Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily news for May 27 2020

Today’s Takeaway

Canadian forestry stocks are on a tear

The Tree Frog Forestry News
May 27, 2020
Category: Today's Takeaway

Canadian lumber stocks have produced spectacular returns since March. In related news: suppliers look to end of summer as lumber prices continue to rise; West Fraser substantially resumed production in May; Canfor assessing customer demand; fire destroys WF Tompkins sawmill in New Brunswick; US hardwood producers hit with one-two punch; and NAWLA launches campaign to showcase industry careers.

In other news: NRCan releases State of Canada’s Forests Report; the Douglas fir bark beetle is on the move in BC; prescribed burns introduce atmospheric toxins; the rare but deadly complications of tick bites and Lyme disease in Western Canada; and Australian bushfire smoke hospitalized thousands with deaths linked to smoke.

Finally, Canada’s top pick for a national lichen is the star-tipped reindeer.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

Read More

Special Feature

#TreeFrogICU features new faces

By Sandy McKellar
Tree Frog Forestry News
May 27, 2020
Category: Special Feature
Region: Canada, United States, International

As we come to the final days of the #TreeFrogICU social distancing party, we’re pleased to welcome a new face – all the way from Ontario, Canada. Your friends and colleagues in the forest sector want to see your smiling face and daily place of work. Send in your picture (and caption suggestion) before it’s too late. Click and email to sandy@treefrogcreative.ca today!

Read More

Froggy Foibles

Behold the star-tipped reindeer — Canadians’ top pick for a national lichen

CBC News
May 26, 2020
Category: Froggy Foibles
Region: Canada

Canadians have voted on a national lichen, and they picked a spiky white caribou snack that looks like “little mounds of cauliflower.” The star-tipped reindeer won the Canadian Museum of Nature’s nationwide online contest with 27 per cent of 18,075 votes cast. “Canada has spoken,” Troy McMullin, the museum’s lichenologist, told As It Happens host Carol Off. “It’s a great choice, largely because it’s easy to identify and it’s a spectacular species that grows mostly in the boreal and Arctic regions that dominate our country.” The museum launched a contest in February for Canadians to choose a national lichen in an effort to boost the profile of the more than 2,500 species that carpet the country. …Still, the star-tipped reindeer isn’t yet Canada’s official national lichen. Only Parliament can declare it so. 

Read More

Business & Politics

West Fraser substantially resumes lumber and plywood production in May

Lesprom Network
May 27, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

During May West Fraser have substantially resumed lumber and plywood production with only a few facilities operating at less than full schedules, company announced. …In respect of lumber, both prices and volumes have rebounded compared to the end of the first quarter, particularly for SYP. …Company expects that demand for its wood products will be volatile over at least the balance of the year in response to the ongoing economic and other impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The tissue demand has been strong but the impact of reduced demand for printing and writing applications is starting to materialize, company noted. Compared to the end of the first quarter, available liquidity has improved and inventories, particularly logs and lumber, have been significantly reduced. The previously announced Dudley, Georgia sawmill complete rebuild project remains on schedule.

Read More

Lumber industry highlights job opportunities in essential industry

By Karl D. Forth
Woodworking Network
May 26, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

The North American Wholesale Lumber Association (NAWLA) is launching a new campaign that showcases the diverse and rewarding careers in the sector. The campaign, “Many Branches. One Industry,” highlights the wide spectrum of careers that lumber offers, ranging from forest management to architecture and design, technology, biochemistry, production, construction and more. The goal is to educate emerging talent on the variety of opportunities and competitive benefits and compensation available. The campaign dovetails with the career-finding website careersinlumber.com, which allows companies in all facets of the lumber industry to post career openings, and users to search job postings by position title or category and location. The site also posts featured content that discusses the industry, including professional insight and firsthand experiences. Renewable forests offer both many career opportunities and a new frontier in the fight against climate change.

