Tree Frog Forestry News

Daily news for November 20 2019

Today’s Takeaway

CN Rail strike to exacerbate downturn in forest sector

The Tree Frog Forestry News
November 20, 2019
Category: Today's Takeaway

The CN Rail strike elicits calls for federal intervention due to concerns it is a trade roadblock that will exacerbate the forest sector downturn. In related (BC forestry strike) news: Western Forest Products’ disappointment, an MP’s call to return to bargaining; and Port Alberni’s support for affected workers. Meanwhile: Canada will announce new federal ministers for environment and forestry; Alberta to reduce forestry red tape; and Nova Scotia’s decision on Northern Pulp is coming soon.

In Wood Product news: the New York Times featured stories on the benefits of mass timber, and the architectural use of the scent of trees. Elsewhere, wood use is celebrated in New Hampshire (office buildings); BC (pools and ice arenas); and Australia (a Passive House-certified school).

Finally, stunning hardwood floors from long-lost Ottawa River logs.

Kelly McCloskey, Tree Frog Editor

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Business & Politics

Rail strike could have significant economic impacts

By Nelson Bennett
Business in Vancouver
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

More than 3,000 CN workers are now on strike, and industries that rely on freight to move products… are sending warning signals to the federal government that the impacts could be severe, if the strike drags on. …In B.C., a prolonged freight rail strike could exacerbate a downturn in the forestry sector, if lumber, logs, pulp, and wood pellets that move through B.C. ports suddenly stop moving. “This development is troubling for us,” said Susan Yurkovich, CEO of the Council of Forest Industries. …The Alberta government… calling on the federal government to step in with legislated binding arbitration to end the strike. But Parliament is not scheduled to resume until December 5. …The Teamsters Canada union says wages are not a major issue in the current bargaining deadlock — safety and drug coverage are. …CN says it has offered to go to binding arbitration to settle the dispute, but the offer was rejected.

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CN strike puts trade roadblock up in Pacific Gateway

By Derrick Penner
Vancouver Sun
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

The impact of a strike at CN Rail began rippling through the Port of Vancouver even before the more than 3,000 … workers set up picket lines Tuesday, said port CEO Robin Silvester. “We’re seeing an impact as we speak,” Silvester said Tuesday… That’s because CN began moving trains early to where they could be held safely during a labour disruption instead of handling port traffic. Members of the Teamsters Rail Council walked off the job at midnight Tuesday as talks with CN hit an impasse over safety, rest times and limits on prescription drug benefits. “To bring it back to the highest level, one dollar in three of Canada’s trade beyond North America moves through our gateway and that is going to stop moving in the next day or so,” Silvester said. …[It] is another disruption that will affect the reputation of Canada’s Western ports.

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Canada’s largest railroad hit by strike, putting Trudeau in hot seat

By Allison Lampert and Rod Nickel
Reuters in The Chronicle Herald
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

MONTREAL/WINNIPEG – Thousands of workers at Canada’s largest railway went on strike for the first time in a decade on Tuesday, disrupting the shipping of commodities and sparking calls for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government to intervene. About 3,000 unionized workers of Canadian National Railway…hit picket lines after both sides failed to resolve contract issues… They continued talks on Tuesday in Montreal amid union concerns over fatigue, safety and ensuring that workers’ breaks are not reduced. …The BC Council of Forest Industries …expressed concerns about the disruptions caused by the strike for rail transport. “Ninety percent of the forest products we produce are sent to export markets in North America and around the world,” Susan Yurkovich, the body’s president, said. “A disruption of this critical transportation network will adversely impact BC forest companies at a time when we are already facing significant challenges and increasing competition from around the globe”, Yurkovich added.

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CN Rail Strike: Media Statement by BC Council of Forest Industries

Council of Forest Industries
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Vancouver, B.C. – The BC Council of Forest Industries issued a statement today expressing significant concern about the impact of rail transport disruptions from the strike at CN Rail.  90% of the forest products we produce are sent to export markets in North America and around the world,” said Susan Yurkovich, President & CEO of the BC Council of Forest Industries.  We rely on critical transportation infrastructure and reliable rail service to get our products to market and serve our customers.  A disruption of this critical transportation network will adversely impact BC forest companies at a time when we are already facing significant challenges and increasing competition from around the globe,” added Yurkovich. “It will create further hardship for the workers and communities who are already feeling the impacts from mill closures and curtailments.”  

