick’s balsam firs.

Finally, one newspaper’s tongue-in-cheek take on Australia’s toilet paper tizzy.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Climate action means more trees, biomass energy

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 5, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Action to mitigate climate change by governments (Canada/NWT, USA) and universities (Arizona Univ., Simon Fraser Univ.) increasingly means planting more trees, incentivizing biomass energy. In related news: Canada’s permafrost is thawing—causing forest habitat shifts; and Canada’s largest conference on the bio-economy in coming to Prince George, BC.

In Business news: reputation concerns linger after CN Rail blockades; Alberta’s forest exports shrunk in 2019; and Lowe’s sells Ace Canada but not its wholesale lumber distribution. Meanwhile; Weyerhaeuser closed its Seattle headquarters over coronavirus concerns, as conferences world-wide are cancelled in virus-hit countries.

Finally, oakmoss, freckle pelt or horsehair—vote for Canada’s national lichen.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus and the thriving US housing market

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 4, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

With coronavirus dominating the news: Zacks, Housing Wire and the NAHB speculate on its potential to shake the thriving US housing sector; while Canfor cites the virus in its decision to continue with its reduced schedule in Vanderhoof, BC. Meanwhile, 84 Lumber’s President receives Women of Influence award.

In other news: FPInnovations on the impact of climate change on Canada’s forest operations; a Narwhal exposé on BC’s Coastal Gaslink project; a Counter Punch commentary on Oregon’s need for taller trees, not taller wood buildings; and Forests Ontario’s planting effort and search for landowners with space for trees. 

Finally, and thankfully, the suspicious-package scare at Gorman Bros. was a false alarm!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wet’suwet’en deal MAY NOT end pipeline dispute, blockades

Tree Frog Forestry News
March 3, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Hope that the Wet’suwet’en deal would end the pipeline dispute (and rail blockades), may be premature, given the chiefs’ refusal to engage on the gas line issue, gov’t reluctance to comment on the agreement, and continued protester actions. In other Business news: BC’s Parliamentary Secretary for Forestry on the Canfor/Interfor tenure transfer; Montana reports a shift in forest employment, on the eve of RY Timber’s mill closure; and Freddie Mac says the US housing market is undersupplied and getting worse.

In other news: forestry training programs are coming to Prince George, BC; Mexico’s cloud forests are in need of protection; and Indonesia is on edge as their fire season is set to start.

Finally, kudos to Ontario’s wood design award winners; and two California achievement winners (in forestry and transportation).

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Wet’suwet’en deal could end pipeline dispute, blockades

The Tree Frog Forestry News
March 2, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

A ‘milestone‘ deal between governments, Wet’suwet’en chiefs offers potential resolution of pipeline dispute, rail blockades. In other Business news: CanforInterfor and Clearwater’s Mayor welcome BC decision to approve tenure transfer; two Western Forest Products mills are still idle; and the coronavirus is causing forest product trade uncertainty in New Zealand and Vietnam

In Forestry news: BC forest enhancement projects help fight climate change; rising soil temperatures reduces Oregon tree growth; Washington’s marbled murrelet policy reduces timber harvests; and thinning forests improve fire safety in California. Meanwhile, research that could make lumber fungal-resistant and impervious to water.

Finally, seeing faces in trees—a form of pareidolia—could be a signal of creativity.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Coronavirus crisis takes toll on global stock markets

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 28, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The US stock market fell again in early trading today, bringing the seven-consecutive-day coronavirus-fuelled-drop to minus-15 percent. In other Business news: trade troubles mean large declines in Vancouver’s port trade; and the Softwood Lumber Board reports hundreds of building projects were converted to wood in 2019. 

Companies making news include: Woodco’s growth in Barriere BC; Canoe Forest Products securing a tax break from the Salmon Arm City Council; some Kenora Forest Products’ bankruptcy optimism; Domtar/EACOM’s Espanola rail line update; Maibec acquires LP’s East River, Nova Scotia siding plant; and Boise Cascade’s Q4 and 2019 results. Meanwhile: opposition Liberals pan BC’s budget and its caribou action plan; while California braces for an intense wildfire season after an abnormally dry winter.