Read More

Canadian forestry stocks are on a tear

By David Berman
The Globe and Mail
May 26, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Canadian lumber stocks have produced spectacular returns for investors during the stock market rebound since March. For evidence that the gains are sustainable, look south of the border. …Prices for SPF have rebounded 19 per cent over the past six weeks. Prices for southern yellow pine lumber have surged 62 per cent over the same period. As a result, Canadian forestry stocks, which are essentially leveraged bets on lumber, are on a tear. Canfor Corp. has risen 60 per cent from its low in March. West Fraser Timber has risen 75 per cent over the same period. Interfor has more than doubled. It’s difficult to dismiss the gains as speculative fervour. …Key to the demand issue is the U.S. housing market, where some indicators are now pointing toward improvement. …At the same time, current home owners are driving retail demand for lumber as home improvement projects ramp up. [We respect the copyrights of the source publication – full access may require a subscription]

Read More

City of Kelowna given $100,000 grant to support forestry workers

By Laura Brookes
Castanet
May 26, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The City of Kelowna has received a $100,000 provincial grant to help people affected by the slowdown in the forestry sector. More than 230 full-time Tolko Mill employees were left without jobs when the mill in Kelowna shut down, which also impacted various contractors and suppliers in the community. The $100,000 grant from the Ministry of Forests… is distributed through the Community Support Grant Program. ….Funding will be distributed immediately to the following organizations which provide relief for workers from the impact of loss of employment:

  • Kelowna Community Food Bank – $45,000
  • Kelowna Community Resources Crisis Line – $25,000
  • Elizabeth Fry Society – $30,000

Read More

Canfor’s Houston mill remains closed

By Rod Link
Houston Today
May 27, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Canfor’s Houston sawmill remains closed with no specific opening date set. “We’re closely assessing overall production capacity against customer demand,” said Canfor official Michelle Ward of a current market hit hard by COVID-19. …And last week Canfor announced it was permanently closing its Isle Pierre mill east of Vanderhoof, a victim it said of COVID-19 and an uneconomic source of timber for the facility because of the mountain pine beetle. …Additionally, the company also announced last week it will be closing operations at Prince George Pulp and Paper and Intercontinental Pulp, for approximately four weeks starting July 6. Canfor’s operations in Chetwynd in the northeast and Elko did re-open May 11 at four days a week but its operations at Polar north of Prince George and Radium in the southeast, as with Houston, remained closed.

Read More

Overnight fire destroys sawmill in western New Brunswick

CBC News
May 26, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Fire destroyed a sawmill in the western New Brunswick community of Bath on Monday night. Firefighters were called at about 10:30 p.m. to the W.F. Tompkins and Sons mill in Bath, about 48 kilometres north of Woodstock. When they arrived, the mill was in flames, fire Chief Stephen Armour said. The mill employed about a dozen people, but none of them were working at the time and no one was injured.  Armour said crews from Perth-Andover, Centreville, and Florenceville-Bristol battled the blaze for four hours but were unable to save the mill. “It was a lot of water to get the fire contained,” said Armour. “We had spot fires flare up from the fire itself and other areas where sparks were dropping down into the grass.”

Read More

China trade and COVID-19: A one-two punch hitting US hardwood producers

By Peter Buxbaum
The American Journal of Transportation
May 26, 2020
Category: Business & Politics
Region: United States

The trade conflict with China has hit the United States hardwood sector hard and the coronavirus pandemic has made matters that much worse. The Phase I U.S.-China trade deal, inked in January, included potential benefits for US hardwood lumber exports, but it’s unclear to what extent the domestic industry will benefit from the accord. …As with other categories of goods covered under the agreement, there is no mechanism in the agreement for enforcing specific buying levels so it’s unclear how the U.S. could ensure the buying levels spelled out. The mention of hardwood lumber in a footnote indicates that category does not assume a high priority for either party. In any event, even full, good-faith compliance with the agreement doesn’t mean China has to buy any U.S. hardwood at all. The $75 million in manufactured goods could be satisfied elsewhere.

Read More

Finance & Economics

Suppliers look toward late summer as softwood lumber prices rise

By Madison’s Lumber Reporter
Wood Business – Canadian Forest Industries
May 26, 2020
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: Canada, United States

Sawmills across North America looked toward the end of summer last week, as lumber prices continued to rise but sales volumes were unsteady. Lumber producers in the US and Canada considered this current market strength as temporary, and were already making plans for seasonal slow-downs when summer draws to a close. …For the week ending May 22, 2020, the price of Western SPF 2×4 kept rising, this time up +$12, or +3 per cent, to US372 mfbm compared to the previous week when it was US$360. Prices for this benchmark construction framing dimension softwood lumber item were up +$36, or +11 per cent from one month ago.