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Trudeau appointing Freeland as deputy prime minister in cabinet shuffle, officials say

By Daniel Leblanc and Robert Fife
Globe and Mail
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada

Chrystia Freeland

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is naming Chrystia Freeland as deputy prime minister as part of a cabinet aimed at quelling regional divisions and pushing his government’s environmental agenda, federal officials said. Ms. Freeland’s new role will be officially unveiled on Wednesday… After receiving praise for her role in renegotiating the North American free-trade agreement with the U.S. and Mexican governments last year, Ms. Freeland will be replaced at Global Affairs by Quebec lawyer François-Philippe Champagne …The sources added Mr. Trudeau will move Jonathan Wilkinson out of Fisheries and into the Environment portfolio. The previous holder of the position, Catherine McKenna, will move to Infrastructure, where she can promote green projects such as public transit. Sources also said Seamus O’Regan is expected to leave Indigenous Services and take over at Natural Resources from Alberta’s Amarjeet Sohi, who lost his seat. Mr. O’Regan comes from Newfoundland, which is an oil-producing province.

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Ritchie Bros.’ Marketplace-E solution surpasses US$500 million in sales

By Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers
Cision Newswire
November 20, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, United States

VANCOUVER — Ritchie Bros. …live unreserved auctions help tens of thousands of companies sell and buy equipment and trucks annually. And yet, not every company is interested in selling without a reserve—they …need more control over the selling price, timing, and/or process. Enter Marketplace-E, Ritchie Bros.’ online sales solution with Make Offer, Buy Now, and Reserve options. …Launched in March 2018, the site recently surpassed US$500 million in gross transaction value (GTV). …More than 3,200 companies from 45 countries have sold assets on Marketplace-E since its launch. The top five equipment categories on Marketplace-E include truck tractors, excavators, dozers, cranes, and pipelayers.

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North Island-Powell River MP urges return to bargaining

By Paul Galinski
The Powell River Peak
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Rachel Blaney

North Island-Powell River MP Rachel Blaney has weighed in on the coastal forestry strike, urging both sides to get back to the bargaining table. “The current labour dispute between Western Forest Products and their workers… has gone on too long and is causing significant harm to the communities I represent. So while the forestry industry… is not federal jurisdiction, as an elected community leader I must add my voice to the mayors to implore you to end the damage being inflicted on our communities and to take the necessary steps to reach an agreement with the union and get people back to work.” Blaney stated that as an act of good faith, at the very least, she encourages Western Forest Products to resume coverage of employee benefits during the strike as has been the precedent in previous disputes.

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Forestry strike remains at a stalemate; Powell River workers still on picket line

By Paul Galinski
The Powell River Peak
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Western Forest Products was disappointed to learn… that talks were over, and no new talks are scheduled, according to president Don Demens. …“To get people back to work as soon as possible, we asked the United Steelworkers bargaining committee to take this offer to the membership to vote on it. We also told both the mediators and the USW bargaining committee that we would be willing to have our employees return to work during the voting process.” …The USW bargaining committee’s position continues to be entrenched, demanding a shorter term and wage increases that are nearly 40 per cent higher than established industry agreements, stated Demens. According USW Local 1-1937, “it is unfortunate, but not surprising that WFP walked away from the bargaining table again. …the proposal made by WFP is a desperate attempt and has failed to undermine the solidarity of the members.”

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Red tape reduction bill proposes slew of changes to 6 ministries

By Stephen David Cook
CBC News
November 18, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

Grant Hunter

The Alberta government introduced a bill Monday designed to cut down on red tape and streamline approvals, but officials couldn’t say how much money would be saved. Bill 25, the Red Tape Reduction Act, was introduced by Grant Hunter, associate minister of red tape reduction. …The bill would give the minister of agriculture and forestry approval authority for entering into forest management agreements. Currently, such agreements between forestry companies and the government require cabinet approval, which can take five to six months. …”It’s going to create greater certainty around timelines,” Alberta Forest Products Association communications director Brock Mulligan said. “It’s going to support jobs and it’s going to take away a lot of the uncertainty and regulatory burden that can really hit your family owned sawmills hard.”