Finally, it’s a Leap Year! Ladies, have you made you proposal plans?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US lawmakers debate climate value of Trillion Trees Act

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 27, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

US lawmakers acknowledge there’s climate value in the Trillion Trees Act but critics say it could encourage logging under the guise of forest management. In related news: The US forest chief says budget constraints means tough choices for wildfire prevention; the UK is encouraged to plant non-native conifers to fight climate change; and Chernobyl’s radioactive forest is timber smuggling country.

In other news: the coronavirus is causing furniture fair postponements in affected markets; some forest sector positives and negatives in BC’s budget; final words from Mike Rosen—retiring Tree Canada President; and 5 (more) reasons to design with timber from a structural designer.

Finally, wood pulp fabrics you can compost after you’re finished with them.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Global supply chains impacted by Coronavirus, Brexit and rail blockades

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 26, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Continued uncertainty related to the coronavirus, the absence of a post-Brexit trade deal and ongoing rail blockades in Canada, are taking a toll on global supply chains, log exports and the stock market. In other Business news: US housing starts are forecast to rise in 2020; Northern Pulp’s mill closure hits Nova Scotia revenues; Boise Cascade to close its I-joist mill in Roxboro, North Carolina; and Rayonier Advanced Materials reports Q4 and 2019 losses.

In Forestry news: BC First Nations in Chilliwack area recognized for protecting spotted owls; FPInnovations’ sustainable revolution; Oregon’s Dep’t of Forestry responsible for their lack of firefighting monies; and ENGO’s question Sweden’s reputation as a world leader in sustainable forestry.

Finally, Ontario’s residential builders say province’s codes a drag on tall wood innovation.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Alberta oilsands mine shelved, Ontario police move on rail blockades

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 24, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Teck Resources withdrew its Alberta oilsands application, citing evidence of unresolved, deep-lying tensions in Canada. In related news: FPAC’s Joel Neuheimer on CN Rail layoffs; Ontario moves in on Belleville area rail blockade; and Alberta cuts deal with two First Nations in anticipation of oilsand-project approval. In other Business news: the US International Trade Council says US millwork industry is harmed by imports from China and Brazil

In Forestry news: BC announces Peace Region caribou protection deal, but loss of  additional working forest is deeply disappointing to industry. Meanwhile, a new study says global warming will reduce natural regeneration in the Maritimes.

Finally, relive the ABCFP conference in pictures and through the Minister’s keynote address.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Blockade idles exports as ships wait for cargo

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 21, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Judson Beaumont 1960-2020

Stalled exports due to rail blockades create a growing backlog of ships in BC’s ports, as federal MPs gear up to debate the crisis. In Company news: Canfor Corp’s and Canfor Pulp’s 2019 and Q4 results; Domtar Kamloops’ fibre challenge; Catalyst Paper’s malware hiccup; and Western Forest Products is back to work Monday. Meanwhile: good news on the US housing front. 

In other news: a BC Mayor calls for resolution of the Canfor/Interfor timber sale; BC First Nations’ get good audit results; ENGO’s file lawsuit over Ontario’s Temagami forest plan; and mass timber makes headway in fire-fearing Chicago, but faces setbacks in post-Grenfell-fire London. 

Finally, the tributes roll in for Judson Beaumont, who changed the way we think about wood and furniture.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Working Forest rally converges on BC Legislature

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 19, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

With calls for for protection of the ‘working forest‘ a convoy of logging trucks descended on the BC Legislature as the BC gov’t delivered its 2020 budget. In related commentary: Minister Donaldson on industry’s petition; Tom Fletcher on the budget’s assistance; Vaughn Palmer on the budget surplus; and Susan Yurkovich on the sector’s future.

In other Business news: FPAC joins the call for federal action to end rail blockades; US housing starts fall but permits rise; and BC’s top employers for 2020 [with a link to forestry]. Meanwhile: the ups and downs of wood construction; the shift to wood energy; Toronto’s Sidewalk Labs moves forward; and Forests Ontario’s award winners.

Finally, we are deeply saddened to share the passing of Judson Beaumont, an artist and wood champion—his memory will live on through his many creative installations in airports, hospitals and homes.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Rail blockades continue as industry warns of economic impacts

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 18, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

No end yet to railway blockades across Canada as industry warns of empty shelves and forestry layoffs. In BC: the 8-month forestry strike is over as the agreement details emerge, and the long road to recovery starts. Meanwhile, a 5000 strong forestry rally will accompany budget day at the BC legislature, and higher utilization standards means increased costs for Interior operations.