Read More

US: Hope from housing

By ING
Think.ing.com
May 27, 2020
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

While we see little chance of a V-shaped recovery overall for the US economy, today’s mortgage applications data offers clear hope that the housing sector can bounce back vigorously. …Today’s data shows the US has recorded six consecutive weekly increases in mortgage applications for home purchases and the US is now well above the levels averaged through 2018 and 2019. …The average age of a first-time buyer is 33 and the economic uncertainty and potential fear over employment prospects mean that this first part of a housing market transaction chain remains the weakest link. …Nonetheless, consumer confidence should rise so are hopeful of improved housing activity numbers for May and especially June and July.

Read More

US New Home Sales Overperform in April

By Robert Dietz
NAHB – Eye on Housing
May 26, 2020
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

After weakening in March, the volume of new home sales came in much better than expected in April. Due to economic challenges associated with COVID-19, NAHB was forecasting an additional sales decline in April. …The Census estimates reported a 623,000 seasonally adjusted annual rate in April, after a slightly revised 619,000 pace in March. …Overall, the data lend evidence to the NAHB forecast that housing will be a leading sector in an eventual economic recovery. Consider that despite the recent weakness, new home sales are reported to be 1.4% higher through April than the first four months of 2019. 

Read More

Wood, Paper & Green Building

Temporary hospital is built from wood blocks held together with metal velcro

By Lloyd Alter
Treehugger
May 26, 2020
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

…Another example of designers using their expertise appropriately is a proposal from Tye Farrow of Farrow Partners. Tye has been working in health care for years, doing huge hospital projects, most notably the Credit Valley Hospital, with its incredible lobby made of wooden “trees.” …Farrow Partners have also been working with Grip Metal, a sort of metal Velcro developed by Nucap Technologies, which works well for any material that is softer than the base metal used. …Newcap and Farrow have been working together on a system where they press scraps of wood (like from shipping pallets) into blocks about the size of concrete masonry units, and then squeeze them together with Grip Metal as the velcro-like glue. They call it “the Grip Timber Cross Laminated Block.” it is built up with internal cavities for integrating electrical and mechanical systems.

Read More

Colin and Justin: Let’s go outside

The Timmins Daily Press
May 26, 2020
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

There’s no doubt we’re living through difficult times. …Whilst our own diary is compromised, you’ll never hear us grumble – mindful of those who’ve really struggled – and besides, we’ve used our spare time to focus on an ongoing reno’ in Haliburton, Ontario. In possession of an ‘open permit’, our crews completed the job (whilst practicing safe social and professional distancing) thereby drawing a line under what can best be described as an ‘arduous’ overhaul. …Our plans, you see, were trounced by multiple issues: consents took longer than anticipated, material consignments were delayed, roads were closed due to fallen trees, and the elements seemed to conspire – at every turn – to stifle our ambition. …The best news, being that we left our cedar unstained (so it can fade, over time, to an ashy grey) is the elimination of staining or re-varnishing necessity each year. 

Read More

Eight-story laminated timber tower proposed in SE Portland

By Joseph Gallivan
The Portland Tribune
May 26, 2020
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States, US West

Sturgeon Development Partners plans to build one of the tallest cross-laminated timber buildings in the western United States in an opportunity zone on Southeast Grand Avenue between Ash and Pine Streets… with completion in the second quarter of 2022. LMC Construction of Tualatin will be the contractor. The 130,000-square-foot speculative office building will be eight stories tall and shows the confidence that SDP’s president, Vanessa Sturgeon, has in the Portland economy — despite the most significant economic depression since the 1930s. …Flatworks will use Mass Plywood Panels, which are not made in the same crisscross pattern as cross-laminated timber. The building’s design shows it will have an eco-roof and be green building certified. …Bob Thompson said, “Oregon and the Pacific Northwest are driven by the timber industry which has allowed us to lead the nation in the continuous evolution of wood-framed buildings,” said Thompson.