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Port Alberni rallies for mill workers

By Mike Youds
Cowichan Valley Citizen
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada, Canada West

The Alberni Valley community is rallying in support of mill workers and loggers who have been affected by a five-month forest sector strike. Talks between Western Forest Products and United Steelworkers Local 1-1937 broke down again over the weekend, with no future mediation dates scheduled at press time. Members filed into the United Steelworkers hall Friday morning (Nov. 15), there to pick up strike pay as well as food hampers, the latter a sure sign of the deepening impact of a protracted dispute. Boxes of bulk food donations were unloaded from Hertel Meats, Double R Meats, No Frills and the Salvation Army, a few of many donors who have stepped up. Much of the initiative — as with Friday’s show of generosity — has come from the community at large, said Laura Mauke, administrative assistant with Local 1-1937.

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Northern Pulp question won’t be ‘speculative’ much longer

By Jim Vibert
The Cape Breton Post
November 20, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: Canada East, Canada

Within a few short weeks, the question won’t be “speculative” anymore, and Nova Scotia’s Liberal government will have to fish or cut wood. Northern Pulp’s new effluent treatment plan – replacing Boat Harbour which, by law, is scheduled to shut down at the end of January – is winding its way through the provincial environmental assessment process.  We’ll know on or before Dec. 13 whether it meets the province’s environmental standards, but the smart money says the mill will get the necessary approval to proceed. …Northern Pulp’s plan to treat the mill’s effluent on site and then pipe the wastewater into the Northumberland Strait doesn’t sit well with fisherfolk…The province’s forestry sector says the mill’s closure would wreak havoc across their entire industry… The provincial government is on the horns of a dilemma. …The government’s reluctance to answer the critical questions about the mill’s future is understandable, but the time is rapidly approaching when those questions will no longer be avoidable. [Full story only available for Cape Breton Post subscribers

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Georgia’s towering wood industry whipsawed by U.S. trade war with China

By Christopher Quinn
Atlanta Journal of Commerce
November 19, 2019
Category: Business & Politics
Region: US East, United States

Breaking up with China cost Jim Howard a sizable chunk of his business. The split wasn’t by choice, but triggered by government policy. His Mableton business, AHC Hardwood Group, had grown its exports of fine hardwoods to China to about $1 million a month. That crashed to less than $100,000 after China slapped tariffs of 5% to 25% on American wood in 2018 in retaliation for President Donald Trump’s tariffs on $360 billion of Chinese goods. …Georgia is a major player in softwood and hardwood… But the weight of the tariffs has cracked the industry, with some businesses laying off workers, freezing investments and losing millions of dollars in sales. It’s been a double whammy for growers, sawmillers, buyers and exporters. The wood unsold to China is now flooding U.S. markets, depressing prices. For species popular in China like red oak, prices have dropped by about 40%.

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Finance & Economics

Home Depot cuts 2019 forecast after sales miss, shares drop

By Elly Cosgrove
CNBC News
November 19, 2019
Category: Finance & Economics
Region: United States

Home Depot’s stock fell after the company said it would take more time for its investments to pay off. The company’s earnings topped analysts’ expectations but sales fell short. Home Depot also cut its 2019 sales forecast and said it expects same-store sales to be lower than expected this year. The Atlanta-based home improvement retailer once again cut its 2019 forecast and reported same-store sales well below estimates. Although earnings came in a penny better than expected, the company said revenue, which also missed analysts’ targets, was hurt by spending on improvements to its IT systems, stores, and supply chain.

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Wood, Paper & Green Building

Wood is a strong performer in pools and ice arenas

By David Wylie
REMI Netowrk Construction Business
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada, Canada West

Wood is a natural choice for constructing indoor swimming pools and ice arenas. An effective insulator with a warm aesthetic, wood is particularly well suited to the demanding atmospheres of swimming pools — as well as ice rinks in arenas. Wood tolerates high levels of humidity, offers acoustic and thermal benefits, and absorbs and releases water vapour without compromising its structural integrity. Indoor pool design has evolved to include ample use of natural light and bold, innovative uses of B.C. wood from sustainably managed forests. Darryl Condon and his firm HCMA Architecture + Design have been using wood prominently in aquatic facilities throughout B.C. “We have long recognized the inherent benefits of utilizing wood in indoor swimming pools; wood is a great solution to the challenges of chlorine and humidity,” he said. …These projects and others are featured in a newly released book, Naturally Wood, which showcases British Columbia’s cutting‐edge wood architecture and design. 