Company updates include: Interfor (CFO change); West Fraser (pension plans); Paper Excellence (Crofton and Northern Pulp woes); and Kenora Forest Products (bankruptcy extension). And south of the 49th: how the big Oregon timber deal came together and Tom Martin on leveraging bipartisan support for trees and forests.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Railway blockades concern industry, attract feds, RCMP

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 14, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Railway blockades impacting Canadian forest products shipments, attract industry, federal gov’t and RCMP commentary. In other Business news: Vancouver Island workers vote on strike-ending deal; and Nova Scotia is urged to stick with the forest industry as Northern Pulp concerns continue to be aired.

In other news: the Yukon and Nova Scotia biomass initiatives attract climate warnings; torrential rain helps contain Australian wildfires; Colorado bounces back from beetles; and New Zealand loggers recover from coronavirus scare.

Finally, Happy Valentine’s day — notwithstanding its dark and mysterious origins.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US lawmakers look to trees as fossil fuel-friendly climate fix

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 13, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

US lawmakers’ tree planting legislation—as a carbon fixing/storage solution for climate change—faces opposition from conservative groups. In related news: the UK leads fight against illegal logging and deforestation; and climate warming disrupts tree masting, the process by which trees vary the amount of seeds they produce.

In other news: FPAC voices concern as Wet’suwet’en protests block railways; WFP workers  may be back on the job next week; and Northern Pulp has plans to reopen its mill, as Nova Scotia adds to its forestry transition fund. Elsewhere, congrats to Fritz Mason (Timber Processing Person of the Year) and Cheryl Power (ABCFP Distinguished Professional Forester).

Finally, Chatelaine Magazine on the greenest way to wipe your butt! 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Canadian sawmill utilization improves, companies report Q4 losses

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 12, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canadian sawmill utilization recovers from brutal lows, while West Fraser, Western Forest Products and Domtar report lower earnings. In other Business news: US housing buoyed by the longest job boom ever; and Canadian rail blockades threaten forest product supply lines. Meanwhile: BC’s Throne Speech bleak on forestry; and New Zealand helps log exporters affected by delays in China.

In Forestry/Climate news: lawsuits mount against Ontario’s forestry plan; Oregon’s forestry compromise demoralizing to Senate GOP leader; and the USDA Chief Forester on Trump’s proposed budget cuts for R&D. 

Finally, a California lumber company is the first to stock hempwood.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Cautious optimism after historic deals in BC, Oregon

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 11, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Cautious optimism follows the tentative labour deal on Vancouver Island, as local mayor says fence-mending and diversification is required, and others caution against moving away from the resource industries. Cautious optimism also follows Oregon Governor Brown’s historic forestry pact, which seeks changes to forestry practices without policy-setting-by-ballot measures.

In other news: Ecojustice is suing Ontario over Temagami’s old-growth; BC may overhaul its reforestation program in wake of the federal gov’t’s tree planting commitment; and France doubles down on timber for the 2024 Paris Olympics, while the UK building code changes are a setback for CLT.

Finally, did you know that today is the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science?

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Western Forest Products, Steelworkers reach tentative agreement

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 10, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

FINALLY! — Western Forest Products and the United Steelworkers have agreed to the terms of a tentative collective agreement. In other Business news: trade disruption from the coronavirus could hit Canada’s forest product exporters hard; Nova Scotia’s forestry future still uncertain, as former Premier resigns as chair of Northern Pulp; Domtar lobbies Ontario for more fibre; and Canadian housing starts are unchanged in January.

In Forestry/Climate news: ENGOs say logging in BC’s Great Bear Rainforest  lacking oversight; fears and fear mongering on Ontario’s forestry expansion plan; opposition to Oregon’s proposed action on wildfire prevention; and a small town boy becomes ‘model researcher’ at the Pacific Forestry Centre

Finally, a Pokemon-style forestry app and the Blarney Stone’s winning Witch’s Yew.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC appoints special mediators to help end forestry strike

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 7, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

To the relief of logging contractors and community leaders, BC appoints special mediators—with additional powers—to help end the eight-month forestry strike. In other Business news: WTO sides against US on Canadian paper tariffs; US/Canada politicians celebrate NAFTA’s renewal; optimism on the pending reduction in softwood lumber tariffs; and more on Nova Scotia’s forestry transition and Northern Pulp loans.