Read More

Forestry

NRCan announces release of 2019 State of Canada’s Forests Report

By Natural Resources Canada
Government of Canada
May 20, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

The State of Canada’s Forests annual report offers a national snapshot of the social, economic and environmental status of forests and forestry in Canada. The theme of this edition is “growing opportunities in our forests”. Feature articles are about the “second life” of trees in a low-carbon future, new technology in the forest industry, urban forests as well as women championing women in Canada’s forest sector. The report presents current information on trends and statistics related to sustainable forest management in Canada and provides comprehensive data sources and information.

Read More

FSC provides consumers with assurance of responsible forestry practices in Canada and abroad

By François Dufresne, President, FSC Canada
Paper Advance
May 25, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada

François Dufresne

Essential to the fight against this crisis are natural climate solutions, one of the most important being trees and forests. Trees are natural carbon traps that emit oxygen, improving the air that we all breathe.  But as the global population grows so does the demand for timber products, including paper and packaging, which contributes the loss of natural forest which continues to run at the unsustainable pace of 7.6 million hectares per year. …Today, our Forest Management Standards provide country-specific guidelines to responsibly harvest and care for forests in more than 80 countries around the globe. FSC Canada’s standard was updated last year to address the most urgent issues facing Canadian forests this century: the woodland caribou crisis, the protection of Indigenous Peoples rights, and the need to support high conservation values that forests have to help fight the climate crisis.

Read More

Campers rejoice! Fire ban downgraded throughout Alberta’s Forest Protection Area

By Dylan Short
Edmonton Journal
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

The provincial government has downgraded its fire ban to a fire advisory throughout Alberta’s Forest Protection Area. Campfires, charcoal briquettes on a barbecue and backyard fire pits are now allowed to be lit… “In response to recent precipitation in many areas of the province and the great work of Alberta Wildfire, the government is removing the fire ban in the Forest Protection Area. A fire advisory is now in effect,” said provincial spokesman Justin Laurence. The advisory now in effect means permits can be issued but some may be restricted in an attempt to limit man-made wildfires. The advisory will also allow for firefighters to continue focusing on existing wildfires. There are currently three wildfires burning in the province, including the Chuckegg Creek fire that forced the evacuation of thousands of northern Albertans from their homes last summer. 

Read More

Artist-biologist duo that contributed to conservation on Haida Gwaii wins award

BC Local News
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

A couple whose work is thought to have contributed to the protection of the Cumshewa Head area on Haida Gwaii have won an award for their conservation efforts. On May 19, WWF-Canada and the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society announced that artist-biologist duo Aleta Karstad and Dr. Fred Schueler were the first couple to have won the Glen Davis Conservation Leadership Prize, which is now in its fourth year. According to a release, Karstad and Scheueler are being awarded $10,000 for their role in “bringing meaningful protections to identifiable land or aquatic ecosystems,” including the publication of the Western Canada Wilderness Committee “Cumshewa Head Trail” book in 1990. The book combines natural history journal entries and illustrations of Cumshewa Head by Karstad with a trail guide section by former resident John Wood, and is credited with raising awareness and helping to prevent the logging of the area.

Read More

Douglas fir trees in Salmon Arm face attack from bark beetle

By Martha Wickett
Vernon Morning Star
May 25, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Douglas fir trees in Salmon Arm are under attack. In a letter dated April 27, resident Brenda Dyck wrote to Salmon Arm Council regarding the increasing numbers of trees the Douglas fir bark beetle has attacked or is attacking in the area. A registered forest technologist, Dyck pointed out that most mature conifers in yards and greenways within the city limits are Douglas Fir. “While small endemic populations of this beetle are common in the area, increased attack usually results in death of mature trees. In residential areas this can present costly and dangerous removal, pose a safety hazard and/or fire hazard if left standing, not to mention trauma for folks who value mature landscaping within yards and greenways…,” she wrote. …Dyck said there are pheromones that can be placed on trees to deter the beetle from attacking. She suggested the city provide information and possibly even the pheromone repellents to the public.

Read More

Above-average forest fire risk for northwestern Ontario, says federal scientist

By Cathy Alex
CBC News
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

Northwestern Ontario, from the Manitoba boundary as far east as Geraldton, is facing a higher-than-normal forest fire risk this summer, according to scientists with Natural Resources Canada. The long-term weather model suggests the summer of 2020 will be hot and dry across much of the region, especially around Kenora, Red Lake and Sioux Lookout, explained Richard Carr, a wildland fire research analyst with the Canadian Forest Service. Spring was slow to come to the area and the Arctic air mass that settled in and kept temperatures cooler than average also increases the hazard, he said. …Carr noted that it is difficult to predict what effect the pandemic may have on the potential for forest fires this year. …A number of provinces and territories restricted open burning in an effort to reduce human-caused fires, at least in the spring.