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This man pulls 19th-century logs from the bottom of the Ottawa River to make stunning hardwood floors

CBC News
November 18, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: Canada East, Canada

Logs End is the hardwood flooring company where many long-lost logs find a new beginning as stunning hardwood flooring. Gord Black, the owner of the company, takes Jonny Harris on a tour of the facility during his visit to Bristol, QC. Black dives into the bottom of the Ottawa River to reclaim logs that sank during the Pontiac log driving era from almost 100 years ago. Back in those times, logging was a primary economic force that brought many workers into the community. After being cut down, logs were “driven” down the rivers to be transported to the lumber companies. But not every log made the journey. “My guess is between two to three per cent of every log that was put into the river, sank,” says Black. …”It’s old growth wood, so it’s a very dense wood, harder than the normal pine,” explains Black. Essentially, it makes for high quality hardwood flooring. 

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What is Glued Laminated Wood (Glulam)?

By Audrey Migliani
Arch Daily
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: United States

Glued Laminated Wood (Glulam) is a structural material manufactured through the union of individual wood segments. When glued with industrial adhesives (usually Melamine or Polyurethane resin adhesives), this type of wood is highly durable and moisture resistant, capable of generating large pieces and unique shapes. Suitable for use on beams, pillars, ceilings, stairs, panels, and cladding, one of the great advantages of this type of structural wood is the ease with which it can produce arched shapes or curves in beams or pillars. …Glulam wood is recommended for any type of construction from residential projects to industrial buildings. It can even be applied to buildings located in areas with specific climatic demands, provided that a moisture protection treatment is applied. …Before designing structures with this type of wood, it’s important to review local regulations and pay special attention to the conditions surrounding the project. 

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The Trees and the Forest of New Towers

By Stephen Wallis
The New York Times
November 20, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

Michael Green has seen the future of the building industry, and that future is wood. Lots of wood. The Vancouver-based architect is among the most ardent proponents of what is known as mass timber. …Most crucially, Mr. Green and others say, building with mass timber can ameliorate climate change because it produces less in greenhouse gas emissions than construction with concrete and steel. …Increasing numbers of architects, developers, governments, educational institutions and corporations are embracing wood. In Biel, Switzerland, Swatch Group just completed three buildings said to be among the largest timber construction projects in the world. …“We’re past the tipping point in the acceptance of wood,” said Thomas Robinson, founder of the Portland, Ore., firm Lever Architecture, which recently completed the Nature Conservancy’s local offices.

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NY City’s One World Trade Center Leads the Way in Green Architecture

ThomasNet News
November 20, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

When you next visit the One World Observatory at the top of the One World Trade Center in New York City, you might notice a unique smell in the air. …the observatory has started pumping a custom-made scent aptly called “One World”. The scent has been designed to resemble trees native to New York including beeches, mountain ashes, and red maples but, as The New York Times reports, not everyone is a fan. Nevertheless, it seems somewhat appropriate that the observatory’s aroma is reminiscent of the natural world given that One WTC has become a beacon of sustainable architecture. …As of September 2016, One WTC became the tallest building in the western hemisphere to be awarded a LEED gold certification. …As much as 50% of the wood used in the buildings of the new World Trade Center was sourced from Forest Stewardship Council-certified forests.

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Can they really build office buildings out of wood? Science Cafe will find out!

By David Brooks
Concord Mirror
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: US East, United States

At Science Cafe we often discuss the cutting-edgiest of cutting-edge technology. That’s why on Wednesday we’re going to talk about making buildings out of – wait for it – wood. What a concept! OK, enough levity. The latest of our monthly geeky-conversations-in-a-restaurant sessions will be taking questions from the crowd about a new way of using trees to make buildings that goes by a variety of terms including mass timber, cross-laminated timber and, my favorite, engineered wood. …engineered wood glues together smaller pieces of lumber to build large items that can replace steel beams, flooring, or concrete. There are plenty of advantages to this approach (and, yes, some disadvantages) said Matt Formicola of SGA Architects, project manager for what will be the first engineered-lumber building in New Hampshire, 90 Arboretum Drive at the Pease Tradeport. Here’s a big advantage that us non-developers wouldn’t think of: Time.