In Forestry/Climate news: Oregon’s wildfire action faces opposition; New York air pollution traced back to BC’s 2018 wildfire crisis, Trump’s trillion-tree planting scheme and a new way to profit with Alaska’s old-growth forests.

Finally, a slideshow of forestry enthusiasts at the ABCFP annual meeting.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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ABCFP kicks-offs their conference with substance and style

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 6, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

The Association of BC Forest Professionals kicked-off its AGM with panels on old-growth management, herbicide use and the role of community leaders in the future of forest management.

In other Business news: the US duty decision is cold comfort for Canada’s lumber producers, who press-on for free trade; the BC government is poised to intervene in the eight-month long forestry strike, after the mediator’s bolt and the opposition Liberals opine; the Nova Scotia government is still reeling from its Northern Pulp decision; and Canada’s forest sector embraces nature-based solutions to fight climate change.

Finally, the oldest wooden structure ever discovered—a 7,000 year-old well. 

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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US lumber preliminary ruling lowers Canadian duties

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 5, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

A preliminary ruling by the US Commerce Dept significantly lowers Canadian softwood lumber duties. Responses include: Canadian stocks rise (CIBC); not a magic bullet (COFI); and evidence of enforcing trade laws (US Lumber Coalition). In other Business news: mediators walk away from Western/Steelworker’s strike; and the Trans Mountain court decision adds clarity to First Nations consultation rights.  

In other news: ENGOs are critical of Ontario’s plan to double the cut; Quebec says it plans to get serious about the environment; Oregon looks to invest big on wildfire reduction and recovery; and five truths to using US forests to tackle climate change.

Finally, PaperWeek Canada kicks off in Montreal and BC’s professional foresters gather in Nanaimo.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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New Zealand forest industry down-tools due to Coronavirus

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 4, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

New Zealand faces a perfect storm of market and safety forces as forestry down-tools and contractors close operations due to the coronavirus (last week, Canfor banned staff travel to China).

In other news: the Wall Street Journal has a feature on the hottest home construction boom since 2006; Sidewalk Labs reveals its digital timber tower; and stories on the green benefits of biophilic design and offsight construction. Meanwhile: Canada and US collaborate on how to reduce fire risk with forest management; Women in Wood celebrate five years; and the US Endowment welcomes Pete Madden as President.

Finally, the Association  of BC Forest Professionals annual conference starts tomorrow in Nanaimo and the Frogs will be reporting live from the convention floor. Check here for daily updates and say hi if you see us!

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC, Nova Scotia contractor loan program details announced

The Tree Frog Forestry News
February 3, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

BC and Nova Scotia announced details of their respective loan programs for forestry contractors. In related news: perspectives on the BC crisis from Premier Horgan, industry spokesperson Susan Yukovich, Liberal MLA Doug Clovechok, and the BC Chamber of Commerce. Meanwhile, as Northern Pulp is put into hibernation, local First Nations, and impacted logging and forestry workers hope for a better the future.

In other news: Alberta firefighters raise concern about tall wood; as another BC community seeks early adoption of the practice. Meanwhile, carbon credits from BC’s Great Bear Rainforest sit idle; Oregon legislators face opposition on cap-and-trade; and a Republican bill will commit the US to planting billions of trees.

Finally, a tree planting alarm clock that plants real trees.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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BC strike talks resume as new export tax adds to industry woes

The Tree Frog Forestry News
January 31, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Western Forest Products and the Steelworkers union are returning to the bargaining table, but as BC’s forest sector struggles, a new export tax adds to their woes. In related news: BC’s shifting natural resource economy; FPAC’s call for passage of the Canada-US-Mexico trade agreement; and Nova Scotia’s reasoned approach to Northern Pulp shutdown. Meanwhile, Weyerhaeuser and Stora Enso report Q4 losses and Canada’s new home construction trends up.

In Forestry/Wildfire news: Australia declares a state of emergency as winds and temperatures soar; Canadian and US scientists seek ways to reduce wildfire emissions; an NRCan researcher is a ‘fungi’ at heart; BC funds projects for wood waste recovery; and a US study focuses solving the biomass bottleneck through wood chip sales.

Finally, revelations in tree-planter camps, as contractors forecast a banner year

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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