Read More

Prescribed Burns May Introduce New Atmospheric Toxins

By Adam Dove
Carnegie Mellon University
May 27, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Cody Jen

…One of the best ways to minimize the probability of large-scale fires is through the use of prescribed burns. …By using prescribed burns, forest managers can go into an area and eliminate this organic fuel with smaller, low-temperature fires. When the next wildfire starts up, it has less fuel to burn and can be contained much more easily. But while these burns have been shown to help reduce the physical damage done by the fires themselves, Coty Jen, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, is concerned that using these burns might just be trading one kind of damage for another. …”My group is interested in understanding how the smoke from managing the unmanaged forest is different in chemical composition from that of the wildfires themselves. Is it more toxic to human health? We are working with forest managers to understand this difference,” said Jen. 

Read More

‘Oregon Women in Timber’ starts chapter in Coos County

By Amanda Slee
KCBY.com 11
May 25, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

COOS COUNTY, Ore. — The statewide group, “Oregon Women in Timber,” is starting a chapter in Coos County. The mission of the organization is to create awareness and appreciation for trees and encourage the understanding of a renewable forest. Two women in Coos County are working to start a chapter, which requires at least three members and the passion to get it going. “Having the women together and building these bonds we’re able to reach and educate and show our roles and our passion to others in the community,” said Vanessa McKinney, a member of Oregon Women in Timber. Mckinney says the group shares facts and studies on the forest industry and the forest. It also works to break the stigmas that are created about the industry.

Read More

The relationships between forests, deforestation and infectious disease emergence

By Institut de Recherche pour le Développement
Phys.org
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: International

The global COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on the importance of certain previously little-studied scientific areas such as the relationships between ecosystems, their biodiversity and the emergence of new infectious diseases. Humans are making increasing use of their environment and so they are more exposed to certain microbes lurking in the shadows, a situation that may heighten the risk of new types of infection. Researchers from INRAE, CIRAD, IRD and the Pasteur Institute of French Guyana recently published in Environmental Research Letters a systematic literature review, using bibliometrics, of some 565 papers published between 1953 and 2018 on the relationships between forests, deforestation and emerging infectious diseases and noted just how scarce information on this major issue is.

Read More

Coronavirus: Forestry soaring for the meantime post Covid-19

By Chris Marshall
New Zealand Stuff
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: International

Post Covid-19 lockdown business for forestry companies is growing, but they are not yet out of the woods. “Things are trucking along quite well,” said Prue Younger, chief executive of the Forest Industry Contractors Association (FICA). “But the big thing with contractors is that they are at the beck and call of log prices. For the last two weeks they’ve been pretty high but how long that will last we’re unsure because of the Chinese economy and the attitude of other internationals towards imports.” The pre-Covid competition from a deluge of cheap spruce logs from Europe had abated, she said, as China was being particular about what they let in. China takes around 80 per cent of New Zealand’s log exports. …The possibility that the current boom was just refilling stocks in China, or because other borders were opening, had been further undercut with anxiety around new legislation requiring the registration of log traders and forest advisers.

Read More

New Zealand National Tree Celebration Focuses On Mental Health

Scoop.co.nz
May 26, 2020
Category: Forestry
Region: International

NEW ZEALAND — Forest & Bird’s annual Be With a Tree celebration this year focuses on the intangible benefits of trees to people. Be With a Tree 2020, which runs from 5-14 June, aims to inspire a love of nature that changes people’s lives as well as the face of the planet. The celebration, run by Forest & Bird’s Kiwi Conservation Club, also gives children and adults a chance to vote for the tree they love the most. “Many people realised during the lockdown how vital nature is for wellbeing,” says Forest & Bird’s KCC manager Sarah Satterthwaite. …Arbor Day falls on June 5, the first day of the Be With a Tree celebration.