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This student housing is the largest Passive House-certified building in the Southern Hemisphere

By Katherine Gallagher
Inhabitat
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

At nearly 70,000 square feet, Gillies Hall at Monash University in Australia has become the country’s largest Passive House-certified building. The school has a population of about 4,000 students. …Since the building was opened, modeling has maintained indoor temperatures between 22 °C  and 24 °C throughout the year. At the forefront of the project was the usage of cross-laminated timber, which inspired much of the design for the building’s interior. CLT is both lightweight and strong and is widely considered to have a low environmental impact in construction projects. Aside from providing superior thermal insulation, its simple and quick installation generates minimal waste onsite. …In Australia, Passive House-certified projects typically cost 6 to 10 percent extra to construct but use about 70 percent less energy than conventional buildings.

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Lenzing starts building world’s largest lyocell fiber plant

MDS Global Fashion Business Jounal
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Lenzing reinforces its industrial capability. The Austrian group has just begun to build the world’s largest lyocell fiber plant in Thailand, which was already announced last summer. The factory will be located in the town of Prachinburi, near Bangkok. For the new plant, the company has partnered with Wood PLC group. The new plant will have a capacity of 100,000 tons per year and the investment volume for a first production line amounts to 400 million euros. …Lyocell is a type of synthetic fiber that is created from cellulose, usually eucalyptus. The material is completely biodegradable and dissolves in an organic, non-chemical solvent, which is reused throughout the process. The fiber is marketed under the Tencel brand, owned by Lenzing.

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With artificial intelligence to a better wood product

EMPA Materials Science and Technology
November 19, 2019
Category: Wood, Paper & Green Building
Region: International

Wood is a natural material that is lightweight and sustainable, with excellent physical properties, which make it an excellent choice for constructing a wide range of products with high quality requirements – for example for musical instruments and sports equipment. Unfortunately, as most natural products, wood has a very uneven material structure that extends over several length scales. Therefore, large safety margins are often required during processing, which limit the efficiency of material utilisation. With the help of science, this drawback could soon be resolved. A key technology for this is artificial intelligence. Neuronal networks sort out flood of data—Mark Schubert works in the research department “Cellulose & Wood Materials” at Empa. In recent years, he has worked intensively on machine learning, with the goal of optimizing the functionality of wood. Schubert and his team would now like to apply this experience to other areas of wood processing. 

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Forestry

Clear-cut logging needs to stop

Letter by Bruce Barnes
BC Local News
November 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

I am writing in regards to logging practices since 2003. The Liberal government under Gordon Campbell exchanged land the companies had almost logged off for Crown land which these corporations actually have title to the land. They, the logging companies, can clear cut right to stream, rivers and hide lakes that are out of sight. Is there no oversight, no required replanting or paying stumpage fees as a result? …The forests protect the ecological environment for all species, absorb carbon dioxide and in turn release oxygen. …The need for change in logging has to happen, not that there should no logging, but not total clear cuts. Oversight has to be done now and logging has to be done responsibly for future generations. Shame on the B.C. government.

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The volume is now available for Quesnel’s Community Forest, so now what ?

By George Henderson
My Cariboo Now
November 18, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada, Canada West

Quesnel Mayor Bob Simpson says the next step when it comes to the city finally getting a community forest is to respond to a letter of invitation from the Minister to the partners that can access the volume that was announced last week. “From there you begin to take a look at the land base, you take a look at where you can get the volume from, and what the business partnerships would be to be able to access that volume. So as far as we understand the 77,000 that is assigned to a community forest can be rolled into the larger volume that is available to First Nations in a larger collaborative, depending on the business relationships that we make, and there may be some efficiencies in that for us.” …Simpson says the city is interested in driving the local economy. 