Read More

Health & Safety

Manitoba researchers warn of rare but deadly complication of Lyme disease

By Rachel Bergen
CBC News
May 25, 2020
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada, Canada West

A Manitoba family hopes that sharing the story of Samuel Brandt, …who died from complications of Lyme disease, will help raise awareness about a rare but deadly consequence of the tick-borne illness. …Samuel’s story was featured … the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Lyme carditis, which happens when the bacteria that causes Lyme disease attacks the heart, isn’t very well known or well reported, says one of the co-authors, Dr. Richard Rusk with Manitoba Health, Seniors and Active Living. That’s part of the reason the researchers took a closer look at it. …Canada-wide, the reported numbers of Lyme disease increased from 144 in 2009 to 2025 in 2017. But according to the report, Lyme carditis is under recognized even in areas where there’s a high prevalence of the disease. …Rusk added that if you do find a tick or get bitten by one, you should remove it properly and take note of the day you find it. For the next month, monitor symptoms in case you need to report it to a health care provider.

Read More

Tick bite leads to Langley toddler’s temporary paralysis

By Rafferty Baker
CBC News
May 25, 2020
Category: Health & Safety
Region: Canada, Canada West

…A spokesperson with the Provincial Health Services Authority confirmed Malia was diagnosed with tick paralysis from a Rocky Mountain wood tick bite on her scalp, and spent four days in hospital. Paralysis from a tick bite is quite rare. The B.C. Centre for Disease Control doesn’t officially track cases, but its public health lab typically consults on zero to two cases each year. According to HealthLink B.C., paralysis is caused by the venom secreted by female ticks when feeding, and symptoms typically begin four to seven days after a tick attaches itself to a person. Paralysis from a tick bite is more common in children than adults. On Monday, the toddler appeared to be fully recovered. …The B.C. Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) warns pets and people are at risk of tick exposure in wooded and grassy areas. …If a tick has buried itself into your skin you should seek medical attention immediately.

Read More

Australia bushfires: Hundreds of deaths linked to smoke, inquiry hears

BBC News
May 26, 2020
Category: Health & Safety
Region: International

Smoke from the massive bushfires that hit Australia in the 2019-20 summer was linked to more than 445 deaths, a government inquiry has heard. More than 4,000 people were admitted to hospital due to the smoke, Associate Prof Fay Johnston from the University of Tasmania told the Royal Commission. The fires burned for weeks, killed more than 30 people and caused air pollution which can be harmful to health. The inquiry is due to suggest ways to improve the natural disasters response. The fires, fuelled by record-breaking temperatures and months of severe drought, devastated communities and destroyed more than 11 million hectares of bush, forest and parks across Australia. …The health cost associated with premature loss of life and admissions to hospitals was estimated at AUD2bn (£1.1bn; $1.3bn), “about 10 times higher” than in previous years, Prof Johnston said.

Read More

Forest Fires

There are eight active forest forests in Northeast Ontario

By Maija Hoggett
Timmins Today
May 26, 2020
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

ONTARIO — As of this afternoon, no new forest fires had been discovered, according to the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry… there are eight active fires in the northeast region. All are being held, under control or being reserved. The active fires are: Kirkland Lake 1 is under control at 15.8 hectares; North Bay 3 is being observed at 1 hectare; Parry Sound 5 is under control at 0.1 of a hectare; Pembroke 5 is being held at 7 hectares; Sudbury 13 is under control at 0.9 of a hectare; Sudbury 14 is being held at 10 hectares; Sudbury 15 is under control at 4.8 hectares; Peterborough 1 is under control at 25 hectares.

Read More

Dry conditions in Nova Scotia fuelling three large wildfires across province

The Canadian Press in Halifax Today
May 26, 2020
Category: Forest Fires
Region: Canada East, Canada

HALIFAX — Provincial officials in Nova Scotia are warning about the potential for forest fires in dry, humid conditions as firefighters battle three significant wildfires across the province. The fires burning Tuesday follow a weekend blaze near Porters Lake east of Halifax that prompted the temporary evacuation of about 1,000 residents. That fire was under control and was still being patrolled for hot spots. “These three fires today are all in remote areas with no homes nearby,” Jim Rudderham, acting manager of forest protection for the Department of Lands and Forestry, told reporters. …Although no cause has been determined for the latest fires, Lands and Forestry Minister Iain Rankin said it was a good opportunity to warn people that a provincial burn ban is in effect.

Read More