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Fighting forest fires: Quebec spends $42M to upgrade water bombers

By Amy Luft
CTV News
November 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: Canada East, Canada

QUEBEC — The Quebec government is spending $42 million to upgrade eight water bombers to help put out forest fires. Forests, Wildlife and Parks Minister Pierre Dufour, who represents the rural region of Abitibi-Est made the announcement Tuesday on behalf of Transport Minister François Bonnardel. Known as the “Super Scooper,” the CL-415 amphibious aircraft will be part of the Quebec Government Air Services (SAG) and available to the province’s forest fire protection agency SOPFEU. The SAG has a fleet of 14 tankers, including six CL-215s and eight CL-415s. “The CL-415 is a high-performance tanker that allows for a quick and sustained initial attack on forest fires. Their modernization will, therefore, ensure the maintenance of forest fire fighting services and extend their operations beyond the next 25 years,” said Bonnardel in a statement. Viking Air Ltd. will carry out the modernization of the CL-415s, mainly by replacing the electrical and electronic navigation equipment.

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Industry donation turns into unique summer forestry job for Northern Arizona University Indigenous students

By Heidi Toth
Northern Arizona University
November 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

Six Northern Arizona University students had unique summer jobs in 2019. They were part of the inaugural Weyerhaeuser Indigenous Conservation Crew (WICC), a program funded by timberland company Weyerhaeuser and the School of Forestry. It was designed to introduce students to a variety of career paths available in forestry and adjacent fields, encourage more Indigenous students to go into these industries and provide a good-paying summer job for students. By all accounts, it worked. …It also was an interpersonal and culturally enriching experience for the six of them. …Weyerhaeuser reached out to forestry educators at NAU earlier this year and invited them to apply for a grant… Facing a shortage of workers in the next decade as the boomer generation of foresters retired, the company wanted to invest in the next generation. They were particularly interested in NAU’s focus on bringing Indigenous students into forestry. …NAU, with its focus on Native American education and outreach, was a natural fit. 

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After seedling shortage a decade ago, some Oregon Christmas tree farmers facing tough times

By Kale Williams
The Oregonian
November 19, 2019
Category: Forestry
Region: United States, US West

A seedling shortage a decade ago has left some Oregon Christmas tree farmers with no trees to sell this year, and back-to-back hot summers in recent years have left others looking for ways to adapt to a changing climate. Cher Tollefson, co-owner of Historic Kirchem Tree Farm outside of Oregon City, said her fields will be closed this season for the first time in 27 years. “We just don’t have the trees,” she said. …Christmas trees take between seven and 11 years to mature and, just about a decade ago, seedling suppliers grew too few small trees to go around, according to Chal Landgren, at Oregon State University. …Now, 10 years later, that short supply of seedlings has left fields full of trees that are too short to sell. Then in 2017 and 2018, the Pacific Northwest sweated through two hot and dry summers in a row.

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Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy

Forest sector calls for EU trade action to support decarbonisation

By Neil Roberts
ENDS Europe
November 19, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

A coalition of trade groups representing the paper, wood, furniture, printing, and bioenergy sectors said securing global competitiveness would help increase the use of forest products providing a “robust solution for reaching a carbon-neutral EU economy”. The industries set out their market development proposals as part of their “vision” for 2050, a response to the European Commission’s long-term strategy for decarbonisation. The report, supported by forest owners’ and farmers’ groups, describes how the industries can play an “essential role” in decarbonisation; substituting for carbon-intensive raw materials and fossil fuels, eradicating waste, and driving resource efficiency. Pathways to meet the industries’ goals over the next three decades would see innovation boosted, sustainable raw materials supply, the development of markets. 

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New study shows paying countries for their forests deters them from cutting trees

Firstpost
November 19, 2019
Category: Carbon, Climate & Bioenergy
Region: International

When Norway decided a decade ago to pay Guyana, a small jungle-covered country in South America, to reduce its rate of deforestation, no one was sure how much effect the move would have. Now they know it does work, according to a study published Monday in the United States. This type of international program — money for forests —has appeared in numerous forms since 2000, and is generally known by the acronym REDD+, standing for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Since forests are carbon sinks, owing to the process of photosynthesis, cutting down a tree is the equivalent of emitting harmful greenhouse gases. The researchers calculated that without the Norwegian pledge, the rate of deforestation would have greatly increased thanks to an explosion in the price of gold, whose mining is the main cause of tree-clearance in Guyana.

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